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Canadian Rail 438 1994

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Canadian Rail 438 1994

CANADIAN RAIL
PUBLISHED BI·MONTHlf BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE TRAIN MASTERS ………………………………………………………………….. HUGUES W. BONIN……………. 3
RAIL
TESTING ON THE ALGOMA CENTRAL ………………………………….. MARK G. GUSTAFSON……….. 17
THE ALGOMA CENTRAL RAILWAy ………………………………………………. EDWARD P. WILKOMEN…….. 28
ACCOUNTS
OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE ALGOMA CENTRAL … R.S. McCORMICK ET AL…….. 33
THE BUSINESS CAR ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… .. 38
PROIff COVER: II iJ about 110011 on Friday. Octobtr 21. 1993. cmtl an ~ur/y s_jull IklS ml1d~ Ihis purl
af Alilonra Cell/rals main lin.-look likt a 1c~n .. from (J CIJrislltl am/1m ;teN Ilr-Raill ,,air in tltl siding at Hubul, 96.1 mile! IlOrlli of Saul I Sir. Marie. At 1591 jUllllxwr
stu 1t,~1 (100/ JUI abot rhe SOO} lhis the /rightS1 .,Int 011 /he AeR. As tht Spur) crt wails. plISStn!;,,
lrai No. I IHlSJt.( (JIllnt main lint. II{)Ifhoo..nd /0 HtQru. (Ilia thisj1utinJIlnonu/Il;$ captUrId Clift/III.
PIWlQ by Mark GlilW/lOll.
For your membership in the CRHA, which
includes a subscription
to Canadian Rail,
write 10:
CAHA, 120 Rue St-Pierre, 51. Constant Que.
J5A 2G9
Membership Dues for 1994:
In Canada: $31 (including GST).
Oulside Canada:
$29.50 in U.S. funds.
Canadian Rail is continually in need of news,
stories, historical data, photos, maps and
other material.
Please send all contributions
10 the editor: Fred F. Angus. 3021 Trafalgar
Ave. Montreal, P .Q.
H3Y 1 H3. No payment
can
be made for contribulions, but the con·
tributer will be given credit for material sub·
mitted. Material
will be returned to the con­
tributor if requested. Remember Know

edge is of little value unless it is shared with
others.
As part of its activities, the CRHA operates
the Canadian Railway Museum at Delson
I
51. COflstant, Que. which is about 14 mites­
(23 Km.) from downtown Montreal. It is open
from lale May 10 early October (daily until
Labour Day).
Members, and their immediate
families, are admitted free of charge.
THE
GOAL OF THE ASSOCIATION IS THE
COLLECTION, PRESERVATION AND D
iS­
SEMINATION OF ITEMS RElATING TO
THE HISTORY OF CANADIAN RAilWAYS
The CRHA has a number 01 !ocal dMsions
across the country. M
any hold regular
meetings and issue newsletters. Further
information may
be obtained by writing to
I
he division.
NEW 8AUNSWlC1( DIVISION
P.O. Box 1182
SairltJo/onNB. E21.407
ST LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 22. SIIIdon 8
I.IonIruaI PO. H38 3J5
R(lEAU VAllEY OMSION
P 0.Il00. 962
Smito, F …. Ore, lOA $AS
KINGSTCt>I oNiSION
PO.llox1714
Klngsl. On! K715V6
TORONTO & YORI( DIVISION
P.O. 800: ~9. T…..-.aI A
TorcnIO, On. M5W lP3
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.O. Box 5093
51. CIlIhItrinH. 011. l2R 6W8
C
AlGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
cJo Ian~. SeaeLary
1912 WfIIWnOIMIt Ro.d NW.
~,AIbtna T2N 31017
SELKIRK DIVISION
P.D. ao. 39
ReYeIsloIe, B.C VOE 2SO
CROWSNEST KEffiE VAlLEY 0tV1$/ON
PO. eo.1,QO
·Cr..oook. B.C. VIC 41-/9
NELSON ELECTRIC TlIAMWAY SOCIETY
1
23Y_Slr_
~BC. V1L218
PRINCE GEOAGE-NECHN PO.8o>;~
Pmo. Geoove. 8.C. V2N 2Se
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
PO.80x 100II. StatIon A
V~, B.C. we 211
ESOU1MAl. T AND NANAIMO DIVISION
I I 013 BIIII!uaI AoId
VlclorIa. B.C vaT 181
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
C(}.EDITOR: Douglas NW, Smith
ASSOCIATE EDITOR (Motive Powe
r):
Hugues W. Bonin
DISTRIBUTION: Gerard Frechette
LAYOUT: Fred F. Angus
Printing: Procel Printing
DIRECTORS OF THE C,R.H,A,
PRESIDENT: WaitE:( J. Bedbrook
VICE PRES.: Charles De Jean
VICE PRES
.: David W, Johnson
TREASURER: Roben Carlson
SECRETARY: Bernard Martin
Frederic F. Angus
Alan
C. BlacKburn
James Bouchard
Gerard Frechette
Mervyn T. Green
J. Christophel Kyle
Wi!1iam Le Surf
Roben
V.V. Nicholls
Ernest Ottewell
Andrew W.
Pan,,o
Douglas N.W. Smilh
W
iUlam Thomson
Richard Viberg
A. Stephen Walbrid
ge
Michael WcS1ren
DIVISION LlASON REPRESENTAnVES
WESTERN
D. Walter Edgar
4515 Oalhan Road N.W.
Calgary. AS
TJA ,B9
Phone: (403)-286-2189
CENTRAL
Christopher Kyle
49 -77 Wellesley SI. East
TorontO,
ON M4Y tH7
Phone: (416)-962·1880
MARITIME
Richa
rd E. Viberg
172
Main SI.
Hillsborough, NB EOA 1 XO
Phone: (506)-734-3467
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 3 CAIlADIAIl RAIL -438
The Train Masters
By Hugues W. Bonin
RESUME
Produite par Fairbanks-Morse etpar la Canadian Locomotive
Company entre 1953
et 1957, la locomotive H24-66 Train
Master etait, avec 2400 cv., la plus puissante diesel de son temps
et bien en avance technologiquement. Dans cet article, on exarnine
les raisons de son developpement, ses points forts et ses faiblesses,
et l on effectue un bref historique des carrieres vecues par les 127
locomotives de ce modele qui ont ete construites et dont un seul
exemplaire, la Canadien Pacifique 8905, a ete preserve et fait
l orgueil du Musee Ferroviaire Canadien de l Association Canadienne
d Histoire Ferroviaire.
ABSTRACT
Built by Fairbanks-Morse and the Canadian Locomotive
Company between 1953 and 1957, the H24-66 Train Master was
the most powerful diesel locomotive
of its time and well ahead
technologically
of its competitors. In this article, the reasons
behind its development, and its strong and weak points are
examined, and a brief historical survey
of the careers of the 127
units
of this model that were built is presented, of which only one
locomotive was ever preserved and proudly displayed at the
Canadian Railroad Historical Associations Canadian Railway
Museum.
FAIRBANKS·MORSE RAILWAY ACTIVITIES
In the 1930s, the Fairbanks-Morse Company achieved
notoriety with the development
of the opposed piston diesel
engine. In this unusual design, each cylinder houses two opposed
pistons, and compression is achieved when the piston heads
approach each other. At the moment
of maximum compression,
the diesel fuel-air mixture ignites and the pressure resulting from
the combustion
of the fuel repels the pistons from each other with
great force. This force
is transmitted from the pistons to two
crankshafts, one above the engine and the other below.
In railway
locomotive applications, these crankshafts are linked mechanically
to the electrical generator which, as in all diesel electric locomotives,
provides the electrical power
to the traction motors. The Fairbanks­
Morse opposed piston engine
is essentially two diesel engines
affixed
to each other head-to-head, in such as way that a 6-cylinder
engine has
12 pistons, and a 12-cylinder engine has 24 pistons.
The first involvement
of Fairbanks-Morse with the railway
locomotive industry was
in the repowering of gas-electrics with
small cylinder diesel engines. These early experiments turned out
rather unsuccessful. The Companys interests then concentrated in
marine applications, and acquired fame
in providing engines for
submarines. In World War II, about 50%
of the American submarines
were propelled
by Fairbanks-Morse opposed piston diesel engines.
Fairbanks-Morse resumed its involvement with the railway
industry in 1944, with the introduction
of the HI0-44 1000 hp
switcher. The PM plant
in Beloit, Wisconsin, produced several other models
of cab and hood locomotives until 1963. In Canada,
the Canadian Locomotive Company, in Kingston, Ontario, produced
FM-designed diesels under license, for the Canadian market. All
these locomotives were powered by an opposed piston engine
based on a 8 x lO-inch cylinder: 6-cylinder 1000-1200 hp,
8-
cy linder 1500-1600 hp, 1 O-cy linder 2000 hp and 12-cy linder 2400
hp engines.
THE TRAIN MASTER
The design of the 2400 hp Train Master began in 1951
in order to cope with a changing diesel locomotive market. The
locomotive was officially the H24-66 model, the
H to indicate
a hood unit, the 24 indicating 24 hundred horsepower, the first 6
numeral for a 6-axle unit, and the second 6 standing for the number
of powered axles. Immediately following the end of the hostilities,
the railroads went on phasing out steam power
as rapidly as
possible, buying about everything offered by the manufacturers,
provided it was diesel-powered. By 1951, market saturation was
already
in sight, with most railways having already assembled
large fleets
of disparate diesel locomotives from the main builders
of the time: Alco, EMD, Baldwin, Fairbanks-Morse and Lima­
Hamilton. Now competition was beginning in earnest, and each
company became conscious that success was now dependent on
the offering
of innovative, yet dependable products.
At Beloit, the engineers
of PM felt that the 2400 hp 12-
cylinder opposed piston engine was the natural evolution, and they
first applied it in the Consolidation Line cab locomotive, the
CPA24-5,
of which only 22 units were produced and sold to the
Long Island RR, the New York Central and the New Haven. These
locomotives had first a multitude
of trouble: piston, radiator fans,
traction motors blowers and main generators, among others.
However, by the time the H24-66 was introduced, most, but not all,
of these problems had been solved.
The first Train Master was outshopped in April 1953 and
introduced the modular component concept to the road switcher
(the concept was first introduced with the C-Liners). The design
was well advanced for its time. It effectively started, albeit
belatedly, the horsepower race among the locomotive builders,
which reached 3600 hp
in a first step in the late 60s (with the
SD45, the U36B, the U36C, the C636 and the M636 as production
models), and, more recently 4200 hp with some GE Dash8-40s.
Unfortunately for Fairbanks-Morse, only 127 Train Masters
were built. Several reasons may be invoked
to explain this modest
success. At that time, the railways did not recognize the merits
of
high horsepower locomotives, as their engineers were still satisfied
with lashing up several low power units to haul the trains
of the
time. Diesel fuel and manpower were relatively cheap
in the late
fifties, and the railways were still under the charm
of the important
savings earned
by having switched from steam to diesel. So there
was little incentive
to bother about maintaining bigger diesel units.
RAIL CANADIEN -438 4 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
Canadian Pacific Railway Train Master No. 8900 pictured at Calgary, Alberta on September 23, 1976.
PhOIO by FD. Shaw.
TABLE I: TRAIN MASTERS OWNED, BY RAILWAY
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS I
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY 21
CENTRAL RAILROAD OF NEW JERSEY 13
DELAWARE LACKAWANNA & WESTERN RR. 12
PENNSYL VANTA RAILROAD SYSTEM 9
READING COMPANY
17
SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 5
SOUTHERN PACIFIC TRANSPORTATION CO.
16
VIRGINIAN RAILWAY 25
WABASH RAILWAY 8
TOTAL 127
Six demonstrators were assembled at the Beloit plant:
#TMI to TM4, and two units intended for demonstration in
Canada: Canadian Pacific 8900 and Canadian National 3000. The
TMI to TM4 were first painted in a very attractive red and yellow
livery for their demonstration trips. This colour scheme can still be
admired today,
in a modified fOlID, on a pair smaller FM diesels
recently retired
by a North-Western Mexican forestproductcompany,
the Basques de Chihuahua S.A.
In the United States, !OJ more
units were produced and purchased by the ·Southern Pacific, the
Central Railroad
of New Jersey, the Delaware, Lackawanna &
Western, the Virginian, the Pennsylvania, the Reading, the Southern
and the Wabas
h. The four demonstrators were eventually purchased
by the Wabash (TMI and TM2 becoming Wabash 550 and 551,
respectively), and the Southern Pacific (TM3 and
TM4 becoming
respectively SP4800 and4801).
In Canada, the Canadian Locomotive
Company produced 20 more units: Canadian Pacific 8901-8920. The Train Masters were produced from April 1953 to
June 1957. Excluding specific railway company accessories, such
as headlight assemblies for the Southern Pacific, for example, the
Train Master carbody came in four phases and sub-phases,
as recognized by the diesel locomotive observers: Phase
1a: non­
dip handrail and open space below walkway; Phase Ib: as Phase la,
but with dip handrail, and no space under walkway; Phase
TI: like
Phase lb, but with cooli.ng fans not spaced apart, and upper centre
portion
of hood without louvres, these louvres now positioned
under the dynamic brake and engine intake air filters; and Phase
IJL: same as Phase II, but with low end platforms for easier passage
of crew to locomotives made by other builders.
Most Train Masters had rather short lives, for several
reasons. One
of the main causes for their early demise was their
oddbaLl or even white elephant status. They were always a
small minority among large fleets
of models such as the F-units
and the GP9s. The largest group
ofH24-66s was the 25 owned by
the Virginian. One may argue that the Norfolk & Western eventually
totalled 33 Train Masters with the combined fleets
of the
Virginian and the Wabash, but the 8 Wabash H24-66s had already
been repowered with
Alco engines at the time of the merger of the
Wabash into the N & W, thus making them
an even different
species
of oddballs among the oddballs.
Even
if the Train Masters benefitted to a certain extent
from the debugging exercise carried out on the CPA24-5, and
other FM models, there remained enough weaknesses
to make
them relatively uflleliable and expensive to maintain and repair.
The earlier units had the Westinghouse model 498 electrical
generator, which, on the H24-66, was shunt-circuited at 1.08 kV,
making commutation unstable and causing destructive flashovers
at the slightest pel1urbation such as under wheel slip conditions, a
common occurrence considering the very high power
of the
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 5 CANADIAN RAIL -438
Canadian National Railways Train Master No. 3000 hauling Train No. 101 at Bayview, Ontario on October 1,1955.
Patterson -George Collection.
locomotive. This problem was solved with the substitution of
General Electric electrical equipment on later models. Other
common problems occurred with the air filter units, for which
several solutions were tried,
but without these problems fully
solved.
The SP quickly discovered that desert sand played havoc
on the engines, and the
best makeshift solution was to restrict the
Train Master
s from running in the desert by assigning them to
commuter service around
San Francisco. Finally, even routine
maintenance and repairs were complicated by the opposed piston
design
of the engines, since, in order to have access to the lower set
of pistons, the top half of the engine had to be dismantled, thus
adding to the down time considerably.
With the appearance
of the second generation diesel
locomotives in the early
1960s, mostrailways saw the advantages
of rationalizing their fleets around a low number of standard
models, and the minority models were the first
to go, especially
those from the dep
arted builders such as Baldwin and Fairbanks­
Morse. An additional incentive for the early retirement
of the
Train Masters was that Coltlndustries, then successor
to Fairbanks­
Morse, was eager to buy at interesting prices used 12-cylinder
opposed piston engines.
It rebuilt them for resale for marine uses
(tug boats), oil rigs,
power peaking plants and electricity generating
plants. This explains why
only one Train Master has ever been
preserved, considering the popularity
of this model with rail buffs: the Canadian Pacific 8905 by the Canadian Railroad Historical
Association,
at its Canadian Railway Museum, in Delson/Saint­
Constant, Quebec.
In the following text, the various fleets
of Train Masters
are examined in more detail, starting with the Canadian railways,
and continuing with the American lines, in alphabetical order.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Table II, on the next page, presents the technical specifications
for this I-unit roster. The Canadian National bought this unit
which, along with Canadian Pacific 8900, served [ust as demonstrator
for Canadian Locomotive Company.
The sources of information
consulted fail to reveal whether this locomotive
wore a special
paint scheme while demonstrating on the CNR, or was fully
painted and lettered for the CNR. Another possibility
might have
been that the unit was painted green and yellow, but was lettered
for the Canadian Locomotive Company, as this was
done for other
models.
Like the
CPR 8900, the CN 3000 displayed two builders
plates,
one for the Fairbanks-Morse Company, with number
24L862, and another for the CLC, with number 2901. This unit was
actually built by Fairbanks-Morse at its Beloit plant, in July 1955.
When acquired by the CNR, it was assigned road number 3000 and
RAIL CANADIEN -438 6 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
TABLE II: CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
1st Road 2nd Road Builders Date Order Phase Weight Gear D,S Electrical
Numb.er Number Number Built Number in Lbs. Ratio Equipment
3000 2900 24L862 July 1955 C636 n 375,770 74:18 D,S GEA
2901
Disposition:
Retired February IS, 1966 and scrapped.
NOTES TO ALL TABLES
Under Col. D,S:
D: Dynamic brakes. S: Steam Generator.
Under Col. Electrical Equipment:
GEA: General Electric
GT567Cl main generator. A: Amplidyne excitation. S: Static excitation. GE-equipped locomotives had
752E traction motors.
WEI: Westinghouse 498A2 main generator. WE2: Westinghouse 498AZ main generator. WE3: Westinghouse 498BZ main
generator. Westinghouse-equipped locomotives had 370DEZ traction motors.
Class CRG24a.
The G in the class designation indicated that the
locomotive was equipped for passenger train service, with a steam
generator.
It probably did not meet expectations in long haul
passenger service, since in June 1956, it was renumbered 2900 and
assigned
to Port Anhur (now Thunder Bay) to push strings of ore
cars on docks.
It appears that the Train Master was not too successful
in pushing ore cars either, since
in early 1960s, it was sent in
commuter service in Toronto and MontreaL For this, it received a
second bell which was installed on the short hood, for bi-directiona1
operation. It was originally built for rurming long hood forward.
After three years
of commuter service, the CNR realized that, at
376,000 lbs,
it was the heaviest unit in the roster, an asset in hump
and transfer service.
In April 1964, she was equipped accordingly
and sent
to Toronto, then Montreal. Part of the modifications
included setting the controls for short hood forward: this meant
that, in commuter service, the crews were routinely travelling long
distances backward!
In addition to working the hump, the 2900 was also
frequently used in transfer service. Being the
sole representative
of its kind on the CNR, it was soon considered a white elephant
and became rather expensive
to maintain and repair. Its brief
career ended officially on
15 February 1966 when it was retired
and scrapped shortly after.
It never received the wet noodle logo
and black/red livery, but during its brief career, it wore two
variations
of the CNR classic green and yellow livery: as #3000,
it had the regular freight paint scheme, even if it was originally
intended for passenger train service, with the words CANADIAN
NATIONAL
in black on a yellow panel, all in one line. When
renumbered 2900, the lettering was changed, with now the word
CANADIAN spelled above the word NATIONAL
in yellow
letters,
all on a black panel outlined in yellow. CANADIAN
PACIFIC RAlLWAY
The first Train Master acquired by the Canadian Pacific
Railway was Demonstrator 8900, delivered
in June 1955 and
assigned Class DRS24a. Like CNR 3000, this locomotive wore
two builders plates: Fairbanks-Morse 24L861 and CLC 2900. It
came with a single steam generator (4500 lbs/hour capacity) for
passenger train service. Like the CN 3000, it is not known whether
this unit came out
of the Beloit plant fully painted and lettered for
Canadian Pacific, or if it wore a special demonstrator livery.
Unlike the CNR, the CPR liked the 8900 enough
to send an order
for 20 more, all delivered in 1956
in three batches, by the CLC
plant in Kingston: #8901-8904 (Class DRS24b), 8905-8910 (Class
DRS24c) and 8911-8920 (Class DRS24d). Except for 8900, all
were assembled
in Kingston, with builders numbers 2922 to 2941.
Class DRS24b units (8901-8904) were equipped with two
steam generators with a combined steam capacity
of 5500 lbs/
hour. They were located
in the short hood which was widened flush
with the cab sides, making these units blind when running short
hood first (i.e. backward). All the CPR Train Masters were
originally built long hood forward, and all could be used in
passenger service, being equipped with steam and signal lines,
even if 8905-8920 were not equipped with steam generators.
Unit 8900 was fust used
to haul such passenger trains as
the Atlanticlirnited for the first months of its career. However, it
was soon assigned
to Southern British Columbia, where it was
joined by the rest
of its newly-built sisters in 1956.
While the CPR engineers were immediately impressed
by
the huge power of these locomotives, they soon became disenchanted
as the many mechanical and electrical problems began to occur at
an increasing rate. First, the Train Masters experienced tracking
problems
on the many sharp curves in the Nelson-Trail-Tadanac
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 7 CANADIAN RAIL -438
TABLE III: CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Road Builders Date Order Phase Weight Gear D,S Electrical
Numbers Numbers Built Number Lbs. Ratio Equipment
8900 24L861 Jun 1955 C635 n 388,000 65:18 D,S GEA
2900
8901-8904 2928-2931 Aug 1956 C638
n 389,000 65:18 D,2S GEA
8905-8910
2922-2927 Jun 1956 C638
n 389,000 65: 18 D GEA
8911-8920 2932-2941 Oct 1956 C638
n 389,000 65:18 D GES
DISPOSITION:
8900,8904: Retired June, 1976. Scrapped, Ogden.
8901,8917: Retired April, 1972. Scrapped, Angus.
8902: Retired November, 1968. Scrapped, Ogden.
8903:
Retired April, 1974. Sold
to United Railway Supply. Scrapped.
8905: Retired June, 1976. Donated to CRHA Preserved at Canadian Railway Museum, Delson -St. Constant.
8906,8911,8913,8914,8915,8919: Retired May, 1968. Sold to Striegel. Scrapped.
8907: Retired April 1968. Scrapped, Ogden.
8908: Retired August, 1968. Scrapped, Ogden.
8909: Retired February, 1972. Scrapped, Ogden.
8910, 8912: Retired July, 1968. Scrapped, Ogden.
8916: Retired September, 1968. Scrapped, Ogden.
8918: Retired October, 1968. Scrapped, Ogden.
8920: Retired February, 1969. Scrapped, Ogden.
area. These derailments were solved when the units had their
trucks modified in Calgary.
As with all the Train Masters, the
CPR fleet was expensive
to maintain and prone to breakdowns,
resulting
in poor reliability. Nagging problems included sparks
igniting bush and forest fires along the tracks, and seemingly
constant engine coolant leaking causing excessive cooling water
consumption and requiring frequent fill-ups.
On occasions, trains
hauled
by Train Masters became stranded in small communities
with the crews having
to request help from the local fire brigade
to replenish the cooling system with water.
Running long hood forward also inconvenienced the crews,
not so much for the mediocre visibility, but for the exhaust fumes
entering
the cabs, ill 1959-1960, aU the Train Masters were
rebuilt
by the CPR to run short hood forward. At about the same
time, the steam generators
in units 8901-8904 were removed, and
the short hoods
of these units were narrowed to make these
locomotives similar
to the rest of the fleet. The H24-66s continued
to provide service in Southern British Columbia, mostly serving
the smelter plant at Tadanac and in the Nelson area, but very rarely
on the Big Hill, for several years without major incidents. The
fleet remained intact until 1968 when
13 locomotives were retired
and either scrapped at Ogden Shops (Calgary), or sold
to Striegel
Railway Supply
in Baltimore, Maryland, where they, too, were
scrapped, except for their engines which were recycled into marine applications. The 8920 soon followed
in retirement, in FebruaIY
1969, but the rest
of the fleet soldiered on until 1972 when the
second wave
of retirements left only units 8900, 8903, 8904 and
8905 on the roster. All four were assigned to hump and transfer
service at Alyth (Calgary), coupled
to a chopped-nose GP9. For
some reason, the 8903 did not linger long at Alyth, and was
transferred
to finish her career in Montreal in transfer service. She
was retired in April 1974 and sold for parts to United Railway
Supply, Cartierville, Que. and
was scrapped soon after.
The remaining three Train Masters hung on a few more
years and were retired
in June 1976. Both the 8900 and the 8904
were scrapped in Ogden, but our hero, the 8905, was set aside and
is now preserved at the Canadian Railway Museum, Delson -St­
Constant, Que.
by the CRHA. It is the only one of the 127 Train
Masters preserved in
its entirety. There are however several parts
of the CPR Train Masters still around. The frames of the 8910
and 8913 were sold
to Kaliam Chemicals, in Regina, Saskatchewan,
and are used as part of their chemical complex. Parts
of the 8901,
8903 and 8917 were used
by United Railway Supply in the
rebuilding
of Ferrocarril Chihuahua a1 Pacifico Fairbanks-Morse
locomotives, and, finally, the traction motors from the 8902, 8907,
8908,
8910,8912,8916,8918 and 8920 were used by Montreal
Locomotive Works in the building of Canadian Pacifics C630s
4500-4507. Some
of these locos are still active at the present time.
RAIL CANADIEN -438
It is interesting to note that none of the Train Masters
ever wore the CP Rail Action Red paint scheme; it is believed that
all kept their original livery, the classic grey and maroon with
SOME VIEWS OF CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY TRAIN
MASTERS
ABOVE:
8917 at West Torol1.toJunction in September, 1965.
This was a rare appearance
oj a Train Master in easlem
Canada.
It was used all Toronto transfers.
Photo by Bill Thomson.
RIGHT: Two views
oj 8903 partially dismantled at United
Railway Supply in Cartier ville, Que. on December
31, 1974.
Photos
by Hugues Bonin.
OPPOSITE, TOP: 8905 al CalgGly,Alberta on February 23,
1976.
Photo by FD. Shaw.
OPPOSITE, BOTTOM: 8907 at Winnipe
g, Manitoba on
August
24, 1958.
Photo by
FD. Shaw.
8 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
block lettering, until the end. This livery was altered in minor ways
twice during the lives
of the H24-66s, in particular when they
were modified to run short hood forward.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 9 CANADIAN RAIL -438
• ,~ :w.. _ .,. r ..,

.-4 –
RAIL CANADIEN -438 10 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
TABLE IV: CENTRAL RAILROAD OF NEW JERSEY
Road Builders Date Buill Order Phase Weight Gear D,S Electrical
Numbers Numbers Number Lbs. Ratio Equipment
2401-2405 24L849 -853 May-Jun 1954 LD17! Ib 386,000 65:18 S GEA
2406-2407
24L854 -855 May-Jun 1954 LD171 Ib 385,800 65:18 S GEA
2408-2411 24L885 -888 Mar-Apr 1956 LD191
II 379,000 65:18 S GEA
2412
24L889 Mar-Apr 1956 LD191
II 379,000 65: 18 S GES
2413
24L890 Mar-Apr 1956 LD191
II 379,000 65:18 S GEA
DISPOSITION:
2401,2404-2407,2409,2411-2413: Retired April, 1969.
2402: Retired and scrapped July, 1969.
2403,2410: Retired late 1968. Scrapped.
2408: Retired late 1968. Scrapped July, 1969.
TABLE V: DELAWARE LACKAWANNA & WESTERN RAILROAD
1st Road 2nd Road Builders Date Order Phase Weight Gear D,S Electrical
Number Number Numbers Built Number Lbs. Ratio Equipment
850-859 E-L 1850-1859 24L734 -743 Jun 1953 LD147 Ib 379,000 68: 15 D,S WHI
860,
861 E-L 1860,1861 24L1035 -1036 Nov 1956 LD203 II 376,000 74:18 D GES
DISPOSITION: 1850,1851,1853-1858: Retired and sold for scrap to Striegel June, 1968
1852: Retired and sold for scrap
to Stliegel June, 1968. Leased by Striegel to Chihuahua al Pacifico
September 24, 1969, renumbered CH-P 534. Acquired 1971. Retired and scrapped December
3, 1974.
1859: Retired and sold for scrap to Striegel June 1968. Leased
by Striegel to CH-P September 24,1969,
assigned number 535 by CH-P but never actually renumbered. Acquired 1971. Wrecked and scrapped.
1860,1861: Retired mid-1969 to October 1969. Sold for scrap
to Striegel June 5,1971.
CENTRAL RAILROAD OF NEW JERSEY
The Central Railroad of New Jersey purchased the fastest
of the Train Masters, with a 65: 18 gear ratio and 42 wheels,
these could run at 80 mph. However, at these speeds, a shimmy
problem was discovered and all
of the first 7 units had to be
returned
to Beloit for modifications to the frame bolsters. The first
batch, #2401-2407, was delivered
in May and June 1954 and were
the last Phase Ib built. They had unique air intake louvres and were
equipped with projecting marker lights unique
to the CNJ.
The railroad was happy enough with its Train Masters
to
order a second batch, #2408-2413, built in March and April 1956.
Like the first batch they had steam generators and the same gear
ratio and same wheel diameter. Their career in passenger and
general freight service went on rather uneventful. All
Train
Masters were retired
in late 1968 and early 1969 and scrapped
soon thereafter. One reason for their rather obscure life was
probably their dull paint scheme: olive green with yellowish bands
and a Miss Liberty emblem on the cab side. Later in their short life, the H24-66s suffered even more indignity
by having their
livery simplified to an all drab olive green with only a small herald
on the cab side.
DELAWARE, LACKAWANNA & WESTERN RAILROAD
Like the CNJ, the Lackawanna acquired its Train Masters
in two batches: the first ten units, #850-859, we
re built in June
1953, and followed by #860 &
861 built in November 1956. All
came
in the attractive grey/maroon/yellow livelY, and were set to
rlInlong hood forward. All except the last two had steam generators.
When the DL& Wand the Erie merged
to form the. Erie-Lackawanna
Railroad
in 1960, the twelve Train Masters were renumbered
1850-1861.
The 850-859 were the first production Train Masters
built. The fleet remained intact until June 1968, when the 1850-
1859 were
aU sold for scrap to Striegel, Baltimore, MD. The 1860
and
1861 lasted a bit longer, until mid-1969 and October 1970,
respectively. They were then retired and sold
to Striegel for scrap.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 11 CANADIAN RAIL -438
TABLE VI: PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD SYSTEM
1st Road 2nd Road Builders Date Built Order Phase Weight Gear D,S Electrical
Numbers Numbers Numbers Number Lbs. Ratio Equipment
8699-8707 PC 6700-6708 24L897-905 Aug-Sep 1956 LD200 II 375,000 74:18 D GES
*.
Please see text for renumbering details.
DISPOSITION: PC6700-6708 all effectively retired Augnst, 1970. Officially retired December 30, 1970 and scrapped.
However, Striegel did not scrap these units right away, and most
were still intact
by October 1970. Two of them were leased, then
sold
to the Chihuahua al Pacifico: #1852 became CH-P 534 on 24
September 1969 and was used somewhat briefly until sold
in 1971
and scrapped on 3 December 1974. Similarly, the 1859 was first
leased
to the CH-P and eventual.ly bought in 1971. It never wore
the #535 intended, and was wrecked shortly after its purchase by
the
CHoP.
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD SYSTEM
The mighty Pennsy ordered only 9 Train Masters, built
in August and September 1956. They were Phase II models, and
were assigned road numbers 8699-8707. Intended for freight train
service only, they did not have steam generators, and they were
built
to run long hood forward. Their paint scheme was the basic
Brunswick green (almost black) with small yellow-gold lettering,
but apparently without any keystone logos. These rather dull­
looking units were distinguished
by their long phone antenna
running all the length
of the locomotive on the top left hand side,
and
by sparks arrestors.
When the Pennsylvania, the New York Central and the
New Haven merged on 1 February 1968
to form the Penn Central,
the H24-66s were renumbered 6700-6708, each unit having its
original number reduced by 2000, except the 8699 which became
the 6708. As expected for such a small group
of locomotives within
a huge roster, the Train Masters did not last much longer after
the merger and, by August 1970, they were all effectively retired.
However, shortly before, they were renumbered a second time, the
6700-6708 becoming #6799,06701-06708. The
0 prefix indicated
that the units were retired, but still kept on the roster
to wait for the
expiration
of their trust. They were officially retired on 30 December
1970 and all scrapped soon after this date.
READING COMPANY
The first batch ofH24~66 s bought by the Reading Company
was the second order received
by Fairbanks-Morse for this type of
locomotive. This first order by the Reading was for four units,
#800,
801 without steam generators and built to run short hood
forwa
rd, and two units with steam generators, #860, 861, and
provided with dual controls. All four units were Phase Ib models.
The 800 and
801 were outs hopped in September 1953, and the 860
and
861 followed in October of the same year. These were joined soon after by the 5 Train Masters
of the second order, #802-806,
built
in November 1953, and also Phase Ib units without steam
generators.
The ranks were further increased in November and December
by the H24-66s
of the third order, totalling 6 steam generator­
equipped units numbered 862-867. Like the 860 and 861, they
were also provided with dual control for bidirectional operation,
but designated short hood forward.
The units of this third batch
were Phase
11 models. In December 1956, Beloit outshopped two
more Phase II Train Masters for the Reading: #807 and 808.
These were not provided with steam generators, and, like all
the
Tra
in Masters, they were painted all medium grey, with small
yellow lettering (nothing
to get really excited about).
With diminishing passenger service requirements, the
Reading took the steam generators
off the 860-867 in 1964 and
1965.
In 1967, the Train Masters were renumbered as follows:
#801,806 and 808 becoming #201-203; the 860, 862, 863, 864, 865
and 867 were renumbered
to 260-265. The other H24-66s kept
their original numbers. The units at that time had only a few years
left in their careers.
The 804 was the first retired, in May 1968,
having suffered a fire at Gettysburg in July 1966. It was scrapped
by the Reading
in 1969. The rest of the fleet were all retired by the
end
of May 1970 and sold for scrap to Luria Bros., Striegel or
Naporano Iron & Metals.
SOUTHERN RAIL WAY SYSTEM
Among the most obscure of the Train Masters were the
five rostered by the Southern Railway System and actually owned
by the Cincinnati, New Orleans and Texas Pacific, one of the
constituents
of the Southern. Built in May and June 1955, the H24-
66s were assigned road numbers 6300-6304 and were steam
generator-equipped Phase IlL units, with low end platforms. They
were painted
in the standard Southern livery, black with the lower
grey band with the narrow gold line separation, and sported the
small CNO&TP letters under the road number on the cab sides.
As expected for Southern locomotives, they were built
to run long
hood forward.
The most notable detail of their 1 O-year career was that, for
some reasons, they were almost always used as trailing units. In
late 1965, they were all retired, traded
in to EMD on an order of
SD35s, and subsequently scrapped (probably by Pielet).
RAIL CANADIEN -438 12 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
TABLE VII: READING COMPANY
1st Road 2nd Road Builders Date Order Phase Weigbt Gear D,S Electrical
Numbers Numbers Numbers Built Number Lbs. Ratio Equipment
800,
801 800, 201 24L770,780 Sep 1953 LD155 Ib 385,900 68: 15 D WH2
860,
861 260, 861 24L781, 782 Oct 1953 LD155 Ib 386,700 68:15 S WH2
802 -805 802 -805 24L795 -798 Nov 1953
LDI58 Ib 385,900 68:15 D WH2
806
202 24L799 Nov 1953 LD158 Ib 385,900 68:15 D WH2
866, 867 866, 265
24L863,864 Nov 1955 LDI85 II 386,400 68:15 D,S WH3
862
261 24L865 Nov 1955 LD185 II 388,400 68:15 D,S WH3
863 -8.95 262 -264 24L882 -884 Dec 1955 LD185
II 388,400 68:15 D,S WH3
807, 808 807, 203
24L906,907 Dec 1956 LD204 II 388,400 74:18 D GES
DISPOSITION:
800: Retired 1958. Sold for scrap
to Naporano Iron & Metals.
801: Retired April
21,1970. Sold for scrap to Luria Bros.
802, 803, 805, 202: Retired 1959. Sold for scrap
to NI&M.
804: Burned at Gettysburg Iuly, 1966. Retired May, 1968, scrapped
by Reading, 1969.
807: Retired 1967. Sold for scrap
to StriegeL
203,260: Retired April 21, 1970. Sold for scrap
to NI&M.
861: Retired 1968. Sold for scrap to NI&M.
261-264,866,265: Retired May 27, 1970. Sold for scrap to Lipsett.
TABLE VIII: SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM
Road Builders Date Built Order Phase Weight Gear D,S Electrical
Numbers Numbers Nwnber Lbs. Ratio Equipment
6300 -6304 24L856 -860 May-Iun 1955 LD179 IIL 362,900 74:18 D,S GEA
DISPOSITION:
6300 -6304 retired and traded
in to EMD late in 1965.
SOUTHERN PACIFIC TRANSPORTATION COMPANY
The Southern Pacific Train Masters were among the
most famous for their relatively long careers and their high
visibility
in commuter service. The SP acquired demonstrators
TM3 and TM4
in December 1953 and renumbered them 4800 and
4801. These units were
bui It in May 1953 and were Phase Ia modeL
As demonstrators, they had non-dip handrails along the long hood,
which were changed
to the dip variety when the units were
delivered
to the SP. However, they were not the first Train
Masters
on the SP roster, as in December of the same year, the SP
had begun receiving H24-66s #4810-4813, built
in November
1953, and 4802-4809, built
in December 1953. The roster was
completed with the acquisition
of 4814 and 4815, built in February 1954.
All 16 of the SP H24-66s had steam generators and were set
to run short hood forward. The 4810-4813 were initially built as
part of a New York Central order that was cancelled after these
units were built. These
Lingered at the Fairbanks-Morse plant for
several months before being delivered to the SP. The New York
Central order was for 8 units that would Ilave been numbered 4600-
4607. None
of the already-built Train Masters ever wore the
NYC livery. The Southern Pacific 4802-4805 were effectively the
rest
of the NYC order and were passed on to the SP instead.
All the SP Train Masters initially wore the famous
Black Widow paint scheme, consisting
of an all black carbody
with
an scarlet red frame band and a silver/orange wing on the
short hood, and silver lettering. They finished their career painted
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 13 CANADIAN RAIL -438
TABLE IX: SOUTHERN PACIFIC TRANSPORTATION COMPANY
1st Road 2nd Road Builders Date Order Phase Weight Gear D,S Electrical
Numbers Numbers Numbers Built Number Lbs. Ratio Equipment
4800 -4801 3020 -3021 24L732-733 May 1953 LD165 la 382,100 68:15 D,S WHI
4810-4813* 3030 -3033 24L787-790 Nov 1953 LD154B Ib 379,320 68:15 D,S WH3
4802-4805*
3022 -3025 24L791-794 Dec 1953 LDI64A Ib 379,320 68:15 D,S WH3
4806 -4809 3026 -3029 24L803-806 Dec 1953 LDI64A Ib 379,320 68:15 D,S WH3
4814, 4815 3034, 3035 24L800,801 Feb 1954 LD164B Ib 379,320 68:15 D,S WH3
*: Originally ordered by New York Central as 4600 -4607. Diverted to the SP.
DISPOSITION:
3020,3022,3024,3029,3030,3032 retired August, 1974 and sold to Chrome Crankshaft. Scrapped
by Purdy Metals, Benicia, California.
..
3021,3023,3026,3028 temporarily used as test bed for brake sled programs. Scrapped June, 1975 .
3025,3027,3033,3034 converted to brake sled MW9102 (1976), MW9100 (Oct, 1974), MW9101
(1976), MW9103 (1976).
in the current medium grey with bloody nose livery. When the
SP found that desert sand was damaging the engines shortly after
the
H24-66s were put in service on the main lines, it took the
easiest route
in solving this problem by keeping the units away
from the desert and assigned the fleet to haul commuter trains
in
San Francisco.
The 4800-4815 were renumbered 3020-3035 in 1965.
They continued to haul commuter trains until the end
of their lives
which occurred in 1974 when the Train Masters were replaced
by 10 rare SDP45s and 3 even rarer GP40P-2s. Train Master
3031 had the distinction
of being the last unit in service on the SP.
The 3020, 3022, 3024, 3029, 3030 and 3032 were sold to Chrome
Crankshaft
in August 1974 and scrapped at Purdy Metals, in
Benicia, CA. The 3021, 3023, 3026 and 3028 were temporarily
used
as test beds for a brake sled program for the Colton hump, and
were scrapped shortly thereafter. Most
of the prime movers of
these locomotives were recycled into marine usage. The 3031 and
the 3035 were retired and sold for scrap
in June 1975, to Purdy
Metals.
Unit 3025 was made into brake sled #MW9102
in 1976, the
3027 became brake sled MW9100 in October 1974, the 3033
became brake sled MW9101 and the 3034 became the MW9103,
both
in 1976.
VIRGINIAN RAILWAY
The prettiest Train Masters were most probably the
Virginian Railroads yellow and blue units, which made the largest
fleet (25). They were acquired under two separate orders, but built
in ttuee batches: #50-57 (March 1954), 58-68 (April-May 1954)
and 69-74 (May-June 1957). The first batches were Phase
lb
models, and the last one was Phase II. Two of the Virginian Train Masters were special: the 74 was the last
one built, and the 73 (as
Norfolk & Western 173) was the last one in service on any railroad.
In 1960, shortly after the acquisition of the Virginian by
the Norfolk & Western Railroad, the
H24-66s were renumbered
by adding 100 to the OIiginal number, becoming
N&W #150-174,
and, eventually, they were repainted
in some N& W colour scheme:
either the solid medium blue with the yellow
half moons logos,
or the dazzling all black with either the yellow
half moons logo,
or the white large NW letters.
The ex-Virginians continued to haul freight trains, coal
notably,
in the Virginias until the late 1960s. In early 1967, the
161 was retired on 20 February and eventually ended up at the
Alcos Schenectady plant and rebuilt with an Aleo engine, using
the hood and power components from another N&W Train
Master, the
161:2 that was traded in to Aleo. Our 161 (in fact the
161:1) was put back
in service by the N&W as #3599 and tluned
out to be the only ex-Virginian unit ever repowered. It served many
more years until second retirement occurred and ended up being
rebuilt
as slug #9917 on 27 November 1976.
The renumbering
just seen is but a glimpse of a more
complicated renumbering exercise that affected both the ex­
Virginian and the ex-Wabash Train Masters, in 1970 and 1971.
This was apparently done to keep a block
of H24-66 intact for trust
purposes. The 165 and 169 exchanged numbers, and when the 3598
was traded
in to EMD in July 1970, the 167 became the 3598:2,
with the original 3598 going
to EMD as the 167:2. In June 1973,
the 3598:2 was retired and rebuilt into a slug (9908), and the
number was assigned to the
153 which became the 3598:3.
The date
of 20 February, 1967 marked the retirement of
several Virginians: the 151, 157,160,166, along with ex-Wabash
161 :2 were traded in to Aleo for an order of the famous high nose
RAIL CANADIEN -438 14 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
TABLE X: VIRGINIAN RAILWAY
1st Road 2nd Road Builders Date Built Order ~ Weight Gear D,S Electrical
Numbers . Numbers Numbers Number Lbs. Ratio Equipment
50 -57 150 -157 24L807 -814 Mar 1954 LD167-1 Ib 394,500 74:18 D GEA
58 –
68 158 -168 24L838 -848 Apr-May 1954 LD167-1 Ib 394,500 74: 18 D GEA
69 –
73 169 -173 24LJ037 -1041 Jun 1954 LD210 II 396,600 74:18 D GES
74 174 24Ll048 Jun 1954 LD210
II 396,600 74:18 D GES
NOTE:
Please see text for details
on further renumbering.
DISPOSITION:
150: Retired and traded in to EMD July, 1970.
151: Retired February
20,1967. Traded in to Alco.
152: Retired and rebuilt
to slug 9901 December 10,1971. Retired March 26,1986.
153: Retired 1971, then renumbered 3598:3 September 1971. Rebuilt to slug 9909 June 25,1975.
154: Retired and traded
in to EMD August 1970.
155: Retired between July, 1970
and January, 1972.
156: Retired early 1973.
157: Retired February 20,1967. Traded in to Alco.
158: Retired
and rebuilt to slug 9916 September 29, 1976. Retired December, 1992.
159: Retired and rebuilt to slug 9904 July 13, 1974.
160: Retired February 20, 1967. Traded
in to Ako.
161: Rebuilt and repowered by Alco, renumbered 3599. Retired and rebuilt to slug 9917 Nov. 27 1976.
162: Retired and traded in to EMD July, 1970.
163: Retired and traded in to EMD August, 1970.
164: Retired
and traded in to EMD August, 1970.
165: Renumbered 169:2 (1971). Retired and rebuilt to slug 9902 November 14, 1973.
166: Retired February 20,1967. Traded
in to Ako.
167: Renum. 3598:2 (early 1970). Renum. 156:2 and retired June, 1973. Rebuilt to slug 9908 Nov. 1974.
168: Retired and rebuilt to slug 9903 November 1973. Retired December, 1992.
169: Renumbered 165:2 (1971). Retired and rebuilt to slug 9900 December 10, 1971.
170: Retired and rebuilt
to slug 9906 September 6, 1974.
171: Retired and rebuilt to slug 9913 December 24,1975.
172: Retired and rebuilt to slug 9907 October 23, 1974.
173: Retired September 26, 1976. Rebuilt to slug 9919 July, 1989.
174: Retired
and rebuilt to slug 9914 July 31,1976. Retired December, 1992.
C630s #1135-1139, which were retumed to the N&W on Train
Master trucks. These Alcos we
re later sold to the Chicago &
North Westem. WABASH RAILWAY
The Wabash Railway acquired its first Train Masters
as
demonstrators TMI and TM2, both built in April 1953. Just prior
to delivery to the Wabash in February 1954, the dynamic brakes on
both uruts were removed and their openings blanked. They became
Wabash #550 and 551.
In 1956, the Wabash received six more Retirements occurred
as detailed in Table X, eventually
leav ing the
173 as the last H24-66 running. It too was retired on 26
September 1976, and, like 19 other Train Masters, it was rebuilt
into one
of the 9900-series slugs.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 15 CANADIAN RAIL -438
TABLE XI: WABASH RAILWAY
1st Road 2nd Road Builders Date Built Order Phase Weight Gear D,S Electrical
Number Number Numbers Nwnber Lbs. Ratio Equipment
550, 551 598, 599 24L730-731 Apr 1953 LD170 1a 378,400 63:15 (D),S WHI
552,
552A, 592 -597 24L891-896 Apr-May 1953 LD194 IIL 378,520 74:18 S GES
553,
553A,
554, 554A
NOTES: 552A, 553A, 554A renumbered 555-557 in 1962.
550-557 repowered by
Ako March -May 1964 and renumbered 598, 599, 592 -597.
592-599 renum. N&W 3592 -3598, (3599) when the Wabash was acquired
by the N&W, 1964.
DISPOSITION: 3592: Renumbered 3598:4 March 1974. Rebuilt
as slug 9905 September 6, 1974.
3593:
Rebuilt
as slug 9911 October 2, 1975.
3594: Retired June 30, 1976. Rebuilt
as slug 9918 in 1981.
3595: Renumbered 3597:2 in 1971. Rebuilt into slug 9912 December 9, 1975.
3596: Rebuilt
to slug 9910 September 11, 1975.
3597:
Renumbered 3595:2
in 1971. Rebuilt to slug 9915 July 3],1976.
3598: Renumbered 167:2. Traded in to EMD in 1970 and scrapped.
599: Never renumbered 3599. Retired and renumbered 161:2
in February 1967 and traded in to Ako,
giving hood and some.power components to repower H24-66m·161 : 1 which was renumbered 3599 when
placed back
in service on the N&W.
H24-66s, numbered 552,
552A, 553, 553A, 554 and 554A. These
were Phase IIL models, with low end platforms. In 1962, the
552A-
554A
were renumbered 555-557. Originally sporting a steam
generator, the H24-66s had them removed when repowered
by
Ako with 2350 hp 16-251 B engines in March-May 1964. The 550-
557 came out
of the Ako plant renumbered 598, 599, 592-597.
They had
Ako builders plates indicating the FM selial number
and the date of repowering. The 599 (nee TM2) got a GE main
generator when repowered, but the 598 did not.
This block was refinanced when rebuilt, and until trust
expi.ration, the Wabash and, later, the Norfolk & Western, had
to
keep the block intact. This explains the rash of renumbering among
the N&W Train Masters. The N&W merged the Wabash and the
Nickel Plate in ]964, and,
as a general rule, the Wabash units got
their road number increased
by 3000, and the NKP locomotives
had their number prefixed
by a 2. Consequently, the ex-Wabash
Train Masters became #3592-3599
in 1965-66. The exception
was the 599 which never became the 3599, since it was traded in
to Ako in February 1967, giving its hood and several power
components to the 161:1 which was repowered
by Ako and
returned
to the N&W as the 3599. Around April 1973, the 3595 and
3597 swapped their numbers, and
in March 1974, the 3592 was
renumbered 3598:4.
Retirements came
at about the same time for the ex­
Wabash and the ex-Virginian Train Masters, and most were rebuilt into the 9900-series slugs. While on the Wabash, the Train
Masters
roamed all the network, mostly
in freight service. They
wore origi.nally the attractive two-tone blue and grey livery with
the Follow the Wabash flag emblem. Later in their career, they
were painted all medium blue with the word Wabash
in yellow.
Under the N&W, they wore one
of the N&W dull paint schemes.
CONCLUSION
The 127 Train Masters turned out to be headaches for the
railroad engineers and mechanics, and their less than average
reliability made them prime candidates for early retirement.
As it
is the case for several diesel locomotive models such as the Alco
PAs which were rather cursed at by locomotive foremen, the
Train Masters were among the most popular diesels with train
buffs. Another Fairbanks-Morse diesel model, the H16-66, was
nicknamed the Baby Train Master
as these diesels looked like
reduced-size Train Masters. Two units
of this type are still with
us, one even in service! This one is the Tennessee Valley Authority
24,
in service at the Gallatin coal-fired plant in Gallatin, Tennessee.
The other can
be admired at the Museum of the Highwood Railway
Project, in High River, Alberta (between Calgary and Lethbridge).
Although not a Canadian unit,
it was painted in primer but lettered
CP Rail 7009 the last time I saw it in June 1991. Its real identity
is Squaw Creek Coal Co. 721001, and was used to haul coal trains
at a Peabody Coal Co. mine near Lynnville, Indiana.
RAIL CANADIEN -438 16 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
Congratulations were in order on July 12, 1955 when D.S. Thomson, Vice President of the CPR, took delivery of Train Master 8900 from
George A. Mueller, Senior Vice President
of the Canadian Locomotive. Mr. Thomson stated that CP proposed to run this 2400 horse power
locomotive in passenger andfreight service between Montreal and Saint John, after which
it would be sent west for service in the mountains.
Canadian Transportation, August 1955
If it were not for the CPR 8905 preserved by the CRHA at
the Canadian Railway Museum, the only memories
of the Train
Masters would be on photographic emulsion, and within the
thousands
of scale models of this grand locomotive. The most
famous
of these models is indeed the Lionel Train Master
offered for so many years
in their catalogues in several paint
schemes including the Virginian blue and yellow and the Lackawanna
maroon and grey. Specimens from the 1950s are worth today
several hundred dollars for the collectors.
Beside the expensive brass models in
0, S, HO and N
scales available for limited times, only Athearn offers a mass­
production, low cost model
of the H24-66, with a choice of the
Phases, in HO scale. The N-scale modeller is still waiting for a
similar treat: Kato, Con Cor and Atlas: do you get the idea?
REFERENCES
1. Extra 2200 South, Issue 24 : Fairbanks-Morse roster and
Reading Roster.
2. Extra 2200 South, Issue 48 : Canadian National roster.
3. Ex.tra 2200 South, Issue 57 : Southern Pacific roster.
4. Extra 2200 South, Issue 60 : Train Master drawings of all
phases, and photos.
5. Extra 2200 South, Issue 61 : Train Master roster, drawings and
photos.
6. Extra 2200 South, Issue 72 : All-time slug roster,
Pan I.
7. Extra 2200 South, lssue 73 : All-time slug roster, Part II.
8. Extra 2200 South, Issue 78 : Lackawanna roster.
9. Extra 2200 South, Issue 82 : Canadian Pacific roster, Pal1 II.
10. Extra 2200 South, Issue 90 : Wabash roster.
I I. J. A. Pinkepank, The Second Diesel Spotters Guide, Kalmbach
Books, Milwaukee, WI (1973).
12. Canadian Trackside Guide 1993, By town Railway Society,
(1993).
13. British Railway Modellers of North America books:
-J.A. Love
& R.A. Matthews: Canaclian National in the West,
Vol. 4, p.13.
-D.M. Bain, Canadian Pacific in the Rockies, Vol. 3,
p. 19.
-D.M. Bain, Canadian Pacific in the Rockies, Vol. 8, p. 24.
-D.M. Bain, Canadian Pacific in the Rockies, Vol. 9,
p. 25.
-F. Yeats, Canadian Pacifics Big Hill – A Hundred Years of
Operation, p. 44.

O. Lavallee, Canadian Pacific in the East, Vol. 1, p. 5.
-J. Hope, Canadian Pacific in the Okanagan and Kootenay
Valleys
of British Columbia (The Early Years of Diesels), pp. 14,
15, 16,23.
14. D. C. Lewis, Rail Canada Volume 1 -Diesel Locomotive Paint
Schemes
of CN The Canadian National Railway; Launch Pad
Distributors Ltd., Vancouver, B.C. (1976).
IS. D. C. Lewis, Rail Canada Volume 3 -DieseJ Paint Schemes
of the CPR; Launch Pad Distributors Ltd., Vancouver, B.C.
( 1979).
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 17 CANADIAN RAIL -438
Rail Testing on the Algoma Central
By Mark G. Gustafson
The author lives in Winnsboro South Carolina. He is a past-president of the Central South Carolina Chapter of the National Railway
Historical Society and former editor
of their monthly publication The Order Board, as well as being an active member of the South Carolina
Railroad Museum.
He has worked for Sperry since June 1993. He has contributed to Canadian Rail before, since he co-authored (with your
editor) the article on Saluda Mountain
in our issue for May-June 1992. In this article we follow the tracks of the Black Bear from the Sao
to Hearst, not to mention Big Bird at Wawa and moose steaks at Montreal Falls!
The author stands by Speny Hy-Railer 805 at Hawk Junction
on October
24,1993. Spenys headquarters are in Danbury,
CT, which is why the 805 bears Connecticut licence plates.
Photo by Fred Angus.
Customs, work visas, truck inspection, and paperwork –­
save for a few details, to be taken care
of at the Ministry of
Transport next morning, all was in order for Sperry Rail Service
Hy-Railer No. 805 to cross the border at the Soo. The occasion was
the twice-annual inspection
of rail on the Algoma Central Rail way.
After the long highway drive from Tomah,
Wisconsin that day, the
heated pool and spa at the Holiday Inn on the Ontario side were
most relaxing.
The next day, October 20, 1993, dawned clear and cold
in
Sault Ste. Marie. Fellow Sperry employee, and Chief Operator,
George Blankenship met an ACR representative and proceeded
to
the M.O.T. office for completion of paperwork concerning No.
805s visit to Canada. Out behind the hotel, the Holiday Inn kitchen
crew, on a break, led me to a water faucet from which I filled
805s
rail water tanks. They remembered Sperrys last visit there –
Sperry crews always looking for water -the water
is used as a
couplant between the ultrasonic search units and the rail. Starting
the generator, filling the paint pot, mounting the ultrasonic roller
search units, and switching
on the electrical equipment kept me
busy while the tanks filled. Then, test the water system a
nd all is
ready.
George soon returned with the go-ahead for 805. After a
quick trip to a currency exchange office, I was ready
to go myself.
Not far from the Holiday Inn
is the ACRs passenger depot. After
conversing with the dispatcher via radio, the ACR track foreman
gave us the O.K.
to put on the rail. This was done at a nearby
crossing, and after dropping
805s test carriage, we were ready to
begin testing northbound.
RAIL CANADIEN -438 18 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
Sperry Hy-Railers are set up
with ultrasonic devices which search the
rail for inter:lal cracks and defects. This
is accomplished at speeds from 2 to 12
miles perhourdepencling on rail conditions.
Abnormalities in the rail are automatically
marked with a
jet of yellow paint on the
ties
or rails. Inside the truck, a bank of
pens ink the pertinent information onto a
continuously running paper tape. When
the operator notes a potential defect, he
will signal the driver to stop and back up
to the exact location.
The operator will
then
exit the Hy-Railer and test the rail
with a hand-held ultrasonic unit. Confill1led
defects
can then be marked and recorded
for future
or immediate repair by the host
railroads track crews. The Sperry crew
then continues testing.
A view of the rear of Sperry detector car 805 showing some of the equipment.
From the Soo, we tested
the
main line through the yards near
Note: All photos by the author except where indicated otherwise.
Passing through the yard at the Soo. Note the passenger cars.
Algoma Steel and past the Wisconsin
Central connection. Steam-heated passenger cars surrounded the
shop area with swirls
of vapor. On a siding were the remains of
locomotives from the recent washout and freight wreck near
Canyon. This was a grim reminder
of the inherent dangers of
railroading that crews face daily. Then, out of town, we continued
testing the ever climbing and curving rails. Glancing back, the
views
of the Soo were interesting, but nothing compared to the
lakes, waterfalls and canyons
yet to come in the next few days.
A few mobile
phone calls to and from border officials via
the ACR track foreman was all that interrupted
our progress this
day. Seems they had
no record of our $100 (Canadian) work visas,
but tllis was remedied by
our reading the serial numbers off the
less-than-day-old documents.
No trains interfered today, and by
nightfall Searchmont was reached.
The 31-mile return to the
Holiday Inn was by
highway.
Two of the locomotives involved in the tragic wreck near Canyon. The body of one rests on a flat car.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 19 CANADIAN RAIL -438
TABLE OF MILEAGES AND ELEV ATIONS ON THE ALGOMA CENTRAL
MAIN LIN E
MILEAGE LOCATION
0.0 SAULT STE. MARIE
7.5 ODENA
13.3
HEYDEN
17.7
Summit
25.0
NORTHLAND
30.9
SEARCHMONT
35.1 WABOS
41.9
ACHIGAN
47.3
OGIDAKI (Summit)
55.4
MASHKODE
56.6
TROUT LAKE
61.5 PINE
LAKE
63.7 MEKATINA (Summit)
68.0 PANGISSIN
70.6
SPRUCE LAKE
72.1 SUMMIT (Summit)
75.4
MONGOOSE
79.1
BA
TClffiW ANNA
84.9
RAND
85.7
Summit
91.7
MONTREAL FALLS
93.0
AWANA
96.1 HUBERT (Highest point on ACR)
102.0 FRATER
113.3
CANYON
120.0
ETON
130.3
AGAWA
132.0
MILLWOOD
137.6 SAND
LAKE
140.2 TABOR (Summit)
149.2 PERRY
156.0
LIMER
164.2
HAWK JUNCTION
(Jet. with Michipicoten Sub)
172.5
ALDEN
177.2
GOUDREAU
178.5
Summit
184.0 DUBREUILVILLE
187.7 WANDA
194.5
FRANZ (Jet. with CP)
200.7
SCULLY
206.0
WABATONG
207.0
Subcontinental Divide
207.2
HILDA
217.0
MOSHER
220.9
PRICE
227.8
DANA
232.9
AKRON
238.6
LANGDON
244.9
OBA
(Jet. with CN)
248.5
Summit
252.4
NORRIS
262.0
HANSEN
272.6
HORSEY
275.0
MEAD
280.1
COPPELL
287.4
STAVART
294.0 WYBORil
295.3
HEARST
(Jet. with ONR)
ELEVATION
IN FEET
590
932
1082
1164
781
945
1122
1228
1043
1128
1388
1454
1275
1325
1426
1243
1022
1398
1429
1286
1591
1461
940
1113
1236
1266
991
1061
1044
1175
1213
1232
1172
1219
1214
1146
1177
1105
1083
1104
1072
1103
1039
926
892
834
807
MICHIPICOTEN SUB
MILEAGE LOCATION ElEVATION
IN FEET
0.0 HA WK JUNCTION 1044
6.7
JOSEPHINE JUNCTION 1252
8.9
MAGPIE
JUNCTION 1055
16.0
HELEN
JUNCTION 1120
18.1 WAWA 960
21.9
TREMBLA Y (Summit) 983
24.8
BRIENT 759
26.0 MICHIPICOTEN 653
NOTES: Elevations and mileages are taken from ALTITUDES IN
THE DOMINION OF CANADA (Second Edition) publ ished by the
Commission
of Conservation of Canada in 1915.
Where altitude is not shown,
it indicates that the station in question
does not appear in the 1915 book,
in which case the mileage shown is
from the current ACR timetable.
Station names are shown in capital leiters, while notes and indications
(e.g. Summit) are in low
er case letters.
ALGOMA
CENTRAL
COUNTRY
Ontano. Canada
Hearst
-…J
$(r Franz_~~~~~f~::1(l
IdlHaWkJCI
~~.
LAKE SUPERIOR
LAKE
SUPERIOR
. 0
Frater .
LAKE HURON
RAIL CANADIEN -438
Snow was in the forecast on
Thursday, October21, as we resumed
testing northward. And not far into
the mountainous and isolated region,
the blizzard hit. But testing continued
as the rail was still well above the
level
of the fallen snow. At Ogidaki,
we cleared for a southbound snow­
encrusted freight. Its passage gave
the rail a good cleaning, and we
made it to Batchewana before dark.
Running light at 20 to 25 miles per
hour up the track, we tied up at
Montreal Falls for the night. ACR
housing and moose steaks were a
welcome change
of pace from the
usual motels.
RIGHT: Friday, October 22,1993,
approaching Hubert station, mileage
96. Here northbound passenger train
No.1 was scheduled to overtake and
pass the test crew. This is
the highest
point on the entire Algoma Central
Railway.
11 is 1591 feel above sea
level, and exactly 1001 feel above
the elevation
of the Soo. The snow
that
fell Ihe day before is clearly
evident.
20 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
ABOVE: Looking more like an impress­
ionistic painting than a scene along the
railway, this view was taken at the height
of the blizzard on October 21. Although
the snow was blinding, it did not last.
When your editor passed this site only
three days later the snow was almost gone.
LEFT: Ogidaki, October
21, 1993. A
snow-encrusted southbound freight train
appears almost like a silhouette as
it rumbles
by the two hy-railers waiting in the siding.
From here north
il will be easier for the
Sperry crew since the passage
ofthefreight
has cleared
Ihe rails.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 21 CANADIAN RAIL -438
ABOVE: The most spectacular structure on the ACR is the Montreal River bridge. Since it is almost inaccessable
by road, off-train photos
of it are rare. Here, SRS 805 poses at the north end of the bridge on October 22. Near
this spot the author spent the night and enjoyed a dinner
of moose steak.
BELOW: The
Speny crew is safely in the siding at Hubert as No. J approches. This is the meet depicted on the
cover.
At this time of year ACR passenger trains run northbound on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, and southbound
011 Saturday, Sunday and Monday.
RAIL CANADIEN -438 22 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
The testing continued daily. Over the weekend and into the
next week, meets with passenger trains (northbound Friday, Saturday,
Sunday; southbound Saturday, Sunday, Monday) and occasional
freights were arranged by the dispatcher via the
ACR track foreman
(Don, John, or Bruce) that was always with us.
The Sperry (luck is
not
to delay trains. Obtaining water in the isolated areas was always
a challenge, and once required pumping some from below the ice
in a trackside ditch at Millwood. Several nightly tie-ups involved
parking the Sperry truck
in a siding and riding the ACR Hy-Railer,
capable
of a higher rate of speed, into town. Lodging included
motels at
Wawa and Hearst.
LEFT: One of the many wale/falls to be seen along the way.
BELOW: The station at Canyon, seen on October
22, is where the
tourist train stops so the visitors may enjoy the beauty
of the surrounding
country. Note the old passenger car used as a souvenir shop.
OPPOSITE, TOP: This location, near Canyon station, is the scene
of
the tragic landslide which caused the wreck of the locomotives shown
on page 18.
OPPOSITE, MIDDLE: Going down the Michipicoten Sub, towards
Lake Superior, on October
23, we see a view seldom seen by rail
enthusiasts. This line branches
off the main line at Hawk Junction and
extends through Wawa
to Michipicoten Harbour.
OPPOSITE, BOTTOM: Passing the mill
at Wawa. mileage 18.7 of the
Michipicoten Sub, on October
24, en route back to Hawk Junction.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 23 CANADIAN RAIL -438
RAIL CANADIEN -438 24 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
An interesting view on the high line of the Michipicoten branch on October 24, 1993. Taken from Speny No. 805,
one can plainly see, in the rear view mirror, the ACR hy-railer following close behind.
The scenery was always spectacular, even
with the absence
of snow to the north. The lakes,
forests, streams, and wildlife all made for enjoyable
work
not
to be experienced in the more developed
parts
of North America. Yet, despite the isolation,
I managed unexpectedly to run into old acquaint­
ances. In the afternoon
of Sunday, October 24, we
had
just finished testing the Michipicoten Sub
from Lake Superior, and were taking on water at
the depot
at Hawk] unction. In pulled the nOlthbound
passenger train and
off hopped Fred Angus of
Montreal, Howard Shepherd of South Carolina,
and Ed Wilkommen
of Wisconsin! All are friends
of mine and fellow members of the South Carolina
Railroad Museum. Small continent, nonetheless.
[editors note. This meeting was completely
unplanned and by chance]. After 15 minutes the
passenger train departed and we followed it
northward. Later, we saw a few motor cars from
Oregon out touring the line.
At mileage 17.3 of the Michipicoten Sub, the fire-damaged area is plainly visible.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994
i
J
25 CANADIAN RAIL -438
Southbound passenger train,ACR No. 2,passes Speny805 at Franz at about 10:41 A.M. on Monday, October 25,1993, the day of Can adas
general election. This
is the same train on which, as No.1, your editor had ridden north from the Soo to Hearst the day before. Franz is
where the ACR crosses
CP Rails main line.
The Algoma Centrals station, buildings and siding at Franz. Sadly. CPs famous station at that locatioll was demolished
ill 1992.
RAIL CANADIEN -438
RIGHT: Two of the motor carsfrom Oregon, on
a tour
of the tine, seen at mileage 249.8 on
October
26, 1993. Bruce Gignak of the ACR
stands beside one
of the cars.
RIGHT: Early in the moming
of October 26, 1993 SRS 805
is ready to start working north of Dba. The day is cloudy and
dull as the crew prepare to depart. The station
is boarded up
and the hotel
is in rt((ns. Dba is still an important freight
transfer point between the ACR and CN, but the passengers
who used
to change trains here are long gone. However VIA
Rails Canadian, as well as ACR 1 and 2, still pass this
remote spot, far from any large city.
26 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
LEFT: The station at Mosher, 217 miles from the Sao,
was passed on October
25. This site is now a ghost town,
as the mill at that location has closed and all the
inhabitants have moved away.
LEFT: Nearing the end
of the longest stretch of track
covered in one day, the Sperry crew crossed a branch
of
Dba Lake, at Woods Camp, on October 25,1993. Near
this spot,
at ~ba, the main line of Canadian National
crosses the ACR. The work for the day ended at Dba.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 27 CANADIAN RAIL -438
On the 300th mile of the test, we roll north along a straight sunlit track through the Clay Belt, so different from the rocky terrain
of the Precambrian Shield. Ahead is a heavy cloud formation which heralds an approaching storm. This striking photo was
taken only
21 miles from Hearst, at mileage 274.7 on October 26, 1993. A few miles further on the testing ended for the day.
The end
of the line! A dull day on October 27 finds SRS 805 at Hearst, and the
junction with the Ontario Northland (until very recently CN, and originally the
National Transcontinental). The week-long job
of track testing 011 the ACR is dOlle,
and now it is back south by road.
The 321-mile test was completed by noon
on Wednesday, October 27. Sixty-five miles had
been the most tested in one day, that being from
near Dubreuilville to Oba. Southbound, we travelled
on the highway via Hornpayne and White River.
CP track crews at the latter place gave us the twice
over since they are used to seeing the more common
large Sperry rail cars.
After a final night with Big Bird in Wawa,
George
and I returned to the Soo on the 28th. The
final defect reports were delivered to ACR
headquarters. News of the impending anival of the
Wisconsin Central onto the property was much
in
evidence here. Was this Sperrys final test of this
trackage under the Algoma Central banner? Perhaps
the big Sperry rail cars will return to Agawa
Canyon, as the WC normally uses these for testing
on their trackage in the States.
Back across the Soo and southbound for
the Straits
of Mackinac; we left Canada behind.
Destination –
The J (Elgin Joliet and Eastern) in
Chicagoland, and more Hy-Railing adventures
with
SpelTY.
RAIL CANADIEN -438 28 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
The Algoma Central Railway
By Edward P. Wilkomen
The author lives in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. He is a past-president of the Milwaukee Road Historical Society, the Iowa Chapter of
the National Railway Historical Society and the Wauwatosa Historical Society as well as presently being the editor of that societys newsletter
Historic Wauwatosa. He was recently the recipient
of the Local History Award of Merit from the State Historical Society of Wisconsin.
This
is not his first contribution to Canadian Rail since two of his photos, of trains along the Thompson and Fraser Rivers, appeared on the
inside front cover
of Canadian Rail No. 399, July-August 1987.
Now that we have had a trip up the Algoma Central with Mark, and seen much
of the lines scenery, lets hear something about its
history from Ed.
One
of the interesting medium-sized railroads of Canada
is the Algoma Central Railway.
It consists of a 296-mile main line
from Sault Ste. Marie
to Hearst, as well as a 26-mile branch line
from Hawk Junction
to Michipicoten, all in the province of
Ontario. I
It all began at Sault Ste. Marie with its rapids in the St.
Marys River which keeps Lake Superior at a 21-foot higher
elevation than Lake Huron. This is a natural barrier
to navigation
and necessitated locks being built. The first lock, a small wooden
one, was built
in 1798 by the famous fur trading partnership, the
Northwest Company. This lock was on the Canadian side
of the
river and was for the use
of bateaux and other small craft.
2
Then,
in 1845, iron ore deposits were discovered at Negaunee, Michigan.
This resulted
in the Jackson Mine being opened in 1848. This mine
was worked by the open-pit system for the next three-quarters
of
a century, with more than 5 million tons of ore being removed.)
In order
to aggrandize the shipping of this iron ore to steel
mills
in Pennsylvania, locks accommodating large (for those days)
boats had
to be built at the Soo. In 1853 the Fairbanks Scale Co.,
which had extensive mining interests in the upper peninsula
of
Michigan, undertook the job of buildi.ng two locks in tandem, and
turned them over
to the state of Michigan on May 31, 1855. Boats
using these locks
had to pay 4 cents per ton for their use. Then, in
1881, the locks were transferred
to the U.S. Army Corps of
Engineers and have been toll free since that time.
4
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario began its importance in the
1880s when the Canadian Pacific Railway completed its line from
Sudbury. The international railroad bridge over the St.
Marys
rapids to the United States was completed in 1887. The community
was elevated
to town status the same year with a population of
1600. In 1889 the town built a power canal and a small power house
while incurring a debt
of $263,000.
5
The real start of prosperity and growth for the Soo began
in 1894· when Francis Hector Clergue passed through the· town
on
the way to Fort William. He was impressed with the potential
development this area offered.
FH. Clergue was born in Maine in
1856. He became a lawyer and was admitted to the bar in 1876. But
his ability
as a promoter was even greater and he spent most of the
rest
of his life machinating business projects.
6
Mr. Clergue concluded an agreement to assume half the
debt
of the power station, using money which he obtained from capitalists
in New York and Philadelphia. His ability to raise funds
and
his liking of the Soo greatly helped the growth of this area. He
even had an inventive ability such
as developing a machine to dry
paper pulp. He obtained backing and, in 1896, started the Sault Ste.
Marie Pulp and Paper Co. which used his invention.
The Lake Superior Corporation was formed with Clergue
becoming its General Manager. It purchased the Helen Iron Mine,
which was located in the Algoma district,
and which had been
discovered in 1897 by
Ben Boyer.
7
This mine opened in 1899 and
produced
21/2 million tons of ore until 1918.
Since a railway is necessary
to furnish cheap transportation
for iron ore, the Algoma Central Railway Co. was incorporated on
August 11, 1899. That summer construction started on a 12-mile
line from the Helen Mine to Michipicoten Harbour and in the year
1900,65,000 tons
of ore were shipped.
In 1900, the Ontario government gave a land grant
to the
Algoma Central Railway (ACR), including mineral and timber
rights
to 7400 acres per mile of railway. But the railway was
obligated
to bring into the Algoma district 4000 settlers per year
for
10 years. They had to build steel boats to haul the iron ore to
steel mills on the lower lakes. Also they were not to export
unmanufactured timber or pulpwood derived from land granted,
and, in addition
they were required to develop 40,000 horsepower
at the
SOO.8
As part of the federal governments policy of expanding
the Canadian railway network, Prime Minister Sir Wilfrid Laurier
gave the ACR subsidies
of $160,000 in 1900 and $431,000 in
1901
9.
At one time there were some 4000 men at work building the
new rail line, so that it reached some 50 miles into the Algoma
district by July, 1904.
Meanwhile, back at the Soo, F.H. Clergue incorporated the
Algoma Iron, Nickel and Steel Company
of Canada in 1901. On
February 18, 1902 the first heat
of steel was produced.
o
The iron
ore which came from the Helen Mine was low in phosphorous
content which is essential when making steel
in a Bessemer
Converter. This steel was rolled into the first railroad rails ever
produced in Canada. Then there was a delay in the completion
of
the blast furnaces which were designed to use charcoal made from
the Algoma timber.
The company quickly found out this was bad,
so they changed the units
to use coke. But a lack of orders caused
the temporary closing
of the Algoma steel mill in December 1902.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994
On May 23, 1901 the railway changed its
name to the Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Railway
(AC&HB). This company purchased four ore boats to
take iron ore down to Lake Erie and bring coal back
to Sault Ste. Marie, there
to be made into coke and fed
to·the blast fumaces. This turned out so well that the
Clergue syndicate bought or chartered
16 more ore
boats.
29 CANADIAN RAIL -438
1902 turned out to be the zenith in the career
of Francis Clergue. He had been involved in the steel
mill, railway, iron mine, timberlands, pulp mill, two
street railway lines, machine shops, ore boats, saw
mill, ferry boats, brick plant, lime works and a
charcoal plant! In all
of these, promoting, financing
and getting them into operation were his specialty. He
was not too good
at actually running them or marketing
their products. His Lake Superior Corporation was
forced to get a 5-million dollar loan from Speyer and
Company
of New York to keep its business going.
These problems surfaced in 1903 when some
of the
factories
had to close as dictated by New York
financiers, not
local people. In April 1903 the Lake
Superior Corp. announced that F.H. Clergue would
retire from the management
of the company, and that The only view
of Lake Superior from the main line is this view shortly before the
northbound train enters the
Agawa Canyon.
Photo by Mark Gustafson.
Cornelius Shields, the General Manager
of Dominion Iron and
Steel
of Sydney, Nova Scotia, would succeed him. But Shields
could do no better, and
in December 1903 stocks of subsidiary
companies were auctioned off to raise cash.
J J
These closings put 3500 men outofwork in early September
1903 with the promise that they would receive severance pay. But
the companies
didnt have the money and they stalled for time.
Men employed out in the woods were kept there. Finally, on
September
18 1903,600 of the lumberjacks and 700 town employees
marched on the companys office and demanded their pay. A notice on the building told them
there was no money and they
should go elsewhere for work. The crowd smashed windows, the
scared office workers retreated to the second floor, and
the workers
hurled bricks.
They also threatened the trans-river ferry and
International
Hotel. To quell the violence, the local militia was
called out, and Toronto dispatched 400 soldiers. They quickly
restored peace.
Clergue was still a director
of the Lake Superior Corp. and
he announced
in late 1903 that wages would be paid by local banks
under guarantee
of the government which held security in the form
of an unconveyed land subsidy to the AC&HB. Also the
railway was guaranteed a 2-million dollar amount for
construction cos
ts and to satisfy creditors. In case of
default, the Ontario government would take possession of
the AC&HB. This guarantee was renewed until 1907.
12
By August, 1906 track construction allowed regular
train service to extend 68 miles to Pangissin. Main line
construction then came
to a virtual halt, not to be resumed
for another four years. However, with its new name, the
railway had its sights set on its ultimate destination
of
Moose FactOlY on James Bay.
Since the Michipicoten branch only extended from
the harbour to the Helen and Josephine mines, all the iron
ore still had to go to the Soo and lower lake ports by ore
boat.
The Algoma Central Steamship Co. boats were
named Paliki,
Theano and Leafield plus two barges
Barium and Agawa. They also ran passenger boats:
Typical
of the architecture of ACR stations is this one at Wanda, 188.1 miles
north
of the Soo. Minnie M., Ossifrage and Siesta. Their largest
passenger boat
King Edward ran on a summer schedule
from Sault Ste. Marie to various settlements
on the North
Channel
of Georgian Bay then southward to Sarnia, Detroit,
Windsor and Toledo.13
Photo by Mark Gustafson.
RAIL CANADIEN -438 30 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
The depression years were lean,
followed
by high production at the steel mill
during World War
ll. This meant lots of
freightcarswitchingancl haulingsteel products
to Oba for shipment westward over what had
become the main line
of Canadian National
Railways. Since the Canadian Pacific had its
own line into Sault Ste. Marie, it received its
cars right there. With gasoline rationing,
passenger patronage
increased. But this road,
like the Temiskaming & Northern Ontario
(now Ontario Northland) is north-south
oriented, therefore these short-haul carriers
are not blessed with high ton-mileage.
A scenic spot in the famous Agawa Canyon, the destination of the tourist train that runs in
the summer months. Nearby is Canyon station where the train lays over two hours before
returning
to the Soo.
Like in many Canadian wilderness
areas, highway construction greatly increased
after World War II, and local freight and
passenger traffic equally greatly decreased
on the AC&HB. On June 30, 1965 the name
of the company was changed again, and
reverted to its original name
of Algoma Central
Railway, since it was fully realized that it
would never extend north
of Hearst. All the
Photo by Mark Gustafson.
Mr. e.D. Warren, President of the AC&HB, also
had an ambition
of building a rail line from Bellevue (19 miles
from the Soo) eastward to Gertrude. They already had a 13-mile
railroad
in operation from there to Sudbury. It was called the
Manitoulin and North Shore Railway.
By 1912 it was extended 10
miles further to Crean Hill and called the Algoma Eastern Railway.
By 1916 the track was extended to Little Current at the gateway to
Manitoulin Isla
nd. During the depression years the AC&HB sold
this line
to the Canadian Pacific.
Starting in 1910, the line from Michipicoten harbor was
extended from Josephine Junction, through Hawk Junction, and on
north, connecting with the CPR at Franz (named for Vice­
Presid
ent W.e. Franz) in January, 1912. Meanwhile, also
starting
in 1910, the main line was extended north from
Pangis and south from Hawk Junction.
The two sections
met
at mile 109.75, between Frater and Canyon, on July 3,
1912, and the line was opened on December
1. Now there
was an all-weather route to haul iron ore from the mines to
the steel mill at the Soo. A frozen Lake Superior was no
longer a handicap. iron mines have now closed except for the
underground McLeod mine near Wawa.
Production at the steel mill has greatly dropped
off, meaning far less carloads
of i.ron ore and steel products hauled
by the ACR.
The steel mainly goes to Oba whence CN hauls it out
west. Most
of the other items now go by truck on the improved
roadway system serving the Algoma district. While forest and
paper product haulage
is also down, the railway still gets a lot of
carloads from the big lumber mill at Dubreuilville. Wood chips are
transferred to
CP Rail at Franz, while lumber goes south to the Soo.
As the tourist industry increased, the ACR came up with a
very
good idea, Wilderness By Rail, a one-day train trip from the
Soo to Agawa Canyon and return. The long passenger train, pulled
by as many as five diesel units, enable many families to enjoy the
Construction pressed on to Oba, where the AC&HB
crossed the Canadian Northern main line, then it ran through
the wilderness
to Hearst where a connection was made with
the Natio
nal Transcontinental Railway in 1914. By now,.
constlUction costs
far exceeded revenue; the AC&HB defaulted
on its bond interest on December
I, 1914 and went into
receivership on February 20, 1915. Thomas
J. Kennedy and
Vivian Harcourt were appointed receivers to
lUn the railway.
This sad fate permanently stopped the idea
of extending the
line to James Bay. Instead the road concentrated on running
its trains, plus switching the Algoma Steel mills. This
allowed
the road to come out of receivership before 1921.
An ACR caboose seen in the yard at Hawk Junction on October 23, 1993.
Photo by Mark Gustafson.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994
superb, virtually unspoiled, forest and low mountain scenery
interlaced with clear lakes and fast-flowing rivers. At mile 114, the
train stops deep
in the heart of the mighty Agawa Canyon where
there
is a two-hour stop-over before the train heads back south. In
the winter time there
is also a Snow Train, so passengers can see
the scenery under very different conditions.
The author with two friends at Hawk Junction-on October 24,
1993. Left
to right we see Mark Gustafson, Ed Wilkomen and
Howard Shepherd, while ACR
No.1 waits in the background.
Photo by Fred Angus.
31 CANADIAN RAIL -438
The trip was extremely scenic, as expected, and the
weather was perfect. But there was one big surprise. When our
train arrived at Hawk Junction, at 2:15 P.M., for a 15-minute stop
(the only place on the line where there was more than a momentary
pause), we met a Sperry Rail Detector car, actually a high-rail
truck. And
10 and behold we found our good friend Mark Gustafson
of Winnsboro S.c. running the car! To have us saunter out of the
train in the middle
of nowhere astonished him. As you can see from
his photos in this and the previous article, he was able to take fine
pictures at inaccessible locations. Resisting the temptation to say
Dr. Livingstone, I presume., we had a brief conversation,
carefully inspected SRS 805, then it was time to get back aboard
No. I and continue north.
North
of Hawk Junction, Franz and Oba are the only places
of any size. At Oba, CN has much work equipment and lots of
freight cars. Their depot is still standing but boarded up. At Hearst,
where the old depot
of the National Transcontinental Ry. was
demolished
in 1992, there is a fairnumberoffreightcars interchanged.
Also located there is a big sawmill providing many loads
for the
ACR and the ONR.
Heres how the ACR operates its freight trains in 1993. All
freight trains are lun as extras. A daily night freight train runs from
Sault Ste. Marie to Hawk Junction, doing some switching
en route.
A daily way freight runs from Hawk Junction to
McLeod iron
mine, then to Michipicoten harbour and return. This
job hauls iron
are,
are fines, coke breeze, mill scale and limestone, besides also
switching the sintering plant.
Six days a week, a freight runs from Hawk Junction to the
lumber mill at Dubreuilville, then to the CP interchange at Franz
and the
CN interchange at Oba; it then returns to Hawk Junction.
Twice a week, another freight goes from Hawk Junction to Hearst
and returns the
next day. Since these are extra trains, their
frequency can vary from week to week.
Now we come to October 24, 1993 when three
far distant railfans, hearing that the line would soon
come under the management
of the Wisconsin Central,
came to ride this interesting railroad . Howard Shepherd,
from Cayce South Carolina, Fred Angus, from Montreal
and Ed Wilkomen, from Wauwatosa Wisconsin. At
this time passenger train No. I goes north only on
Friday, Saturday and Sunday, while
No.2 goes south
only on Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Because
of
various scheduling arrangements, we had decided to
go north on the Sunday train and return via the Ontario
Northland. The ACR train consisted
of diesel 203,
steam generator cars 74 and 75, baggage cars 301 and
308, and coaches 5441 and 5545.
The latter two were
originally CN, had been acquired
by ACR from VIA
and were still
in the VIA paint scheme. The extra
steam generator car was to have been set out at Hearst
for the Ontario Northland Railway. This could be
picked up by the ONR at Hearst since,
in September
1993, they purchased the line from Cochrane through
Hearst to Calstock from CN. However, a photo taken
at Franz the next day (see page 25) shows that the extra
steam generator car went back south on train
No.2.
The ACR crosses the CN main line at Oba which is a busy interchange point. In this
view, ACR No.1 has crossed the CN line and
is coming up 10 the now closed station.
Photo by Fred Angus.
RAIL CANADIEN -438 32
Wabatong, 207 miles north of Sault Ste. Marie, is atlhe subcontinental
divide. South
of here the waters flow into the Great Lakes and the St.
Lawrence. North
of here streams and rivers flow into James Bay and
Hudson Bay. At this point a collag
e, standing between the railway and
the lake, bears a large Canadian flag, plus the name Pellicoat Jct..
Pholo by Mark Gustafson.
Usually there is also a way freight on Thursdays from the
Soo
to Hawk Junction. It goes south on Fridays, often hauling ore
cars. Besides these road
jobs, several switch engines are needed
around the clock to switch the Algoma Steel
miU in Sault Ste.
Marie.
Starting January
1, 1994 the Wisconsin Central Railroad
was scheduled
to begin operating the Algoma Central. But it does
not own
it. Why the WC can run the ACR in a better maImer is not
clear, but this
is the latest development in the long history of
Canadas interesting medium-sized railroad.
END NOTES
1. Algoma Central Railway data.
2. Canadian Sault Ste.
Marie canal data.
3. Iron Ores
of Lake Superior by Crowell and Murray.
4. Soo Locks data, U.S. Anny Corps of Engineers.
5. Ontario Bureau of Mines Report, 1904.
6. Ontario History, the Rise
of Sault Ste. Marie as an Industrial
Centre by Margaret Van Every, 1963.
7.
The Canadian Iron and Steel Industry, 1915.
8. Canadian Annual Review, 190
I.
9. Canadian House of Commons Debates, 1901.
JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
A map of the Algoma Central & Hudson Bay Railway, as well as
the Algoma Eastern, which appeared
in the Railway and Marine
World
in June, 1912.
10. The Sault Star.
11. Eldon Explorations Report.
12. Canadian Annual Review.
13. Official Guide
of the Railways and Steam Navigation Lines,
various issues.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 33 CANADIAN RAIL -438
Some Early Accounts of the Construction of the
Algoma Central
Researched by Fred Angus
Having received for publication two excellent articles relating to the Algoma Central Railway, your editor decided to round out the
story by reproducing
some contemporary articles relating to the construction of the line. All these articles appeared in the Canadian Railway
and Marine World
(CRMW) between 1911 and 1914. All illustrations of the railway (except one modern view inserted as a comparison)
are from the June, 1912 issue
of that publication. The photos of telephone equipment are from the Northern Electric catalogue of 1917.
ALGOMA CENTRAL AND HUDSON BAY RAILWAY
CRMW, December, 1911.
The section of the line from mileage 6S to 79 has been
taken over
by the company from the contractors, and a regular train
service was put in operation Oct. 28.
The Board of Railway
Commissioners has authorized the operation
of regular trains on
the extension
as far as mileage 8S from Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.
Track has been laid to mileage 91, at the crossing
of the Montreal
River, where a large blidge has been completed. Three trestles at
mileage 93 are nearing completion; two other trestles at mileage
99 are well advanced, and three trestles between mileage 104 and
106 are also under construction. Grading has been completed to
Agawa, at mileage 126, and it
is expected that track will be laid to
that point this season.
The remainder of the grading to Hawk Lake
Jet. has been completed, and the line
is being operated from that
point to Josephine Jet., the point
of connection with theMichipicoten
branch. This junction
is at mileage 170 from Sault Ste. Marie. The
grading between Hawk Lake Jet. a
nd Hobon [soon to be renamed
Franz], on the C.P.R. transcontinental line, is well advanced, a late
report stating there
is only about nine miles to be completed. The
Board
of Railway Commissioners has approved a revised location
on this section between mileage 30.08 and
S3 from Hawk Lake Jet.,
and ordered an interlocking plant at the crossing at grade
of the
C.P.R. at Hoban. It
is expected that the line will be completed to
Hobon
eadyin 1912. Grading is also in progress from Hobon
towards the National Transcontinental Railway.
THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE ALGOMA CENTRAL AND
HUDSON
nAY RAILWAY
By R.S. McCormick, M. Am. Soc. C.E., Chief Engineer.
CRMW, June, 1912.
The construction of the Algoma Central and Hudson Bay
railway was originally begun in the spring
of 1900 by the old Lake
Superior Corporation, under the management
of F.H. Clergue, and
a land grant and subsidy was granted by the Dominion Parliament.
Construction was carried on until the spring
of 1903, at
which time there was graded a continuous line from Sault Ste.
Marie, Ont. to a connection at Josephine Jet. 170 1/2 miles north, with a line extending down to Lake Superior at Michipicoten
Harbour. This section, 20 miles long, was built in 1899 -1900 to
gain access to valuable iron mines
in this territory, owned by the
corporation.
The grading on the main line was not completely
finished, however, as financial misfortlUles overtook the corporation
and track was only laid
to about SS miles north of Sault Ste. Marie.
A large number
of bridges and trestles between this point and
Josephine Jct. were also not built but otherwise the line was
completely to sub-grade. Between 1903 and 1908 additional track
was laid to carry the end
of steel to mile 68, but no other work was
done north of this point.
In 1909 active measures were begun to complete the A.C.
and H.B.R. by an English syndicate, which had in the meantime
secured control
of the Lake Superior Corporation, including the
Algoma Steel Co., the railways and other transportation and
industrial interests, at Sault Ste. Marie. Before undertaking the
completion and proposed extension
of the railway, a report was
made for the management on the whole project by F.H. McGuigan,
of Toronto, formerly of the GT.R. He reported favourably on the
completion
of the line and on its extension to connect with the
National Transcontinental Ry.
The necessary financial arrangements being successfully
completed, the first work undertaken was the locating
of a line to
connect the old grade near Hawk Lake with the C.P.R. This was
accomplished by the location and construction
of 30 miles of line
from
Hawk Lake Jet, to Hoban on the C.P.R. S. Keemle, Toronto,
was
in charge of the locating party on this work. A 0.6%compensated
6 degree maximum curve line was secured at a cost
of about
$38,000 a mile complete, including track and structures.
In May,
1910, a contract was let
to the OBoyle Bros. Construction Co. of
Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. for this section, and on July I, 1910, another
contract was let to the same contractors for the completion
of the
main line from mile 68
to Josephine Jet., mile 170 1/2, including
regrading at points where cuttings had slid
in, bringing up settled
embankments, all the bridging (excepting Montreal River), track
laying and ballasting.
In the meantime a spur line
of9 1/2 miles was located from
a
point 17 miles from Michipicoten Harbour on the line extending
from the lake to the mines, northerly,
to a new Magpie iron mine.
This construction, including track laying, and the ballasting, was
also let to the
OBoyle Bros. Construction Co., and in May, 1910
active work was started on this section.
RAIL CANADIEN -438
The railway company also started work to repair and re-tie
that section
of the 20 miles extending from Michipicoten Harbour
to Josephine Jet. known as the Josephine branch, being the upper
10 miles
of the line which had been wholly unused for over eight
years, and which
was in wretched shape, as the ties were rotteo, and
very little ballast having originally been
puton when firstconstructed
it was necessary to re-ballast the whole section.
The railway
company did this
work with its own forces with some help from the
OBoyle company.
Erecting the bridge at Montreal River.
CRMW, June, 1912.
From May, 1910 to August, 1911, the work on the main
line, north from mile 68 and south from Josephine Jet., the grading
of the Hawk Lake -Hoban section, the building of the Magpie
branch and the rebuilding of the ten miles of the Josephine branch,
proceeded with the usual ups and downs peculiar to railway
construction work in such a country.
Poor labor, generally a lack
of same, bush fires, whiskey and aU the troubles incident thereto,
known only to the experienced, were faced and fought.
By August 1, 1911, the Magpie branch was completed, at
a cost
of practically $275,000. The line was built on a 1.5%
compensated
grade against the traffic and 2.5% flat, with the
traffic. The first 4 1/2 miles to the crossing
of the Magpie River was
light work,
except for some heavy side cutting descending the
slope to cross the river,
at which point the adverse .grade Df 1.5%
compensated was located.
From the river crossing, however, to the
mine the line
is heavy, and at mile 71/2 there is a timber trestle 900
ft. long, 80 ft. high, on a 12-degree CUlve and a 1.75 [%] grade. Up
to this point the grade is
2% maximum, from here to the mine site
it is 2 1/2%, 12 degrees being the maximum curve. Very large
expenditures are being
made by the company in opening the mine,
and in addition to a plant for treating the siderite
are, a model
mining town is being built. This branch is laid with 80 Ibs. A.S.C.E.
34 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
rail with Sellers shoulder tie plates on all curves and is most
substantially built in all respects, excepting that timber and piles
were used in bridging.
On July 15, 1911, the sub-contractors on the Hawk Lake –
Hoban section finished the grading. Murdock Bros. had the lower
19 miles, and Cavicchi and Pegano the upper
11 miles. The work
was quite heavy, the grading quantities being 732,933 cu. yds.;
classified 261,269 cu. yds. solid rock; 94,378 cu. yds. loose rock,
Montreal Falls and the Algoma Central bridge.
CRMW, June, 1912.
and 377,286 cu. yds. common excavation. In addition there was
20,178 cu. yds. over break in rock cuttings. About 3,000,000 ft.
b.m.
of bridge timber and 40,000 lin. ft. of piling was also used on
this work.
Other items of grading, etc., included 1.500,000 cu. yds.
overhaul, 170,000
ft. b.m. culvert timber, 220,000 lbs. bridge iron,
291 cu. yds. dry stone masonry, 423 cu. yds.
cement masonry and
other small items.
The rock work was exceptionally well done, as
the specifications only allowed common excavation for over break
and all the time the work was in progress this was enforced.
On
final estimates, however, a fair amount of over break was given as
solid rock. Track laying and some ballasting was
done this year and
the bridge work was completed. On January 10, 1912, track was
connected up, giving railway connection from the
c.P.R. into the
mines
of the Michipicoten district. Some ballasting was also done
this year.
Work on the main line completion progressed slowly from
June, 1910, to May, 1911, at which time track had reached the
Montreal River, mile
91 l/2 north of Sault Ste. Marie. Here a steel
viaduct,
1,550 ft. long and 130 ft. high, situated at the head
of a falls
150
ft. high, had to be built. This viaduct was designed in 1902 by
Boller and Hodge,
of New York City, and a contract was arranged
at that time with the Canadian Bridge Co. for its erection. Due to
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 35 CANADIAN RAIL -438
in the country, is British Columbia fir, it is
necessary to build these bridges from end of
steel. The old line from Sault Ste. Marie to
Hawk Lake Jet.
is through a most difficult
country to build in, and the location secured,
while good work on the whole, shows
it.
The line to Hawk Lake Jet., with the new
extension, and
on to Michipicoten is badly
handicapped with heavy grades and sharp
curvatures, I 1/2% uncompensated grades
and 12-degree maximum curves.
To improve
this, grade and alignment would require
extensive relocating, hence, for the present,
this
is not contemplated. The route is very
picturesque and travellers have a treat
in the
rugged scenery awaiting them on theopening
up of the
Algoma Central for traffic, north
of Sault Ste. Marie.
The Montreal River bridge and yard as they appeared when they were new.
CRMW, June, 1912.
While the above work was
progressing south of the C.P.R. main
transcontinental line a location was made
north to the National Transcontinental Ry.
at the new town
of Hearst (or Grant) in the
the suspension
of this work the contract
was never carried out, and upon tak.ing up
the work to complete same the wtiter awarded
another contract to the Canadian Bridge
• .f
Co. There is 1,745 tons of steel in this
viaduct, and the
alignment being on a
curve at each end it was a very interesting
job of erection. The viaduct consists of
tower girders supported on steel legs, with
concrete pedestal piers with end abutments.
There are thirteen 30-ft. tower girders and
one 40-fl. situated
on an island in the
middle
of the river. The intetmediate girders
consist
of one 85-ft., five 75-ft., ten 60-ft.,
and two 30-ft. spans. Thestructure is designed
under the Dominion Government
specifications, class 1 loading, and is a
splendid piece
of work. Due to some poor
work
in concreting the piers and having to
re-build some, the erection was slow.
However, track was laid over this viaduct
and track laying proceeded north
of it in
October, 1911.
The same bridge as it appears today, little changed in 82 years.
Photo by Mark Gustafson.
At the date of writing track is at mile 104 1/2. At the north
e
nd track laying has progressed to mile 117 to date,leaving a gap
of 12 1/2 miles, which it is expected will be finished by the middle
of June. The principal reason for the slow progress being made in
track laying is on account of the excessive amount of bridging and
trestling on this line.
Between
Sault Ste. Marie and Josephine Jet. there are
about 16,000,000 ft. b.m.
of bridge timber in 140 structures,
besides
LOO,OOO lin. ft. piLing. Some of these bridges are very large,
and as all the bridge timber used, excepting a few thousand feet cut
first division point west of Coch.rane and 101 miles north of the
C.P.R. This location
is on the same grades and curvatures as the
Hawk Lake -Hobon section, viz 6.6% [sic! Should be 0.6%)
compensated grade and 6-degree maximum curves. Louis Whitman,
locating engineer, had charge
of the location, with Sanford Hazelwood
and W.H. Wilkie
in charge of the parties. The route traversed by
this line is through rough country for 30 miles north of the C.P.R.,
north
of this the line enters the great clay belt of Northern Ontario
and the grading
is light. The south 30 miles, however, brings up the
average cost
of the line to about $30,000 a mile, including track and
structures.
RAIL CANADIEN -438 36 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
The above work has all been in
charge
of the writer, as Chief Engineer,
s
ince the beginning, with a staff of division
and resident engineers. G.G. Horsey and C,
Le B. Miles have charge
of the work at the
north
end, and L.C. Maxwell and J.A.
Hed
gecock at the south end as division
engineers.
W.c. Franz is General Manager
and G.A. Montgomery, Superintendent
of
the A.c. & H.B. Ry., as also of the Algoma
Eastern Ry.
ALGOMA CENTRAL & HUDSON BAY
RAILWAY
~~————~~–~~–~~~~~~~~~~~~–~–~
The Alice Lake Trestle on the Magpie branch of the Algoma Central.
CRMW, Jun
e, 1912.
The crossing of the C.P.R. and the Canadian Northern
Ontario Ry. (under construction)
is made at grade. There are very
few bridges on this 100 miles, and none at all
of any size excepting
some bay crossings
of Oba Lake, where four pile trestles are
driven, one
of them being 1,302 ft. long with deck 10ft. above the
water.
The balance of the bridging consists of pile structures, the
largest, the crossing
of the Mattawishquia river, near Hearst, at the
junction with the National Transcontinental Ry., being 700 ft.
long.
The grading quantities on this 100 miles will be, approximately
360,000 cu. yds. solid rock; 250,000 c
u. yds. loose rock; 1,500,000
common excavation, and 3,500,000 cu. yds. overhaul. There will
be about 80,000 lin. ft. piling
ancll,500,000 ft. b.m. bridge timber,
besides other lesser items. Corrugated ingot iron pipe is used in
culverts, no concrete at all, and a few native timber culverts.
In
August, 1911, a contract was let to the Superior Construction Co.
for the construction
of the section complete, including grading,
bridging, track laying and ballasting.
To date 60% of the grading
is completed, and it is expected track laying will be started about
June 15 at Hobon and reach the C.N.O.R. crossing in October, thus
placing
the A.C. & H.B. Ry. in a position to deliver construction
material and supplies to the contractors for this line at
Oba.
Explorations for further extensions
of the A.C. & H.B. Ry.
to the north
of the National Transcontinental Ry. have been made.
A
copper metallic circuit telephone line has been constructed from
Sault Ste.
Marie, through to Michipicoten Harbor and extensions
to the mines and north to Hobon and Hearst (Grant) will be made
this summer.
At Sault Ste. Marie, new terminals, consisting
of a modem
locomotive house, machine shops, stores and office building and
a new
tenninal station and office building are all contracted for and
the
work started. This work involves the expenditure of about
$500,000, and includes an extension
of the main line to reach
nearer the centre
of the city of Sault Ste. Marie, and a new yard at
Tagoma, the industrial centre, where extensive alterations and
additions
to the terminal facilities are being made. The company
will also build a large coal and ore dock at Michipicoten
Harbor,
in the near future.
CRMW, September, 1913.
Construction on the completion of this
companys line to Hearst on the National Transcontinental Ry. is
rapidly drawing to a close. Trains are being operated from Sault
Ste. Marie to Franz, at the junction with the
c.P.R., 195 miles north
of Sault Ste. Marie, and to Michipicoten Harbor and the companys
mines, branching off at Hawk Jet. This section was opened for
traffic December I, 1912. North
of Franz, grading is entirely
completed through
to Hearst on the National Transcontinental Ry.
Track was laid to Oba at the junction with the Canadian Northern
Ontario Ry.
in December, 1912. This season this section is being
ballasted, a
nd by October I, will probably be taken over for
operation. Tracklaying is progressing north
of Oba, and steel is
expected
to reach Hearst by November 1. By that time this section
will be practically ballasted also, so that it
is quite probable trains
will be operating through to Hearst via the A.C.
& H.B. Ry. by
December
1. Hearst is 295 miles north of Sault Ste. Marie. Oba is
50 miles south,
or via the A.C. & H.B. Ry. it is an even 100 miles
between the C.P.R. and the National Transcontinental Ry. By a
rather peculiar coincidence this is the shortest distance these two
railways are apart over any feasible route for the connecting line
anywhere between Quebec and a point west
of Fort William. It is
also the only place where the Canadian Northem Ry. comes just
midway between these railways, hence the A.C.
& H.B. Ry. has
secured the shortest and
most direct route connecting by a cross
line these three transcontinental railways with the Great Lakes. All
new work on the line north
of Hawk Jet., 164 miles north of Sault
Ste. Marie,
is constructed on a maximum 0.6% compensated grade
with 6 degrees maximum curves.
COMPLETION OFTHEALGOMA CENTRAL AND HUDSON
BAY RAILWAY
CRMW, November, 1914.
We are officially advised that this ]jne is fully complete
from Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., to Hearst, Ont., the junction with the
National Transcontinental Ry., a total distance
of294 miles, which
finishes the line as far as the
companys present plans go. The
Board of Railway Commissioners has issued an order for the
operation
of the line through to Hearst.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994
The line north of the c.P.R. main transcontinental line
through to the N.T.R. at Hearst
is 99.81 miles long, connecting
with the N.T.R. one mile west
of the station building. This line is
built on 0.6 grade and maximum 6 degree curve, all curves being
spiralled with serial spiral. The line
is on modern standards in
every respect, rock cuttings 20
ft. wide at subgrade, earth cuttings
the same, excepting north
of Oba in the rolling clay belt, where
very light cuttings are common, they have been widened to provide
additional drainage.
The line from the C.P.R. at the junction point, Franz, to a
point half way to
aba, where it crosses the Canadian Northern Ry.,
is through the same sort of formation as along the C.P.R. in this
distJict. At this point the line enters the clay belt and the country
north
of that point presents an entirely different formation, gradually
verging from a rocky wilderness into rolling clay ridges and rich
spruce low lands, which when drained will make excellent farm
land. The line north
of Oba has a maximum 3-degree curve, with
the one exception where it connects with the N.T.R., which is a 4-
degree curve. The maximum grade is the same as the section
between Franz and
aba, namely, 0.6%.
TELEPHONE TRAIN DISPATCHING ON THE ALGOMA
CENTRAL AND HUDSON BAY RAILWAY
CRMW, January, 1912.
This line has been dispatching trains
by telephone since
1902, using on the Main Line Division the Bell 1000
ohm magneto
type wall instruments and on the Michipicoten Division the· New
State 80 ohm series instruments.
Last spring the construction
of a metallic circuit of No. 12
new British standard hard drawn copper wire was commenced.
When completed the line will extend from Sault Ste. Marie, north
to Hobon [Franz], 195 miles, with connection at Hawk Lake with
the Michipicoten Division metallic circuit
of 36 miles, covering
the Michipicoten, Josephine and Magpie branches and serving the
Helen and Magpie mines. The existing pole lines were practically
rebuilt last summer and new lines have been built from Pangissin,
68 miles north of Sault Ste. Marie, to mileage 107, and from
Josephine Mine Jet., mileage 107
to 125. The gap of 18 miles is
A Northern Electric No. 1020 desk telephone.
37 CANADIAN RAIL – 438
now being closed and it is hoped to secure communication between
Sault Ste. Marie and Michipicoten Harbor early
in January.
The Hawk Lake -Hobon extension
of some 30 miles will
be built next spring and further extension
of the system north of the
C.P.R. proceeded with. A portion
of the new dispatching telephone
apparatus will be installed this winter and the instaJlation, with the
exception
of the Hobon extension, will be completed early next
spring. This will give a dispatching circuit
of 190 miles for the
present and 220 miles on completion
of the Hobon extension.
The line has been constructed on a substantial standard
specification and the equipment installed
is the last word in up-to­
date telephone apparatus.
It is furnished by the Northern Electric
and Manufacturing Co., Montreal, and consists
of their dispatchers
head receiver, etc., and their selector equipment for calling stations.
For stations at which agents are maintained the office
is provided
with their 1020 B transmitter aIm and head receiver, and station
selector set. Flag stations are provided with a 1317 W type wall
telephone. Portable telephone sets with line poles are provided for
use
of train crews.
A Northern Electric No. 1317 type wall telephone.
The system when completed will admit of the dispatchers
communicating with one
or more stations simultaneously, allow
of the sending of time over the wire, and also the transmission of
companys and commercial business.
Between Sault Ste. Marie and Searchmont, 30 miles, an
iron metallic circuit
is provided for commercial business and a
ground circuit extends from Searchmont to mileage 79. On the
Michipicoten branch
an iron metallic circuit between Michipicoten
Harbor and Helen Mine,
11 1/2 miles, cares for commercial
business and an iron ground circuit from Helen Mine to Grassett
on the
c.P.R. cares for conunercial business between the mines
and the outside.
We are indebted for the foregoing to G.A. Montgomery,
Superintendent
A.c. & H.B. Ry., at whose request it was prepared
by
C. Fitzsimon, Superintendent, Telephone Construction.
RAIL CANADIEN -438 38 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1994
The Business Car
The last train on the Fredericton Branch departs from Frederictonfor
Saint John on November 29,1993. Photo by David Morris.
LAST CAR TRAIN TO FREDERICTON
As reported in Canadian Rail No. 436, September-October
1993, permission was granted, on March 4, 1993 for the Canadian
Atlantic Railway (i.e. CP Rail)
to abandon considerable trackage
in New Brunswick, including the branch from Fredericton Junction
to Fredericton. A history of this line was carried in Canadian Rail
at that time.
The last train out of Fredericton departed on Monday,
November 29, 1993, with locomotive 8042 leading.
So ended 124
years
of rail service on the Fredericton Branch.
Train No. 12, the Atlantic, bound from Montreal to Halifax, stops at
Saint John on November
21,1993. The new VIA station, which opened
on December 16, is in the foreground. Photo by David Morris.
NEW VIA STATION IN SAINT JOHN
Due to the construction of a new arena in Saint John N.B.,
it was necessary
to re-locate the VIA station in that city. The new
station
is slightly east of the old one, and is the fifth railway station
to exist
in the immediate area. The first was from 1858 to 1884, the
second from 1884
to 1932. the third from 1932 to 1973. the fourth
from 1979
to 1993 (from 1973 to 1979 passenger trains did not
come into downtown Saint John). and the fifth starting
in 1993. In
view
of the impending abandonment of CPs Short Line through
Maine, on which runs the only passenger train serving Saint John,
one
can only wonder how long the new station will be in use.
FAIRVILLE STATION DEMOLISHED
Our member Dyson Thomas reports that all efforts to save
the Fairville.(Lancaster). station in Saint John failed, and this
century-old structure was demolished
by the CAR. An article on
this station appeared in Canadian Rail No. 432, Jan-Feb. 1993.
The ICE train logo on the side of Amtrak baggage car 1133 in
Montreals Central Station
on November 23, 1993.
Photo by Mark Gustafson.
ICE IN MONTREAL
Although there has been lots of ice in Montreal this very
cold winter, the ICE train, on its tour
of North America, did not,
unlike the X-2000, come to Canada. However, at least one car
of
the support train for the ICE tour did make it to Montreal. On
November
23,1993, Amtraks Montrealer arrived in Montreal,
and the baggage car was none other than 1133. complete with the
logo concerning the tour. Mark Gustafson was a passenger on the
Montrealer that day and took this photo in Central Station. It
shows that at least one car
of the tour train was in Montreal.
LINDSA Y & DISTRICT MODEL ENGINEERS
The Lindsay and District Model Engineers show will be
held on
Apri1 9 (11 AM to 5 PM) and 10 (Noon to 4:30 PM). 1994
in Victoria Park Armoury.
210 Kent StJeet, West Lindsay. Ontario.
For more information write to the Model Engineers at Box 452.
Lindsay, Ontario K9V
4S5 or phone Wayne Lamb (705)-324-9865
or Eric Potter (705)-328-3749.
THE NEW CANADIAN RAIL
You may notice some changes to Canadian Rail starting
with this issue. The title page and masthead have been modified,
and
SDme other changes in layout have been made to improve the
appearance
of the pages. Above all, colour pictures appear on the
covers. This is the first time that an actual colour photograph (as
distinguished from a coloured black-and-white photo) has ever
appeared on the front cover
of Canadian Rail. Whether colour will
continue
to appear depends on how our membership increases, but
there will be at least three issues (Nos. 438, 440. 442) with colour
covers in 1994. We hope you like the changes.
Fred
F. Angus, Editor.

JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1994 39 CANADIAN RAIL -438
ED 1 TOR I A L By -Par Hugues Bonin
The readers of Can:ldian R~jl have. hopefully, nOliced
my nalDe as the newest addition 10 the editorial team. I was pleased
w accept a request from OUT President. Mr. Walter Oedbrook. 10
collaoor:ne in the production ofCanadian Rail, 3.<; MOIive Power
Editor. on u sustained basis.
Canadian Raj] is probably lU a turnins point in its
history. lnthe past. such as in the late sixties when I first joined the
CRHA, Canadian Rail wasoneoflhe VCT) few publications (and
the best) devoted alIllO~1 exclusively 10 Canadian Railways. Now
Ihe competition is rather ferocious lUuong the numerous high
qua
lity magazines which have proliferated al a much more rapid
nile than lhe available do
llars of the rJi1 enthusiast
A fuel of life with any periodical publication based on the
s
pontaneous submission of an.ic1es is that there are times of
abuOOanet: and times of famine, At the time of this writing, tho:
supply of material for publication is rl1lrn:r good, Nevcrtheless, in
order
10 ensure a continuing sou!X:e of good material. I ask you,
Canadian Rail reader, 10 submil :II least one anicle not only 011
motive power, but also on any r:tilwa)~rclalcd topics. Second, I
intend to ask personally a dozen persons to
conllnit themselvcs to
contribute at least one puper withill a period of two years. 111e idea
h
ere is 10 keep the commitment in time and effort as reasonable as
possible f
or eaeh individual. Of course, if you dont receive a leiter
from mc, plcase
doot ft:c1 overlooked. You are most welcome to
volunteer yourself as a regular e
omribUlor to Canadian Rai]·.
l.ndced, I have to provide the example. and I will contribute
ankles to Canadian Rai] on II more frequent basis, l havc also
offcred
to Fred my services for French -English language Inmslution,
aOO [ intend to increase the ratio of French within Canadi,m Rai],
wilhout plejudice
to the English language cuntent.
For those of you who d
ont know me, lei me say about
myself
that, in the 1970s, my modest student budget allowed me
limited activities such as a
few trips behind CNR 6218 aud 6060.
out
of MOlllrc.al, and a few vi~its 10 the Canadian Railway Museum
Du
ring (I foor-year sta), Itl Purdue University in L,fayclle, Indiana.
1 joined briefly the
Railfans of Indianapolis and attended severnl
of their meelings in Indianapolis. Back ill Canada. I joined the
teaching staff
ofthe Royal Military College of Canada in Kingston.
Ontario in 1
979, At that time. and in spite of a cons.idemble rnilway
heritagc, the Kingstoo area did not have any organized dub, With
the help
of my friends Mr. Peter MacDonald (cf. Canadian
Railway Modeller.
TrJ.in J. track 3, p.23) and Mr. Jotm Maycll.
the Kingst
oo Railfan Society was launched in 1982 and has grown
since then. It became the
Kingston Division of the CRHA in 1986.
I was then the first President
ofthc club and also the first editor of
our bi-month[y publication called
Kingston Rail, which was
considerably improved when Walter Bedbrook succeeded me as
Editor. Finally. I am an N-scale mode
ller of the amlChair variety.
and I take numerous slides
of all kinds of milway subjL(.ts nnd I
enjoy I
r-Jding Ihose Cl(tnl ones with scveral pen pak
Les It.Cteursde Canadian Rail [Iuront. saosdoule, remarqtt6
mon nom Il()uvellcrnent ajout~ i) tcquipe de redaction de [a revue.
II ma fait plasir daccepter tine requtte de notre President, M.
Waher Bedbrook. pour
coJJabo~r i) Canadian Rail sur une base
reguliere, dans
Ie domainc des locomotives, Canadian Rail est
probablement a un poinl lou
mant de son existence. Autrefois,
notam/llem a la fin des ann&:s soixante alors que jadh~rnis !I
lACHF, Canadian Rai[ ~tait !lon scuJelnentle pone·ctendard de
IACHF, mais elai! aussi rune des r.r.rcs publicatiOfl.~ consaerees
t:ll majeure partie [lUX chemins de fer canadiens. Aujourdhui, lu
concurrence
CSt plulot feroce entre Ics nombreux magazines de
haUle qualitc, (lui sont multiplies a un rythme bien sl~rieur 11 cclui
des dollars disponibles des amateurs de tra
ins.
Une eamclcristiqut: Iypiee des ¢riodiques bases sur la
sQurnissiol1 spolllal1tSe d articles ¢.~t qu . il y a ~ temps d abondanct:
eomrnc
il y a des perior[es de disette. MOll approche pour conlrer
(.C probleme est dabord de vou.) encourager 11. soumcnre au rnoins
un article
ia notre revue, non seulement sue les locomotives. mais
aussi sur t
OllS :lUlres SUjclS ferroviaires qui vous intCrcssenl. Dan~
un dcul(icme temps, jc veux massurer dun appon constant de
materiel
pour publication, et pour cela, jc lOllS demander
pc
rsonnclkment ~ une douzaine de persorutcS de prornetlre au
moins un a
nicle 11. Canadian Rail par periode de deux ans. Lidfe
cst iei dobtcnir de la pa.rt de ces personae. .. une contribulion uts
rC,llis modesle. Bien entendu. si IIOUS ne rccevez pas de lellre de rna pan,
ne
soyc-. pas offusques! COllsidcrtl-VOUS cordialemcnt invites a
vous
poner volomaires pour dcvcnir run des collaborntcurs
regu[icrs de
Canadi,u1 RaiJ.
11 va de .<;oi que je dois dormer lexcmple. et jenverrai dcs
articl
e. .. i) Canadian Rail dc f~Ofl plus frequentc. jli aussi otTen
m~s service.~ i) Fred comme tmducteur du Franr;ais a lAnglais Ct
vic
e·versa. rai aussi lintcmion daugmcmcr I:i presence de la
langue
fran~aisc dans nutre revue sand prejudice pour nos [ccteurs
anglo
phoncs.
Pour
(CU.( dcnlre ous qui IIC me cOIUlaisscnt pas. jc dir.li
que. dans
[C1j nnn~ soi xante-dix, mcs maigre!> fCSSOUrtC!> fma.ncicres
uctudiant
mont toul de mcme pcnnis quc1que, voyages avec Ic~
Canadien N~liona[ 621g et 6060, et quc1l[t1<.:~ visites au MlIs Fcrroviaire Canadien. Durant un sejour dc quatre :l.IlS pour mon
doctoral
ia Purdue University dc Lafayette, Indi:l.lla. jai adhere:1lI
dub Railfans of lndimmpolis ct a~siste ;J plusicurs de leurs
rCunious Illensut:lles a Indianapolis.
De retour au Canada. fai joint
1c corps cnscignam du
Royal Mili
tnry College of Canada de Kingston. Ontario. en 1979.
A rna surprise. et Illalgre JMriwge fcrroiaire C
OllsidCr.lb1c de 13
region de Kingston, ilny ;lvait aucun dub orgmlis:. AVlC [aide
de deux :IIuis. M. Peter Macdonald (d. Canadhm Railway
Mooc
Her. Train 3, Tr:tck r. p. 23) et M. 101m MaycJL la
Ki/lgstol1 Railfan Society fut fond&: en 1982 et a prosperc
depuis. dcvcnaut
Ja Dii~ion de Klng~ton de [. ACHF en 1986. J en
fus
Ie premier president, amsi que Ic ]lNmicr redacteur de [a revue
Kingslon Ra
il qui a etC bien IlmClior:e dcptlis par Waher
Bedbro(lk. Enfin, Je
~ui~ modcli~tc (echelle N) de la varictc
Chait><: he~anIC ct je prcnds beaulOup de di,IPOS de Inlins el
g
aree;. et jen cch.lOge bcauLoup avec plusicllrs correspondanK
BACK COVER: The 0111) T,aln Masltf~ IlxvlIJoth( til he psell((/ i$ emil/dim! Padflc 8905. This !iew .f/rmS it at C(lIXlI/Y. AIIItll.
8905 i$ /lOW a dutl exlribit a/lire C(//wdic/ll Railway MllsellllJ at lJd.Wfl . St. COI/Slalll P.Q.
Photo b) Ron Visockis.

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