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Canadian Rail 433 1993

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Canadian Rail 433 1993

Canadian Rail
No.433 MARCH -APRIL 1993
THE MONTREAL PARK AND ISLAND RAIL AY
~
1893 –CENTENNIAL–
1993
CANADIAN RAIL
PUBLISHED 81-MONTHl Y BY THE CANAOIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
FOITaR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR Douglas N. W. Smith
For your mecnbershlp in the CRHA, which includes a
subscription to Canadian Rail, write to:
DIST
.. HBl,.. -tON: Gerard Frechette
CARTOGRAPHER: William A. Gerrr.a.,iuk
LAYOUT: Fred
F. Angus
CRHA. 120 Rue SI-Pierre. $1. Constant. Que. J5A 2G9
Rates: 11 Canada:
ou~side Canada:
$30 (including G8T).
$27.50 in U.S. funds.
PRINTING: Prc::;sl P,ntilQ
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE MONTREAL PARK AND ISLAND RAILWAy ………………… . RICHARD M. BINNS ……………. 39
DRAWINGS OF CANADAS RAILWAYS
IN WORLD WAR II ….. THURSTAN TOPHAM…………. 71
HISTORY BEHI
ND A PICTURE FRAME ………………………………….. .. FRED F. ANGUS ………………… 72
GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY FIRE, 1874 ………………………………….. DRIFTIN DOUG SMITH ……….. 73
THE BUSINESS CAR …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 74
Canadian Rail is continually in need 01 news, stories. historical data, photos. maps and other material. Please send all contributions to the
editor: Fred F. Angus, 3021 Trafalgar Ave. Montreal, P.O. H3Y 1 H3. No payment can be made for contributions, but the oontributer will
be given credit for material submitted. Material will be returned to the contributor iI requested. Remember Knowledge is oIfinle value unless
it is shared with others.
DIRECTORS
PRESIDENT: Walter J. Bedbrook Frederick F. Angus William Le Surf William Thomson
VI
CE PRES : Charles De Jean Alan C. Blackburn Robert V.V. Nicholls Lawrence M. Unwin
James Bouchard VICE PRES : David W. Johnson Gerard Frechelte Ernest Oltewell Richard Viberg
TREASURER: Robert Carlson Mervyn T.
Green Andrew W. Panko
A. Stephen Walbridge
SECRETARY: Bernard Martin J. Christopher Kyle Douglas N.w. Smith Michael Westren
The CRHA has a number 01 local diVisions across the country. Many hold regular meetings
and issue newsletters. Further information may be obtained by writing to the division.
FRONT COVER: MOlltreal Iork & 1.~land
HllilwayNo$. /OJ2 01111702 P055irtJl each otiter
0
11 tlte WIItf right 0/11(1) besi,it MaplC·ood
A,y. 1111907. IOJ2(Is tile fir. fl/lilt stritsof
lell larg! $u/rOO cors that 5( …. ·tdjron 1f}(J2
lI/1/if tli! 1920s allli 111m. after rebrlildiK.
UII/illht 1950s. 702 1150/1 MSR Scotch cor~
of 1901 rl,m >(IS lrOJ/sttrred to rht P&/ aboul
f907 atUII.5ed 05 1m ~rJua· on tht around­
l/r-III,,,,/1/(1II1 mil. It ,,liS rrlmilt itl 19f2. rt­
rurnrd 10 cily stn·iu o/Ill rmud in 1928.
CRlfA lIi(5. WCTC Colltclii}fl.
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O eo. 1162
~ Jcrn N.B E2l. ~7
ST LAWRENCE VALLEV DIVISION
P.O Be. 22. SIaIion8
–P.D. H3B~
RIOEAU VALLEV DIVISION
P.o.Bex~
SmIIt .• F …… One. K1A 5A$
KINGSTON OMSION
PO eo. 100. Sa1IQn-
KirqIIc>n.o… K7M SP9
TOROHTO & fOAl( DIVISION
P.O eo. 5&19. r ……… -A­
T_.ON. M5W1P3
NIAGARA DIVISION
POBe.~
SI.. ~ Crt. l2R6W8
CALGARY /I. SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
6O-&HlO ~A …. N.E.
~.~T2A5Z8
ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
po. Box 6102. Station-C-
E SELKIRK: ONISION
po Box 39
RewIIIIOI CROWSNEST /I. KfTflE VAUfV ONISION
PO _400
Olrilroal<. B.C. VIC ~HII
NELSON ELECTRIC TRAMWAY SOCIETY
I:!:3VWl-wSnM
NeIIon. B C. IlL 2VlI
PfIflCE GEOROe·NECHAKO-FRAS£R DIVISION
po 8ox2401l
Prr.o. G&oroe. a.c. 1m 2S6
PACIFIC C()A5T 0II1S1ON
PO. eo. 1005, ~ -A­
VarICOII¥OIt. B.C. V6C 2PI
As part of its activities, the CRHA operates
the Canadian Railway Museum at Delson I
St. Constant, Que. which is about t4 miles
(23 Km.) from downtown Montreal. 11 is
o
pen from late May to early October (daily
until
Labour Day). Members, and their im­
mediate families. are admitted Ileeol charge.
GOAl.. OF THE ASSOCIATION THE OOLLECTION. PAESERVATION,o.N[) DISSEMINATION Of ITEMS RELATING TO THE HISTORY Of RAilWAYS tN CANADA
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAIJ RAIL Page 39
Tile Montreal Park and Island Railway Co.
And Its Rolling Stock
By Richard M. Binns
The following article was written by Richard M. Binns (1902 -1988) who was a long time member and director of the CRHA, and
who was largely responsible for the Montreal street
car collection coming to our Association. In 1987 your editor had been in correspondence
with Mr. Binns, who was then living
in Victoria B.C., regarding a major article on the Montreal Park and Island railway. It was felt that since
there
is so little concrete data remaining on the rolling stock of this pioneer suburban line, what does exist should be recorded for posterity
before it disappears. Unfortunately, Mr. Binns died on January 8, 1988 before the article was completed. Subsequently his heirs donated
much
of his historical material to the CRHA, and among these items was the unfinished Park and Island article.
In view
of the fact that 1993 is the centennial of the start of construction of the P&I, your editor has completed the article for
posthumous publication.
It was about two-thirds complete at the time of Mr. Binns death, and what has been added is the introduction and
history
of the line, the final paragraphs, some contemporary newspaper accounts and additional photographs. A small amount of information
subsequently found has been added, and a few references to the present time have been brought up to 1993 instead
of 1987. However, the
full research and comments
on the rolling stock, including the forward and the text, is the work of Mr. Binns.
Canadian Rail
is proud to present this centennial article both as a tribute to Richard M. Binns, and to those whose faith in suburban
development
in greater Montreal caused them to plan and build the Montreal Park and Island Railway, one hundred years ago.
INTRODUCTION
The Montreal Park and Island Railway Company was
incorporated
in 1885 by act of the Legislature of the Province of
Quebec 48 Victoria, Chapter 74. Under this act the company was
empowered
To build ([ steam, electric or otherwise operated
railway from points
in City of Montreal to summit of Mount Royal
Park and
to the various municipalities on MOlltreal Island, etc.,
etc..
There was also an agreement with the Montreal City
Passenger Railway Company regarding running rights. The name
of the proposed railway came from the fact that it was to operate
in Mount Royal Park, and also throughout Montreal Island. At that
time electric traction was
in its very early stages, and the fact that
electric power was mentioned
in the act shows that the incorporators
of the P&I were up to date. However 1885 was seven years before
electric traction came to Montreal, and little was done for eight
years
to build the lines mentioned in the charter.
In 1892, the Montreal Street Railway (which was the new
name for the City Passenger Railway) had begun a major project
to electrify
aU its lines, the first electric car had run in September
of that year, and the electrification would be complete in little
more than two years. Electrification meant that suburban extensions
had become feasible, and the new year
of 1893 was not very old
before the Montreal Park & Island Railway Company woke up
after its eight-year sleep and began actively
to promote and build
lines into the suburbs. The plan to build
to the summit of Mount
Royal was deferred (and eventually given up under act
in 1906);
it was decided to concentrate all the company
s resources on the
suburban lines.
Construction was begun in the summer
of 1893 on a line
from Montreal
to Sault au Recollet, and the first tJial run over the
entire line was made on December 27
of that year, with regular
service beginning early
in January, 1894. During 1894 another line
was built through Outremont, reaching the village
of Cote des Neiges (near the present corner
of Cote des Neiges Road and
Queen Mary Road) on August I, 1894.
The line was then extended
west, then south, on what
is now Girouard Ave., and east again to
the
corner of Victoria Ave. and Sherbrooke Street where it
connected with the system
of the Montreal Street Railway. Thus by
the
summer of 1895 it was possible to go completely around the
mountain by electric car. In 1895 a new line was
commenced,
leaving the around-the-mountain run at Snowdon Junction, and
heading north
to the village of St. Laurent and on to Cartielville.
This line was completed in 1896,
in which year the P&I began yet
another line, from the west end of the Street Railways Notre Dame
Street line to the city of Lachine. This line was entirely separate
from the
other Park and Island lines, requiring the cars to run over
the tracks of the MSR to connect. However, under the agreement
of 1885, and subsequent modifications, the P&I had running rights
over the
MSR so their cars could run to the centre of the city.
By 1899, tbe Montreal Park and Island Railway
was a
substantial
suburban system, operating 41.86 miles of track,
including sidings, and owning
51 pieces of rolling stock (including
freight and work cars), as well as 8 cars leased from the MSR.
At
this time, however the expansion of the system came to a sudden
halt.
The earlier plans for a network of lines grid-ironing the
island were suspended and,
in most cases, never built. The trouble
was that the company had expanded too fast into lightly-populated
areas and development
of these areas was not proceeding fast
enough to generate the passenger revenue needed to
make the
railway a profitable undeJtaking. In short, the P&I was
ill serious
financial difficulties and sought help to bail it out. Fortunately
help was close at hand. Negotiations were begun with the Montreal
Street Railway with the result that an agreement was reached, in
June 1901, that, for the sum
of $1,100,000, the MSR would
purchase all the stock and bonds
of the P&I and assume control
effective July
I, 1901.
Page 40 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
MONTREAL TO BACK RIVER
THE NEW ELECTRIC ROAD TO SAULT AU RECOLLET
A Trial
Trip Yesterday. The Montreal Park and Island Railway Company. The Island to be Belted by Electric Roads.
From Montreal to Sault Au Recollet was the trip taken by a number of the shareholders of the Montreal Park and Island Railway
Company, and representatives of the press yesterday afternoon,
It was the first trial trip over the new electric road which, it was explained
by some of the officials, is only the first portion of the belt of electric railway with which it is proposed by the Park and Island
Company to
encircle the Island of Montreal.
The road has been in process of construction since September last, but it will not be in regular order for about
ten days yet. Those present on the trip were the Hon, J.R. Thibaudeau, Mr. W.S. Williams, Managing Director, Messrs. A.
J. Corriveau, R.
Stanley Bagg, A.E. Lewis,
James Quinn, Roy and Marble, the engineers in charge of the construction, and the press representatives. A
visit was first paid to the car house of the Montreal Street Railway at Hochelaga, where are two new cars of the Park
& Island Railway:These
cars were made
in Philadelphia and are of very handsome pattern. They are painted of a light colour outside and are finished in oak and
cherry. Comfortable cane covered seats, ranged as in the ordinary railway coach, will easily seat forty persons, but there are also straps
for passengers who, on account of any rush of traffic, may be compelled to stand.
The coaches are thirty-three feet long, with double swivel
trucks. The company will
have six of these coaches ready within ten days, when they will commence a regular service.
The trip
over the road was made with one of the Montreal Street Railway cars, the route being up St. Lawrence street, past the
Canadian Pacific tracks. To cross the tracks a new kind of diamond is used, rendering
it unnecessary to cut the rails of the road. The road
then turns eastward into the fields, passing around the Shamrock Lacrosse grounds where, it may be said, the company has purchased
ground for switches and platforms. After St. Denis street has been crossed the road runs in a straight line to Vervais Hotel, or the
Half Way
House, as it is called. The road goes right through the garden, and from there in almost a straight line to Back River, through the Bagg Farm
opening up 15,000 feet of frontage. The road at present goes as far as the Jesuit Noviciate, but in the spring
it will be continued as far as
St. Vincent
de Paul. The run was made in good time yesterday, the record from Mount Royal avenue to Peloquins Hotel being made in thirty
minutes. When we get the road in good working order, remarked Mr. Williams, we will
do the entire trip in thirty minutes.
The road is not yet ballasted, the ties being laid on the solid stone roadway, but in spite of this the running was
very smooth. The
Hon. SenatorThibaudeau is very sanguine overthe prospects of the road. We propose to run a freight service in connection with the road
said Mr. Thibaudeau to a
STAR reporter, and will bring in country produce, provisions, and will do a good business in carrying out supplies
to the country residents. Why,
our coal business alone will be a big item, It costs 75 cents a ton now to carry coal to Sault au Recollet, and
we will carry it for 23 cents.
We will also run spurs into the quarries and bring stone into the city. We will hire special trains to parties who
desire them. In the summer
we expect to run every quarter of an hour from six oclock in the morning till twelve oclock at night. We will be
able to accommodate ten thousand people a day.
Yes, the line is bound to go, said Mr. Williams, taking
up the conversation. I have already had a large number of enquiries from
residents of the Back River wanting to make arrangements for season tickets, and also from people
who propose to reside out here. A stop
was made on the way back at Peloquins Hotel, where a number of healths were proposed. Mr.
R. Stanley Bagg proposed the health of
the Hon. Mr. Thibaudeau and Mr. Williams. The Hon Mr. Thibaudeau,
in replying, said that they intended to construct 125 miles of the electric
roads on the island;
in fact to reach every municipality.
Next summer they would build out by St. Laurent, to the bridge at Bord a Plouffe, and ultimately to Ste.
Genevieve. Lachine would
also be reached, and they hoped to build to Longue Pointe and Pointe aux Trembles, besides constructing a road to Notre Dame
de Grace
and around the mountain to the two cemeteries.
Theywould be ready next summer to carry 10,000 people a day, that is 5000 out and 5000
back, to Sault
au Recollet, while they were confident of being able to handle the crowds that would rush to the Shamrock Grounds, He
referred
to the stability of the company, and in support of this pOinted out that it embraced such men as Sir Donald Smith, Mr. R.L. Gault,
Mr.
D. Morrice, Mr. Arthur Boyer and many other local men, as well as several New York capitalists. They had secured running powers over
the Montreal Street Railway tracks in the city, and were in a position to develop the whole Island of Montreal and contribute to its prosperity.
Subsequently he said that they intended to
have a line to Ste. Rose. The difficulties the company had met with were referred to by Mr.
Williams
in explanation of the delay in getting into operation. When he setout ten months or a year ago they had intended to construct twenty
miles during the past summer, but the enterprise met with so many obstructions in the matter of rights of way, and
was impeded by so many
powerful interests that it was impossible to do so.
In one case they had been offered $1 0,000 to come by St. Denis street, but when they were ready these parties wanted to be paid
$10,000. Finally they got a right of way from Messrs. Bagg, Lewis, Vervais and others, but in many cases they were already building before
the agreements were signed, and it was the first of October before they got to work
in earnest. Subsequently Mr. Williams said that he and
Mr. Corriveau had intended at first to enlist New York capital, but the crisis came [the financial panic of 1893]. and they had to localize their
interests, finding also that there was a sentiment in its favour as against foreign capital, and now the majority of the capital was held in
Montreal. He
reviewed the history of the company, and said that, now they had a charter covering the whole island, they could go into any
municipality, but he broadly intimated that they did not intend to force their
way into villages where the council was not willing to make
arrangements of a suitable nature.
The health of Mr.
R. Stanley Bagg, Mr. A.E. Lewis and Messrs. Roy and Marble, the engineers, were also proposed, after which
the party returned to the city.
Montreal Daily Star, Friday, December
29,1893.
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 41
Although the life of the P&I as an independent company
was over,
it continued to exist as an important wholly-owned
subsidiary
of the MSR. Taking advantage of earlier franchise
agreements, new lines, notably the track
on Sherbrooke Street west
to Montreal West, was built
in 1908 in the name of the Park &
Island. Even the purchase, in 1907,
of the land for the new Youville
Shops was made, officially, by the Park and Island. It was not until
1911 that the various transit companies
in Montreal were reorganized
as the Montreal
Tramways Company, with full amalgamation
taking place in 1912. Even then the
name Montreal Park & Island
did not disappear, for tickets, transfers and other documents still
carried the P&I name for several years
even under the MTC,
possibly because
of franchise considerations. Finally in 1918, with
a new comprehensive agreement between the
MTC and the various
municipalities which it served, the historic name Montreal Park &
Island Railway disappeared, although the Jines they built and
operated would continue
to in service as suburban electric tramways
for another forty years.
THE ROLLING STOCK OF THE MONTREAL
PARK
AND ISLAND RAILWAY
FORWARD
When Mr. David E. Blair, former Vice-President and
General Manager
of the Montreal Tramways Company, joined the
Montreal Street Railway in 1903, as Assistant Superintendent
of
Rolling Slock, one of his first duties was to assist in preparing the
1903 inventory
of cars and equipment. Some of his pencilled notes,
made while drafting the Park & Island Inventory, are quoted,
in
part, below:
In order to help you in tracing the differences between the
inventories
of P&I stock since the road was taken over by MSR, I
have prepared the following statement showing how I have fixed
upon the figures
in inventOlY of 1903. Park & Island property has
never been labelled
in any way, and it is hardfor a stranger to pick
it out
of a common pile. I have had to follow the biography of each
article separately according
to type etc. without allY records to
work 0/1. I feel from all information / can collect that the figures
are correct ……..
.
…….. Besides these, eight cars, complete, were leased from MSR
and operated o/ltheirlines; Nos. / –
2 -3 -4 -5 – 6 -10 -11. These
were returned
to MSR at the time of transfer of stock. The shortage
in trucks (single) seems
to point to the fact that the trucks under
these cars were counted
in taking inventOlY of P&I stock before
/901.
How useful that pre-1901 inventory would be now! Early
car records, if they exist, have never been discovered. Considering
Mr.
Blairs difficulties in 1903, it is small wonder that ninety years
later,
we have trouble in getting all the facts. We must rely on news
items
of the time, some data from technical and other publications,
a few photographs, and data from
MSR records after 1902.
AftercomingunderMSRcontrol in 190 I, the P&I continued
to be operated as a separate company, and its
car records were kepl
separate from those
of the MSR. The companies sold cars and
equipment to
each other and, after the Terminal Railway came
under MSR control in 1907, cars were exchanged between the
thr
ee companies; each having separate corporate identities. In
1912 all rolling stock was consolidated under the newly-formed
Montreal
Tramways Company. Our story of Park & Island cars
covers the
entire period from the commencement of regular
operations in 1894 until the amalgamation of equipment in 1912.
Information on the original pre-190 I rolling stock is
necessarily sketchy, but a fairly complete listing can be made. In
the 1902 -1912 period, all cars designated on the records as the
property
of the MP&I Ry., or officially transferred to that company,
are described herein. However,
it is known that, during the last few
years
of operation, other MSR cars were used on P&I lines without
being officially transferred. Trucks, motors and controllers shown
are from the earliest records available, but are not necessarily the
original
or subsequent equipment.
PERIOD 1893 -1901
LEASED CARS
In] uly 1893, before the Park & Island commenced operations,
a contract was
made between the Montreal Street Railway and the
Park &. Island, designed for their mutual advantage and for the
benefit
of the public. Its main purpose was to provide for through
running
of P&I cars between suburban municipalities, where the
P&I had electric railway franchises, and the centre of the city, over
MSR lines, and to exclude any other railways from making similar
agreements. Article
5 of this contract reads, in part:
The Street Railway agrees to lease, and the Island Railway agrees
to hire from the Street Railway aile electric motor car, with two
motors each,
of a capacity of /lot less thanlhirty horse power each
motor as hereinafter describ
ed, for every two miles of electric
railway which it shall construct and operate, and the Street
Railway shall have the option
of supplying the whole or such part
of the additional (if any) cars and motors which may be used upon
the railway system to be constructed by the Island Railway as it
may see fit, upon the same terms and conditions as the cars above
mentioned ……..
Article 7:
All the cars so leased by the Street Railway to the Island Railway
shall be
of a quality and finish equal to the cars know/1 as Brills
Palace Car
No.2 with bevelled glass, with not more than twenty­
two foot box,
and of a power not less than sixty electrical
horsepower,
if motor cars.
A rental of five percent, per annum, upon the cost of the cars was
specified.
OPPOSITE PAGE: This account,jrom the Montreal Daily Star of December 29,1893, describes in considerable detail the events of the
opening
of the P&Jsfirstline.lt also mentions the vicicitudes of the company in securing capilal and a right of way, but it also demonstrates
the extreme optimism
of the promoters, with their plans to build 125 miles of track and serve the entire island. The description of the cars
is quite accurate but,
in fact, only two of that type were ever built.
Page 42 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
This historic photograph is the oldest precisely dated photo known of a Montreal electric car. It shows closed car No.2 and open car No.
10]
of the Montreal Park and Island Railway all decorated on the occasion of the first through trip through OU/remont to Cote des Neiges
on August
J, 1894. En route, a stop was made on Cote Ste. Catherine Road where this photo was taken. Notice the Maximum Traction trucks
under
No.2, also the temporary Outremont and Cemeteries sign over the regular Sault au Recollet sign on the front dash.
The
MO/Zlreal Gazette of August 2. ]894 reported in part Ten weeks ago, grading was started on the Outremont and COle des Neiges lines
of the Belt Line and the opening took place yesterday, August 1 st. Afew minutes after two, two special cars left the Cote Street depot. Those
on board included Han. J.A. Chapleau; Han. G.A. Nantel; Han. L. Beaubien, President; Senator Desjardins; Mayor Villeneuve; the
mayors
and councillors of Outremont, Cote des Neiges, Notre Dame de Grace and Mile End. Also shareholders and officers including Mr. Justice
Mathieu, Messrs.
H. Hogan. E. Lusher, and AJ. Corriveau. The first car was driven by Motorman Cully and Condltctor V. Belanger. The
line is double track throughout …….
At COle des Neiges, the party adjourned to the grounds of Mayor Swail, to partake of light refreshments.
Speechmaking followed. with President Louis Beaubien toasting The Queen. The return journey was then commenced, and twenty
jive
minutes later the city was reached. During the evening, the municipalities along the route were illuminated with Chinese Lanterns. The
line was open to the public at
5:00 P.M. and large crowds were present at this time. The service is to be half-hourly.
National Archives
of Canada, Merrilees Collection. Photo No: PA-J85903.
The advantages to MSR of an agreement which prevented
the
P&l from tying up with any other railway were apparently great
enough to justify MSR financing at least part
of the P&Is rolling
stock.
Consequently,
by the time the P&I had about 16 miles of
line in operation (Baok River Line, Mountain Belt -Line, and
Cartierville Line
to College Street) in the summer of 1895, we find
that
eight of their cars had been supplied by MSR under the terms
of the agreement. These were all closed cars of three styles: Nos.
1 and 2, ordered on July 27, 1893 and delivered late
in that year,
were
Brills Palace cars. These cars were rather handsome and
were mounted on double trucks
of the Maximum Traction type. This type
of truck had recently been developed by Mr. John A.
Brill, the famous Philadelphia car builder. for double-truck cars
havillgonly two motors. The design was such that about 75% of the
car weight
came on the large driving wheels, and 25% on the small
guiding wheels. This feature of the first P&I cars deserves particular
notice for two reasons -first, because
it was probably one of the
earlier applications
of this Brill truck design, and secondly because
this type of truck was never seen again in Montreal, although it was
widely used in the United States, even
in recent times. As a matter
of fact, the maximum-traction trucks on P&I cars I and 2 were
short lived, being replaced by standard single trucks starting as
early as 1895.
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 43
Only afew months after the photo opposite was taken, car No.2 had undergone several changes. It now sported primitive vestibules,
still open
at the sides, as well as new arc headlights. Most interesting, however, is the fact that the Maximum Traction trucks have been
replaced by a single truck! Evidently the original trucks were prone to derailment. This photo was taken near the Shamrock Lacrosse
Grounds, and appeared
in the magazine uLe Monde Illustre
U
for February 2, 1895.
National Library
of Canada, Photo No. NL-J8035.
The cars had generous open platfonns and were arranged
for double-end operation.
The only details we have are that the
body was 22 feet long, the overall length was 33 feet, the cars had
transverse seats (the earliest closed electric cars in Montreal to
have this feature), and the motors were Westinghouse
No.3 type.
The new cars were being fitted out near the end
of 1893 and
were ready for inspection by the press at the time that a successful
trial run was made to the Back River (Sault au Recollet) on
Wednesday, December 27 1893. Some accounts say that car No.
I was used for this run, others say the new cars were not quite ready
and a regular
MSR car was used instead.
Cars number 3 – 4 – 5 – 6 were ordered from N&AC
Lariviere, Montreal, by
MSR on December 28 1893 and delivered
to the P&I in May, 1894. They were single-truck cars of excellent
quality, with
21 foot bodies, and mounted on Blackwell trucks
(Canada Switch & SpriJlg Co.). Motors were Westinghouse No. 12
type. Cars 3 and 4 had open platforms, but 5 and 6 may have been
built with enclosed vestibules. A shadowy photograph
of No.5,
taken on Park Avenue in 1898, shows a substantial enclosed
vestibule, quite unlike the minimal ones then used by the MSR
(and later applied to P&I 1 and 2).
The vestibule on No.6, as seen
in photos taken years later when it was a work car, is also unlike
the MSR variety.
In June, 1894 P&l asked MSR to order more cars, but MSR
regretted that
it could not comply at present, but would lend some
of its own cars. The outcome of this suggested compromise is not known,
but early in 1895 two new cars, Nos. 10 and II, were
delivered to the P&I. These were also single-truck by Lariviere and
also had enclosed vestibules, Blackwell trucks and Westinghouse
No. 12 motors.
In an article on the
P&l in the Street Railway Journal of
October, 1895, it was stated that the company had ELEVEN closed
motor cars; two by Brill and NINE by Lariviere. This strongly
suggests that there were three others, which would conveniently fit
into the numbering sequence
if numbered 7 – 8 -9. These may have
been borrowed from the MSR, or may have been
P&I cars lost in
the
fiJe at the P&I car bam ill 1896.
Two exterior colour schemes appear on the eight known
leased cars. There
is evidence that Nos. 1 and 10, at least, were
green with gold letterillg. Others appear from photos to have been
an undetennined light colour with black lettering (described in a
December, 1893 newspaper account simply as
a light colour),
possibly the forerunner
of the buff-yellow adopted by the MSR
around that time and used until 1913. All were lettered M. S. Ry.
Co. and Montreal Park and Island Ry. Co. Lessee.
All
of these eight cars were returned to the MSR in
October, 1901, renumbered and used thereafter on their city lines.
One of these cars, No.6, was renumbered 48 in the MSR system
and became salt car 48
in 1925. In 1932, for reasons now unknown,
it exchanged numbers with salt car 332 (ex. MSR passenger
car
332) and, as salt car 332, survived in service until 1948. It was
scrapped as late as 1950, the last surviving pre-1901
P&I car.
Page 44 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
Two very early views of P&! cars, photographed in 1894, on the Back River/ine. Top is No.4 at SI. Gabriel station, while helow are 3 and
4 posed somewhere along the line.
CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
MARCH -APRIL 1993
ABOVE: No. 10, built ill 1895 with
an enclosed vestibule, is shown
when new, painted in
the P&I dark
colour, likely dark green with gold
lettering.
RIGHT: Car
No.6 had a long
histOlY.
In 1901 it became MSR
No.
48 and was used on city lines.
In 1925 it became a salt car, and in
1932 it was renumbered
332. Here
we see it in 1948, two years before
it was scrapped. Its P&I ancesliy
was, unfortunately, not knownllnlil
years later so no attempt was made
to preserve it.
Photosfrom CRH A Archives, Binlls
Collection.
CANADIAN RAIL Page 45
ABOVE: A very rare photo showing the P&Jsfirstvestibuled
car, No.5, heading north on
ParkA venue in 1898. AI/hough
of indifferent qllality, this is the only known 19th century
photoofaP&lcaron that line. Col/ectionofFredAnglls.
LEFT: Park and Island
No.4 at Henderson station on the
Back River line
in 1894. Note that the track ran right
through the station, allowing the passengers
to boardflllly
under cover. CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
Page 46
By 1895 the P&I work crews
were busy laying tracks as the system
continued to expand. Excerpts from
two
publications, that show the
progress
of the railway at that time,
would not be out
of place. In that
year the company published a
64-
page booklet entitled Suburban
Montreal, As Seen From the Routes
of the Montreal Park & Island Ry.
Co..
This booklet extolled the
advantages
of the new suburban area
accessable by the P&I. It also
contained several extremely rare
views
of early P&I rolling stock.
The virtues
of the electric railway
were summed up,
in an amazing
example
of late Victorian prose, by
an anonomyous writer whose initials
were E.J.C. An extract from this
publication follows:
Whatfairer counny on earth
than this great district so rapidly
being dOlled with the homes
of
Montreal peoplel Scenes of rural
beauty there are
to enchant the artist
and inspire the poet, while historical
associations cling
10 picturesque
spots and quaint structures to inspire
the patriotism
of the Canadian and
excite the interest and admiration
of the stranger. If the people of
Montreal have been comparatively
ignorant of the lovely country
contiguous to their fair city, they
have no excuse
for continuing in
ignorance any longer. Like many
other goods
we enjoy in this latter
part
of the nineteenth centU/y, we
owe this boon to that subtle power,
the very latest and most
up to date
necromancer, electricity. Heretofore
rural Montreal has been
comparatively a sealed book to
Montrealers because the highway
was the only means available
to
reach its solitudes. EvelY citizen of
Montreal does not own a horse or
the time to indulge
in long drives
and none
of us enjoy the blinding
dust
of a countlY highway. It would
RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
THE P&I IN 1895
The Montreal Park and Island Railway Co.
Office: 17 Place d Armes Hill.
OUTREMONT DIVISION TIME-TABLE,
Takiug elfect Frida). August 1, 1595.
LEAVING CRAIG STREET. LEAVING COTE DES NEIGES.
Lene 111011111 Cote des f ,Leave Mount I Craig
C . r Sl Royal N RUII No. lote des RO)tll Sl e t
ral}; . Avenue. I elges. Neiges, Avellue. r e.
————————
630
7 10
7 50
S 30
9 10
95
0
to 30
II 10
J I 50
12 ,30
1 10
1 50
2 30
3 10
3 So
4 30
5 10
5 So
630
7 10
7 50
330
9 10
9 So
10
3
0
IJ 50
610
650
7 3
0
S 10
S 50
93
0
1010
10 SO
II 30
12 10
12 50
I 30
2 10
2 50
3 30
4 10
4 50
5 30
6 10
6 50
7
30
8 10
8 50
93
0
10 10
10 50
II ,30
630
7 10
7 50
330
9 10
950
10 :;0
II 10
I ( 50
12 30
I 10
1 50
2 30
3 10
3 50
4 30
5 10
5 50
630
7 10
7 50
8 :;0
9 10
95
0
10
3
0
II 10
II 50
II 10
630
630
7 10
750
S 30
9
10
9 So
10
3
0
I [ 10
II 50
12 30
1 10
1 So
2 :;0
3 10
3 50
4 30
5 10
5 50
6 30
7 10
7 50
830
9 10
9 50
1030
It 10
11 50
65
0
I 730
3 10
~ So
93
0
10
10
1050
II 30
12 10
12 50
1 30
2 10
2 50
3 30
4 10
4 50
j ,30
6 10
6 50
7 30
8 10
S 5 9 3
0
1010
1050
J I 30
11 fa
7 10
750
S 30
910
9 So
10,30
II 10
II 50
12 30
I 10
I 50
2 30
3 10
3 50
4 3
0
5 10
,<; 50
6
30
7 10
7 So
3 30
9 10
9 50
10,30
II 10
I I 50
:OTE.-The first car for Cote-tles-Nei~(>s will leave i101l111 Roy:-.t
.\cnue :1t 6.10 a.lI1.
The last car leavillg Cote-cles-Neiges at 11.50 p.m. will TUn only to
lIount Royal Avenue.
SUNDAY SERVICE.
The first car leaving Craig Street :wcl Cott!.t.les·~e;ges will be at
7.40 a,IIl., and e,-ery 20 minutes thereafter.
–>y<--
BACK RIVER DIVISION TIME-TABLE.
. ,. NOTICE .•.
Beginning WEI): Slreet and Dack Ri,er ecry half hour:
The first car len ing
second It
last
Crnig Street.1t 6.30 a.W.
Bnck R,ier nt 5.30.1.1Jl.
tit. 6.30.1.JU.
Crnig Street [It 11.00 p.m.
Bnck Ri,-er at II.3D p.w.
SUNDAY SERVICE.
011 SUNDAYS the first car will leave Back Ri,er t ;.,}o a Ill. fllld
Craig Street 01 3.00 a.m.
Fly order,
The Montreal Park & Island RailwQy Co.
Per JOS. R. ROY,
eMf/Eng. rllld Syp.
would have meant complete ruination
of the natural beauties of the adjacent
country, the electric railway has
been introduced, giving
pelfect
communication between the heart
of the city and some of the most
remote and most lovely parts
of the
surrounding country. The
country
has virtually been brought to
the
city, and the magician who has
accomplished
it all is the Montreal
Park and Island Railway.
So far this enterprise is in
comparatively an incomplete stage
of development. Before long its system
will include a net-work
of tracks
grid-ironing the whole island. At
present it
is operating two main
routes, one running
up St. Lawrence
Street, thence to the Back Rive
r, the
other running
up Bleury Street and
Park Avenue, passing through
Montreal Annex and Outremont
to
Cote des Neiges, whence it is at the
present moment being continued
round the Western spur of the
mountain to connect with the Street
Railways system, providing for a
complete circuit of the two
mountains ….. .
And what a grand opportunity an
electric railway affords for seeing
and enjoying a rare bit
of scenery
like this. The windows
of your cozily
equipped car are wide open, every
one
of them. You are in no danger of
being choked by dust or blinded by
cinders,for there are neither cinders
nor dust on this electric railway.
The absence
of the torturing cinder
is easily understood, and the absence
of the equally annoying dust is just
as easy to explain. The Park and
Island Railway tracks are ballasted
with stone, broken macadam,
securing at once a solid road bed
and freedom from dust. So solid
is
the road bed that noise and jolting
are reduced
to rhe minimum. The
cars glide along with an easy roiling
have been almost sacrilege
to desecrate this rural paradise with
the screaching
[sic], the dust and the cinders of the steam railway.
Where the steam railway, with its objectionable locomotives, motion and with the windows wide
open you can carry
all conversation as easily as if you were in your
own drawing room.
It is certainly the nearest approach to pel!ection
we have in the way of travelling ashore.
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 47
MAPLEWOOD
ON THE OUTREMONT LINE
Beyond
to the North is a lovely, peaceful pastoral scene
Two
photos,jrom the 1895 booklet published by the P&l, show the line through Outremont as it was just after it was bui/t. The open cal
in the photos is No. 101. The lovely, peaceful pastoml scene has long since vanished, and the P&1 cars have been replaced by traffic
jams much worse than the scleaching steam locomotives.
Collection
of Fred Angus.
Page 48 RAIL CANADIEIJ MARS -AVRIL 1993
More matter-of-fact, but equally interesting, was the
description
of the P&I which appeared in a convention souvenir
edition
of the Street Railway Journal in October, 1895:
This line [Back River) is double tracked for a distance
of two miles to the Shamrock Lacrosse grounds, which have just
been laid out, and is single track with turnouts for the remainder
of the distance. The road-bed consists of 56 lb. T rail laid on
tamarack and cedar ties,
8 in. by 6 in. by 7ft., spaced 2ft. between
centers, in rock ballast. Four bolt fish plates, 18 ins. long, are used,
and
the track
is bonded with Chicago bonds, manufactured by
the Washburn
& Moen Manufacturing Company. Bracket construction
is used wherever possible on this line, with span construction for
the double track portion.
The Cote-des-Neiges line leaves the city at Fletchers
field, which has some historic interest, and ascends the slope
of the
lower spur
of Mount Royal, through the Montreal Annex and the
town
of Outre mont to Cote-des-Neiges, which is the seat of a large
Catholic counllY and athletic club, and
of the College Notre Dame,
for boys hetween five and twelve years
of age. This line is three
miles
from the city limits and extensions have been buill through
the villages
of Moun I Royal Vale and Notre Dame des Graces [sic]
and inlo the town of WeSlmount (fonnerly Cote St. Antoine), a
place
of 5000 inhabitanls. This extension carries Ihe line three
milesfarlher, making it six miles in all. Still further extensions are
plannedfrom WestmounttoLachille, through Kensington, Montreal
Junction, Blue Bonnets and Rockfield, a distance
of 7 112 miles,
and it is
thought that in 1896 the line will be continued from
Lachine
to the end of the Island through six or seven townships, so
that the Companys entire system will be not less than 40 miles in
length.
The line
to Cote-des-Neiges is double tracked and is built
in the same way as the Back River line, except that angle fish plates
are used
011 the track, and the rails are laid with broken joints [sic!
What
is evidently meant is that the rail joints were not opposite
each other. Ed.].
The company owns eleven closed motor cars, seven open
motor cars and seven open trail cars. Nine
of the closed cars were
built by N.& A.C. Lariviere and two by the J.G. Brill Co., while the
open cars were built by Canadian manufacturers. The motor and
trail trucks were built by the Peckham Motor Truck
& Wheel Co.
and
the Canada Switch
& Spring Co. The company owns four No.
3 and eight No.
12 Westinghouse motors furnished by Ahearn &
Soper, and fourteen Royal Electric motors.
The company has not yet built its main power station,
preferring to wait until its lines are fully built before determining
upon the location. At present it
is operating a temporary power
station at Mile End,
in which are placed one 200 K. W. and one 100
K. W. Royal Electric four pole generators; one Cooper-Corliss
engine,
of 300 horse power capacity; one Corliss engine of 150
horse power capacity built by the Cowan Engine Company; and
four return tubular boilers,
of 125 horse po}ver capacity each, built
by
local manufacturers.
The companys officers are as follows: President,
L.
Beaubien; Vice-President andManaging Director,JR. Thibaudeau;
Treasurer, R.L. Gault; Secretmy, Albert
1. Corriveau; Manager,
Henry Holgate.
Toboggan SHde
AT BACK RIVER.
;
—–
The management of the Toboggan
Slide begs to announce that the­
slide
built n.ear the terminus
of the Back River line is now
open and will be kept in order all
winter.
The P. & 1. cars will­
run at regular intervals from the
city [Iud will thus afford an excel­
lent opportunity to those who wish.
to enjoy
this exhilarating sport.
Take the Park & Island Gars ..
Advertisement urging people to take the Park &
Island Cars to the toboggan slide at the Back
River.
The Metropolitan magazine, February 1 1896.
CARS OWNED BY THE PARK AND ISLAND RAILWAY
In 1894 the P&I bought seven single truck open electric
cars from Patterson & Corbin, car builders
of St. Catharines,
Ontario. From the only available photographs (the only identifiable
car number being 101) they appear to be typical nine-bench open
cars
of the period. They are believed to have had Blackwell trucks
and Royal Electric Co. motors. It is highly likely that they were
numbered
101 to 107 consecutively. At the same time, seven
matching open trailers, the numbers
of which are unknown, were
also obtained from Patterson & Corbin. The disposition
of all these
early open cars
is unknown, since none appears among the cars
taken over by the MSR
in 1901. Some may well have been
destroyed
in the car bam fire of 1896, and others may have been
sold by the P&I when they bought their larger open ca
rs between
1898 and 1901.
Four more single-truck open cars were bought from the
Crossen Car Company
of Cobourg, Ontario, probably in 1896. No
plan or photo
of these cars is known to exist. The only information
we have
is that they were ten bench cars, on Peckham trucks, and
they had Westinghouse No. 12A motors and
28A controllers. They
came to MSR
in 1901 and were renumbered 701 -703 -705 -707,
so continuing MSRs open car series of odd numbers which was
then
up to 699. The cars were classified by MSR as lot 8A, which
suggests that they were similar to lot 8 cars.
In 1907 they were
again renumbered, this time to 35 -69 -77 – 127
to avoid
duplication with MSR
s closed cars of the 703 (odd numbers)
series that were being delivered that year. All four
of these single­
truck P&I open ca
rs were scrapped between 1913 and 1915.
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 49
A PARK & ISLAND RAILWAY Co. OPEN CAR
PELOQUIN STATION
Two more photos
/rom the 1895 P&! booklet. The top viell, of cal No. 101, is the best existing photo of a single-truck P&! open cal. The
hOllom photo shows some
of the open trailers which were identical in. design to the motor cars. Peloquin station was later named Auhl1lsic,
and survived until the end
of electric railway service in 1959.
Collection
of Fred Angus.
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MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 51
Disaster struck the P&I on July 301896. A fire began in the
main building (the former Crystal Palace)
of the Provincial
Exhibition on
Fletchers Field. The flames soon spread to the
adjacent
car barn of the P&I, and both buildings were completely
destroyed. Lost
in the fire was an unknown number of P&I cars,
some owned
by the company and some leased or borrowed from
the MSR.
It is quite likely that some (or even all) of the Patterson
& Corbin open cars perished, and perhaps also the conjectural
closed cars 7 -8 –
9. As official MSR car records do not exist from
that period, we cannot determine the exact losses to that company.
However a extract from the minutes
of a meeting of MSRs board
of Directors on October 10 1898 (more than two years after the
fire) reads:
The sum of $3048.08 has been paid by the insurance
company on account
of cars destroyed in the fire on the premises
of the M.P. &1. Ry. Co. al the Exhibition grounds on July 30 1896.
This suggests a fairly substantial loss of several cars. We can
postulate that they may have been leased cars 7 -8 -9, as well as
MSR city cars 310 and 340. These latter two, built by Crossen
about 1893, disappear from the roster
in 1896, being replaced by
new cars,
of a different design, bearing the same numbers. While
the evidence
is circumstantial, there is a strong possibility that
these two cars had been loaned to the P&I and were lost
in the fire.
This somewhat fuzzy photo is the only known view of a P&! single
truck Rathbun car in its original condition. No.
21 was heading west
on St. James Street, bound
for Lachine, when photographed in the
winter
of 1899. Collection of Fred Angus.
some photos of them exist also. The plan is
dated August 6 1896, only one week after the
fire, showing that the P&! did not waste any
time
in placing the order for the much­
needed new equipment.
The new cars were
substantial, 35 feet long overall, with closed
vestibules and clerestory roofs. They were
specificaUy designed fordouble-end operation
on single-track lines where station platfOlIDs
were uniformly on one side
of the track.
Consequently they had doors on one side
only.
The seating arrangement was unusual
in that there were six reversible cross seats
for four persons each, and a fixed seat against
each bulkhead. The aisle was along one side
of the car. They were heated by a circulating
hot water system under the floor. While a
Montreal Park & /slandRy. No. 1014 (ex No. 27) at Snowdoniunction on Februmy 21,1904.
CRHA Archives, Binns Coli
ection.
press report mentions 10 cars ordered in
1896, we find that
11 turn up on the 1903 inventory. This is an
unlikely number, and it may be inferred that there were 12
in this
group. While there
is no record of the original numbers, there is a
press report
of a collision between P&I Nos. 22 and 27 in January
1897, as well as a photo
of No. 21 on the Lachine line in 1899. This
would indicate that they were numbered in the 20 series consecutively
(i.e.
20 to 31 inclusive). After renumbering in 190 I, the eleven cars
on the 1903 list were Nos. 1002 to 1022 (even numbers). Conspicuous
by its absence
is No. 1000, and this seems to have been the missing
twelfth car, disposed
of some time between 1901 and 1903. The
eleven cars remained on the P&I lines until 1907 when they were
transferred
to MSR and used as work cars and for other purposes.
In the 1903
to 1907 period they had Blackwell class 12 trucks,
Royal motors and 28A controllers, except Nos. 1020 and 1022
which had Westinghouse 12A motors and K-lO controllers. The
last glimpse we have
of these cars in passenger service is a report
of No. 1018 being involved in an accident on the Back River line
in July 1905. In early December 1896,
in answer to complaints that the
service frequency was poor, an unnamed P&I official said,
in part
….. they must take into condideration the misfortune we have met
with during the summer. Thanks
to the MSR, we have been enabled
to run the cars which were not burnt, and we expect to have, within
a few weeks, several exira new cars on the different routes.
On
December 7 1896, a meeting
of shareholders was held at which
Herbert (later Sir Herbert) Holt was elected President
of the P&I,
a position he held until the sale to the MSR
in 1901. Following the
meeting, a tour was made
of the companys new Mile End shops
which were expected to be completed within ten days. At the same
time some
of the new cars, to be described below, were inspected
by the shareholders and the press.
In order to recover from the loss caused
by the fire, the P&I
ordered a number
of single-truck, straight-sided, closed cars from
the Rathbun Company
of Deseronto, Ontario. A general plan of
these cars (reproduced on the opposite page) has survived, and
Page 52 RAIL CANADIEN
. ,
MARS -AVRIL 1993
LEFT: Rathbun-built cal No. 1014 serving as a wailing
room at Club Champetre, on the Terminal Railway,
in
1913. Soon afler the photo was taken, the cal was
destroyed.
BELOW: Double-truck Rathbun cal No. 1030, built in
1897,
in its original configuration in service on the Back
River line
in March 1905.
BOTfOM: After their 1910 rebuilding, the /897 Rathbun
cars looked quite different.
No.1 028 is here photographed
after being repaintedforthe MOn/rea/Tramways Company.
AI/three photos: CRHA Archives. Binns Collection.
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 53
These are the onLy two photos known of MTCs OfficiaL Cal, ex -P&I No. 1024. Left, is the rear platform during an inspection trip on the
CQrtierville
Line on February 13 1917. Right, a group of dignitaries poses by the cal outside You ville Shops in 1925.
Both photos, CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
So far, with the short-lived exception of Nos. 1 and 2, all
P&I passenger cars were
of the single-truck type similar to city
cars. This policy was probably dictated by the need to run over
MSR lines, under the terms
of the joint agreement. In any event,
this placed a severe limitation on the road, both as to speed and
capacity. Practically all the trackage was
in relatively open country,
and the operation
of small single truck cars over rural roads and
open track could not have been very satisfactory.
In 1897 four double-truck single-end suburban type cars
were received from Rathbun for use on the Back River line. They
were 4 1 feet long and had Blackwell Class
31 trucks with Westinghouse
38B motors and K-6 controllers. There
is some evidence that they
had cross seats for four persons, and an aisle along the right side,
the same as the 1896 single-truck cars from the same builder. A
peculiar feature
of the body framing was the heavier posts and
wider spacing at the second and tenth windows.
The original
numbers are unknown, but may have been 32 -33 –
34 -35. After
1901 they were numbered 1024 -1026 -1028 -1030, and retained
on P&I lines until 1910. In that year all, except No. 1024, were
remodelled for Pay-As-You-Enter operation and sold to the Telminal
Railway.
The vestibules were completely rebuilt, thereby lengthening
the
car to 45 6. They operated on the Bout de lIsle line until they
were retired
in 1929. The body of No. 1026 was used as a first aid
shelter at the SI. Hubert airfield between 1929 and 1941.
No. 1024 was rebuilt as the Official Car in 1910, but was
retained on the P&I roster. It was used by MSR officials for
inspection trips and special ceremonies. While this
car had most
of its official life under Montreal Tramways Co. ownership, it
was, nevertheless, a P&I car and should, therefore, be briefly
described here. Quite unaccountably, no plan or good photograph
of this unusual and interesting car has been found to date although
the car was
in use until 1928, and stored at the St. Denis car barn
until 1939. General features included a very small
motonnans
compartment, scarcely larger than a telephone booth, in the left
front corner. A door on this compartment prevented the motorman
from overhearing the officials discussions. Aside from a
naITOW
front window in the motonnan s cab, the front of the car was made
up
of a large curved window, providing the passengers with an
excellent view
of the track ahead. An open rear observation
platform with ornamental railing was another distinctive feature.
The window post between the fifth and sixth windows, on each
side, was removed and double width fixed picture windows were
installed.
Interior appointments included window draperies,
ornamental light brackets
on each post, twelve moveable wicker
armchairs, a table, refreshment locker, carpet and the inevitable
brass cuspidors.
After the four double truck Rathbun cars
just described, we
come
to an important addition to the P&Is rolling stock -a series
of large new single-ended open cars put into service between 1898
and 1901. Excursions into the country for picnics and pleasure
riding were becoming popular and fashionable.
The P&I lines
passed through pleasant fields and woods to amusement spots and
picnic grounds
at Cartierville, Sault au Recollet and Lachine. To
meet and stimulate this summer traffic, six large open cars were
Page 54
~.~.~ •• a
… ~ …. ~ .. :
RAIL CAIlADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 55
ordered in 1898, two more in 1899
and four
in 1900. These were thirteen­
bench cars built by Lariviere. Actually
they were
half open, there being a
solid panel with window openingson
the left side. They had closed ends but
no bulkheads, and were 40 feet long
overall. Two Westinghouse 38B motors
were provided on the rear truck only;
they were geared for 45 miles per
hour on level track. Trucks were Canada
Switch & Spring Co. Class 40, and
the controller was a Westinghouse
202.
The cars weighed 24,000 pounds
each.
In
1901 the P&I built, in its
own shops, four similar cars. These
were s
lightly longer, 43 6, and had
15 benches with the last pair of seats
at each end placed back to back. Brill trucks were used with two
Westinghouse
101 motors and K-lO control. These cars weighed
28,000 pounds each. Mr. W.H. Douglas, Assistant Secretary and
Superintendent, supplied details
of these cars to the Street Railway
Review
in August 190 I, from which the following items are
derived: -The seating capacity was 75,
but as many as 115 passengers had been carried. There were hexagonal vestibules
with three windows which slid down, one side
of the car was closed
to a height
of3 3 from the floor with the upper part containing two
half windows, the upper sashes stationary and the lower ones
opening upwards. Sills and underframing were
of Georgia pine and
posts
of ash. Flooring was tongue-and-groove Georgia pine, and
OPPOSITE, TOP: P&I car lOll, originally 117, built by Lariviere in 1898, on the Mountain Belt line, running along what is /lOW
Queen Mary Road in 1904. Other than having been renumbered, the car was essentially as built.
OPPOSITE, BOTTOM: The same car on Bellingham Road about the same time. This view shows the closed-in left-hand side.
THIS PAGE, TOP: Number 1025, originally 124, as
it appeared in 1912, just after being rebuilt as a closed car by the MTC.
THIS PAGE, BOTTOM: Number 1031, after being rebuilt, in service at the corner
of Park Avenue and Mount Royal in 1913.
NEXT PAGES: An original drawing, by Richard M. Binns, of No. 124 as it appeared when new in 1901.
All illustrations from CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
Page 56 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993


.
~:—
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 57
r_
-… _–~-
Page 58 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
Saini John Raiiway Co. (Saint John, New Brunswick) car No. 51, photographed in 1903, soon after its arrival from the Montreal Park &
Island Railway. These six cars, 50 through 55, were the largest street cars ever used in Saint John, and were the only ones with air brakes.
They proved
/0 be /00 large for the Saint John system and were sold, in 1908, to other cities.
Collection
of Fred Angus.
the oval roof of alternate strips of white wood and bass wood was
supported
on ash ribs 11 inches apart. The seats were of ash with
the centres
of the backs filled with turned spindles at 2 1/2 inch
interva
ls. The Sterling brake was used. The lighting consisted of
a five-lamp cluster in the centre, and a four-Iamp cluster at each
end. Inside work was oiled and stained, all the outside work was
painted.
These cars must have been rather impressive, with
their
large arc headlights and wooden pilots. This fleet
of sixteen cars
was most successful with
the public, and they were used for many
years on all the P&I lines during the summer months. They were
numbered in the 100 series, and after 1901 became the 1001 class
(1001 to 1031, odd numbers only).
It is known that No. 1025 was
formerly No. 124, so it may safely be assumed that the original
numbers were 112 to 127 consecutively.
In 1911 and 1912 all these
cars were converted to closed Pay-As-You-Enter suburban cars
by
the MTC. They were scrapped in 1923 and 1924.
Before leaving the 1893 –
1901 period, insofar as passenger
cars are concerned, it should be mentioned that there appear to
have been six closed double-ended double-truck cars (36 to 41?)
built by the P&I
in 1900 and sold to the Saint John (New
Brunswick) Railway
in the spring of 1903, since the P&I began a
program
of phasing out double-enders after 1901. As they do not
appear on the inventories
of September 1902, or September 1903,
we can only suppose that they were so
ld to Saint John in 1902,
when the 1032 class was put in service, and delivered early in 1903.
In Saint John, they were numbered 50 to 55; however they did not
last long there as they were too lar
ge for the hills and curves of the Saint John system.
In 1908, three were sold to Berlin (now
Kitchener), Ontario, while the other three went to Levis, Quebec.
It
is interesting that, in Saint John, the company initials on the car
sides were in the gothic style typical of the P&I and MSR at that
time,
but quite un-typical of Saint John. This suggests that they
were painted and lettered
in Montreal before going to Saint John.
In the 1893 -1901 period there were a number
of work cars,
some of them undoubtedly home made. Surviving to 1901 we find
the following:
Parcel Car
A and Construction Car B. A dropped out of sight
immediately, but
B became Freight Car B and remained on
P&I lines until 1912 when it became
an MTC stores car, eventually
being numbered 3001.
Two single-truck tower cars on Peckllam trucks with Edison
motors, designated I and 2 after 1901. No. I was scrapped in 1906
and was replaced
in 1907 by double-truck Tower Car No. I. No.2
was renumbered 3
in 1910 (when new Tower Car No.2 was
received) and was retired
in 1916.
Three sweepers by Lariviere, with Westinghouse 3 motors,
P&I
numbers 13 -14 -IS. The latter two survived to modern times as
MTC N0s. 34 and 35.
A
single-truck rotary plough, No. 16, on Peckllam truck with GE
800 motors. This became Rotary No. I and also survived into
modern times.
Eleven double-truck flat cars
of which we have no details. These
were used primarily for transporting ice to the large ice companies
which flourished
in those days. Most were gone by 1910.
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 59
These two very rare photos show P&! Rotary Plough No.1) built by Peckham in 1901) in service in the very early years of the twentieth
ce
ntwy. Because of the wide open spaces on the P &1 lines, the rotGlY was a very useful piece of equipment. This car survived until 1950.
CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
There were probably othermisceUaneous pieces of equipment
which were not kept by the MSR when they bought the road, and
of which we have no record.
While only a few
of the original P&I car numbers are
known,
it seems certain that they numbered closed cars (including
work cars) from
No.1 on consecutively, and open cars from No.
lDO or 101 on consecutively. After purchase by the MSR it was
decided to renumber the
P&I cars in the 1000 series to avoid
confusion with MSR cars. Consequently the new numbering
followed
MSRs practice of assigning even numbers to closed cars
and odd numbers to open cars, with one curious exception
to be
noted later.
At this writing it has not been possible to detelmine exactly
the exterior colour scheme used on the early P&I cars. Aside from
so
me of the leased cars, all photographs of P&I equipment show
a solid dark colour with little omamentation. This colour has been
described some as a dark green, verging on black (Brunswick
green?). Others claim it was maroon
or brown. Whatever the
colour, it appears to have been retained for a few years under MSR
ownership.
Such was the Park and Island as the nineteenth
centUlY
ended. However the days of independent existence of the P&I were
rapidly drawing to a close.
The new century was less than six
months old before the agreement with the Montreal Street Railway
w
as reached, and June 30 1901 marked the end of the first major
era in the history
of this interesting suburban system.
The moming of Dominion Day, July 1 1901, saw the start
of
MSR control as well as the beginning of a new era, probably the
greatest time
in the history of the Montreal Park and Island
Railway.
Cartierville Line
lV!:. ~. ~ :1:. :Fl/y Co.
This transfer is good ollly for pll~·
f:nge on fir~t M. S. J:. (:Ir 1t~:HilJ.!
jUIl<:i.ioll poillf. without. ftlrl.l.wr trails·
fer to City lilies.
T: , 1902 I
II~
14
1
20
,26
JAN. ~ 2 m 2(27
MAR. APRIL 3
16 22 28
MAY JU 4
I
17 23 29
JULY AUC, I 5
SEPT. OCT, 6
12 (8 24
..
, ,
NOV. DEC. 7 .13 19 25 31
A,M,!
32310
! PI 0:,
; * 10 * ZC * 30 * 10 * ~O *
2 * 10 * 20 * 30 * 40 * 50 *
3 * 10 * 20 * 30 * 40 * 50 *
4 * 10 * 20 * 30 * 40 * 50 11:
5 * 10 it 20 * 30 * 40 * 50 *
6 * 10 * 20 * 30 * ~O * 50 *
.–
7 * 10 * * 30 * 40 * 50 *
—-
8 * 10 * 20 * 30 * 10 * 50 *

9 * 10 * 20 * 30 * 10 * 50 1<
10 * 10 * 20 * 30 * 40 * 50 *

! I * 10 *-20 * 30 * 1_0 * 50!
12 * 10 * 20 *-30 * 40 * 50 *-

THE LAST DAYI This transfer was issued on the Cartiervil/e line
at 7:20 P.M. on June
30 1901, the last day of independent
operation
of the P&I.
Collection
of Fred Angus.
Page 60 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
P&! No. 1040 arriving at the original Carlierville station about 1906, soon after these cars had been painted in the MSR yellow paint scheme
CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
PERIOD 1901 -1912
When the Montreal Street Railway assumed control of the
Montreal Park & Island Railway
in 1901 it was found that much
of the rolling stock acquired from the original company was not
suitable for a modern suburban electric railway
of the twentieth
century. Certainly single-truck cars were out
of place on a suburban
line which was carrying more and more passengers
as the surrounding
areas gradually were built up. What had been acceptable in the
pioneer years of 1893 -1895 would not do in 1901. With the
withdrawal of the cars that had been leased from the MSR, there
was a very definite need for new and better passenger cars.
In 1902, ten fine suburban high-speed cars were tumed out
ofMSRs Hochelaga Shops for the P&1. These were the 1032 class,
numbered from 1032 to 1050, even numbers, destined
to become
the backbone
of P&I service for many years to corne. These cars
were
50 feet long and were mounted on Canada Switch and Spring
Companys class 40A high-speed trucks having a 6-foot wheelbase.
Four Westinghouse 67 motors were provided and geared for 50
miles per hour. These cars weighed 47,900 pounds each, were
smooth riding and perfOlmed well. They were equipped with arc
headlight, air whistle, marker lights and
in all respects were typical
suburban cars
of the period. In the be~inJ1ing city type fenders were
used but later some,
ifnot all, carried a wooden pilot. In winter all
had a nose-plough.
Five of the cars (1032 -1034 -1036 -1040 -1042) were
built with the door in the usual position, at the rear. The interior
of
these was divided into two compartments; the forward section, 13
2 long, seated sixteen passengers and the rear section, 26 9 long, seated 38. Smoking was permitted
in the forward section. The
other five cars (1038 -1044 -1046 -1048 -1050) had the door just
ahead of the rear truck, with swinging doors in each bulkhead
leading into the interior compartments. With this arrangement the
rear section, seating 17, was the smoking compartment.
The
forward section had 36 seats. An innovation on the 1032 class cars
was the individual cane back chairs, mounted
in pairs on swivel
pedestals. The chairs could
be placed transversely or turned with
the backs to the wiJ1dows, forming continuous rows
of chairs,
facing inward, along each side. The exteIior side panels and dashes
of the 1032-class cars were V -joint mahogany and finished in clear
varnish. Posts and letterboards were
in matching natural finish. In
1905 -1906 all P&I cars were refinished
in standard MSR colours;
light yellow-buff with silver and black trim.
The 1032 class cars were used on all P&I lines. Those with
centre entrance were found to be particularly suitable for the
Lachine line, and three
or four were assigned to that division. The
original class 40-A trucks of these cars were replaced by Curtis
trucks about 1911, but otherwise the 1032s survived
in their
original form for many years; long after the consolidation
of 1912.
In the 1920s they were rebuilt by the MTC and got a new
lease on life. They remained in regular service on the Cartierville
line until 1934 when they. were retired and, in 1938, five were
scrapped. The remaining five, plus 1051, were returned to service
during World War
Il and, painted green, saw much service for IS
more years. They began to be retired in 1950, but some remained
in service until 1955 and one, No. 1046,
is preserved at the
Canadian Railway Museum at St. Constant Que.; the last surviving
Park & Island passenger car.
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 61
Three views of No. 1050 01 differenllimes in
ils career.
ABOVE
: In 1909, when painted yellow,
and
wilh its original Irucks.
LEFT: /n
1913, al Sloney Point, Lachine.
Note
the Curtis trucks and the MTC paillt
scheme.
BELOW· Afler rebuilding in
1923. In this
form it served until 1955.
CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
Page 62 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
o
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oS £,oCI r
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This drawing, dated January 24th 1906, shows Montreal Park & Island Railway No. 1046 as it was when built. This is one of very few Montreal
street car plans
from this era to have survived. NOlice the circular seats which were mounted in pairs and could be shifled to a crosswise
alignment, or could be placed along the wall for rush hour lraffie.
Why this parlicular car was singled oul for this drawing is not known, since it was one
of five identical cars with this cenlre·enlrance
configuralion. No. 1046, in its rebuilt form, has survived and is al (he Canadian Railway Museum.
T
his drawing has been reduced (0 fit the page, and shows Ihe cal 1140 of actual size. it can be photostated 10 any size for model pUiposes.
CA.

MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 63
::=JII Ilr
111[ ]] II 1111 II ~ II~
~
0
~
I
I I I I
[
I I I I I CJ
J
1.
D
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<) J
~
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1046
-~——
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cf .I5/0/7d tfy. CO.
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til .II4~, 211>, ~O6

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I
Note regarding restoration of drawings. The drawing on these two pages, as well as the one on page 50, survived in theform of badly faded
and discoloured prints from tracings originally made
87 and 97 years ago and which may no longer exist. Some of the fading was so bad
that the lines
were scarcely visible. In order to make them acceptable for publication they had to be restored. To do this, your editor had
them copied,
in their original scale of 314 inch to the foot, then strengthened each line individually with a fine drawing pen, a painstaking
job that took many hours. Also
it was necessary to cover stains and disc%urations using opaquing fluid.
It is important to note, however, that 110 lines or inscriptions have been added, nor have allY been deleted. The drawings appear here as they
were when drawn
in 1896 and 1906 respectively, the only change being that they have been reduced in size to fit the pages.
Page 64 RAIL CANADIEN
ABOVE: This rare view of 1042 was taken about 1907 on the loop al Ahuntsic station.
AI that lime il still had its original trucks, but had been equipped with a massive wooden
pilot.The station
is the same one thaI appears on page 49. Later, il lost ils eyebrow
window, but otherwise it did nol change much until it was torn down
in 1959. Car 1042
was the first
of the 1032s to be rebuilt (/921) and it always kept its 5-window front. It
was retired in 1954 and used to store windOlvframes until it was scrapped in 1958.
Collection
oj Peter Murphy.
MARS -AVRIL 1993
ABO liE: It wasllt always pleasant weather I
Winter in the open COUI7l!y along the P&I lines
could be very severe. jhis dramatic scene shows
1040
ill the winter wilderness along the Outremont
line early
in 1904. Not a building is in sight.
Compare this view
to the summer photo, taken
Ilear the same place nine years earlier, that
appears at the bOllom
of page 47.
CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
1051 as it appeared soon after it was built by
Ottawa Car Co.
in 191 J. The rounded ends
and smooth sides
of what was then a modern
steel car give the feeling
of high speed.
CRHA Archives, Binlls Collection.
Another view
of 1051. taken in the 1950s, a
few years before it was retired. It
is hard to
believe that it is the same car, so complete
has been the rebuilding which was carried
out by the MTC in 1924.
As rebuilt it was
virtually identical
to the rebuilt 1032-class
wooden cars.
CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 65
#>

I
,>~
..
I
-~~
Car lJ01 on a trial run when new on June lJ, 1908. CRHA Archives,Binns Collection.
Between 1904 and 1908 several work cars were acquired
by the P&I from the MSR as follows:
1904: Five 33-foot double-truck flat cars, Nos. D – E –
J -K -L.
They were returned to the
MSR in 1906.
1905: Single-truck rotary plough
No.3, bought for the P&I, and
double-truck rotary plough
No.2, transferred from the MSR.
1908: A double-truck Russell plough.
In 1908, two large centre entrance cars, Nos.
11 00 and
II 01, were built in Hochelaga Shops especially for the Lachine
line. With these two, a new series
of numbers, the 1100s, was
begun for suburban cars. From 1100, all the way
up to 3517, all
cars, both city and suburban, would
be numbered consecutively
rather than even-and-odd series. Strangely, however, one more
odd-numbered series, in the 1000 range, was built three years later.
Cars 1100 and 1101 were divided into two compartments, the
forward section, 19 3 1/2 long, seated 26 passengers, and the rear
section, 17
7 long, seated 22. The centre platfOlm was 8 I 1/4
long. No. 1100 weighed 60,000 pounds -the heaviest passenger car
ever to operate in Montreal [this was actually 1200 lbs. heavier
than the articulated cars 2500 and 2501]. The weight
of No. 110 I
was reduced
to 58,400 pounds. Both cars were 51 9 1/2 long
overall and had Montreal Steel Works Class 60 trucks with GE 80
motors and K-28 controllers.
In 1909, following the opening
of the P&I line to Montreal
West the year before, four city cars were equipped for suburban
service and sold by the MSR to the P&I. These were Scotch
cars 704 and 716, built in 1901, and 1905 Stephenson-built cars 864 and 866. Then,
in 1910, No. 636, the last single-truck car built
by MSR (1900) was also sold to the P&I.
MSR Scotch cars 700
and 702 are also shown on the P&I roster; they are believed to have
come to the P&I about 1907 although there
is no official record.
They were used
as extras on the around the mountain line, and
sometimes on the run to Montreal West.
1910 also saw the acquisition
of double-truck rotary
plough No.5, bought new, and locomotive
No.2, a fOlmer MSR
Taunton plough, acquired from the Tetminal Railway. Rotary No.
5 has been preserved and
is now at the Shoreline (formerly
Branford) Trolley Museum in Connecticut, the
last surviving P&I
work car.
In 1911 three more cars, similar to 1100 and 1101, were
received from the Ottawa Car Company.
These were numbered
1102 -1103 -1104, and were slightly shorter, 49 6 long, but had
the same seating capacity. The centre platforms were 9 feet wide.
By more skilful designing
of the underframe, these cars weighed
only 50,900 pounds. They were on Curtis trucks, with motors and
control the same
as Nos. 1100 and 1101. The appearance of these
cars was unusual due
to the absence of a letterboard, and the
shallow side panels, these being only 29 inches high. Consequently
the cars presented a very large area
of glass. The windows were
mounted in narrow metal frames which further enhanced the effect
of spacious windows.
All five
of the 1100 class worked as regulars on the
Lachine line. As far
as is known they spent their entire life in that
particular service. Nos. 1100 and 1101 were scrapped in 1936 and
the other three in 1940.
Page 66 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
MONTREAL PARK AND ISLAND RAILWAY CAR ASSIGNMENTS, WINTER OF 1911
LACHINE SHERBROOKE CARTIERVILLE BACK RIVER MOUNTAIN
REGULAR EXTRA REGULAR EXIRA REGULAR EXTRA REGUlAR EXTRA REGULAR EXTRA
1100 1038
864904 1051 1059 1032 1046 1034 700
1101 1044 866 1053 1036 1055 702
1102
1103 1048
1050
1104 716
~
. MONTREAt PARK & ISLAND
) RAILWAY CD. CAl
~~ Good(oro:e plSSgO in either <::)
~ direction t.tn ;,…-.
_ 1> TOWN OF ST. LOUIS C}l
~~ and ST. LAURENT
~ lot good if dllaclied .c>-
, MBnt.& Island
~ o.
g 00 , TlNUOU8
; , ROM
2 MONTREAL PK. & ISLAND RY. CO.
This coupon 18 good for_…l.
ONE FAnE ~
bet,veen It10ntrcnl nndc.o
A)::netN~~~O:~:~ttl~~~D)O
on condJtl.on that It 1~ not. de-N
tached Irom porUon bearing
signature. Not Tra.ns(ernble
TOP: A view of 1 102 at Stoney Point, Lachine in 1913. The large windows in these cars
earned them the nickname
of Glass Houses. CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
ABOVE: Some tickets used on the Park
& Island Railway. They can be dated by
signatures
asfollows: H.S. Holt. 1896 -1901, L.J. Forgel, 1901 -1911, E.A. Robert,
1911 -1918. Collection of Fred Angus.
RIGHT:
A meet with 1057 on a passing siding on Ihe Cartierville line, then single-track,
about
1918. CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
OPPOSITE: Stephenson-built No.
866, sold to the P&I in 1909 and equipped for
suburban service, at work on the Cartier ville line. CRHA Archives, Binns Collection.
1040
1042 1057
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 67
Also in 1911, five new cars were purchased for the
Cartierville line; three from Ottawa, Nos. 1051 –
1053-1055, and
two from Preston
Car and Coach Co., Nos. 1057 and 1059. The
former had Montreal type roofs and the latter regular clerestory
roofs. All were 49 8 long and seated
51 persons. Framing was
composite steel and wood with side panels sheathed with metal.
Conventional rear entrance was provided. Equipment consisted
of
Curtis trucks, GE 80 motors and K-28 controllers. The cars
weighed 49,000 pounds each. It will be noted that here neither the
former even-numbered convention, nor the consecutive-numbered
1100 sequence was followed. Instead they were numbered as a
continuation
of the 1033-series of the Terminal Railway, which
originally were open cars.
In their OIiginal form, the 1051-class was amazingly short­
lived. It was evidently felt that they were too heavy for their
capacity, consumed too much power and were hard on the roadbed.
In 1924, No. 1051 was rebuilt in the same manner as the 1032-class
(a steel car rebuilt as a wooden car!) and thus became virtually a
new car, remaining in service until 1955. The remainder were
scrapped
in 1925 at the young age of only fourteen years.
The 1051s were the last cars purchased for the P&I. In
1912 all remaining P&I cars, together with those of the MSR and
Terminal Railway, were taken over by the newly formed Montreal
Tramways Company. An equipment assignment sheet for the P&I
lines for the winter
of 1911, the last year of operation as a separate
company, has survived and
is reproduced at the top of the opposite
page. Interestingly, it shows that twenty-six cars (the 1032s,
1051 s, 1100s, plus six former MSR city cars) provided all the
service on the five routes operated by the Park and Island.
The
other former P&I cars had either gone to the Terminal Railway or
had been retired from P&I service.
—!–.

–.
…. ~.
FINALE OF THE MONTREAL PARK & ISLAND
The Park and Island continued as a division of the MTC for
another six years after the formal consolidation
of 1912, although
no new equipment was acquired specifically for these lines during
this period. Then in 1918, following the signing
of a new contract
with the municipalities, the entire system began to be operated
in
the name of the Montreal Tramways Company, and the honoured
old name, the Montreal Park and Island Railway, faded from the
scene.
In 1951, a third of a century after the demise of the P&I
name, the
MTC was taken over by the city and gradually the
electric lines were converted to bus operation.
The former P&I
lines survived well into the 1950s.
The line to Montreal West (the
last built) was the first to go, in 1956. In 1958 the Lachine line made
its last run, soon followed
by the Outremont route, the original
around-the-mountain run
of 1894 -1895. In the spring of 1959 the
end came for the original Park and Island route, the line to Sault
au
Reco]Jet and Montreal North, and finally, in the early morning of
June 281959, only two months before the end of all Montreal street
car service, the last run was made
of the Cartierville route, the last
P&I line to be abandoned.
Although the old routes have been gone for many years, the
spirit
of the P&I lives on. A glance at the map quickly reveals that
the north-south Metro lines
in Montreal very closely follow the
layout
of the Sault au Recollet and Cartierville lines. So it is that
thousands
of passengers a day are travelling swiftly and smoothly
by electric
power over much the same routes that were pioneered
100 years ago
by the Montreal Park and Island Railway Company.
The promotors
of the line who worked so hard to make it a success
between 1893 and
1901 would be pleased.
Page 68 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
PASSENGER CARS OF THE MONTREAL PARK AND ISLAND RAILWAY
P&I NUMBER TYPE OF CAR DATE BUILDER BODY LENGTH T R U C K S NOTES & DISPOSITION DATE
SCRP. PRE-AFTER BUILT & WINDOWS
1901 1901 (OR BENCHES)
2
3
4
5
6
77
87
97
10
II
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32? 1000?
1002
1004
1006
1008
1010
1012
1014
1016
1018
1020
1022
1024
33? 1026
34? 1028
35? 1030
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
?
7
7
?
7
?
?
108
109
110
111
DE DT Clsd. 1893 J.G. Brill
DE DT Cisd. 1893 J.G. Brill
DE ST Cisd. 1894 Lariviere
DE ST Clsd. 1894 Lariviere
DE ST Cisd. 1894 Lariviere
DE ST Cisd. 1894 Lariviere
DE ST Cisd.
DE ST Cisd.
DE ST Cisd.
DE ST Cisd.
DE ST Cisd.
DE ST Cisd.
DE ST Clsd.
DE ST Cisd.
DE ST Clsd.
DE ST Clsd.
DE ST Clsd.
DE ST Cisd.
DE ST Cisd.
DE ST Clsd.
DE ST Cisd.
DE ST Clsd.
DE ST Clsd.
DE DT Cisd.
c.1894 Lariviere
c.1894 Lariviere
c.1894 Lariviere
1895 Lariviere
1895 Lariviere
1896 Rathbun
1896 Rathbun
1896 Rathbun
1896 Rathbun
1896 Rathbun
1896 Rathbun
1896 Rathbun
1896 Rathbun
1896 Rathbun
1896 Rathbun
1897 Rathbun
1897 Rathbun
1897 Rathbun
22
22
21
21
21
21
7
?
?
21
21
21
8
21 8
21 8
21
8
21 8
21 8
21
8
21 8
21
8
21 8
21 8
21 8
28
DE DT Cisd. 1897 Rathbun 28
DE DT Clsd. 1897
DE DT Clsd. 1897
DE ST Open 1894
DE ST Open 1894
DE ST Open 1894
DE ST Open 1894
DE ST Open 1894
DE ST Open 1894
DE ST Open 1894
ST Open Trlr. 1894
ST Open Trlr. 1894
ST Open Trlr. 1894
ST Open Trlr. 1894
ST Open TriJ. 1894
Rathbun 28
Rathbun 28
Patl. & Corbo ?
Patt. & Corbo 7
Patt. & Corbo ?
Patt. & Corbo 7
Patt. & Corbo
7
Patt. & Corbo ?
Patt. & Corbo 7
Palt. & Corbo 7
Patt. &
Corbo ?
Patt. & Corbo ?
Patl. & Corbo 7
Patt. & Corbo 7
ST Open Trlr.
ST Open Trlr.
DE ST Open
DE ST Open
DE ST Open
DE ST Open 1894 Patt. & Corbo 7
1894 Patt. & Corbo 7
c.1896 Crossen
21
c.1896 Crossen 21
c.1896 Crossen
21
c.1896 Crossen 21 8
8
7
7
7
7
?
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
11
I 1
11
11
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
9
10
10
10
10 Brill
Max. Trac. To ST 1895. MSR 34 in 190 I. 1923
Brill Max. Trac.
To ST 1895. MSR 44 in 1901. 1927
Blackwell CI.
12 MSR 54 in 1901. 1917
Blackwell CI. 12
MSR 46 in 1901. 1916
Blackwell CI.
12 MSR 60 in 1901. 1927
Blackwell Cl. 12
MSR 48 01. Salt car 332 32. 1950
Unknown
Unk.nown
Probably burned in 1896.
Probably burned in 1896.
Unknown Probably burned in 1896.
Blackwell CI.
12 MSR 24 in 1901.
Blackwell CI.
12 MSR 28 in 1901.
Blackwell CI. 12 Probably sold before 1903.
Blackwell Cl.
12 Terminal Ry. funeral car 1909.
Blackwe
ll Cl. 12 MSR cinder car M in 1906.
Blackwell Cl. 12
MSR tool shed in 1907.
Blackwell CI. 12
MSR cinder car N in 1907.
Blackwell CI. 12
MSR farebox car 10 in 1907.
Welding car 3006 in 1916.
Blackwell CI. 12
MSR cinder car 0 in 1907.
Blackwell CI.
12 Term. Ry. waiting room 1907.
Blackwell Cl. 12
MSR cinder car P in 1907.
Blackwell Cl.
12 MSR cinder car Q in 1907.
Blackwell CI. 12
MSR cinder car R in 1907.
Blackwell Cl. 12
To MSR in 1907. Not used.
Blackwell Cl.
31 Rebuilt as official car in 1910.
Blackwell Cl.
31 To Terminal Railway in 1910.
Became first aid shelter 1929.
Blackwell Cl.
31 To Terminal Railway in 1910.
To Terminal Railway in 1910.
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901.
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901.
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901.
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901.
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901.
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901.
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901.
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901.
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901.
Unknown disp. Gone by 190 I.
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901.
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901. 1896
1896
1896
1924
1923
7
1919
1910
1909
1910
1926
1910
19137
1910
1910
1910
1907
1939
1941
1929
1929
7
7
?
?
?
7
?
?
?
?
?
?
Blackwell C1. 31
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unk.nown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Unknown
Peckham
Peckham
Peckham
Peckham
Unknown disp. Gone by 190 I. 7
Unknown disp. Gone by 1901. 7
MSR 701 in 1901. 35 in 1907. 1915
MSR 703 in 1901. 69 in 1907. 1915
MSR 705 in 1901. 77 in 1907. 1913
MSR 707 in 1901. 127 in 07. 1915
MARCH -APRIL 1993
112 1001 SE DT Open
113 1003 SE DT Open
114 1005 SE DT Open
115 1007 SE DT Open
116 1009 SE DT Open
117 1011 SE DT Open
118 1013
SE DT Open
119 1015 SE DT Open
1898
1
898
1898
1898
1898
1898
1899
1899
120 1017
SE DT Open 1900
121 1019
SE DT Open 1900
122 1021
SE DT Open 1900
123 1023
SE DT Open 1900
124 1025
SE DT Open 1901
125 1027
SE DT Open
126 1029 SE DT Open
127 1031 SE DT Open
367 DE DT CIsd.
377
387
397
407
417 DE
DT CIsd.
DE DT Clsd.
DE
DT Cisd.
DE DT CIsd.
DE DT Cisd.
1032
SE DT CIsd.
1034
SE DT Cisd.
J 036 SE DT CIsd.
1038
SE DT CIsd.
1040
SE DT CIsd.
10
42 SE DT CIsd.
1044
SE DT Clsd.
1046
SE DT Clsd.
1048
SE DT CIsd.
10
50 SE DT Clsd.
636 SE ST Clsd.
700 SE DT Cisd.
702 SE DT Cisd.
704 SE DT Clsd.
716 SE DT Clsd.
864 SE DT CIsd.
866 SE DT CIsd.
1100 SE DT Clsd.
1101
SE DT Clsd.
1102 SE DT Clsd.
1103 SE DT Clsd.
1104 SE DT Cisd.
1051
SE DT CIsd.
1053
SE DT Clsd.
1055
SE DT Clsd.
1057 SE DT Clsd.
1059 SE DT Clsd. 1901
1901
1901
1900
1900
1900
1
900
1900
1900
1902
1902
1902
1902
1902
1902
1902
1902
1
902
1902
1900
1901
1901
1901
1901
1905
1905
1908
1908
1911
1911
1911
1911
1911
1911
1911
1911
Lariviere
Lariviere
Lariviere
Lariviere
Lariviere
Lariviere
Lariviere
Lariviere
CANADIAN RAIL
34 4 13
34 4 13
34 4 13
34 4 13
344 13
344 13
34 4
13
34 4 13
Can Sw & Spr Cl. 140
Can Sw & Spr Cl. 140
Can Sw & Spr Cl. 140
Can Sw & Spr Cl. 140
Can
Sw & Spr Cl. 140
Can Sw & Spr Cl. 140
Can Sw & Spr Cl. 140
Can Sw & Spr Cl. 140
Lariviere 34 4 13 Can Sw & Spr Cl. 140
Lariviere 34 4 13 Can Sw & Spr Cl. 140
Lariviere 34 4 13 Can Sw & Spr Cl. 140
Lariviere 34 4 13 Can Sw & Spr Cl. 140
M.
P. & 1. 36 2 IS Brill
M.P.&1. 362 15
M. P. &
1. 36 2 IS Brill
Brill
M.
P. & 1. 36 2 15
7 Brill
Blackwell
Blackwell
Blackwell
Blackwell
Blackwell
Blackwell
M. P. & 1. 7
M. P. & 1. 7 7
M.
P. & 1. 7 7
M.
P. & 1. 7 7
M.
P. & 1. 7 7
M. P. & 1. 7 7
M. S. R. 40 9 12 Can Sw & Spr Cl. 40A
Can Sw & Spr Cl. 40A
Can Sw & Spr Cl. 40A
M. S. R. 40 9 12
M. S.
R. 40 9 12
M. S. R.
M.S.R.
M.S. R.
M.S.R.
M.S.R.
M. S. R.
M.
S.R.
M. S. R.
M.S. R.
M.S.R.
M. S. R.
M. S. R. 40 9 12
Can Sw & Spr Cl. 40A
40 9 12 Can Sw & Spr Cl. 40A
40 9 12 Can Sw & Spr Cl. 40A
40 9 12 Can Sw & Spr Cl. 40A
40 9 12 Can Sw & Spr Cl. 40A
40 9 12 Can Sw & Spr CL 40A
40 9 12 Can Sw & Spr Cl. 40A
22 7 Can Sw & Spr Cl. 15
33 7 Blackwell Cl. 31
33
33
33 7 7
7 Blackwell Cl.
31
Blackwell Cl. 31
Blackwell Cl. 31
Stephenson 28 2 10
Stephenson 28 2 10
M. S. R. 51 6 15 Mtl
Steel Wks Cl. 50
Mtl Steel
Wks Cl. 50
Mtl Steel Wks Cl.
60
Mtl Steel Wks Cl. 60 M.S. R.
Ottawa
Ottawa
Ottawa
Ottawa
Ottawa
Ottawa
Preston
Preston
51 6 15
49 6 15 Curtis
49 6 IS Curtis
49 6 15
Curtis
38 3 14 Curtis
383 14 Curtis
38 3 14 Curtis
38 3 14 Curtis
38 3 14 Curtis
Page 69
Rebuilt closed in 1912.
Rebuilt
closed in 1912.
Rebuilt closed in 1912.
Rebuilt closed in 1912.
Rebuilt
closed in 1912.
Rebuilt closed in 1912.
Rebuilt
closed in 1912.
Rebuilt closed in 1912.
Rebuilt colsed in 1912.
Rebuilt
closed in 1912.
Rebuilt closed in 1912.
Rebuilt
closed in 1912.
Rebuilt closed in 1912.
Rebuilt closed in 1912.
Rebuilt closed in 1912.
Rebuilt closed in 1912.
Saint John N.B. No. 50 in 1903.
Saint John N.B. No. 51 in 1903.
Saint John N.B. No. 52 in 1903.
Saint John N.B. No. 53 in 1903.
Saint John N.B. No. 54 in 1903.
Saint John N.B. No. 55
in 1903.
Had rear door. Rebuilt
in 1925.
Had r
ear door. Rebuilt in 1925.
Had rear door. Rebuilt
in 1925.
1923
1923
1923
1924
1922
1924
1924
1923
1924
1924
1925
1924
1924
1924
1924
1924
7
?
7
7
?
7
1938
1938
1952
Had centre door. R
ebuilt in 1921. 1938
Had rear door. Rebuilt in 1925. 1938
Had rear door. Rebuilt in 1921. 1957
Had centre door.
Rebuilt in 1926. 1938
Had centre door. Rebuilt
in 1924.
Donated to
CRHA in 1963.
Had centre door. Rebuilt
in 1924. 1955
Had centre door. Rebuilt in 1923. 1955
Acquired 1910.
Ex MSR 636. 1917
Acquired c. I 907. Ex
MSR 700. 1928
Acquired c.1907. Ex MSR 702.
Acquired 1909. Ex
MSR 704.
Acquired 1909.
Ex MSR 716.
Acquired 1909.
Ex MSR 864.
Acquired 1909. Ex
MSR 866.
Length given is t
otal length.
Length given is total length.
Length given is total length.
Length given is total length.
Length given is total length.
Rebuilt 1924
same as 1032 class.
Retired
after only 14 years.
R
etired after only 14 years.
Retired after only 14 years.
Retired
after only 14 years. 1928
1928
1928
1929
1929
1936
1936
1940
1940
1940
1956
1925
1925
1925
1925
Page 70 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
WORK CARS OF THE MONTREAL PARK AND ISLAND RAIL WAY
P&I NUMBER TYPE OF CAR DATE BUILDER TRUCKS NOTES & DISPOSITION DATE
PRE-AFfER BUILT SCRP.
1901 1901
A
A
ST parcel car ? Unknown Unknown Disp. Unknown.
?
B B ST construction car 7 Unknown Blackwell Frt car B 1902. Renum. 3001, 1914. 1926
I st I
ST Tower car 7 Unknown Peckham Retired 1906. 1906
1st 2
ST Tower car 7 Unknown Peckham Renumbered MSR 3 in 1910. 1918
2nd 1 DT Tower car 1907 M. S.R.
M.S.R. Retired 1959. 1960
2nd 2
DT Tower car 1910 M. S. R. M.S. R. Retired 1959. 1959
7 7
DT Flat 7 Unknown Unknown 1904
7
7
DT Flat 7 Unknown Unknown 1904
7
7
DT Flat 7 Unknown Unknown 1904
7 7 DT Flat 7 Unknown Unknown 1905
? 7 DT Flat 7 Unknown Unknown 1905
7
7
DT Flat 7 Unknown Unknown 1906
7
? DT Flat 7 Unknown Unknown 1906
7
7
DT Flat 7 Unknown Unknown 1910
7
7
DT Flat 7 Unknown Unknown 1910
7
7
DT Flat 7 Unknown Unknown 1911
7
7 DT Flat 7 Unknown Unknown 1912
D
DT 33 ft. Flat 1904 M. S. R. Class 110 To MSR 1906. Renum 3015 in 1914. 1958
E
DT 33 ft. Flat 1904 M.S.R. Class 110 To MSR 1906. Renum 3020 in 1914. 1936
J
DT 33
ft. flat 1904 M. S. R. Class 110 To MSR 1906. Renum 3023 in 1914. 1958
K DT 33 ft flat 1904 M.S. R. Class 110 To MSR 1906. Renum 3021 in 1914.
Box car
in 1917. Brine car In 1947. 1957
L
DT 33 ft. flat 1904 M. S. R. Class 110 To Term. Ry. 1910 as locomotive L.
Renumbered 3024 in 1914. 1946
2
DT Locomotive 1904 Taunton Taunton Acquired 1910. Ex MSR plough. 1913
137 33
ST Sweeper ? Lariviere Lariviere Sold to Cornwall about 1902. 7
14 34 ST Sweeper 7 Lariviere Lariviere 1950
15 35 ST Sweeper 7 Lariviere Lariviere 1950
16 1 ST Rotary plough 1901 Peckham Peckham 1950
3
ST Rotary plough 1905 Ruggles Peckham 1950
2
DT Rotary plough 1906 Ruggles Peckham Acquired from MSR. 1952
47 Russell plough 1908 Russell Class 100 1936
5
DT Rotary plough 1910 Ruggles Class 100 To Branford Trolley Museum in 1959.
NOTES
No official record of pre-190 1 Park & Island numbers is known to have survived. The numbers shown are largely based on photographic
evidence and on contemporary reports
of how many cars existed in each·group. It is not certain that renumberings of a given group were
carried out in the same sequence
as the original numbers although, based on later practice, it is likely that they were.
The existence of pre-1901 cars 7, 8, 9,20,36,37,38,39,40,41 as well as post-1901 No. 1000, must be regarded as conjectural.
There is
no definite record that the six cars which went to Saint John in 1903 ever actually ran on the Park and Island.
The trucks shown are the earJiest known for a particular car. Some cars had their trucks replaced with newer types at a later date.
In 1912 all surviving P&I rolling stock was transferred to the Montreal Tramways Company, although the numbers remained the same.
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL
The Railway and the War
By Thurstan Topham
CANADAS Railway Lines
a..-ethe arterieswhichsuppl4 LIFE­
Bt.oootothe qreat BRIrISH COMMONWfAlTli
AIRTRAININ~PLAti. From huqe supply
depots fast CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAi5
lreigh1 trains rush supplies-from
need Ie!> to enqine!l-i.o dirfields & training
centres lo(oted on the lines of ih.e
~~ NATIONALSVSTEM
-V-l~~ {hyouqnout ~~~~ ,,~.,
~. I i ~ CANADA Ir ……. C!JG:J ~
{)~ ~ r. rr.rl·r,
~~~~~~~OOl~ ( .:~) ~~ ;.~~~ ~ ~
.suPPL1rDr..p()T
RAILWAY TRAFFIC IN CANADA is nOll)
Page 71
60 p~t clnl qreater 1hcm in the peak year
of ine last war. In 19,1 the CNR moved
ihe largest tonnZlge of fn.lqht in its history.
1h£le was ,n increase of 43 ~r (mt irz
fre1ghi tonnilge hZlndled sin.c.e the stMt-
of ihe wc..r _ 1941
r==-: :
nil ~I 1[
I ,-. . 10· . : II<~
65,370;412. TON:5
;. ~ ~J I :, .. ,
HANDLlN~ WARTIME
TRAFFIC,C.N.R.win require
8 MILLION TONS
45,691,230 TONS
i..: : (Ell .
t-: .. , , ; ~ , , ,:-
of COAL THIS YEIR­
ElOU9h 10 hCllt
A MILUON AVERAGE HDME5
Waste is Sabotage is th.e wartime sloqan. of Corlo.di~rt
Railwi:ljmen. Ca.tto.do.s rail 6l)stems so.lvaqed and reclaimed
materia-Is essen..tio.l tothe counlYYs LI)()r effort toih.e l1alu.e of
$10,000,000 le>.St yeaI:
~
Since 1939 the CN·R Motil)e ~
1 POLIJer depMtmerd rto..s ~~
. 1 recondiiioried 83 freiqht cllqin l which. ordin().rill,l would ha.l1 repla.ced btl new locomotives. I,-i~
Th.ey o..re 011 qiuinq valuoble . ill ~~
servIce tod1l..J. Some pf ihem ·~/t~I1 .. ~at~.
hCve Iserv!_d~(=.~_r.t~do In fOLLY .~::-. -IJ.;O,~ ~ti ….-
wo.rs. ~~ Salvaqe makn,, :i:l ~
==~_ … –;.$ from homes of rcJI-~ 1 ~
-;::;,.~ …. ;, 7~, wo.y men. I: qai i1ered . ~
SOUd~!e5e WH-1S<)6 btj mern) ~c:. ~–~-.r -.–c::::::::::: Serl>lce5 A<:,soc-··
,~.1…~ GI;:~uJD iaiione. formed by
_ %fi.>r.:L-~ ~~.,.) C N·R ernrloyees Irt
–~-• • • • -rnam) rarts of CunudCl.
Boer W~r:I!><):_ G~.::.t We>.Y-1914 Ttlel) c11so raise funds
. t b I I, til. L ~ ~. .. ,.~ formobliccunteen5, In 0
a. es I,,:e . ese. ~51 lJ ~:. ~~ .-~;-.. :.,..-.,~; . o.mbulu.nces owr~c~,,>
ih.an. 0. million pounds l0ere ~B . .. -• pilrcels iheRED(RO;~
imed,erLouqhto make 592.,593 P;esent Wi>o.r-10:59 o.nd oiher w,r relief.
R,QSS CD-rtons.
Page 72 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1993
History Behind a Picture Frame
By Fred Angus
While repairing the frame of an old picture, your editor
discovered that some pieces
of old newspaper had been placed
behind the picture
to prevent dust from coming into the frame.
These pieces
of paper were extremely fragile and brittle, and
would have crumbled away if not very carefully handled. They
proved to be from a single newspaper, the Montreal Daily Star
of
Thu[sday,July 12, 1894. Aquickglancerevealed that this discoloured
and disintegrating paper was a window to the world
of almost a
century ago. The major event reported was the disastrous railway
strike
in the United States which had started at the Pullman
company and had spread nationwide. By July
12 much violence
had occurred and there had been many fatalities as troops opened
fire on the strikers.
The article although fragmentary and crumbling,
did include some line drawing illustrations which were too badly
deteriorated
to reproduce here.
However
in the same paper were several small items,
mostly
of local interest, concerning main line railways as well as
the street railway which, in Montreal, was nearing the end
of the
conversion from horse
to electricity.
Some articles are tragic,
some are informative and some
are downright amusing. What
is amazing, however, is that so many
items
of railway interest can be found in three small pieces of
disintegrating paper that were behind a picture for almost a
century.
A MIXED UP COLLISION
Trolley, Ice Waggon and Milk Express Badly Tangled.
There was a mixed up collision this morning about nine
0 clock on Windsor street, a little below the Windsor Station. The
component parts were a Windsor and St. Lawrence electric car
going south, an ice waggon going north, a milk cart standing still,
and a lamp-post which pe/force
of itself could not move away. The
car collided with the ice waggon, which
in tum collided with the
milk cart, which laller impelled the horse drawing it against a
lamp-post. The car and the ice waggon escaped injury, the milk
waggon and the lamp-post being the only victims. Both are badly
crushed, the post particularly so. The driver
of the cart was thrown
out and badly bruised.
Street Cars Delayed.
A fal/en wire delayed cars going west on St. Catherine
street,
for some time, about six 0 clock this morning. The mishap
occurred
in front of the St. James Methodist Church. Thefirst car
to be stopped was filled with laborers on their way to work; they
had no time
to spare, so sprang out and pushed the cOlIor a couple
of blocks. They were about to enter the car again when the trolley
pole gave way and came crashing down
to the street. One of the
men was struck
on the cheek making a horrible gash.
[And it was the day BEFORE Friday the 13th!]
The railway traffic to the Sault is rushing over both Grand Trunk
and Canadian Pacific. He Claims He Beat The Train.
Mr.
O. Desjardins, of 39 University street, started from St.
Laurent this morning on a bicycle
to ride to Montreal. As Mr.
Desjardins mounted his wheel, a train was leaving the station. Mr.
Desjardins came via the Outremonl road and arrived at the
Bonaventure Station one minute ahead
of the train. He started at
8.07
and arrived at 9.30.
Fenders are now being put on the street cars.
[Previous to this the electric cars were the source of an alarming
number
of pedestrian casualties.]
Where is Maplewood?
Maplewood
is situated on the west slope of the Mountain.
How can I get
to Maplewood? Follow the Park Avenue
Electric Railway tracks
to Maplewood.
Maplewood is beautifully situated and covered with choice
Maple Trees.
The Electric Railway has a double track running through
the entire length
of Maplewood. For plans and terms of Maplewood
lots apply
to
RA MAINWARING, 147 St. James St., or
HENRY BOGUE, Manager at Maplewood.
[Editors note: The electric railway referred to is the Montreal Park
and Island
Railways Outremonlline. The advertisers were a little
premature, for this line, which passed through Maplewood, was
not opened until August I, 1894.
So as of July 12, the tracks were
indeed there, but not yet the cars!]
What the Electric Cars are Doing.
Taking passengers
10 the Cyclorama of Jerusalem, corner
of St. Catherine and St. Urbain streets.
[An advertisement with an eye-catching heading.]
Another Canadian Pacific official, but of lesser magnitude,
was in great glee this morning
[speaking of the tragic railroad
strike in the United States]:
If the strike were to continue another
two months we would be doing all the business. Why we are getting
all/he California travel. On Monday we had four sleepers on, on
Tuesday five, and again on Wednesday foul. The Californians are
afraid to use the United States roads just now and are just pouring
in on our line.
[Palt of an article concerning the U.S. labour U1u·est.]
And, finally, these words of wisdom which are just as
applicable in 1993 as
in 1894.
To abandon afriendfor a single error evinces a cold heart
and a weak judgement.
Source for all articles: Montreal Daily Star, Thursday, July 12,
1894.
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 73
Great Western Railway Fire, 1874
By Driftin Doug Smith, The Singing Trainman, 1989
Great Western Railway, Sarnia Express
Leaving out
of London with a mixed consist
Petroleum and baggage cars, coaches on behind
Crowded full
of passengers having a good time
Halfway
to Komoka the lamp fell to the floor
Kerosene was burning, flames began
to soar
Panic seized the passengers, wind fanned the flames
The only hope they had was
to stop the speeding train.
Chorus:
And the train rolled on, the engine sang a song
But the engineer, he never knew just what was going on.
With no bell-rope connected up
to the engineer
Conductor Mitchell climbed the roof, his heart filled with fear
He ran along the catwalks
to give the order STOP
By now the coach was burning from the bottom to the top.
Passengers were jumping headlong from the train
Some who tried
to escape, their efforts were in vain.
Eight died in the fire, Conductor Mitchell did weep
And asked the Lord, his passengers, their souls in heaven
to keep.
Page 74 RAIL CANADIEN MARS-AVRIL 1993
The Business Car
CRHA ANNUAL AWARDS
Mrs. Elizabelh Tancock receiving her award, October 8 1992.
PholO by Hollie Lowry.
Recent presentations of the CRHA Annual Awards have
taken place
in Toronto and Vancouver. The Award for the best
article
in a non-CRHA publication was won by Mrs. Elizabeth A.
Tancock, and it was presented to her by Toronto & York Division
President Chris Kyle at the
T&Y meeting of October 8, 1992.
Mike Green presents the award to Fritz Lehmann.
Robert Turner receives the
1991 award for his book Logging
By Rail.
Vancouver B.C. was the scene of two presentations of
CRHA Awards .at the meeting of the Pacific Coast Diyisionon
December 20, 1992. The 1990 award to Fritz Lehmann, for the
article on James Good in the May-June 1990 issue
of Canadian
Rail, was presented, as was the
1991 Book Award to Mr. Robert
Turner for his book Logging By Rail. Both these awards were
presented by Pacific Coast Division President Mike Green.
LAST STEAM HEATED TRAIN
The lasl sleam-heated Atlantic, No. 11, seen at Saint John NB.
the evening of January 23, 1993.
Photo by David Morris.
The logo used on
Ihe train to commemorale Ihe occasion.
Sunday, January 24 1993 marked the completion of the
conversion
of VIA Rails transcontinental passenger trains from
steam heat to head-end-powered electric service. On that morning
the last steam-heated Atlantic arrived
in Montreal, completing
its run from Halifax via Saint John. Since this train passes through
the state
of Maine, this may also have been the last steam-heated
regularly-scheduled long-distance passenger train in the United
States. :rhe significance
of the occasion was marked by VIA, and
there were several railway enthusiasts and representatives
of
railfan publications aboard the train. This historic train consisted
of locomotives 6432 and 6309 hauling cars 15462, 15458,9618,
5736,9616,5537,5500,757,5750,1347, CHATEAU DOLLARD,
EVERETT, EDENWOLD, ALGONQUIN PARK. This is, of
course, not the last steam-heated passenger train in Canada, since
MARCH -APRIL 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 75
there nre still the f1Qrthcnl trains to Jonquicre. Scnm,:lcrrc, Churchill
t.IC. as well as a numocr of shortcr-di~tance lrains in southern
Qnlnrio. Howev
er the IrJnscOluincmal ser …. ice from Halifa~ 10
Vancouver is now all hcad-end-powcr.
BUSINESS UP ON CANAIHAN ATl.ANTIC
A truly ironic eellt has taken place. In Ihe vcry wed: thaI
CP Rail filed an application 10 abandon ill Short Line cast of
Shcrbrooke. through Maine. [0 Saini John. [he line has seen a huge
incre
ase in traffic. 1bc reason was icc jams that blocked lhe Saint
Lawrence River and prevcl1lcd ~hips from coming The PorI of
MOnfrea!. As a result many container ship!; were John. and their cargo stUppcd 10 and from Montreal by Ihe
Canadiun Atlantic. Train crews have bt:en working double shifls.
locom
otives have been brought cast from Montreal. full-length freight trains
have bt.-.::n lunning daily Ocr the line.
Sidings are
fiJleu wilh loaded cars, sincc all allilable yard space
h While all this will probably end ooce river traffic resumes,
this evc
nt should be a warning of the serious conscquences that
could ensue should Ihe govemmcnl allow this vital link to be
abanuom,,-ti. This timc.lhe railway was there to meeltheemergency;
il is in the best interest.s of Ihe country 10 ensure thai it remains
there for t
he future.
RAILWAY SOCIETY OF NEWfOUNULANO
We are in receipt of the annual newsletter of the Rllilway
SOCicly of Newfoundland, which contains vcry eocouraging reports
of the Society~ prest,rvution efforts Oil its museum site ncar
Comcr Brook. The rolling stock has
sten much improvement.
si
aning with a rcp..1inling of steam engine 593 and repairs to its
cylinders. A new
insignia colour has been adopt … xllInd il definitely
has a ~harper appcamocc. The baggage lind box-baggage cars had
their roofs
sealed and painted as a number of the roof joints were
starting to
corrode, llJC baggage car had a )leW door sill installed
3nu a final interior cleaning. TIle dining car had new carpet. drupes.
chairs and
nooring tnstalled. After a finishing coat of paint it i~
now the sllOwpiece for the Society. The snowplough interior. the
speeder exterior and trailers re
ceived a fresh paint job. The diesel
locomotivc
had its engine doon. secured and winterizcd. The
advice
of an electrician will be secured before this years start-up.
1llere is a real change sweeping through the area and it is
taking on
a new life of itl; own as the tmin site progresses. The work
carried out this
past summer hn.> gone a long way to improve the
look and
ehameter of the old switching yard. Befl)lC too long the
~Ialion will be ready to accept arriving passengers who will have
the chance once more
of hopping aboard a waiting Bullet expre~s
by Station Rood. As one of the workers kept S:lying last fall, Give
me:l shovel full of coal and Ill get old 593 working for u~ again!
While it is not that sim
ple. we think in some way his wish i~ coming
lrue. P
lcasc scnd any enquirics to: Railway Society of
Newfoundland. P.O. Box 673. Comer Brook. Nnd. A2H 6G1
HELP WANTt:O
Mr. Rene Elliott. P.O. Dox 367. New
Lisbon. N.Y. 13415.
U.S.A. wants information about the
Linn Manuracturing Company
of Morris, N. Y. ·Jlte company produccJ half-track style machines.
Md Mussens Ltd. of Montreal were Linns Canadian distributer
froUl 1922 until Bfter World War II. Unfortunately cOll1pany
records cove
ring thi~ perioo appear to have been destroyed. Mr
Elliot! will appreci
ate any help th;lt members can give him.
SALEM & HILLSBOROUGH
The New Bruns
wick Division of the CRHA repons that the
S&H is looking forward to a
good operating season in 1993. and
wishes to e. cnd an invitati
on to all interested person~ to Climb
on Board all they enter their tenth SC:lson. The past, 1992. season
brought forth improvements to the milroad. including refurbishing
severnl
picce~ of equipment:
CN Jordan Spreader 51040 has
been 90% rebuilt. and iln:ccivc a new paint job including stcneilled data.
TIle two S&H diesels 208 and 8245 have been cleaned :lIld ptiintt.tI
inside and
OUI.
UTLX lank car 36025 and eN double-endc wt:re painted and received ~Ieocliled data.
CPR steam crane 414324 reteived new paint and scripted Iel1ering
Canndian Pacific.
II now presents a unique photo opponunity for
the
enthu~iasl.
CN baggage cnr 8665 had repairs to the doors and to the body.
Presently
in the shop is box carCN 506335 (ex-CN 70005) having
restorntion
….. ork completed.
SASKATCHEWAN RAILWAY MUSEUM
The Saska1chewan R!!ilway Museum has securerlthe body
of Regin!! MuniCipal Railway street car No. 42. built by the
Canadian Car
and Foundry Company ill 1928. and closely rescmbl ing
the Montreal Tmmwltys
Co. 195O-cluss one-man ca~. This tram
was
one of SCen similar cars delivered to the Queen City thaI
spring. 65 )ears ago. Originally
it featured rallan covered sealS and
cherry red lllld cream painted exterior. Although Ihe inTerior is in
poor shape with
many fixtures :lnd seats missing. the car is
restorable, No.
42 saw service in Regina from 1928 until the end
of street car service in 1950. although it is doubtful if it sa\ regular
service
afler 1949. The OOdy WIlS sold in October 1950. and was
used for many yell
fS as a cabin. The City of Regina later re·
purchased it with the idea of restoring il. bul. as tht: yellrs passed.
it was
felt that the best way of preserving il was to sell it to the
Saskatchewan R
ailway Museum. It should :tmve on the site this
s
pring.
Soun:e: The Pr..irie Switcher.
}JACK COllER: II! flur Oerembtr 1992 isslIe, wt showed pictllres o/Ille Nort/, Slrtet SIfl/iOlI illl/ali/ox 0/1<1 it hod heel! ilnld/y (Iomognl
in tlw disastuQIIS Ixplosioll o/Deamocr 6 1917. III this I)hoto IW .He tlte Simian ill happier times: (IrOIl/U/ tlu 111m flf tilt f(IIIIII). The /lame
Inure%llial Railway~ alld IIII dOlI 1876 is Ii!iible in the brickwork of thr 101If!f. Dill of Hali/(lxs fllrlitSI rle([-;I Sireet cars. No. 10.
bllill ill 1896. is {JaS.filig tIM SUIt iOI/. III Iltt backsrolilld COli lH strll If, Narrows. near Ihe spat where lI,r e.w/osiol! look place almost IlIcmy
,I((IrJ IOler.
NOIio/1lI1 Archin:s 0/ Callada, Phmo No. C-19262.
Canadian Rail
120, rue St-Pierre, St. Constant, Quebec
Canada J5A 2G9
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10 days return to sender, postage guaranteed.
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