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Canadian Rail 477 2000

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Canadian Rail 477 2000

98
CANADIAN RAIL
ISSN 0008-4875
Postal Permll No. 1494279
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
EIGHT-COUPLED STEAM TO THE KOOTENAyS ………………………………………………………………….. .. MIKE WESTREN ………………………… .
OLD RAILS …………………………… _ ………………………………………… _ …………………………………………… .
PETER LACEy …………………………… .
GOING
ON VACATION IN 1900 ……………………………………………………………………………………….. . FRED ANGUS ……………………………. .
RATTLING
THE WiNDOWS …………………………………………………………………………………………….. .. LORNE PERRy ………………………….. .
CENTENNIAL
OF QUEBEC INTERURBAN ELECTRIFiCATION ………………………………………. .. FRED ANGUS ……………………………. .
PHOTOS
ON THE TEMISKAMING & NORTHERN ONTARIO …………………………………………….. . ELIZABETH ELLIOTT ……………….. ..
OUR GALLERY OF MURALS (CONTINUED) ………………………………………………………………….. ..
BOOK REViEWS …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. .
THE BUSINESS CAR ……..
……………………………………………………………………………………………….. .
99
104
106
114
115
118
120
121
122
FRONT COVER: A two car train of the Montreal and Southern Coun/ies Railway, headed by cal 611, comes off Victoria Bridge and comes to a stop
at East E
nd station in St. Lambert on May 16, 195/. This photo captures the spirit of the times pelfectly -no/ice the things, once commonplace, that ore
n
ow gone. For example the old-style phone booth with dial phone, the penny-in-the-slot scales, the adfor the Montreal Standard (defunct in
September 1951), the old-style seven up bottle, the clothing styles, and of course the station itself, are long gone. However 61 1, built in 1917, is still with
us
and is a prized exhibit at the Canadian Railway Museum. Photo by William Bailey
BEL
OW: During the recent CRHA Convention, 011 May 20, 2000, seventy-six year old Montreal observation car No.3 pausedfor a pholo 011 the loop
at
the Canadian Railway Museum. This car is scheduledfor regular service at the museum this yem: 11 was on this cal that /he CRHA operated ilsfirst
street ca
l charter back on May 14, 1949. Photo by Fred Angus
For your membership in the CRHA, which
includes a subscription to Canadian Rail,
write to:
CRHA, 120 Rue St-Pierre, St. Constant,
Que. J5A 2G9
Membership Dues for 2000:
In Canada: $36.00 (including all taxes)
United States: $31.00 in U.S. funds.
Other Countries: $56.00 Canadian funds. Canadian Rail is continually in
need of news, sto­
ries historical data, photos, maps and other mate­
rial. Please send all contributions to the editor: Fred
F. Angus, 3021 Trafalgar Ave. Montreal, PQ. H3Y 1 H3.
No payment can be made for contributions, but the
contributer
win be given credit tor material submit­
ted. Material will be returned to the contributer if re­
quested .. Remember Knowledge is of little value
unless it is shared with others.
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: Douglas NW. Smith
ASSOCIATE EDITOR (Motive Power):
Hugues W. Bonin
LAYOUT: Fred F. Angus
PRINTING: Procel Printing
DISTRIBUTION: Joncas Postexperts
Inc.
JULY-AUGUST 2000 99 CAIlADIAN RAIL -477
Eight-Coupled Steam to the Kootenays
By Mike Westren
.-
—-~ .
~~~ .. —
-…………. =…::=!r..J ___ _
CPR No.3537 in 1916. Photograph NO.56184 published with permission of the Vancouver Public Library, 350 West
Georgia Street, Vancouver BC, V6B 6B1.
Sandon is likely not the best known community in
Canada, let alone one hailed as a hot bed of leading edge
railway preservation. But not so fast: this secluded British
Columbia valley is home to an incredibly ambitious and
courageous heritage project. The Sandon Historic Site
is in
the process of being completely restored and reconstructed,
by a small but totally dedicated band
of people. They are
faithfully turning back the calendar to the tum
of the century,
never mind this millennium stuff. Folks like these can
succeed so wonderfully because, quite simply, they 00 not
and will not understand these things cannot be done! And
this state
of affairs persists despite seemingly plenty of people
with expert opinion ready and willing to enlighten them as
to the projects total impossibility.
Unbelievable mineral wealth had been discovered in
the
Central Kootenay region. Grand, sophisticated towns
were built to replace tent cities in these remote spots, usually
suffering cycles
of periodic leveling by fire, flood or both, and rebuilding, until the ore seams outlived their economic
recovery. The tumultuous story of Sandon
B.C. is told in a
wonderful book, Silver,
Lead & Hell, by one of the two
dozen or so present day permanent and part time residents,
Veronika Pellowski.
In a sentence or two, Sandon rose and fell, destroyed
by fire, was rebuilt, then declined slowly into the 1940s.
Displaced Japanese Canadians were interned here during
that ignominious episode during the Second World War.
However, in the post war years, the town hung on by a thread.
The little hydro-electric plant still hummed quietly away, as
indeed it still does and has ever since 1905. Some mining
and work at the concentrator, the Carnegie Mill later
Treminco, persisted till very recently. Mother Nature
continued her relentless work, and winter snow and ice
combined gradually to crumble the abandoned buildings
and infrastructure of this seemingly condemned and dying
community.
RAIL CANADIEN -477 100 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
0-8-0 8 WHEEL SWITCHER TYPE CLASS V 4
—~
LlJ
C~~ADI~~ PACIFIC
SUB CLASS
CAPAC I TY
V 4 A
42;;:
I $tA,.. .
1-4:&t-6·l·-~·~5·r.~–IH{—-·O·~·o-IO··O·~
…. ~—I~IO—-~—-;O-·
—Iz~1—————…. ,.~,,… —————–4~~t­
.. ) ._——————–~.I1A· OUT tmupl.r.
WJ! 8IZU
Class V4A locomotive diagram from the Canadian Pacific record
old station building has been replicated on
its original location.
Much of the K & S right­
of-way has become part
of a nicely maintained
hiking trail, the Galena Trail. Be wary of
bears and cougars, this is remote back­
country, The Canadian Pacific Railway had
a
standard gauge branch which terminated
here, right by the K & S station in fact. It is
this CPR connection to which this little piece
speaks,
Boiler and cab of 6947 upon arrival at Sandon in the summer of 1998.
Part of the CPR formation, or track bed
has remained
more or less intact. It needed
some leveling and trimming, and track had
to be re-Iaid, A switch back arrangement
behind the main street ended up in a short
siding at roadway level, the Warehouse Spur.
This track has been partly reinstated for
display of a short wayfreight, which in turn
will consist
of a former CPR steam locomotive
Photo by Mike Westren
In these declining years, a young man slipped into
town to apprentice at the mill. He quickly realized that the
remaining residents had a marvelous story
to tell, and despite
all manner
of discouragement, there was still a spark of life
remaining within this community. Hal Wright and his family
are now numbered among the few year round inhabitants
of
this steep valley. In all genuine modesty he will hasten to
tell you that he was not the only one who kept faith with
Sandon. Nevertheless he has been and remains a principal
force in this heroic heritage effort.
The railway formed a vital
element of the transport
scene in the earlier days, hauling people and supplies in,
and millions
of dollars worth of valuable metals out. Two
railways served Sandon at its height. The Kaslo
& Slocan
narrow gauge ran right through the upper part
of town. The and a selection
of vintage freight cars.
Ideally a Consolidation should be placed at
the head
of the display freight. The next best thing might have been
an 0-8-0, which had started life as a
CPR 2-8-0. Also most
importantly, such a locomotive,
Class V4a No. 6947, was
not only available but a new home was actively being sought
for it. Facilitated in part through the Western Region
Committee of the Canadian Council for Railway Heritage, a
deal was brokered between the
Sandon Historic Site which
wanted an engine, and the Alberta Railway Museum in
Edmonton which was equally anxious to give one away.
Characteristically the Sandon group simply took four
Wrightway Transport lowboy trucks and arrived at the
Alberta Railway Museum site to collect the engine, The
locomotive and tender were quietly dismantled into four
loads, and taken away, A couple of days later No. 6947 was
JULY-AUGUST 2000
being reassembled in British Columbia. All
of this took place in the early Fall of 1998.
Accessories
removed for transport are being
cosmetically restored before being put back
in place. As the photographs show, the
locomotive and tender now stand on the
display track. Once the engine and tender have
been
re-coupled, and accoutrements such as
the
side rods and reversing gear have been
reinstated, the locomotive will be ready to
receive visitors.
Courtesy
of the Canadian Trackside
Guide, we can quickly trace a brief resume of
this locomotives pedigree and career. Built
by the Montreal Locomotive Works in
September 1908, MLW No.45590, it appeared
as Canadian Pacific Railway 2-8-0 Class M4h
No. 1737. In January 1913 it was renumbered
to
No.3537, until September 1928 when it
was reconfigured as an 0-8-0 switcher, Class
V4a No.6947. In addition to the obvious and
radi
cal change in appearance due to the
removal of the leading pair of guide wheels,
the traditional pattern front pilot was
replaced with footboards to be ridden
by yard
switchmen. The original 58 inch eight­
coupled driving wheels were changed to a
smaller 52 inch set. Dispo
sed of by the CPR
in F
ebruary 1959, the locomotive was
acquired by the Manitoba & Saskatchewan
Coal Company, which kept it until 1970.
During this time
it was worked very hard with
probably minimal maintenance.
For the next
28 years Alberta Pioneer
Railway Association
retained the former
No.6947 in the Alberta
101 CANADIAN RAIL -477
:: t
I
.;
I
.I ,
i··;!. f!t1
Three photos showing the
procedure as the boiler is
gently reunited with the main
frames and wheels, using a 60
ton crane and Model 980
loade/: A 950 loader rolls the
undergear into position.
Ph
otos by Hal and Andrew
Wright
RAIL CANADIEN -477 102 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
railway historian Lance Camp positively
identifies the location unknown as Drake Street
Roundhouse in Vancouver, where at time of
writing, little 4-4-0 No.374 resides. He goes on,
the
circular number plate, early generator and
headlight style could put it before 1916, though
the positioning
of class lights would place it in
the 19
J 3 through World War 1 period. Used in
mainline freight service, Lance notes that
Walchaerts valve gear, with which this engine is
fitted, was rare in
The West on Consolidations.
More common was the Stephenson motion. We
are indeed fortunate that images like the
Vancouver Public Library photograph No.56184
have survived. Fortunately that institution is
willing to share it with us for historical study
purposes.
Until one
of the fabled Consolidations lost in
a variety
of deep lakes in south-central British
Columbia mysteriously rises to the surface,
relatively intact, this 0-8-0 will do very well. Of
course there may be unicorns on the Galena
Hiking Trail as well. Then again, it might be
nice
if history were to be reversed, and No.6947
could be reincarnated as No. 1737 of 1908 all
over again. Somehow in its present form the
locomotive does appear a little ungainly and out
of balance. We would do well also to reflect that
it is both a fully developed artifact
in its 0-8-0
configuration, and the last surviving Class V4.
ABOVE AND OPPOSITE: 0-8-0 No. 6947 sits quietly in the early morning
sun at Sandon August
01, 1999.
In the meantime, the locomotive and its freight
train will make a good and appropriate
interpretive addition, in context, at the Sandon
Historic Site. The search goes on for any details
and specific information on this locomotives
long career, as No. 1737,3537 and 6947. If you
know anything in this regard, the folks at
Sandon
would love to hear about it. A concerted effort
continues to make the display presentable, and
to
provide good, balanced, sound background
interpretive information. The more complete the
provenance that can be assembled the better.
Sandon is located deep in southern British
Photos: Mike Westren
Railway Museum collection. Once the decision had been
taken to consolidate the Museums focus and attention on
the Canadian National/Northern Alberta Railway
connection, this Canadian Pacific ugly duckling became
surplus, hence its being made available to Sandon.
Several freight cars have been gathered to make up a
representative consist. A water tank car, with a CPR and
Northern Alberta Railway lineage, was also transferred from
the
Alberta Railway Museum. Two wood sided outside
braced dreadnought ended boxcars of 1914 vintage, and a
couple of similarly aged flatcars are currently on site. A
wood Canadian Pacific caboose would finish the train off
very nicely.
An
interesting and important photograph of this
locomotive in its phase as CPR No.3537 in 1916 came to
light in the collection of the Vancouver Public Library. Local
Columbia, between Kootenay and Siocan Lakes, good
Canadian Pacific sternwheeler territory. Due north of Nelson,
take
either 31 to Kaslo or 6 to New Denver. Connecting
these two communities is secondary route 31 A., from Three
Forks take the improved side road south, five kilometers in
to Sandon. You may be assured
of a genuine welcome from
the
good people of Sandon, British Columbia.
References
Canadian Trackside Guide, published by By town;
Canadian Pacific Railway Steam Locomotive Diagrams and
Data,
edited by Orner Lavallee;
Silvel; Lead & Hell, the Story of Sandon, by
Pellowski, available from
The Prospectors Pick.
New Denver, B. C. at around $20 plus tax and
proceeds to the Sandon Historic Site.
Veronika
Box 369,
handling,
JULY-AUGUST 2000 103 CANADIAN RAIL -477
RAIL CANADIEN -477 104 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
Old Rails
by Peter Lacey
Old pieces of railways, it seems, neither die nor fade
away (unlike generals); instead, they show up
in odd places
performing functions that might or might not be expected.
Boxcars, cabooses, and tank cars turn up in use as storage or
residences or cottages; there are garages
in the older part of
Winnipeg built in part with pieces of wood bearing Canadian
Northern lettering and car numbers; and then theres the
footbridge on the Whitemouth River (eastern Manitoba).
Some miles north of the town of Whitemouth, there
used to be a village named Olden berg, on the east side
of the
river.
It boasted a Lutheran church and a school, which were
attended by people from both sides
of the river. Some sort of
footbridge was built as early as 1928, but this was destroyed
by river ice around 1940.
The present bridge was built soon
afterwards, largely by local
farmers who contributed time
and materials.
It was severely damaged by ice around 1959,
and
doesnt appear to have been used since then, although it
is still intact, testifying to its staunch construction.
The west end
of the bridge is depicted in these photos
and drawings
(at the time of writing, I havent visited the
other end, although permission has been obtained). The
structure across the river looks very much like this one. The
bridge deck is some twelve feet above the surface of the
river, which gives
an idea of the size of the flood in 1959
(and again
in 1997). When it was in use, there were boards
for footing although these have long since disappeared.
The
railway parts involved are in the uprights, the crossbars, and
the turnbuckle anchors. These are: the uprights are 1920
80
lb. EJie & Lackawanna rail; -the top crossbar is a piece of
rail within a steel cylinder. It is of course impossible to
identify it.
The bottom crossbar is a piece of Mersey Steel
1875 rail,
but its weight doesnt appear. -the turnbuckle
anchors are dated 1907, but no other information is visible.
JULY-AUGUST 2000
SEE DETAIL CROSS MEMBER
CABLE
VERTICAL SUPPORT
(RAJLROADTRACK)——~~~
105 CANADIAN RAIL -477
RAILROAD TRACK
EVERY SECOND RIB
IS
EXTENDED IN TIllS MANNER.
CROSSING EXTENDS
FOR APPROX. 100 FT.
) -t . …,.
:./l ___ / ./, … ~., ……… )_,
Its tempting to try to find out how these bits of rail
got here, but thats a long shot.
The interesting part is how
often railway technology can be adapted for things never
dreamed of and how long the things may linger.
1m very grateful to Bob Porth of Seven Sisters for
showing me this structure and gathering the information,
and to Dennis Grenier for the drawings.
All photos are by the author.
RAIL CANADIEN -477 106 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
Going on Vacation in 1900
by Fred Angus
For more than a century
and a half, .July and August
have been traditional vacation
months. Starting in the mid
19th century, the increase in
prosperity
of workers, and the
establishment of at least one
week off per year, began to
create a desire among many
people to travel. At the same
time development of faster and
cheaper means of trans­
pOItation, especially railways
and steamships, made travel
much more feasible, comfort­
able and fast. No longer was
tourism the private domain of
the rich, who had the time and
money to go on extended
grand tours; now the
majori ty of the population
could afford to travel to some
distant place at least once or
twice in a lifetime, and in some
cases as much as yearly. A fine
example of the new tourism
was the establishment of
Thomas Cooks travel agency
in England in 1841; this is now
a world-wide organization, and
there is scarcel y a place on the
globe where Cooks Tours
have not visited.
,VOL. XV. NO.1. MAY 1900 PRICE,25Cb. given the condition of the
roads which were unpaved,
dusty in dry weather and
muddy in wet. The practical
range of horse-drawn vehicles
was only a few miles; just
enough to get from the nearest
railway station or steamboat
dock to your destination.
Another difference was that
once you got
to where you were
going you tended to stay there,
hence the big summer hotels
that were built at popular
resorts. Frequently whole
families would spend much of
the summer away from the city,
in a
hotel or rented cottage,
while the head of the family,
the
breadwinner, remained at
his
job in the city. Perhaps he
could join his family for a week
or so on vacation, but the rest
of the time he was a summer
bachelor until the others
retumed at the end of August.
T IE
CANADIA
AGAZI E
–ONTARIO PUBU SHING
By 1900 tourism in
Canada was a fully developed
industry, and companies like
the Canadian Pacific and the
The front cover of the Tourist Number of the Ca/Jadian
Magazine,
May 1900.
In May of 1900, a
publication which was named
The Ca/Jadian Magazine
produced what it called its
Tourist Number. In it were
articles describing many of the
tourist areas
of the Dominion,
together with their various
attractions and their historical
importance. Since these
articles do not contain much
Grand Trunk railways offered tours to popular vacation spots.
In the hot s
ummer months, before air conditioning, favourite
places were the mountains or the seaside. Places like the
Lower St. Lawrence, the White Mountains or the Maine coast
were visited by Montrealers, while Torontonians flocked
north to Muskoka and other spots on the Canadian Shield,
not to mention the grand daddy of all tourist attractions,
Niagara Falls. Following the opening of the CPR it was
practical to visit the Rocky Mountains at places like Banff
or Lake Louise. All these places could be reached easily
either by rail, steamboat, or in some cases both.
There were, however, some significant differences
between going on vacation in 1900, and going a century
later. In 1900 there were no airplanes, and very few
automobiles. Even if you were rich enough to own an auto,
you
certainly would not want to use it to go on vacation,
of interest to the present-day railway historian we do not
quote from them here. However, in the same issue are very
OPPOSITE TOP: If you were going west you might travel
on the CPRs most luxurious train, the Imperial Limited,
introduced in
1899, only a year before. This dramatic night
view is from a post card printed a
few years late!:
OPPOSITE BOTTOM:
AdvertisementsjiOln The Intercolonial
alld Canadian Pacific railways. The ICR emphasizes
moose
hunting, fishing and its
vestibuled trains (a relatively /Jew
feature) while the CPR depicts a stylish couple plus a polar­
projection
map showing the extent of CPR services.
Note, all advertisements, unless
noted otherwise, are from
the Canadian
Magazine of May, 1900.
JULY-AUGUST 2000
GREAT GAME LAND
INTERCOLONIAL
RAILWAY
… nd its contlccfil1l1f;. 111 il~ h;rriwry
is inducted lhe In,vincc or NC_\i
Brullswick, whi .. h h£s more big
game to lhe 8tlll limo has any other part of the
Dominion.
MOOSE, DEER AND CARIBOU
within eas), reach or lownS and vilJ~);cs where. ~lIpplic:i and gujdc~ (;~II h~ hAd.
Wild Fowl ure DIRECT THROUGH ROUTE hy which sportsOlIeo alld tourists
mal NEWFOUNDLAND.
The finc~t. S, .MON find TROUT FISHlNG ill 1lHcriCIl is (ound in the
territory tralcrsed by the Intercolonial.
The Most Complete and Luxurious
Vestibuled Trains In Canada.
For further parliculars, Sh0I)till.:. fi~hilll:! and lourlst ad:.ntages or this line,
address
\. H. PHICI::, ~L!\ ~ul;hllld ;J5Clll, H(,l~IOU, i!;,,..~,
J, WESLEY ALLISON. U.S. Rl·prc~Cflt~tic. Grlld CClIh:11 1)1,,)1. Nc..:w VNk City.
\M, RORtNSOK, (1,llH!I:l! rr.1,~lilll:.~ AI!~lIt. T H. ,. PHI(£, ,h::.isll4nl Delleral P:I!ool11KCI AS,~t. irI1111Iru.d,
D. PDTTIHDER, Coneral Mon.gcr,
MOpiCTON. N,D,
JNO. M. LYONS, C,nal PB6sengor Agont,
MONCTON, N.B.
107
~======~~====~.~=============~
CANADIAN RAIL-477
it..:: bnlllcltcs ;lIId lIlakillK
dlJsc COlluEclions with thl;}
United States RaiIYNl),S
for all Pointo:: East ano
VCSl.
RAIL CANADIEN -477
/ILL I;YFOR/fATI(JII,/LLLl5T1?ATfO
iJE5CRI/,TIVc LITERATLlIiE/1A/5 ETC
5.£IIT //(e/: Oil /!,PPL/(ATIOIY TO
(tI~l. M.HAY.I.
,~f.llt?rd/ /f,lnJJer.
nONTRfAL.
4[o,B. rlEI.VE. .
(ri·,,,r. 41)( NtJn 11oNTREAL.
108
The Grand Trunks advertisement was one of the most
impressive. The 1895 station at Muskoka Wharf disappeared
in the 1950s, but a replica has been built,
and here one can
still ride the
1887 steamer Segwlln. However the trains no longer
go to the
wharf
many advertisements by railways and steamboat companies,
often fine examples
of late 19th century graphics. After all,
the
companies were competing for the tourist dollar and a
tastefully
done advertisement might make the difference as
to which company the tourist used. The ads were not confined
to Canadian companies; several American railways
extolled
the features of their lines to U.S. destinations as far away as
California, and transatlantic steamship lines offered passages
to Europe and Asia. A special attraction was the worlds fair
being held in Paris.
The CPR not only advertised its train
service but its steamships as well, and they went one better
by offering trips around the world! As they pointed out, it
was no longer a highly notable event to go around the world
in 80 days, as in the Jules Verne story of 1872. By 1900, if
you could afford it, the trip could be done easily in sixty
days without resorting to elephants, balloons or sail cars.
JUILLET-AOUT 2000
The advertisements of 1900 not only included
transportation companies, but also covered items that the
tourist would take.
Foremost was proper luggage; in those
days there was no
such thing as lightweight airline bags,
frequently there would be huge trunks, big suitcases, and
perhaps a
carpet bag or two. Families would take all they
needed for the summer, and they travelled heavy.
The big
items would, of course, go in the baggage car and be
delivered by porters or transport companies at the
destination. The advertisements would include other items
required like special clothes, medicines, cameras, and
firearms, especially .22 rifles; good for target practice, for
shooting squirrels around the
summer cottage, or for use by
the ladies who would be more popular with the men if they
were good at rifle practice!
The Intercolonial Railway put
much emphasis on shooting
moose at places along the line,
while several stores offered rifles with which to shoot those
moose. Evidently the hunting instinct was not far below the
surface among Canadians at the turn
of the last century.
To
get a look at some of the differences, and the
similarities, between tourism in Canada in 1900 and 2000,
we reprint a selection of advertisements of a century ago.
Most are from the aforementioned Canadian Magazine for
May 1900, but to make a clearer picture we have included a
few from two years earlier; June 1898. Caption text has been
kept to a minimum so you can enjoy the graphics of the
advertisements. Take a look at
them and decide where you
would have taken
your vacation if you had been around in
the summer of 1900.
Suit Case
~O ,
Steamer Trunk
TI~.\i~:1. TO ,,,-V PART
OF THE wOlu.n I,!ITH
COIFOHT.
Or ir you wi~h :l much
more el;,uorate outfit, q! can
supply the. sfllelilest need or
the Krcnlcst lu;.;ury.
SUIT CASf!:-SI}lc .0. ,)oJ. price $(l.so; Qlh(r linc:> ~5 10 $30.
Our IJJustrated Catalogue C6 has jus, b,.n iss,d, und wilt b.
————-Sc.ut you on rCJuosL 11 dCSNibcs
and illustr order by mail a complete Ironclling OutfIt, and we assure you of elllirc salisfa.ctiOIl.
We PPOPD.Y O)l[1l033 ohtlrgos on (Ill goods to Ont8l,·lo poInts.
STEAMER TRUNK-S1yle No. 852, lric~ S.o; olhf .cl)lcs S-1 t $Jo.
The Julian Sale leather Goods Go Limited
105 King Street West, Toronto,
M.k, of FINE TRAVELING AND LEATHER GOODS. ,; _.,
Even if you were not going on the Grand Trunk you would
still
need a grand trunk to carryall your things. Messrs.
Julian Sale Leather Goods would oblige.
JULY-AUG UST 2000 109
Free Trip to Paris Exposition, 1900
FIrst PrJ.lc for 12 Ih· … ( Nq~utJ~l:- rmHle wllh tile
RAY
CAMERA
Second Prize, $100.00 in Gold
Clrculnrs ot Agencies, Or seat tJ) 1/13/1, ghloll /ll/J
illformallQJI Hlld list of prlIes. C:ltnJoJ:utJ PRee.
RA Y CAM ER.A CO., (i1l1bCh~~~R~~~~f6~~ & Co . .)
207 Centre Street, Rochester, N. Y.
The Ray camera would record the sights of your summer vacation, and you might
even win a free trip
to the Paris Exhibition, or five nice shiny $20 gold pieces I
The name took advantage of all the talk about Ihe newly-discovered X-rays.
Through Buff,t SIpiog Cars
Dally betwt:cll
BOSTON, NEW YORK, NIAGARA FALLS, CLEVELAND,
:~ DETROIT, CHICAGO AND ST. LOlliS.
~ ~ .L. DltAGO, H. PAltRY. C. E. LAMBERT,
a ~ Canadian Possenger Agent, General Agent, General Passenger Agent
• • TORONTO. ONT. BU~PALO,.N. Y. NEW YORK. ~.
~~~~~~~~€.€.€.€.€.€.€.~€.~@.~~
For lravellers 10 Ihe eastern United States, the Conlinental Limited of the
West Shore line could take you from
51. Louis to New York and Boston, and
you could visil Niagara Falls along Ihe way.
Lehigh· Valley Railroad System
I THROVCH DRtw,Sc·ROO~1 AND BUFFET
tSLEEPING ~~E~ SERVICE
I
~ Toronto, Hamilton and New York
via Niagara Falls.
. Fastest Time Toronto to New York.
The new route bet.ween aU CANADIAN POIKTS
:-tIlJ BUFFALO.
, DIRECTLI0£ TO tUm PRO~I
New York, Philadelphia, Baltilllore and Wash­
ington, via Niagara Falls and Buffalo.
,so
Toronto, all points in Canada and Chicago.
Solid Vestibule Trains t.hrough. OininJ; C:lrs
:I Ja C Route of .he BLACK DIAMOND EXPRESS.
H.,nd~omest traills n the world.
Por 1 ickels. Time of Trains. ~l{~ .. ppl) to ernts cJ
Grand Trunk R,ilway System, or to
(IfOMINCJ VAI.Lty
R, S. LEWIS,
C1 A. A. HEARD,
3 Yongo St .. TORONTO. ONT.
\estern Passenger Agent,
::2:~ ;lo1.in St., BUFFALO.
CHAS. S. LEE,
OClIenu Pa!scllgcr Agent,
26 Cortl lF;W YORK OfflICES-:i55 Dn)aJw;{),. 27:; RrtlaJ\ :IY, ,1IId .
26 Cortlandt Slftl..t.
DEPOTS-Foot of Vcst :,nrd. CorLlanJl Of DI:. … hro!-.Sl· … SI. …
CANADIAN RAIL -477
iTill take you from
Chicago to Los Angeles
in only 2% days;
66 hours.
Pullmans, Dining Car, $
Buffet-Smoking Car (with $
Barber Shop), ~
Observation Car (with
Ladies Parlor),
Vestibuled and Electric­
Lighted Throughout.
Four times a week
Tuesdays, Wednesdays,
Thursdays and Saturdays
from Chicago.
SantaF~Route
General Pa6senger Office,
I
$
$
Tbe Atchison, Topeka &. Sant& Pe Rall …. y. J
CHICA.GO.
1..,,,,,,,,,,,,,, …. …,..~
ABOVE: The Sanla Fe offered a 66-hour
trip from Chicago to Los
Angeles four
days a week, and you could have your
hair cut en roule!
LEFT The
ad for the Lehigh Valley line
(fastest time
ToronlO to New York) has
some of Ihe niceSI graphics of any
railway ads of Ihe period. It depicts two
scenic views including one of a train
going by Mauch Chunk (now Jim
Thorpe) Pennsylvania. Today a tourist
train operates from the 1888 slalion
there.
RAIL CANADIEN -477 110 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
JI S~lf = eontain~d earriag~
MASSEY-HARRIS
BICYCLE
,.U~ Lo~olOobil,; is Cam,d,ls only hors-des<>
cJ.rri.lg~, It is Ihe. only cJ.rriJ.g.: Iade in C:Il
adJ..
It is sl(am-drivo:n.
m.ly ix ridden J.oywhC:r(. ova Ih.: rOl!gh~sl
ro.ld,s, up tIl s.pads.
Tlwt-is no d:p£l,d.:oc(.on delic.,!,: d(.c!riC.ll
conneclion.~, no heavy stor,lge b.-dleri.::s. flO
~Uldl 01 c~plodt:d R.L>OIiI1(.
The w.::ii!ht is on.iy /iV!! hundr.:.d pound6.
You nlly h;l,,,,,-; c;I~logu<,= for thl. asking.
C1.11 And Sou. the curiiig.::. Gel A ride on il.
with empha.sls all the Ladles models for
1900. 5peclal design Ladle!l wheels­
udles SAfely Oress guard-Chain less
Vhecls-comblned c0381e[ and brake_
slmpllflod C-r30k mechanism-Improved
handleb3r ond 6eat pO~l adJustment­
the Lodles Ideal.
The National Cycle and Automobile Company, Limited,
~anada ~Y~lt Si motor ~o.,
[Imllld,
34 King Sired Wes.I, TOlOlllo. 122 Pal Str;:d, Monlr<..1.[.
/6-1 Princ lilad OffiCI, toronlO, €,nada.
LEFT The steam-powered Locomobile was strongly promoted, but nol for a vacation trip. NOle that it had no batteries or
delicate wires,
and especially no smell of exploded gasoline .
CENTRE: The ad for the Massey-Harris bicycle is a reminder that 1900 was in the heyday of the bicycle craze; but YOIl would
110t use it to get to your vacation spot.
RIGHT: For the Annie Oakley type girl, there was nothing like expertise with a .22 rifle
to auract the young men. There was
no mention
of shotgun weddingsl Canadian Magazine II July 1898.
Quebec Steamship Company,
!Ij.1~~~~~c:::::=================:::.:j.~~.:t~~~
1i Western Steam Navigation Company 1)
~f~ VANCOUVER LINE ~f~
UMtTED.
River and Gulf of St. Lawrence.
m m m m
SUMMER CRUISES IN COOL LATITUDES,
m m
Th~ well 41!lel fa vor(l bl y < nOWIl
S. S. CAMPANA
1,:;00 tons, lighted by Electrkity, alld with all modern comforts, leaves
JVolltreal 011 ;Iondays at 2 p.m., .ph and ,Sth .lIllie; 211d, 16th and
,Joth July; 13th and 27th Augllst j for Pictou, N.S., cnlling fit Quebec,
Father Point, Gaspe, Perce, Summersicie, P.E.I., ad Charlotte­
town, P,E,1.
…. 1 rip lhrough Ihe 1,lu!ld~ 01 the l.ower Sound lind the Gull of In the world If (k …. n Oil Ihe St(olll 5.5. NO~TH PACIFIC or MAINLANDER. will 1cale ;:ulO:OI!I c·..:n· Tuc.~d;\·,
T11I,,· .. clil) ;lIul Snlurd ,wcoIIcr ;,nd 1111: :-;CCIIC u( the wreck of Ihe hi:.I fi lh:! Fraser R.i,·c,,, throngh Ill! San )U1111 atd,ip<-Ia~o and tinder tllc f:(im fO!I:<; of ldlllintll) fi
ifi H ;~: 11~I~c~~. ~~; ;IS ;~:.d I ~~; ::~:I:~::~~;i: :.~ ~~~t~cc ;:;~ ::: I ~:I;~ f}~ I ~ :~:: I ;1:~~1; ;~:;,.~ II is; II C II II e~ cc 11 ell. ,fi
The Ilntsl trip of the season foJ health (Inc[ comfort.
ARTHUR AHERN, Secrolary, Quebec,
B.-RLOW CUMBERLAND, Agent, Toronto,
i.i Fur filii il,forllll,io.)lI I~g-:Hdillg rnlrJS, ell., Iply 10 J
(\. JOIINSON & IIUR;NliTT. Lhulle .~-.. MCOliEI~. D.C. -!i,
~$.~¢:C;===================~~~~~?,I
IlE,VTtfUI.
1I0TI!Ll
0:-: TH~.
CO:TI:-:~:-:T.
~ …… ~ • •. … ,,r
. ,. ou …… ) ………… ,
JOS. 1. nOI.~. ;11.HH.J·:.
l
• 1;:..:, I:..~. r …… …… .oII … .j …… a.t…..}I ………. , •. Q. 1…..-…~ •• lQ..o t·.~
~
1
T. H[;NI{V.
T
… _II …. T:tl! !I
C;. F. (JILOERSLEE~.
I! •. ,,~. ~ h1.II.
,
.~~.&..:.-~~~,~~ .. ~~c-.uc~c-,,.l.Y~~C~C.
LEFT AND ABOVE LEFT:
BOlh the Richelieu & Ontario
Navigation Co. and the
Quebec Steamship Co,
operated service on the St.
Lawrence River, The R&O
was promoting its new resort
hotel the Manoir Richelieu,
built the year before, Its
successor
is still in operation,
ABOVE RIGHT: The Western
Steam
Navigation Compan)
offered steamship service
from Vancouver to mal1)
points along the coast.
RIGHT For those travelling
overseas, the Allan Line, soon
10 be part of the CPR system,
provided good service from
eastern Canadian Ports,
r ALLAN LINE
Montreal to Liverpool.
The St. Lawrence Route.
Three Days Smooth Sailing.
Shortest Ocean Passage.
BAVARI~~lr. S;r CORINTHIAN, • 8,000 Tons SICILIAN, ~ 7,500 Tons
PARISIAN, -G,Goo TOns OALIFORNIAN, 6,000 TOni.
Th~:.;c fine Sl~alncr:.:. or others of .he Il~el, s;,;1 every Thulsdpy
hom ~h~rpool lind (rom Monlr.!!!l. clIlling al Quebec lhe Slea,crs arc amonJ:st the IlIq;esl ancl (JnC.t in the Tr:tn~;lll~nlic
I.;r.~, ;Iud :He ~)(celled by none. in Ihe Ilccommodalion (or all cb:.~~,; o(
jJ;~~O:ll;erll. Tho Saloons and SI:lH:roon,s ;Ire :!Illidships whue le.:!sl l1Iolion
is fclt, and bilgl k~lls have h~en fiUed 10 nil Ihe Slr~mcrs which has rculICed
the rolling motion 10 the minimum.
[OcCinc Lij;hls are in lJ~e IhrOlJghout the Ship$, and Ihc c;o.bin,; hnv~ (III
thc comforts of m.J:r (,~,I·c1a~s hote1.~.
Th, hour d( s:liliog i~ Mrang..:, to makc Nnnce-lion will, traillS arriving
from Ine Ve.sl and 5<1,1111.
Rates of PfH::lj;C is abo,!! 2; pcr cent. IOwel Ih:ln Iill New York .
For [mlher p;lrlicular.~ :lpply 1(1 fin) ,gc of the COIII~anr
H. BOURLIER, 77 Yongt. ShUl, TORONTO
or H. & A. ALlALI, MONTREAL
JULY-AUGUST 2000
Something quite new for the
vacationer of 1900 was sending
postcards to friends Clnd relatives, the
start
of millions of having a wondel/ul
time, wish you were
here messages.
Although business postcards had been
around
for many years, it was only in
1898 that the postage was reduced to
one cent,
and picture postcards first
appeared. Only 27,000 postcards were
mailed in Canada in 1900, a figure
which grew to 50 million annually by
1910. This card, sent from Saint John
N.B.
to Boston, is one of the first, the
design having been
registered in 1898.
Note the special blank space for the
stamp. It has five pictures for the price
of one, all views of Saint John including
one showing the
1885 railway bridge
111 CANADIAN RAIL -477
N .
over the Reversing Falls. The card was written on August 5 1900, mailed on August 7, put aboard the night train to Boston, and
received
in the Massachusetts capital the next day. Note that the pictures, address, stamp (a Queen Victoria I-cent green) and
postmarks are all on the same side; the message
is on the back. Not until 1904 was it permissable to have the address and
message on the front (with the picture on the back) at which time the modern postcard was born, and this type became obsole
te.
No one likes to D.!lk
questions. Our po.m~
phlet. ,. How to Know
New York. answ€rs
nil awkward ques­
tiol1s about Gre:tttf
New York. Free to
anv a.ddress on re·
celpt of 3c. po!;ta~e
GLUm UNIOK BOTEl, FonD & SIIAl,. P~p~
Tho Gr~nd Union. directly or>p,,<;te the Grn~ Cenl! StOItin,;, 1
hh:h·~l:Is, comforrhle, home·like hOI(I,wltillllo 311<1 upward. European p!: . No cab fares nor oxprcss chargcs.
ABOVE: The Kodak was not the only camera made in
RochesteJ: The Tourist Pocket Camera co
uld even make
slides that could be projected.
It did, howevel; represent an
older technolo
gy, for it used glass plates wheras the Kodak,
introduced originally in 1888, used the much more
convenient roll film.
Can
adian Magazine July 1898.
LEFT: This delightful view
of passengers getting off an
open-platform car was
to promote the travel services offered
by the Grand Union Hotel
in New York City, and to make
sure that none
of the visitors asked awkward questions
on arriving
at the metropolis.
Canadian Magaz
ine July 1898.
RAIL CANADIEN -477
WHITE PASS AND YUKON ROUTE
Pacific and Arctic Railway and Navigation 00.
British Columbia Yukon Railway Co.
British Yukon M. T. and T. Co.
SCENIC RAILWAY OF THE WORLD.
THE
WHITE PASS and YUKON ROUTE
BEI·~E.TT. D.c., iTLlN, WIiITEHonSF., JMWSON,
CAPE :-:OME /NO J(,J::H; ED[rTE rOI~TS.
Hnvo 1101.1 Geen the Hew
AI .. eh« Souvenl .. Ploylnlf
DI,.
Tho) .ro II. Work of AIL
111.00 In 5ta.m, will bring
yOLI D Pack.
Two Trains Daily Between SkaguJ) and Whitehorse, at which Poinl we
make Direct Connection wilh a Fine Fleet of River
Sleamers 10 Above Points. Affording a Daily
Service from Whil~horse,
About June 1st, or at the opening of Navigation, Schedulo Time from
puaet Sound Or British Oolumbln Ports to Dawson, about 7 daY:I.
The Popular Tourist Route of the World-comb;n;,g ;,. ils limit> nd
surpassing-in interest all the beauties of the Thousand Islaods, the Mediterranean
anu the Rhine.
From Pugct Sound and British Columbia Porls to Skaguay. Alaska, in.
comfortable Ocean SteAmer, is a voyage lhrout:;h an Inlacd St!:, ill and out of
innulIlcrnblc windint: channels, pAssir,g bcautiful ish11ld~.
From Skaguay to Whitehorse, over the WHITE PASS and YUKON ROUTE,
the railway runs along (he pruipiloUS .:;ide!i of 10ft) snow-capped mountains, elVer
glaciers .. nU ru~hing tlJrrents, by the side of hikes of surpassing beRul). The
grandeur of the whole scenery defies description or cOnlpadson.
From Whitehorse down the Yukon River, navigable for over 2000 miles or its
length, is a fascinating sail of IlnequalleJ ~plend0r :tnd interest-the whole trip being
one that ClI.onOI fail 10 please a.od deli~hL
The Trip hai> delighted and plensed huntlretls who have :tlready made the trip, through
Ihe lillld of the Midnighl Sun.
Send for our rolder of General Information regard;ng the Laod of Gold,
Cor~spondenc( solicitetl rdalie to R}lles, Rontes, etc.
E. C. HA WKlNS, GtDiUI Man.lgu,
SI!ATTLE. WASH.
S. M. IRWIN, Tn;, M •• gu,
SEATTLE, WASH.
112 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
Those who were truly adventurous could go to the Klondike!
The
gold rush was ove}; but it was now quite easy to get
there
for on July 29 1900, the White Pass & Yukon Route
was completed at Carcross,
YT as we see in the (somewhat
premature) advertisement on the left,
If you did not take the
CPR
to the west coast, other lines like the Southern Pacific
would oblige, and the various costal steamboat companies
could then take you
to Skagway and the WP&Y.
Birds eye view from Railway
and Shipping World. Oct, 1900.
CALIFORNIA AND MEXICO,
ARIZONA AND TEXAS,
NEW MEXICO AND OREGON,
HAWAII AND THE ORIENT.
Throlt[;,h PIIIll;ln BOo,!t Slccling Cars to LO$ Angele& :lllll sCln Frftnci!lco.
Throllg!! PIIIIIII:m Ordiu::tr), S!ccpinB Cnr!> Chlcngo, Cincinnati ilnd Vashlngtoll Iv PM.inc C();]<;t pnil1l~.
Via NEW ORLEANS.
JULY-AUGUST 2000 113 CANADIAN RAIL -477
lH IS _
CHICAGO.MILWAUl{fE tr S1.PAUL
. . _. .
One of the most attractive advertisements of the period was this one for the California Limited of the Milwaukee Road.
Although its own line
to the west coast would not be completed until 1909, it provided through sleeping cars via other routes.
The $6.00 sleeping car fare was in addition to a first class ticket.
This concludes our look at the methods of travel used to go on vacation 100 years ago. While the emphasis has been on
railways we have considered steam-boats as well (after all, the charter of the C.R.H.A. definitely included steam navigation), and
even touched on automobiles, horse-drawn vehicles and bicycles. While some of the ways to go seem strange to us in this last
year
of the twentieth century, they were very up-to-date in the last year of the nineteenth. Today we can go much farther in a
shorter time, thanks to
jet travel, and the cost, in terms of buying powel: of the dollar, is much less. Now we have crowded airports
and highways, but then it was
crowded stations and trains. We will leave it up to you to decide which was better.
RAIL CANADIEN -477 114 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
Rattling the Windows
by Lome Perry
430-429, which the
local Canadian rail­
roaders called the
Paper Train. South­
bound it started out
from Canadian Nation­
als Turcot Yard in
Montreal in the late
morning, stopping in
Southwark Yard near
St.Lambert to pick up
/ additional loaded cars
that had come from
Eastern Quebec.
After pumping
up the air, and receiving
clearances and a
green
signal, the assigned CV
700 put all of its
cons iderable energy
into starting its 100-car
train, and this
is where
the window-rattling
chorus came in. The
driving wheels were
comparatively small at
60 inches, boiler
pressure a rather average
If your house
was near the railway
tracks back in the steam
locomotive days, as
ours was, there were
several things you had
to take into account: 1 .
A successful wash day
depended on the wind
direction. In our
situation, if it was
threatening rain, the
wind brought loco­
moti ve soot over the
laundry as it hung on the
line. 2. Hobos were
frequent callers. They
hopped off slow­
moving freight trains at
the top of the street
before the train entered
nearby yards, and
petitioned the kind lady
of the nearest house for
a sandwich.
They were
always polite, never
threatening. 3. Hard­
working freight loco­
motives rattled the
windows, literally. Each
blast of smoke and
Delaware & Hudson 1034 at St. Lambert in May 1946. 230 pounds per square
inch, and large cylinder
Photo by Lome Perry
steam had enough concussive power to shake the houses
100 yards distant
(lOO metres approximately).
These movers were shakers
Which leads to the question of which classes of
locomotives, in my experience, were the supreme rattlers of
windows. The location was St.Lambert, Quebec, and our
house nestled inside the curved double track at Edison
Avenue, just where wye trackage branched off from CNs
Rouses Point Subdivision.
Freight trains were always in slow motion around
there because
of serious curves, switches and a grade in one
direction. Northbound locomotives generally worked very
hard, especially
if they had been stopped by a signal a mile
to the south.
But even downgrade, the locomotives of the
heaviest freight trains had a struggle
to get their mile long
trains into motion. A contributing factor was their load
of
newsprint rolls from Canadian mj]]s on the way to the hungry
presses
of U.S. newspapers. This particular commodity tended
to test the weight limit for the boxcars
of the day.
From their debut
in 1928 until their withdrawal from
service in the mid-1950s, the Central Vermont T-l-a Texas
types (2-10-4) numbered 700-709 were frequent visitors to
Montreal. One
of their standard assigmnents was daily train
diameter of 32 inches
conspired to produce a starting tractive effort of 76,000
pounds. This was augmented by a booster engine on the
trailing truck adding another 10,000 pounds
or so.
I can easily recall
to mind the sound and fury of this
performance. I estimate the exhaust blasts came at the rate
of
no more than two per second as the locomotive passed near
our house.
The window effect was most pronounced in winter
when they
were shut against the cold and antique double
windows were added. A CV 700 effectively changed the
ambient air pressure
in a series of pulses. Pressure inside the
house remained
more or less constant, with the result that
the window frames were alternately pressed
in and released
in sympathy with the raging locomotive not far enough away.
The roar was throaty, loud, but slightly muffled. The sound
was very distinctive to this class
of locomotive, no doubt
related to the enormous volume of smoke and steam escaping
through its chimney twice a second.
Smaller but louder
But there was one other series of locomotive that
passed
our house for part of a year which practically took
the windows out
of their frames. In 1946, CNR, in common
with many other railways, was short of motive power. The
Second World War had ground down the motive power fleet,
JULY-AUGUST 2000
while traffic held up. However, some railways had a traffic
downturn and their surplus locomotives were available for
short term lease. CNR found that a small number of Delaware
& Hudson 2-8-0s were standing idle and snapped them up.
So as to avoid customs implications, they were put to work
on freight trains between Montreal and a yard just south of
the U.S. border. For a few months in the winter and spring of
1946 they entered Canada every day.
They had boilers of enormous diameter and a firebox
that came right out to the clearance limit at the bottom.
Designed to burn hard coal, they benefited from a copious
grate area permitting a thin but potent bed of coals.
And they could holler. Each exhaust at slow speed
was a cannon shot; sharp, abrupt and ear-shattering. We
didnt lose any window glass when they went by, but it must
have been a near thing.
115 CANADIAN RAIL -477
Not all went back to their owners in good shape. One
was a victim of CNR roundhouse unfamiliarity with their
peculiarities.
Before it should have been necessary to inspect
the level
of water in the glass during an overnight layover, it
went out of sight and the resultant boiler explosion lifted
the entire boiler
off the frame. It lay in shreds on the ground
nearby. If this
locomotive wasnt scrapped in Canada, it no
doubt moved south
in several gondola cars. The rest of the
series had another ten years
of service hauling coal drags on
their
home rails.
The 1000 series D&H Consolidations came and went,
but the
CV 700s were responsible for a daily storm, day in
and day out, for all
of my 18 years living beside the tracks in
St.Lambert. And if the wind was from the east, washday was
postponed.
Centennial of Quebec Interurban Electrification
By Fred Angus
The Quebec Montmorency & Charlevoix Railway
constructed its line east from Quebec City to Ste. Anne de
Beaupre and on to St Joachim, the first regular train operating
on
July 10, 1889. Nine days later the railway ran its first
pilgrimage train to the popular shrine of Ste. Anne, starting
a tradition that continued for the seventy years that
passenger
service existed on the line. In the early days the QM&C was
a
conventional steam-operated railway; its passenger cars
being built new for the company by the well known car
builders Jackson & Sharp of Wilmington Delaware.
Combine car 107 was one of the original Jackson & Sharp
cars
of 1889. II survived as a lrailer unlil 1955.
From the first the little 26-mile line was a success,
and as
time went on it developed more ambitious plans. In
1898 it
took over the Quebec District Railway which had
electrified the street cars of Quebec City the year before. At
that time electric power was the state-of-the-art technology
and, with the hydro-electric potential of Montmorency Falls
right beside the line, the QM&C began to consider
electrifying its line. Early in 1898 the company announced
plans to electrify, and at first it was thought that the job
QRL&P car 302, one of the first electric cars on thai line,
was buill
by Ollawa Car Co. in 1900, and was retired in
1950.
Here we see i/ at Quebec Cily shortly before its
retirement. Photo by Omer Lavallee.
might be done that year. However the company wisely
decided not to rush, but to go slow and do a good job with
the best equipment. In August 1898 the Railway and
Shipping World reported It has been decided nol 10 extend
the electric Railway system
of Quebec to Montmorency Ihis
year by eleclrifying Ihe QM&C Ry., but everything will be
got in readiness during the winter to change the motive
power of the entire railway from Quebec to Cap Tourment
from steam
to electricity next spring.
The following year things went rapidly forward, and
in April 1899 the
Railway and Shipping World published a
much more detailed report as follows The Quebec,
Montmorency & Charlevoix Ry. Co. proposes changing the
existing steam railway system from Quebec to Cap
Tourmente, 30 miles, into an electric system. In addition it
proposes to construct a
branch line, parallel to the existing
line but on top
of the cliff and alongside of the public road,
between Quebec
and Montmorency Fails, 7 miles. With this
RAI L CANADI EN -477 116 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
;~:.~-:——c-~~~;:-i~~,=:~-!~h,_-__ ~ –

I. DORLEANS
-,

\,
MONTMOPENCt 9/VISION
or THE
O.R t.. (toP C~ RAILWAY

RIVER ST LA¥REl,,CE
ABOVE: A map of the line, from a booklet issued by the railway in 1920. BELOW: An advertisement from the same publication.
object in view the Company has let a contract for the
necessary cars, which will be somewhat similar to the
ordinary steam railway cars,
55 ft. long and equipped with
four 50 h.p_ motors and air brakes manufactured by the
Westinghouse Company
and speeded for 50 miles an hoUl:
The additional generating plant required at the
Montmorency Falls power house will consist of one 600
KW AC DC generator converter, switchboard, etc., complete,
and at the sub-station which it is proposed to build at St.
Anne de Beaupre, one 200 KW rorary transformer with
converter,
switchboard, etc., complete. This will all be
supplied by the Westinghouse Company. The Q.M. & c. Co.
already operates the street railway in Quebec City by
electricity.
Since the foregoing was written we have been
informed that the changes between Quebec and Cap
Tormente will undoubtedly be made this yeal; and if there
are
no undue obstructions in purchasing the right of way
for the branch line between Quebec and Montmorency Falls,
it also will be built this yew: All the work will be done by
the Company itself, and the contracts
for rails, ties, timber
and other material have been placed. The cars will be
somewhat similar to (hose used by the Detroit & Ypsilanti
Ry.,
and each will have four 50-h.p. Westinghouse motors,
with controllers,
air brakes, etc. The generators, rotary
transformers, etc.,
for generating the current at the power
house at Montmorency Falls, and at 51. Anne de Beaupre,
will also be
of Westinghouse manufacture. The water wheel,
which will be required to operate the generators under 195
ft. head, has not yet been ordered.
Later in 1899 the company changed its name to the
Quebec Railway Light and Power Company, and continued
with the electrification of the main line. Despite the initial
hopes, the
job took a bit longer than had been planned, but
by the spring
of 1900 all was ready and very soon the QRL&P
rrICJO::TS SJ.vr; … on. TIllS TRIP
l~CLl!J)J~G WIll J,).
TO VISITORS
IX .fIlE CITY OF
QUEBEC
TAKE ~llE
Fast Special Electric Tourist Trains
FOB·
Ste_ Anne de Beaupre & Montmorency Falls
JJlulng qnc!)(c nnll\n~·. J/I~lIt &; Power Co., SUl(.IOIl
SI. lnuJ Streel at U.Hi n.m. OIHt 2-.13 p.llI. clllll,y.
(;lII)J,:; EXrldlNS :.LL POINTS OF IITEREST.
completed its metamorphosis into an electric interurban. On
May 27, 1900 electric
service began between Quebec City
and Montmorency Falls, and
by July 15 the remainder of the
line had been converted. The six new electric cars were
numbered 301 to 306 and, as the above article stated, were
standard railway
car width, although somewhat shorter. The
old cars from the steam days were kept in service and used as
trailers, in fact some remained in use until 1959. The
interurban line was known as the Montmorency Division,
and was operated
separately from the city lines which were
called
the Citadel Division. Steam never vanished from the
interurban, for many
of the very long pilgrimage trains were
JULY-AUGUST 2000 117 CANADIAN RAIL -477
Car 303, one of the original electrics of 1900, at Montmorency Falls about 1910. CRHA Archives
steam-hauled, often using regular passenger cars. In later
days the Quebec & Saguenay Railway built from St. Joachim
to
Murray Bay (also known as La Malbaie), and its steam
trains had running rights
over the QRL&P.
In 1902 the increase
in traffic required new cars and
the first
of the 400 series were constructed by Ottawa Car
Co. These big heavy interurbans became the mainstay of the
line and some served for 57 years, the longest career
of any
Canadian interurbans.
Later additions to the fleet were the
450-c1ass steel cars built in 1930, and some ancient trailers
bought from the United States during World War II.
The first
electric car, 301, was scrapped in 1937, but the others
remained until mid-century. In 1950, 302 and 305 were
retired, while 303, 304 and 306, which had been converted
to trailers, were scrapped
in 195 I. This left the 49-year-old
400s the oldest
in service.
The QRL&P continued running year after year with
little apparent change, surviving long after the city cars were
abandoned
in 1948. By mid-century it was an anachronism,
a throwback to
an earlier era. In 195 I it was bought by the
Canadian National Railways who already owned the
former
Quebec & Saguenay (which never reached the Saguenay).
Under CNR management the line continued much the same,
and
around 1958 work actually began on straightening the
old angled wire-support poles.
However the end was near for electrification and
passenger service and late in 1958 it was announced that
they would be discontinued. The end came on March IS
(the Ides
of March) 1959, and to commemorate the event the
CRHA ran a special excursion using 1902 car 401 hauling
1889 trailer 105. Both these cars were saved and are now at
the Canadian Railway Museum in need of extensive
Electrification did not spell the complete end of steam on
the QRL&P. This vinv, from the 1920 QRL&P booklet, shows
a steam-hauled pilgrimage train
10 Ste Anne de Beaupre.
restoration. Car 40 I is tied (with another 1902 interurban at
the Fox Lake museum
in Illinois) for the record of the oldest
interurban
car remaining in North America.
The track
of the QRL&P is still in existence and for a
few years
in the 1990s hosted a passenger train which took
visitors to the
Manoir Richelieu at Murray Bay. This was
discontinued in 1996, but the line still operates as a
short
line, having been sold by CN.
Besides cars 401 and 105 at the Canadian Railway
Museum, at least three other cars have survived. Steel car
454 is at Seashore Trolley Museum in Maine, while two of
the 1889 coaches are at Steamtown in Scranton Pa. It is
hoped that the CRM will see fit to restore 401 and put it on
display
in time for its centennial, a scant two years away.
RAIL CANADIEN -477 118 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
Pll0toS on the Tenliskanling & Northern Ontario
Miss Elizabeth Elliott of Barrie, Ontario sends these
four very interesting photos and writes:
I
am enclosing four photos taken on the old
Temiskaming & Northern Ontario Railway, now Ontario
Northland. The first photo (above) is of the yards at Rouyn,
taken
about 1939.
The second (below) is one of three men outside an
office
of the Canadian Express Company.
The third photo (opposite top)
is a picture of men in
front of engine No. 1009. Two men are leaning against the
right side.
The one in the long white sweater was my father.
His name was Joseph Elliott, and he started out as an
expressman in Toronto on a run
to Fruitland and Vineland. I have buttons on my winter coat. One
is silver reading T&NO
Ry Brakeman with crest in circle with two animals holding
shield. Other buttons read
Canadian National Express.
The fourth picture (opposite bottom), I have no idea
where
it was taken. Obviously it was two on one [double
exposed]. The engine was certainly steam. I know my father
was on the first train
to Moosonee. [Editors note: It looks
like Englehart].
I can remember the express car with the round stove
and granite pot
of tea, going to Englehart on a trip with him.
Freight and express by rail was less noisy and had
less pollution than
aJl the trucks everywhere, driving through
towns in residential areas.
·w), II I~IO
)I I I ( I
JULY-AUGUST2000 119 CANADIAN RAIL -477
RAIL CANADIEIJ -477 120 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
Continuing our Gallery of Murals
ABOVE: This mural, all afence in
Greenwood B.
C., as seen on July
3 1999, proclains fhat Greenwood
is
B. C. s smallest city. Featured on
the train is No. 401, CPRs first
consolidation, built in September
1886, eleven years before Green­
wood was incorporated.
Photo by Fred
Angus
LEFT: This mural of Toronto
Suburban car
12 passing the town
hall at Weston, Ontari
o, is on the
side
of a firehall at 2000 Westall
Road.
Photo courfesy
of Ray Corley
BELOW LEFT: Not exactly a
mural, this model
of fhe front of a
VIA locomotive is still worfhy of
being included in our series. It is
on the
fran! of Shepherds
Hardware in Armstrong B.C.,
and·
was photographed on July 5,
1999.
PhOfO by Fred Angus
JULY-AUGUST 2000 121 CANADIAN RAIL -477
Book Reviews
TITANIC RAILROAD: The Southern New England
by Larry Lowenthal
(reviewed
by Douglas N.W. Smith)
By the turn of the twentieth century, the railroad
construction era in New England appeared to be over. Under
the watchful eyes of legendary financier, J P Morgan, the
New Haven Railroad was busy swallowing competing
railroads, trolley and steamship lines. In southern New
England, it had gained an almost total transportation
monopoly. The announcement by the Grand Trunk Railway
that it would build a line into Providence, Rhode Island was
warmly welcomed by those who feared the effects of the
New Haven monopoly.
The NH was not pleased and resulting
conflict between the two railways caused political
repercussions that reached as far as the White HOLise.
The Southern New England was to be the eastern
component of a grand scheme for a new transcontinental
railroad. The Grand Trunks President Charles Hays had
seemingly mesmerized the
GTRs British stockholders as he
simultaneously rebuilt their moribund railway and raised
profits and dividends to unprecedented levels. The
remarkable growth of the Canadian west after the turn of the
century made it appear the land of golden opportunity to
Hays. He persuaded the
GTRs Board in 1903 to expand
from the railways traditional base
in New England, Quebec,
Ontario, Michigan and Illinois
to the Pacific. To be successful,
it needed good access to transatlantic shipping. The Southern
New England would replace Portland, Maine as the eastern
terminus since it had proven to be a disappointment.
Construction on the Southern New England boldly
started between Palmer, Massachusetts and Providence,
Rhode Island in 1909. Three years later, Hays flirted with
the idea
of extending it to Boston. His death on the Titanic
was apocalyptic, foretelling the collapse of his dream.
Financial problems with the Grand Trunk Pacific dragged
the
GTR into insolvency. While the Southern New England
was abandoned before track could
be laid, millions had been
spent on a building a right
of way which can still be seen.
Author Lowenthal. a professional historian with the
United States National Park Service, deftly traces the story
from
the lordly boardrooms to the humble construction
workers shanties.
Hard cover,
8112 by 11. 254 pages, 211 photos, maps and
plans.
Price:
$56.66 (includes $3.00 shipping and GST)
Available from Trackside Canada,
POBox 1369, Station B,
Ottawa, Ontario
KIP 5R4
PRINCE SHIPS OF NORTHERN BC:
Ships of the Grand Trunk Pacific and CNR
by Norman Hacking
(reviewed
by Douglas N.W. Smith)
For 65 years. the Grand Trunk Pacific (GTP) and CNR
operated
some of the finest coastal steamships to be found
in North American waters. They were designed to link the
GTPs remote rail terminus at Prince Rupert with the
population centres of Seattle, Vancouver and Victoria to the
south and the towns of southeastern Alaska to the north.
Since they competed with the famed CPR Princess vessels,
the GTP and
CNR named their graceful vessels in the Prince
series.
Author Hacking traces the history
of the many ships
which sailed under the
GTP and CNR banner from 1910 to
1975. Included are descriptions of the ships; their
groundings, sinkings and recoveries(!); and their heroic
wartime service as armed navy merchant cruisers.
This book can be recommended to any CNR or
marine
enthusiast.
Soft cover, 8 by 8, 72 pages, 51 b&w photos and maps
Price:
$16.00 (includes $3.00 shipping and GST)
Order from Trackside Canada, POBox 1369, Station B,
Ottawa,
Ontario Kl P 5R4
ONE TRACK MIND Photographic Essays on Western
Railroading
by Ted Benson
The Boston Mills Press is pleased to launch its
Masters of Railroad Photography Series with this
outstanding collection of photographs and essays byTed
Benson. Devoting much of the past 30 years to rail
photojournalism, Benson is widely acknowledged as one of
the worlds top railway photographers. In One Track Mind
he presents more than 200 of his finest black-and-white
photographs on the topic of western railroading. Capturing
the romance, power, and personalities of western railroading,
Bensons photography speaks to the railfan in all
of us with
equal measures
of timeless human interest and peak-action
railroad imagery.
There is something for every railfan in this first-class
collection: from the non-traditional view of A New
Generation of Railfans at Southern Pacifics San Jose station
-one
of Bensons most popular photographs -to the poignant
final run
of the California Zephyr; from the major lines of
the Southern Pacific, Santa Fe and Western Pacific to
Milwaukees electrified Rocky Mountain Division and
shortline railroads in California. Oregon, Washington and
Montana; from the desolately beautiful Great American
Deselt to fertile valleys and evergreen forests; from dizzying
7,000 foot mountain passes to the elegant dining room of
the Rio Grandes Silver Banquet.
Like Ansel Adams renowned landscape photography,
Ted Benson has aspired to create a collection of rail
photography fuJI of rare, unexpected pleasures.. high
drama spiced with quiet moments
of reflections. These are
the qualities the reader will find and enjoy on every
page of
One Track Mind.
Hard cover, 176 pages, 200 duotones.
Price: $60 Canadian, $45 U.S.
For more information please contact Chris Isaac, phone (416)
445-3333, fax (416) 445-5967, E-mail
cisaac@genpub.com
RAIL CANADIEN -477 122 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
The Business Car
TORONTO UNION STATION SOLD TO CITY
Upgrading Union Station is key to redeveloping the
citys waterfront and capturing the 2008 Summer Olympics,
Transport Minister David Collenette says.
This is, in effect,
the first step to the waterfront rejuvenation, the first step to
our Olympic dream being realized,
he said on June 7.
Union Station seen from the eN Tower in October 1996.
Photo by Mark Gustafson
The federal government will chip in $25 million
toward improving the station building, which the City of
Toronto is buying from the railways. As the proud new owner
of the station, the city realizes well it has a fixer-upper on its
hands. The heritage structure, opened by the Prince of
Wales (later Edward VIII and still later the Duke of Windsor)
in 1927, has
been sadly neglected, and the plumbing and
electrical systems are outdated. But that will change, Mayor
Mel Lastman vowed at a news conference in the buildingS
Great Hall. We will restore the glory of this marble palace,
Lastman promised. Union Station needs $14 million
in work
just to meet building code standards.
The city is buying the property from Canadian Pacific
and Canadian National North America for $80 million. Of
that, $55 million comes from GO Transit in return for a 99-
year lease and the city
is writing off $25 mi Ilion owed by the
railways in back rent on the city-owned land beneath the
station.
Union Station also will be the starting point for a rail
link to Pearson International Airport, said Collenette, who
is
also minister responsible for the Greater Toronto Area.
Costing between $250 million and $300 million, the link
will be built entirely by the private sector and will whisk
passengers between the two facilities in 20 minutes, he said.
The city, which estimates development of Union
Station will cost $200 million, plans to find a private
developer to bring in new retail, entertainment and office
tenants. The goal is to make Union Station not only a
transportation
hub but a destination in itself, Lastman said.
There wiB be fun places to be and fun places to enjoy, he
said.
Toronto
Star, June 8, 2000.
FORMER PLACE VIGER HOTEL TO BE SOLD
The historic Viger building in Montreal, which was
Canadian Pacifics first hotel in the city and
once served as
a
passenger station, is being eyed for redevelopment. The
1898 building on Montreals east side now houses city
offices. But officials, who hope to sell the property to the
highest bidder this fall, say that in the right hands the
landmark structure could help revitalize the neighborhood.
Fred F. Angus, editor of Canadian Rail Magazine, published
by the Canadian Rai Iroad Historical Association, told the
Montreal Gazette that the Viger was CPRs first hotel in
Montreal. It would be nice to have it back as a hotel,
Angus said. It would probably go well with the
revitalization of Old Montreal. Its probably a good place
for a hotel now. The buildings use as a hotel ended with the
Depression and the westward shift of Montreals main
business district. It closed in 1935 and was sold to the city in
1950, since which time it has been used for city offices.
The
station closed in 1951. Internet item courtesy of Mark Paul
VIA TO CONSIDER PURCHASE OF UNUSED
CHANNEL TUNNEL PASSENGER EQUIPMENT
VIA Rail Canada is considering buying or leasing
some or all of the 192 sleepers, coaches, and food service
cars that were built for the Channel Tunnel Nights tar
service by GEC-Alsto
m. The service was never started, and
JULY-AUGUST 2000
I TIlINKI CAN· ..
I ~INK I QJJ …
ll-UNKI CAN .. ·
A cartoon which appeared in the Edmonton Journal in April
2000. soon after it was announced that
VIA would receive a
subsidy
of $400 million.
the cars have been stored at a military base at Kineton.
England, for several years. In an effort to sell the cars, Alstom
has shipped
one of each type of cars to Canada for VIAs
inspection.
The three cars arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia,
by
ship early in June and were loaded on flatcars for the
move to Montreal. They were to be sent to Quebec City for
a first display to the VIA board
of directors, at their meeting
there on June
19, but plans have changed, and the cars have
been
forwarded to Montreal and were to be taken off the
flatcars on June
14. The cars lighting and air conditioning
systems are supposed to be powered up for display. The
equipment doesnt conform to North American regulatory
standards and would likely require
modification or special
waivers to be operated, should
VIA decide to buy or lease
any
of it. Ed Jordan.
NOW THE SCUNNEL?
No ones calling it the Scunnel yet, but the new
Oresund Bridge-Tunnel between Demnark and Sweden opens
July 1
at 11 p.m., easing auto and rail touring in Scandinavia.
The $3 billion link is 16 km long and took seven years to
build. On the Danish side, there is a 4
km tunnel, connected
to the artificial island
of Peberholm and a 7.5 km. double­
deck bridge on
the Swedish end. One-way toll for a car is the
equivalent of about $45 Canadian.
QUEBEC CENTRAL REVIVED
Dwane Wilken of The Montreal Gazette
The long haul to profit begins this summer for
Quebecs newest short-line railway operator, a trucking firm
magnate with an ecologists heart. As a former railway
customer, 61-year-old lean-Marc Giguere said he has long
opposed the dismantling
of Canadas railways on economic
123 CANADIAN RAIL -477
grounds. These days, its the threat of global warming caused
by
greenhouse gas emissions that really stokes his zeal for
trains.
Automobiles are responsible for 60 per cent of this
problem, said Giguere, president of Express Marco Inc.,
based in East Broughton.
And when I talk about vehicles,
Im talking about my trucks, too. I think that if we want to
leave the
planet breathable for future generations, we have
to start using methods of transport that are less polluting.
After five years of deal-making to put together the
$16-million project,
Giguere plans to revive freight service
along the historic Quebec Central Railway, linking
Sherbrooke in the Eastern Townships with Quebec City and
the Beauce region through more than 70 rural municipalities.
The Canadian Pacific Railway Co. sold its stake in Quebec
Central
Railway for an undisclosed amount on Jan. 6.
Jean-Marc Giguere standing by a QCR locomotive.
Dividends from the railways operations could be
many whistle-stops down the line, however. Under the
current business plan, the refurbished QCR will generate
just $3 million in revenues the first year and lose $500,000.
The plan calls for revenues of $3.8 million in the second
year with a net loss of $250,000. We wish it could be better,
Giguere said. But in business, you know, you have to
evaluate how much
youre able to lose before starting. If we
werent able to lose $500,000, we would not have gone
ahead. Only after Quebec Centrals tracks are fully repaired
and the railway
is operating at full capacity three years from
now does
Giguere expect to turn a profit of $1 million on
total revenues
of $7 million. The math is in his favour when
it comes to fuel costs, at least. Whereas 5 litres
of fuel will
carry a tonne
of freight just 114 kilometres by truck, Giguere
notes that the
same amount of fuel will take a tonne of freight
330 kilometres by train. In any case, he said he can no
longer
meet the transportation needs of the region with trucks alone:
of the 32 trucks in his fleet, four are sitting idle because he
cant find enough qualified drivers.
Giguere, who started his own trucking business 28
years ago, is convinced that
by pursuing a more aggressive
marketing strategy and offering better customer service than
his predecessor, he will be able to guide the QCR to
profitability once again. In the past, the railways were
known as an iron world. Little discussion, little concern
for
people. That was the past. Today, I think my recipe is a
winning
recipe.
RAIL CANADIEN -477
The new rail service, employing 45 people, resumes
June 24 between Sherbrooke and Vallee Junction, passing
through East Angus, Dudswelll, Disraeli, Black Lake,
Thetford Mines and Tring Junction. A weekly passenger
excursion run dubbed the Train Touristique Chaudiere­
Appalaches, is expected to generate additional seasonal
employment in the region. I would be very optimistic that
he is astute enough to make it a success, Robert Ballantyne,
president
of the Railway Association of Canada, said.
Express Marco Inc. will operate the line under the
old Quebec Central name. The locomotives, freight cars
and coaches are being painted in Express Marco colours,
but will bear the names of two historic railways that merged
in the 1870s to form the QCR: the Eastern Townships Railway
and the Levis
& Kennebec Railway. This is the history of
our ancestors, Giguere said. By bringing back local rail
connections in the Townships and the Beauce, Giguere
expects to be able to offer, among other things, a cheaper
means of transporting wood over long distances to paper
mills both in Canada and the U.S. northeast. He plans to
offer transportation links with the Bangor & Aroostook
System at Sherbrooke, as well as connections to CN and CP
lines. It proves what I started to say five years ago: if the
regions are to remain economically connected to real markets,
we have
to preserve all our major developmental tools, which
includes the railways. He has personally committed $4
million to the project to pay for rolling stock and track repairs,
with the rest
of the financing coming from loans. Over the
course of the summer, repairs on the Levis and Chaudiere
subdivisions will permit the extension of freight service to
Harlaka, near Quebec City and through Saint-Georges-de­
Beauce to Lac Frontiere on the Quebec-Maine border. The
railway has also received financial support from the Quebec
government, including subsidies to repair and upgrade the
track, abandoned by
CP in 1994.
Montreal Gazette, June 5,2000.
ADIRONDACK ONE OF WORLDS GREAT TRAINS
A recent issue of the National Geographic Traveller
lists and describes a number of the great train trips in the
world. On this impressive list
is Amtraks Adirondack which
runs daily between Montreal and
New York City. When one
considers the scenic and historic Champlain and Hudson
valleys by which this international train runs, one can see
why it was included in the National Geographics list.
NEW HISTORIC TRAIN LE RIVERAIN
A new excursion train, known as Le Riverain made
its
debut in Montreal on June 23. Consisting of a 1950s
diesel locomotive hauling refurbished first-generation GO
Transit cars, the train will depart from Windsor station twice
daily on weekdays and four times a day on weekends during
the summer. Operating between
Montreal and Ste. Anne de
Bellevue, 20 miles to the west, the train proceeds at a leisurely
pace, taking two hours for the round trip. On board are guides
dressed in late Victorian (one news release said 1899, the
other 1889 -take your pick) costumes who explain the
points
of interest along the way, and tell a great deal about
the rich history
of the area through which the train passes.
124 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
Also on the train is a display of historic photos which also
explain the story.
Before boarding, passengers are greeted
by an actor playing the part of Sir William Van Horne, the
CPRs second president (1888-1899), and this sets the theme
for this historical journey. On arrival at Ste. Annes, the
passengers
have the choice of returning on the same train or
taking a tour of this very interesting town and returning on
a later train.
The fare is $19 for adults, $9 for children and
$17 for seniors, but group rates are also available. More
information may be had by phoning (514) 287-7866.
CPR INTRODUCES NEW SERVICE FOR TRUCK
TRAILERS
In an effort to regain market share lost to trucks over
the past decades, Canadian Pacific Railway has launched a
new intermodal service that allows truck trailers to ride
on
flatbed railcars. The new service, called Expressway, will
run twice daily between Montreal, Toronto and Detroit.
CPR
plans Lo expand the service to Quebec City and Chicago by
the end
of the year and to New York City in 2001. At an
inauguration
ceremony on June 7 at CPRs yard in Cote St.
Luc, Jacques Cote head of the railways eastern Canada
network, said that rising fuel costs, a shortage of drivers and
road congestion mean that many trucking companies are
looking for alternatives on long-distance routes. We are
not trying to go head-to-head with trucking companies, but
rather give them a complementary service on certain routes,
Cote said.
The new service can save wear and tear on trucks,
avoid overnight driving and long waits at customs and help
companies avoid large investments in adding trucks to their
fleets,
Cote said. Most railways, including CPR competitor
Canadian National, have been trying to perfect different
types of intermodal trailers and railcars. The advantage of
CPRs system, according to company officials, is that the
truck trailers do not have to be specially reinforced and can
be driven onto flatbed railcars using ramps.
The trailers are
then secured to the railcar with a hitch. Each train can carry
up to
60 trailers at a time. The specially designed railcars
were built
by National Steel Car in Hamilton, ant. Traditional
intermodal services often involve lifting truck trailers onto
railcars with cranes, hence the need for reinforcement. Only
about 10 per cent of truck trailers in use in North America are
reinforced,
so they dont have access to a traditional system.
Montreal Gazette, June 8, 2000.
JULY-AUGUST 2000
NEW COIN SHOWS LOCOMOTIVE TORONTO
A new $20 silver coin, recently released by the Royal
Canadian Mint, depicts the first locomotive built
in Canada,
the
Toronto, built in the factory of James Good, in its
namesake city,
in 1853. The coin, which is not intended for
circulation, is about the size
of the old silver dollar, and is
made of sterling silver (92.5% pure). The obverse (front)
shows the Queen with the usual inscriptions and the date
2000, while the reverse is as shown above. A very unusual
feature
is the hologram which takes the form of a head-on
view
of the locomotive and appears just above the side view.
In this illustration, made by scanning an actual coin, the
hologram appears as a black-and-white view, but in actual
fact it is in vivid, variable colour. This
is at least the sixth
time since 1981 tbat a locomotive has appeared on a
Canadian coin, and the fir
st that was not of CPR ancestry. A
maximum
of only 25,000 of these coins will be minted, and
they may be obtained for about $60 each from tbe Mint. It
should be noted that the figure
of 25,000 is the maximum
possible; only enougb will be made to fill orders; the $200
gold piece with the CPR train on the Stoney Creek bridge
also had a limit
of 25,000, but only about 7,500 were actually
made.
NEW SERVICE IN NOVA SCOTIA
VIAs newest train, the Bas dOr, was set to depart
from Halifax on May 9 to start a weekly service between
Halifax and Sydney. Every Tuesday until Oct. 17, the train
will
depart Halifax at 7:30 a.m., pausing for one hour in Port
Hawkesbury from 10:40 to
11 :40p.m., and arriving Sydney
at 6: 15 p.m. Every Wednesday until Oct. 18, the train will
leave
Sydney at 7:30 a.m., pausing in Port Hawkesbury from
10:40 to
II :40 a.m., and arriving back in Halifax at 6: 15
p.m. Equipment from the Ocean, which does not depart
from Halifax on Tuesday, will be utilized.
The 470.
125 CANADIAN RAIL -477
ANOTHER RAILWAY STAMP
In our article on stamps depicting railway subjects
(January-February 1997 Canadian Rail) the one shown on
this
page was overlooked, probably because it was not a
postage stamp. These stamps were issued by the telegraph
department of the CPR and were the means by which
authorised persons could send telegrams free over CPR lines.
These persons received a booklet, the cover of which was in
the form of, and the same size as, a railway pass
of the period.
In the booklet were several pages
eacb of which contained
four
of these stamps. When a passholder wished to send a
free telegram he presented the pass to the agent who would
then detach
one of the stamps and stick it on the telegraph
form as evidence that the telegram had been sent
by someone
entitled to send them free.
The
CPR issued these stamps from 1887 to 1936, and
they are known for every
year except 1888. Interestingly,
the older ones are easier
to find; evidently the company was
more free with passes
in those days. The 1887-1929 design
is as shown above and was printed
in black except for 1902
and 1903. In
1930 a new design was adopted showing a
shield with a telegraph pole, but
it did not have the system
map as the earlier design did.
The last year was 1936, after
which they were
discontinued.
Other railways and telegraph companies in Canada
issued. similar stamps at various times between 1890 and
1935.
Among them were the Canadian Northern, Grand Trunk
Pacific, Canadian National, and even the (extremely rare)
Algoma Central. None
of these others has a railway subject
for its design. By far the most common, and the most
interesting, are the early CPR ones; a nice one can still be
obtained for less than $10.
HERES ONE TO DREAM ON!
Randy Parten of Houston, Texas, who operates a small
railroad in Mexicos Copper Canyon and in the Province of
British Columbia, wants to put back a little history on the
former CP main line to Montreal from Saint John, NB.
The
RAIL CANADIEN -477
new name will be Acadian Railway and will
first see passengers arriving
by cruise ships
in May of 2002. The new train service will
cost up to $300 for a one way ticket to
Montreal, making a night stop
in Greenville,
Maine. Parten would build a large motel in
Greenville to meet the demands of his
passengers. Parten says hes not into
transportation as much as hes into
entertainment. The 13 car train would
include a formal dining car, a lounge car, a
bar car, an activity car with dance floor and
TV and a dome car.
The 470.
NEW ACQUISITIONS FOR THE CANADIAN
RAILWAY MUSEUM
During 1999, the Canadian Railway
Museum acquired Ontario Northland locomotive
1400 as well as CP Rail No. 4744. These two photos
show them after their arrival at the Museum.
MISCELLANEOUS PHOTOS
Following are a few interesting photos taken
in the
first six months of 2000. They are printed
here in no special order, either by date or location.
126 JUILLET-AOUT 2000
ABOVE: On a dull and snowy late afternoon on Februwy 5
2000, Sperry Rail Service car
119 was seen resting for the
weekend at Smiths Falls, Ontario. Car 119
is one of the oldest in Sperrys fleet, and is
frequently seen on CPR lines in eastern
Canada.
Photos by Fred Angus unless indicated.
BOTTOM: On May 8 2000, VIAs
Chaleur, eastbound to Gaspe. stopped
at
New Carlisle, on time. Motive power
was 6406. one of six ViA locomotives
specially painted to advertise Kool Aid.
OPPOSlTE TOP: Amtrak 319 and V1A
6458. both leased to the Montreal
commuter service. are seen side by side at
Windsor station on the morning
of March
9, 2000.
OPPOS1TE MIDDLE AND BOTTOM:
In the
early morning hours of May 23 2000,
David Morris took these two time
exposures of VIA train 51. the Montreal­
Toronto
overnight train Ente/prise, at
Kingston, Ontario. Overnight service
between these two cities resumed in
January after a ten-year hiatus.
. .:.{:.
JULY-AUGUST 2000 127 CANADIAN RAIL -477
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available in mid-September 2000
A rHOTO HISTORY
Of TIl[
ra/Ne[ £DWARD ISLAND RAILWAY
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ABOVE: An exciting new book, soon to be
published,
is Allan Grahams photo history of
the Prince Edward Island Railway. II can be
obtained for $29.95 plus postage from the
authOl; ALLan Graham, PO. Box 335, Alberton,
PE.I.,
COB 1BO
BELOW: Five Amtrak sleeping cars under­
going refurbishment at Canadian ALLied
Diesel
in Lachine Que. on May 21 2000, They
hav
e been leased to
VIA for use on the trains
between Winnipeg and ChurchiLL, Manitoba.
BACK COVER: Electric interurban car 401 of the Quebec Railway Light and Power Co, SLOpS at Montmorency Falls on
September
12 1951, This car was, foLLowing the retirement of the last of the 300-series earlier that ye(/}; the oldest interurban
car in service in Canada, Less than two months afler this photo was taken, November
1 1951, the QRL&P was sold to the CNR.
However electric
passenger service would continue more than seven years more, until March 15 1959, and 401 would be in
service
tiLL the end. Today it is at the Canadian Railway Museum and is 98 years old.
Photo by William Bailey
This isslle of Canadian Rail delivered to printer June 28. 2000.

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