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Canadian Rail 460 1997

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Canadian Rail 460 1997

114
CANADIAN RAIL
ISSN 0008-4875
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE REBIRTH OF 1231 ………………………………………………………………
………….. M. PETER MURPHy …………… 115
RAIL TESTING
IN EASTERN CANADA AND MAINE …………………………………. MARK G. GUSTAFSON ……… 124
THE WATERLOO St. JACOBS RAILWAy ………………………………………………….. MARK PAUL. …………………….. 136
THE BUSINESS CAR ………………………………………………………………
…………….. . 138
FRONT COVER: Locomotive No. 40 of the Canadian American Railroad, pictured at Moosehead, Maine on December 10, 1996. At that time it
was the only locomotive to be lettered for this railway.
Photo by Mark Gustafson.
BELOW-This map shows the site
of the proposed Downtown Historic Railway in Vancouver, as well as the display site for interurban car 1207.
For your membership
in the CRHA, which
includes a subscription
to Canadian Rail,
write to:
CRHA, 120 Rue St-Pierre,
SI. Constant,
Que.
J5A2G9
Membership Dues for 1997:
In Canada: $35.00 (including GST)
United States: $30.00
in U.S. funds. Canadian Rail
is continually in need of news, sto­
ries historical data, photos, maps and other mate­
rial. Please send
all contributions to the editor: Fred
F. Angus,
3021 Trafalgar Ave. Montreal, P.Q. H3Y 1 H3.
No payment can be made for contributions, but the
contributer will be given credit for material submitted.
Material
will
be returned to the contributer if requested.
Remember Knowledge is of little value unless
it is
shared with others.
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: Douglas N.w. Smith
ASSOCIATE EDITOR (Motive Power):
Hugues
W. Bonin
DISTRIBUTION: Gerard Frechette
LAYOUT: Fred
F. Angus
PRINTING: Procel Printing
to Stan/flY
Pa
Burrard Inl.r
Interurban 11120- Display Sit.
1st
2nd
3rd
4111
5th
6th
1!
m ..
7111
t:
-=
CD
l,
,
Establlshed~
Route
.
-.
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– .
~, ,.
Robson
and
,Granville.
Jt
.
,

,
Library ~,
Squ.,. ,
,,
,
…. Cannda
Harbour
B.C.

,
Proposed extensions 10 ChInatown
Gastown and Chinatown
Proposed extension 10 north
shore of False Creek
i
.g
~
i 0
I
a
Skyi/o.
1.1
2nd
Jrd
4111
51h
6th
71h
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1997 115 CANADIAN RAIL -460
The Rebirth of 1231
By M. Peter Murphy
Editors Note: We are happy to be able to publish an article by Peter Murphy, a long-time CRHA member and former editor of
Canadian Rail. While Peter is interested in many aspects
of railway history, he is best noted for his interest in electric street cars and intelurbans.
The following article describes an interurban restoration project that has somehow escaped the notice
of most railway enthusiasts. Even Peter.
was amazed when
he first found out about it! It might be described as a fish story that didnt get away. When you read it you will realize that
traction restoration in Canada is ali ve and well.
On a recent holiday
visit to Victoria, British Colum­
bia (July, 1997), I decided to
look up an old traction friend
who had retired there back in
1988. William C. (Bill) Bailey,
many will remember him from
his fabulous auction
of traction
memorabilia which was held in
Milton, Ontario, in November
of 1987.
Having lost touch with
B
ill over the years, I was pre­
pared for what was expected to
be the usual B.C. answer
to the
question,
what are you doing
with yourself these days?
Golf, fishing, hiking, many pos­
sibilities exist in beautiful
Victoria, British Columbia, I
wasnt prepared for the answer;
Im restoring an interurban
car, what gauge, twelve inches
to the foot!
Restored isnt the word,
this car was rebuilt from the
sills
up, an undertaking of major pro­
portions. This rebuild includes
structural members, all wood­
work, trucks, motors and acces­
sories.
The restoration of the car
has been accomplished by re­
building it to the exact specifi­
cations as the original. Follow­
ing is the exciting story
of the
rebirth
of 1231 .
Following the discontinua­
tion
of B. C. Electric interurban
service on February 28, 1958,
several interurban cars found
their way to TroUeyland USA at
Olympia, Washington. They
were never restored and in 1975
three cars were brought back to
Canada
on flatcars; 1235, 1231
and 1220. 1235 was sent to Ot­
tawa as we have already men­
tioned, it is stored unrestored.
The other two cars were placed
in several locations in Vancouver
before being stored in a metal
shed on Mitchell Island. Was he serious, he
played along, like a cat teasing
a mouse. I was given little de­
tail, but was invited to appear
at the Victoria Transit Garage at
2:00 PM the next day. Bill
would take two hours or so
from his hectic schedule to
show me around. Some retire­
ment, you need an appointment
to meet him! In 1988 Bill got involved in
restoring two 1957 Brill CD52
diesel busses (ex BC Transit) and
operated a downtown shoppers
bus service in Victoria
in 1989
The A end of 1231, July 1997, windows and doors remain to be fitted. to cover the cost of restoration.
Photo by the auth01: Also in 1989, he was asked to
What could this inter-
urban car be (if in fact it was true at all, or
just another fish story),
from the excitement in his voice, I knew that something was up.
Recalling that interurbans
havent run on Vancouver Island since
the Saanich line
of B. C. Electric ceased operation in 1924, the
mystery deepened. Furthermore, to my knowledge, no B. C. Elec­
tric interurbans were ever preserved in Canada (except 1235 which
is in storage at the National Museum of Science and Technology in
Ottawa).
At the appointed hour, I appeared at the Victoria Transit
bus garage,
summer temperatures prevailing, the doors were fully
open. Looking in, at the back
of the garage, bathed in construction
lighting was B. C. Electric interurban car 1231 almost fully re­
stored! take over an abandoned restora­
tion project involving ex Porto Portugal
car 167, a single truck con­
vertible car built by Brill in 1910. This car was restored and num­
bered BCER
30 which was an early Victoria car that was quite
similar. Restoration costs were provided by
BC Transit.
Because
of the high quality of restoration on the ex Porto
car, the Chairman
of Be Transit asked Bill if he would tackle the
restoration
of one of the St. Louis built B.C. Electric interurban
cars. The car was located in Vancouver and it was offered that the
car would be moved to Victoria where Bill and his team were lo­
cated.
1231 was chosen as it was the last B.
C. electric interurban
to operate in regular service. Bringing the
car to Victoria was no
easy task, too high for the Tsawwassen -Swartz Bay ferry, the car
RAIL CANADIEN -460 116 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE1997
TOP: 1218 in downtown Vancouver in May, 1952.
CENTRE:
1235 and 1202 at Marpole in August, 1957.
Both photos by Peter Cox. Collection of Peter Murphy.
BOTTOM: The two Brill CD52 busses restored by Bill Bailey
and Norm Smith, this was the start
of it all.
Photo courtesy Bill Bailey.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1997
The Porto car (before) as received on September 8, 1989.
Photo courtesy Bill Bail
ey.
117 CANADIAN RAIL -460
Three views of the Porto car (after) now lettered B. C.Electric Railway Co. 30. Photos courtesy of Bill Bailey.
RAIL CAIJADIEIJ -460 118 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1997
had to be transported by
Mid Island Express to
Nanaimo and brought to
Victoria on the larger
(higher clearance) ferry.
Victoria
Transit
cooperated by providing
restoration
space in its
bus garage. Getting the
car unloaded and rolled
to the
back of the bus
garage was no easy feat,
todays modern bus ga­
rages don
l have rails for
such occasions. Resto­
ration, funded by B.C.
Transit (Vancouver) pro­
gressed through 1991
and 1992 with a mix
of
volunteer and paid pro­
fessionals doing the me­
ticulous work.
1231 loaded on the flatbed on February 12,1991, en route from Mitchell Island to lictoria via the Nanimoferry.
Photo courtesy Bill Bailey.
LEFT CENTRE AND LEFT BOTTOM: Two views of major
wood
rot, the side sill and cornerpost
ABOVE: New corner post andframing.
OPPOSITE TOP: Rebuilding the structure; new
woodfrom the
floor up.
OPPOSITE BOTTOM: New composite hardwood
and steel sills
to support the vestibule, note how the wood is worked to sur­
round the steel
J beams.
Photos courtesy Bill Bailey.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1997
Fortunately a search
for a highly qualified carpen­
ter turned up Ms. Karen
Robertson, actually a furni­
ture refinisher by profession.
Karen has made this project
a labor
of love, her knowl­
edge
of woods and her pro­
fessional skill are
evident
from the first glance at the
restored car.
The team had their
work
cut out for them, the
car was in poorer shape, es­
pecially structurally, than
was evident. As with most
interurbans, the company lit­
erally ran them into the
ground in later years as
abandonment approached.
Thirty three years of outdoor
storage in the USA obvi­
ously didnt help, the car was
in terrible condition.
The main structural problem that wasnt evident was the
fact that all the vertical members between the windows had rotted
through and were broken at the belt rail.
The four partially rotted
corner posts were literally holding the
roof up. In later years the
cars probably ran in this condition,
some riders remember the roof
lurching backwards as cars accelerated and lurching forward as the
cars braked, a sure sign
of structural problems. In addition, one
vestibule had been destroyed in a collision, the other was sagging
119 CANADIAN RAIL -460
by l77mm (7 in.), the car operated like this as the doors had been
cut to fit the sag!
Fortunately, an arrangement was made with Comosun
Com­
munity College whereby their fully equipped carpentry and paint
shop could be used to rebuild the wooden parts, windows, doors,
etc. required.
The school is located about five miles from the bus
garage and many miles have been put on various vehicles shuttling
parts back and forth.
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RAIL CANADIEN -460
Rebuilding the structure, interior view.
Photo courtesy Bill Bailey.
Working on the mahogany door to the smoking
section.
Photo by the author.
The car was taken down to the floor, steel (bolted on) sides
removed, sills repaired and the sides completely rebuilt with the
hardwoods as originally used
in construction. Both vestibules were
completely rebuilt including a laminated hardwood floor (like a
butcher block).
One hidden advantage
of the VictOlia (marine environment)
restoration location was the availability
of brass hardware furnish­
ing suppliers. All brass details right down to the window latches
were
sent out to a marine shop and the brass buffed and lacquered
(or replaced
if necessary). New windows were constructed of ma­
hogany and glazed.
The interior cherry wood, and mahogany trim
and details were completely rebuilt, smoking section bulkheads and
sliding door was removed, stripped down and varnished.
122 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1997
Rebuilt control stand, note the polished and lacquered
brass, all brass parts down to window latches and
toggle switches were restored in this
manna
Photo by the authOl:
Seats were completely rebuilt and recovered with rattan
sourced and brought over from Malaysia. Blinds were silk screened
with the original
shell pattern so common on electric railway ve­
hicles
of the era. Trucks were removed and the traction motors
completely rebuilt by a local motor repair shop, the
car was com­
pletely rewired to original General Electric
MU specifications, un­
fortunately lack
of 600V D.C. power prohibits testing in the Victoria
bus garage.
The Provincial election
of 1992 saw a change of govern­
ment, one
of the results of which was that work on the car was
halted. After lying dormant for five years, the project was revived
in 1997, and work was resumed. The job is now financed by the
City
of Vancouver although B.C. Transit owns the car.
1231 is scheduled to join restored interurban car 1207 and
operate on the
Downtown Historic Railway which is being built
by the City
of Vancouver. The city has purchased the old Canadian
Pacific False Creek railway
conidor which will form the basis of a
demonstration line from False Creek to Leg in Boot Station. Power
will be drawn from the Sky train power supply to operate the ca
rs.
Proposed extensions
of the demonstration railway include
a line to the north side
of False Creek, Chinatown, Gastown and
eventually west to Stanley Park; the interurban era
is returning to
Vancouver. Incidentally, the third car 1220 is being restored in
Steveston for local display and possible operation on a short line
there.
Under the tireless and enthusiastic coordination
of Bill
Bailey, the following volunteers deserve special mention: Shirley
Bailey, Norm Smith, Gordon Hatch, Doug Parker, Gordon Ellis
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1997
(electrician). Talented and dedicated staff include
Karen Robertson (lead carpenter), John Doughty,
Dave Carter, Doug
White, Dave Collis, Pierre
Gagnon.
When the project
is complete, perhaps Bill
and Shirley will really have time
go fishing.
mSTO:RY OF 1231
One of 28 identical cars purchased by B.
C. Electric from the St. Louis Car Company in
1913, this was the largest order for new cars that
the company would ever operate. Six
of the cars
(1239 to 1244) went to the Saanich line on
Vancouver Island, the others operated in the lower
mainland out
of Vancouver. The six Vancouver
Island
cars were returned to the mainland in 1924
just before the line was abandoned.
123 CANADIAN RAIL -460
Unusual in their construction, these were
really wooden cars with bolted on steel sides be­
low the belt rail.
The object was to make the cars
appear modern
in 1913 when steel cars were be­
ing introduced by electric
car builders. The origi­
nallivery was dark green with gold leaf lettering
and a red brown roof.
In the mid 1920s the cars
Pardon the debris, but this is 1231 in July, 1997, note the motormans door and smoking
section bulkheads leaning on the side
of the CQ/:
Photo by the authOl:
were repainted in their more familiar red and cream livery for im­
proved visibi lity.
The cars had General Electric type M control with dual
(para.llel) jumper cable plugs both for trolley line and control
MU
cables (4 cables between cars). B. C. Electric cars could operate
with only one trolley pole up because
of this aITangement.
The car is
51 0 long, 8 6 wide and 12 11 high to the
trolley board, it rides on St. Louis trucks and has radial MCB trac­
tion couplers. Special thanks to Bill and Shirley Bailey as well as all the
volunteers who made not only the restoration
of 1231 possible, but
also this article for the readers
of Canadian Rail.
EPILOGUE:
As this article is being prepared (September 8, 1997) we
have received word that the restoration
of 1231 is complete, and
the
car will return to Vancouver soon.
123 J restored as of late August, 1997, photo taken in the Victoria Transit bus garage. How do we get this dam thing out of here?
Photo courtesy
of Bill Bailey
RAIL CANADIEN -460 124 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1997
Rail Testing in Eastern Canada and Maine
With Emphasis on the Former CPR Montreal -Saint John Short Line
By Mark G. Gustafson
From late September to
mid-December 1996, Sperry Rail
Service hi-railer No.
807 was test­
ing rails on several lines in eastern
Canada and
New England. Most
notable was the test of the entire
length
of the former CPR Short
Line from Lennoxville, Quebec to
Saint John, New Brunswick. Mark
Gustafson was the
driver of 807
during this entire time, and these
rl
The R&S job was com­
pleted on
Friday, October 4, and
then it was on to the n
ext assign­
ment; the Canada &
Gulf Terminal
at
Mont Joli. [some CRHA mem­
bers may remember the great excur­
sion we had on the
C&GT with the
diesel-electric doodlebug on
—Il>~~0~~~:..oB~::::::f.-Ii/ia~~~L~__ March 14, 1964. Ed.]. So on Satur-
-LL day it was down to St Simeon,
I
.—,
photos, taken during breaks in the
work schedule, show these lines as
A Sperry Hi-Railer
across the St.Lawrence by Ferry to
Riviere du Loup, and on to
Rimouski. Due to an equipment
they are today; working freight railways which, alas no longer have
any passenger service.
On September 24,
1996, SRS 807, driven by the author,
entered Canada and, after going through the required formalities
to
secure permits to work in Canada, proceeded to Chatham, Ontario.
The first assignment was to test the rails of the CSX line between
Chatham and Blenheim. This
is all that remains in service of the
fOlmer Chesepeake and Ohio line across southern Ontario.
The first
photo taken was
of CN locomotive 4142 at Chatham station.
Testing the
CSX line began on September 25 and was com­
pleted early on Friday,
September 27. The next assignment was to
be the Canadian American Railway at Lennoxville, Que., where
work was scheduled to begin on Monday, September
30. This al­
lowed almost three days to
get to Lennoxville, so giving time for a
weekend visit to Fred
Angus in Montreal, including a trip by rented
car to the Canadian Railway
Museum at Delson. SRS 807 was
parked for the weekend outside
Freds house, and was inspected
by
some of the local railway enthusiasts.
Departure from Montreal was about
4:30 A.M., as it was
necessary to report to work in Lennox ville by
7:00 A.M. Due to the
good condition
of the track, testing went quickly, and the Quebec­
Maine border was reached at Boundary siding about noon on Octo­
ber I. There
is little to show that this is the international border, and
the former cleared area along the boundary line is largely over­
grown. Because Sperry was required to complete the assignment in
Canada before returning to the United States, testing on the Cana­
dian
American ended
at the border; not to be completed until the
Maine portion was done early in December.
Next assignment was the Roberval & Saguenay, and after a
night at St. Georges, and a brief visit
to Quebec City, the Sperry
crew arrived at Jonquiere late on October 2, ready to begin work
the next day.
The R&S proved to be an interesting assignment, as
there are many spurs and branch lines not shown in the usual maps
and rail atlases. UnfOitunately it was not possible to test all the
railway, since much
of the track was still being repaired after the
disasterous flood
of July, 1996. The importance of the R&S to the
aluminum company was emphasized by the shutdown due to the
flood.
The company tried transportating bauxite by road, but it was
far less efficient and more expensive than shipping it by rail, and
they were happy when the railway reopened. This ended, for the
time being anyway, talk
of replacing trains by trucks. problem, testing on the
C&GT was delayed one day, and actually
took place on Tuesday, October
8. Then it was on to Saint John
N.B., and the New Brunswick Southern.
Our base for this part of
the job was Fredericton; rather ironic in view of the fact that that
New Brunswicks capital city has joined the ever-growing list
of
major Canadian cities without any rail service at all! On October
10 and 11,807 covered the entire distance from Saint John to the
border at St. Croix, five miles west
of McAdam. Then followed
Canadian Thanksgiving weekend, which allowed time to ride VIA
with Fred Angus between Halifax and Montreal, including the rare
mileage diversions near Montreal due
to work being done on Vic­
toria Bridge. We also had time
to pay a visit to Dave Morris in
Fredericton; he
is the resident expert on the Atlantic Limited, the
much-lamented train that used to run between Montreal and Hali­
fax via Maine and Saint John.
On Tuesday and Wednesday, October
15 and 16,807 tested
the branch from
McAdam to St Stephen, and this completed the
work on the N.B. Southern, and the assignment in Canada. Next
was to cross back into the USA and continue on to the next assign­
ment. It had originally been planned to continue on the portion
of
the ex-CPR line in Maine, but there was a more urgent need to go
to Rutland Vt, in view
of the impending introduction of Amtrak
service to that city. After the Rutland assignment, it was
off to St
Albans and the New England Central, formerly the Central Ver­
mont. This allowed time for another weekend trip to Montreal to
go to the model train show there.
The NEC job was followed by one on the SI. Lawrence &
Atlantic (fOimerly Grand Trunk) between Portland and the border
and all this took until the end
of November, and the base of opera~
tions moved several times. Finally it was all completed, and De­
cember 5 saw 807 back at Vanceboro, Maine, ready to continue
where it had left
off seven weeks before. For the next week the
testing continued on the line that used to see VIAs Atlantic make
its three-times-a-week nightly trips in each direction; almost
200
miles across the United States while running between points in
Canada. Since the train ran only at night, the testing assignment
offered an opportunity to see this scenic line by day. Finally, on
Wednesday, December 11, the crew reached the border at Bound­
ary, and so completed testing the whole line.
There then followed a
short assignment on the Bangor & Aroostook, then back to Danbury
Ct., to deliver the
807 back to Sperry. After that it was time to go
home to South Carolina for the Christmas holidays.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1997
RIGHT: The station at Chatham on Sep­
tember
25, 1996. The switcher at thatloca­
tion
is CN 4142.
All photos by the
authOl:
BELOW: A closeup of 4142 at Chatham.
The number brings back memories
of CPR
trains
41 and 42, the Atlantic Limited,
which used
to run between Montreal and
Saint John over the line that
Speny car 807
would soon be testing.
RIGHT: Blenheim, Ontario on
September
26. The CSX trGl::k
is on the left. Track on right is
the
former C&O main line
across Ontario, now owned by
a grain elevator/or switching.
SRS 807
is on thefonner C&o.
The locomotive
is a switcher
owned by the grain company.
125 CANADIAN RAIL -460
RAIL CANADIEN -460
RIGHT-Megantic is only a shadow of its
former self, and most
of the tracks in the yard
have gone. However the station
is stili in
good condition.
RIGHT-After a day-and-a-half drive
10 Jonquiere, 807
began work on the Roberval
& Saguenay. This view, taken
at Laterriere, Que on October
4, shows an R&S crew re­
pairing damage from the
flood of July 1996.
126 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE1997
LEFT-The former CPR station at Scotstown, Que.
on October
1. It was totaliy abandoned and derelict.
Early in
1997 it burned to the ground.
LEFT: This photo shows Sperry
807 at Boundal}
on October
1, just touching the international bor­
de!: It tested right up to the border but was not
pennitted
to continue into the U.S.A. In this view
we are looking eastwa
rd into Maine. Notice the
block signal turned at right angles
to the track.
The blocks are no longer used since the passen­
ger train was discontinued.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1997
RIGHT: Crossing the Reversing Falls
at Saint John on October
10. The wa­
ter
is flowing upstream because it is
high tide.
127 CANADIAN RAIL -460
LEFT: Nearing the east end of the
Canada and
Gulf Terminal Railway
at Matane, Que. on October
8. Al­
though owned by
CN, the C&GT is
still run as a separate company.
LEFT: Some beautiful scenelY on the New Brunswick
Southern,
20 miles out of Saint John. This was one of the
many scenic views once enjoyed by the passengers
of the
Atlantic.
RAIL CANADIEN -460 128 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE1997
.. NEW RE . REOlJIRMENTS ..
. NOTICE
ALL P
ERSONS ARRIVING IHTHE
EDESTRIANS
UNITED STAres AS P 5 Of ANY .
PASSENGERS~~::::ER MEANS
CONVEYANa nLYTOANOPEN
. MUSTBRQRoER;rECTION OffICE
U.S. —-VIOLATION oF
CIVIL PENALT!.~: 155000 FOR .
EPORTING-u.~ MAY RESULT
~IRST OFFEN5~:C:SICUTION5
IN CRIMINAL SC14591r8CFR135
19 USC 1439.
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SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1997 129 CANADIAN RAIL -460
OPPOSITE, TOP LEFT: 807 in front of the magnificent station at McAdam. This building has been donated to the town of McAdam and is to
be restored.
OPPOSITE, TOP RiGHT:
A sign on the banks of the St. Croix River, warning as to the requirements for entry to the United States.
OPPOSITE, MIDDLE: New Brunswick Southern locomotives
3795 and 3764, in their attractive paint scheme of green with yellow trim, are
seen at McAdam on October
15, heading up a southbound freight en route to St. Stephen.
OPPOSITE, BOTTOM: An Algoma Steel 80
lb. rail, made in February 1906for the CPR, on the NBS at mile 22.8 of the St. Stephen branch.
This was near the end
of the time when the railway initials were placed on the rails. After more than ninety years, this old rail is still peifectly
good,
and passed Sperrys inspection.
TOP: Vanceboro station, seen here on December
5, is the point of entry to the Ullited States. This part of the line is now known as the Eastern
Maine Railroad.
BOTTOM: The station at Danforth, built in
1871, is the oldest on the line. 1t gailled this distinction in late 1991 when the similar 1869 station
at Mattawamkeag was torn down. This portion
of the line, then known as the European and North American, was opened in 1871 and so
completed theftrst all-rail link between New Brunswick and the rest
of Canada (via Portland). It replaced a stage coach which rail between
Mattawamkeag and Vallceborofrom
1869 to 1871.
RAIL CANADIEN -460 130 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1997
LEFT: The hot box detector at Eaton, near Danforth, was well klwwn
to railway enthusiasts.
BELOW-The clock tower at Danforth, Maine was afavorite land­
markfor night time passengers on the Atlantic. 807 stops by it al
12:52
P.M. (by the clock in the tower) on December 5.
BOTTOM: On December 6, 1996 SRS 807 departed Mattawamkeag
and crossed the distinctive bridge across the river
of the same name.
This
is the location where the newly-built CPR track met that of the
Maine Central in 1888.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1997 131
RIGHT A memento of happier times. The plaque to commemorate the
100th anniversary
of the laying afthe last rail on the Short Line, December
10, 1888, is still in place at Packard Brook, where the event took place. The
plaque was unveiled at a ceremony
011 December 9, 1988, and the photo
was taken almost exactly eight years late
l; December 6, 1996.
BELOW: It was a cool morning, with the water frozen, when the Sperry
crew stopped at Kingman Maine on December
6, 1996.
BOTTOM: There are still long freight trains in Brownville Junction, still
an important interchange point. Photo taken December
9, 1996. CANADIAN RAIL -460
RAIL CANADIEN -460 132 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1997
THIS PAGE: One of the most spectacular features of the Short Line is the famous Ship Pond bridge at Onawa, with the Boar Stone Mountain
in the background. These photos show the bridge, and the view from it, on December 9,1996. In 1889 a special train, carrying CPR officials,
stopped on this bridges predecessor as they enjoyed the view while having dinner. Remember June
1989 when 1201 had a runpast here?
OPPOSITE, TOP: Greenville station looks much like the now-vanished one at Lancaster (Fairville) N.B. Not long ago
VIA stopped here.
OPPOSITE, CENTRE: A
briefstop at Greenville allows the crews to be photographed, December 9,1996.
OPPOSITE, BOTTOM: Along the shore of Moosehead Lake at Greenville, December 10, 1996, the 108th anniversmy of the Last Spike on the
Short Line.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 1997 133 CANADIAN RAIL -460
RAIL CANADIEN -460
ABOVE: An eastboundfreight train of the Canadian American Rail­
road, hauled by 40 and 3610, in the siding at Moosehead ready
to
leave on December 10, 1996. The westbound has already passed, and
SRS 807
is on the main line. Here we have a beller view of the block
signals turned at right angles
to the track. This is where the eastbound
and westbound Atlantic often used
to pass in the middle of the night,
and exchange customs crews (and the occasional railfan!).
134 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1997
LEFT: It wouldnt be Moosehead with­
out Moose Here are two
of them lei­
surely clearing the track at mileage
29.5, Ilear Greenville, while a third one
waits safely down the embankment. In
the days
of the Atlantic there were
often cases
of the train hitting a moose,
but SRS 807 stopped in lots
of time.
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1997
RIGHT A water and lunch stop at
Jackman on December
11, 1996. A
westbound freight is also waiting.
RIGHT· Guided by the Maine Atlas
(loaned
by Fred Angus), SRS 807
passes milepost 82 on December 11,
1996. Later that day the testing crew
reached Boundary, connecting with
the previously tested Canadian sec­
tion, and ending this rail-testing ad­
venture
on the Short Line.
135 CAIlADIAN RAIL -460
LEFT A westbound
Canadian
American
RRfreight, hauled by
Bangor
& Aroostook
303, departs JacknulI1
as SRS 807 clears.
RAIL CANADIEN -460 136 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE1997
The Waterloo St. Jacobs Railway
By Mark Paul
After much waiting, and many delays, Canadas newest short line passenger railway operation made its debut on Saturday, July 12,
1997. This was the Waterloo St. Jacobs Railway, running between the two places in its name. The railway had purchased an 18 kilometre
section
of the track between Waterloo and Elmira on April 13, 1996, and had hoped to begin operation last year. However a legal dispute
delayed the startup until this year.
The trains will run daily until October 13, and then on weekends only until November 23. There will be four trains a day in each
direction, except Sunday when the first train (10:30 up, 11: 15 down) does not run. Day passes will also be offered for $8.50 for adults, $7.50
for seniors and $5.50 for children.
Mark Paul was there for the first run, and rode the first train. He took these photos, and also supplied the schedules and other matetial
about the run.
Fifties
Streamliner
The first revenue departure from Waterloo, 10:30 A.M., July 12, 1997. Photo by Mark Paul.
The logo painted on the sides
of the equipment. Photo by Mark Paul. The brochure used
to promote the train.
Fifties Streamliner Schedule
Northbound
Read down
3 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 12 noon
3: 18 p.m. 1 :48 p.m.
3:30 p.m. 2 p.m.
Southbound
Read
1:20 p.m. 2:50 p.m. 4:20 p.m.
12:55 p.m. 2:25 p.m. 3:55 p.m.
12:45 p.m. 2: 15 p.m. 3:45 p.m.
Morning trains do not operate on Sundays
SEPTEIVIBER -OCTOBER 1997
.
N~ 10541
Valid for unlimited travel on
scheduled daytime trains on
date stamped on reverse.
Adult Day Pass
keep this ticket with you
throughout the day. It will be
checked each time you
board the train.
JUl12 1997
Group travel •
when punched .
137 CANADIAN RAIL – 460
LEFT, TOP: A day pass issued to Mark on the first
day.
LEFT MIDDLE: The stamp applied to the back of
the ticket to show that he rode the train on its first
day
of operation.
TOP: The
Jl :00 arrival at St. Jacobs on the first
day.
Photo by Mark Paul.
ABOVE: The first southbound departure from
St,
Jacobs, 11:15A.M. July 12,1997.
Photo by Mark Paul.
LEFT: The 3:00 P.M. departure passing through
Waterloo Park.
Photo by Mark Paul.
RAIL CANADIEN -460 138 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE1997
The Business Car
NEW BOOK ON SCHOOL CARS
The School Car
Bringing the Three Rs to Newfoundlands Remote Railway Set­
tlements
(I936-1942) By Randy P. NosewOlthy
The main line of the Newfoundland Railway stretched
some 547 miles from St.
Johns to Port aux Basques. During
the mid-1930s there were scattered along the line a number
of
small, isolated settlements where railway workers and their farru­
lies lived for part or all
of the year. Being far removed from
regular schools, the children living in these settlements had no
way to obtain a formal education. In response to the situation,
the Department
of Education and the Newfoundland Railway,
in
co-operation with the Anglo-Newfoundland Development
Company, devised an imaginative approach involving a School
on Wheels. For six years, this mobile schoolhouse travelled
back and forth along the main line
of the Newfoundland Rail­
way, bringing to the children
of remote locations the opportu­
nity to attend school and learn the Three Rs -reading, writing,
and arithmetic.
In
The School Car, Randy Noseworthy provides a de­
tailed account
of the School on Wheels program, from its begin­
rungs in 1936 through to its discontinuance
in 1942. In addition,
the
book documents the history of the railway car which was
used in the program from its origin as the private car
Shawnawdithil through to its last years of service and its ultimate
fate.
Drawing on the transcriptions of many hours of recorded
interviews with the former head teacher, former students, retired
railroaders, and others, Noseworthy presents much of their
thoughts and recollections in their own words. The text is sup­
plemented with original tables and figures, as well as selected
excerpts from other published sources. In addition, the book is
extensively illustrated with over 125 b&w photographs, most
of
which have never been previously published.
The School Car: Bringing the Three Rs to Newfound­
lands Remote Railway Settlements (1936-1942) by Randy P.
Noseworthy. 202 pages. Soft cover. 6 x 9 format. Perfect bound,
with glossy colour cover. Includes bibliography. [SBN 0-9682594-
0-5.
$19.95 plus $5.00 postage & handling.
Send
cheque or money order to:
(U. S. orders, please add 5%.)
Randy
P. Noseworthy, P.O. Box 23, Main Street, Whitboune, Nfld.
AOB 3KO Telephone (709) 759-2725.
QUEBEC BRIDGE POSTCARDS
Ninety years ago, August 29, 1907, occurred the collapse
of the first Quebec Bridge while it was under construction. Within
a very short time
of the disaster, photographers were selling post­
cards showing the bridge
before and after the collapse. This
was the golden age
of the postcard, a time when they could be
mailed for one cent anywhere in North America.
Three of these
cards recently turned up.
They were mailed, in November, 1907 to
a recipient in SI. Anseleme, Dorchester County, south-east
of Que­
bec City.
To commemorate the ninetieth anniversary of this spec­
tacular tragedy, we reproduce the three cards.
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1997
HONEYMOON EXPRESS
(90NEYMOONfl
xpRESS
I
The famous multiple-unit cars of CNs Mount Royal com­
muter service, in use from 1952 to 1995, have
no doubt had many
adventures in their long career. What may be a first for these cars
occurred on August 25, 1997 in far away South Carolina when two
of the cars were run as a wedding special! Our member Mark
Gustafson was
mauied that day, in his home town of Winnsboro,
S.c., to Peggy Sue Patterson. Mark is no stranger to CRHA mem­
bers, as
he has been the author or co-author of several articles in
Canadian Rail, including the major one starting on page 124
of this
issue. As those
of you who have read Canadian Rail No. 450 (Janu­
ary -February 1996) know, Winnsboro
is the site of the South Caro­
lina Railroad Museum, which
has four of the Montreal M-U cars
(6730, 6733, 6735, 6746).
Immediately after the wedding ceremony, about eighty
of
the guests proceeded to the Museum where they boarded the spe­
cial train. It consisted
of cars 6746 (ex T7) and 6733 (ex M4) hauled
by 2015, an ex U.S. Army diesel locomotive. The train had been
specially decorated
inside, and carried a large banner, reading Hon­
eymoon Express on the locomotive. The train proceeded to the
s
ummit of the line where the bride and groom boarded. A reception
was then held as the train returned to the Museum by 8:00 P.M.
Your editor was present for the occasion and reports that a
good time was had by all. The cars are
in excellent condition and
are being repainted. They will still be in the CN colours, but the
roofs are painted silver; a necessity in the hot southern climate. On
days when the Museum offers train rides, two
of the cars are in use,
and on special occasions (like the Santa Claus train) all four are
run.
Needless
tei say, we wish Mark and his bride all the best in
their married life.
ARCHAMBAULT PAINTING
The well known Montreal music firm of Archambault is
commemorating its 100th anniversary
this year. As part of this com­
memoration, they have special plastic shopping bags depicting their
store in 1926.
Of interest to CRHA members is the beautiful view
of street car 1220, running on route 3A, passing the store on Ste.
Catherine Street. The detail on the car is extremely accurate; your
139 CANADIAN RAIL -460
editor examined it carefully and could not find any errors at all. In
the distance, on St. Denis Street,
car 1550 is also visible. The entire
painting gives a wonderful glimpse
of what a winter street scene
was like
in Montreal in the mid 1920s. As a matter of interest, 1220,
built in 1912, was the very
last Montreal Roof car to operate in
regular service (June 1956). 1550 was the first of the class of two­
car train lead units, and ran from 1917 to 1957.
Archambault has also produced a
4-CD set of 100 years of
classical music. It plays for 4 1/2 hours, costs only $20 (plus taxes)
and bears the same picture on the box. Sounds like a good buy!
INFORMATION WANTED
John Doughty of 1009 Chamberlain St., Victoria B.C. V8S
4Cl, phone (250) 598-5762, is looking for information on the
Godscraft Ind. Endor
Motor Division. They made a 38cc. bicycle
attachment motor called the Pixie in 1949 in Montreal. It was a
copy
of a German motor. He has the owners and parts manuals,
but would like to know more about the company, how many motors
were made, etc.
COLOUR COVER
By a special arrangenent we have been able to produce colour cov­
ers for this issue.
We hope to be able to do this occasionally next
year, and make other improvements from time
to time as finances
permit.
BACK COVER: The 3:00 PM. departure from Waterloo, Ontario of the new Waterloo St. Jacobs Railway on July 12, 1997, its first day of
operation. The equipment was used in previous years for the now-defunct run east from Quebec City.
Photo by Mark Paul.

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