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Canadian Rail 412 1989

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Canadian Rail 412 1989

Canadian Rail rt=:P
No. 412
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER
1989
146
CANADIAN ~IL
————————ISSN 0008-.875 —–
PUBLISHED 81·MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus For your membership in the CAHA which includes a
CO-EDITO
R: Douglas N. W. Smith subscription to Canadian Rail write to:
PRODUCTION: M. Peter Murphy CAHA, P.O. Box
148, SI. Constant. Quebec J5A 2G2
CARTOGRAPHER: William A. Germaniuk Rates: in Canada . . . . . . . . .. ……. $27.
LAYOUT: Fred F. Angus outside Canada: ……….. $23. in U.S. FUNDS.
TYPESETTING: Belvedere Photo-Graphique Inc.
PRINTING: Procel Printing
r—————–~TABLEOFCONTENTS——————_.
THE NELSON ElECTRIC TRAMWAY
THE NELSON & FORT SHEPPARD RAILWAY ..
DARLINGT
ON AND PORT UNION STATIONS
LORD
KITCHENERS LAST RAIL JOURNEY
THE 1939 ROYAL TRAIN -AN UPDATE ..
RAIL CANADA DECISIONS
CRHA COMMUNICATIONS
THE BUSI
NESS CAR
MIKE CULHAM
… F.M. BARONE
ROBERT G. BURNET
……… JAN G. MORRIS
LON MARSH
DOUGLAS N.
W. SMITH
……. ……..
147
151
158
166
167
170
176
177
Calladlan R,il IS continually ;n need of news. stories. historical data. photos. maps and other rt:tproducuble material. Please send all
contnbullOnsto the ed,lor; Fred
F. Angus. 3021 Trafalgar Avt:t. Monueel. P.O. H3Y lH3. No payment can be made for contributions, bul
the
conlllbulor will be given credit for matenal submitted. Malerial Will be returned to the contribulor if requested. Remember. Knowledge IS
01 little value unless it IS shared with others .
Frederick F. Angus
R. C. Ballard
Jack A. Beetty
Walter J. Bedbtook
Alan
C. Blackburn
Charles De Jean
Gerard Frechette
• NATIONAL DIRECTORS.
William Hrynkow
David W. Johnson
J. Christopher Kyle
Bernard
Martin
Ro
bert V.V. Nicholls
A
ndrew W. Panko
Douglas N.
W. Smith
The CRMA has a number 01 local d,v,s,ons across Ihe counlry. Many hold regular
meetin
gs end Issue newsletters. Further Information may be obtained by wrhing to the
dlVlSlon.
• NEW BRUNSWICK DMSlON
P.O. 60. 1162
S_oot John.
N …… Brun ….. ~k E2l 4G 7
• ST LAWRENCE VAlLEY DMSlON
P.O Bo. 22 St,on B
Monueel. Que. H3B 3J5
• RIDEAU VAUEY DMSlON
P.O 60. ge2
Smm flU.. Onta .. o K7A !lAS
• KI
N<>STON OMSION P.O.
Bo>< 103. Slllion MA
KlngoJlon. On~rio K7M 6PS

TOAONfO & YORK DIVISION
PO 80. 56<19. TIII ... IA.
lomnlO. Onl….. MSW I P3

NIAGARA DIVISION
PO. 80. 593
51. C.,tl&f1n Onl.10 L2R 6W8
1 WlNOSOA.eSSE)( DIVISION
300 Cob.nl RG&d hl.
W,nd….Ont.no N9G IA2 •
KEYSTONE DIVISION
I R~dI e.v
WlnnII. M8M~ R3K C».I
1 CALGARY & SOUTH weSTERN DIVISION
60 _ Bl00, 4th A …. NE
C ….. …,. Albefuo T2A 528
1 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OIVlSlON
PO. 50, 6102. S~In C.
Edmonton. AlbI.,. TS8 2NO
1 SEU(IRt(. OMSION
PO.
80. 39
R … elstoke. B.C. VO€ 250
1 CROWSNEST I. KETTlE·VAlLEY OIViSION
PO 60.400
C,.brook. Bnlm. Coiumbta VIC 4H9
• NELSON ElECTRIC TRAMWAY SOCIETY
123 View Street
Nelson. B.C. VI L 2VB
• PACIFIC COAST ONiSION
PO Bo 1006. Station A.
Vanc:_a •. BnI,lh Columboa V6C 2PI
Deryk Sparks
D
avid W. Strong
Laurence M. Unwin
Rrchard Viborg
A. Stephen Walbridge
John C. Welf
FRONT COVER:
Dcmimon Atltlntlc RtliJwlJY 504. bUilt by
Schenee//Jely in NovembIJf 1902. WIIS once
ntlm~ HtI/tftlJl tlh Ihe £.rl of HeldeJl, not its
n
.muekll city. This vIew. r.ken on Septembll!
15 1942. shows it ., Digby on Ir/Jill 98 (rom
YtlrfflO/Jlh to HllfifllJl. Thtl Iocomoti~e.nd he.d·
lind CtlfS would bll fUn down 10 t~ whllrl to
mellt the CPR ferry from S.mr John. while the
COtlCMS tlOO P/JrlOfJI cal would be moved by tI
switCher. TllIin 99. flom HJllifsJI to YtlrmOUm,
would l!pelJt thtl opl!ftltion. This m.noeuvre
wss a plJrt ofths Htl/if/JJI Yarmouth service until
rhll eerly 1970·s.
Photo from P/Jrterson·GeorrJII colleetkm.
As part of lIS actIVIties. Ihe CRHA operates
the
Canadian Railway Museum al Delson/St.
Constant. Ouebec whIch
IS 14 miles (23 Km.1
flom downlown Monlreal. It is open dally
from lale Mav to early October. Members and
their Immediate lamilies are admined free
of
charge.
G04l OF THE ASSOCIATION. THE COllECTION. PRESERVATION AND DISSEMINATION OF ITEMS RElATING TO THE HISTORY OF RAilWAYS IN CANADA.
147
The Nelson Electric Tramway
by Mike Culham
For fifty years Nelson enjoyed the distinction of operating the
smallest Street Railway in the British Empire.
It all started with
the immensely rich discoveries
of copper-silver ore on Toad
Mountain that attracted a swarm
of treasure-seekers, and like
mushrooms that spring up overnight, Nelson sprouted in the
valley below the mine.
As this celebrated Silver King Mine and others were
developed, Nelson the
Queen City became a center of
commerce for the entire Kootenay Region. Soon two competing
railroads linked with sternwheelers were built to fight
for the
lions share
of the mineral trade that was being extracted. The
optimism was so contagious that British capital was beginning to
invest
in the local mines. Captain T. J. Duncan represented
some
of these interests that began to open up gold mines near
Blewett.
Capt. Duncan was so enthusiastic about the potential
of the area that he convinced the giant, British Traction
Company to capitalize and establish a local street trolley
system. Rossland the
Golden City above Trail was also
considered but the system was only built
in Nelson. At that time
Nelson was the only city between Vancouver and Winnipeg to
warrant streetcars.
Elaborate plans were soon laid and with appropriate
ceremonies the first spike was driven on July
31,1899. This was
a time
of celebration and civic spirits soared high.
Another great resource was recognized, the Kootenay
Rivers potential for hydro generation resulting
in the West
Kootenay Power and Light Co. Tapping it by building a dam at
lower Bonnington.
The WKP & L. Co. was a pioneer in the
science
of high voltage transmission, an industry in its infancy at
that time. They are credited with the longest and highest voltage
transmission line in
North America, the 32 mile, 20,000 volt
line to the Rossland mines.
The Nelson Electric tramway Co.
contracted with the
WKP & L. Co. to supply power for their
Street Railway.
The tramway company was incorporated on Oct. 4, 1899
with the election
of a Board of Directors and an order was placed
for two streetcars. The Canadian General Electric Co. of
Peterborough, Ontario supplied the electrical equipment to
change the alternating hydro power to direct current
to power the
overhead trolley wires.
When the construction was completed late in the fall of 1899
a first class system was built
of which the nelson citizens could
be proud. Finally the day for the trial runs came. Those with a
superstitious trend would warn that maybe
Dec. 13, was the
wrong day to start but they went ahead as planned, when the
power was first turned on, a motor in the temporary power
converter system failed and burnt out perhaps foreshadowing
events to come.
On inauguration day, Dec. 23,1899, after a few successful
tests the
NET Co. accidently staged a wild streetcar runaway on
Kootenay Street the steepest grade on the line. The car loaded with officials successfully climbed the hill but as it was turned
over to the other motorman and started back down it built up
excessive speed.
As the streetcar careened out of control down
the hill and into the curve at Hall Mines Road it flipped over onto
its side.
When the dust cleared it was evident that most had
jumped clear but unfortunately motorman Peters was jammed
under the car with his
ann crushed. As help arrived he was pried
loose from the wreckage but lost his arm.
The others escaped,
shaken up with only miner cuts and bruises.
Despite this inauspicious introduction the line did get off to a
start and business picked up early in 1900 even though they were
restricted from running on the steep uphill section.
Changes were soon made that included jogging the line over
to Stanley Street above the car barns to eliminate the steep 13%
grade
of Kootenay Street and trackage was also extended into
Bogus Town near the Lakeside Park.
Almost from day one, the company began to run into
financial difficulties. The ideal solution seemed to be to sell
some surplus electrical power to the city which suffered from a
chronic power shortage. Nelsons own power system was so
feeble
in those days it could barely get a street lamp to glow at
night.
For no apparent reason John Houston, the eccentric
Mayor bucked the proposal, opposed his board, and vetoed the
whole plan. In retaliation the Tramway Company began
to lay
off its employees and soon the struggling line was bankrupt.
The next phase began on Jan. 1,1905 when the City decided
to lease the complete system and operate it themselves.
Maintenance problems continued to plague the line but it would
take something really drastic to cause them to give up.
The next setback was the work of a fire fiend. The attack
started with a sabotage and a fire at the substation which
climaxed the next night when the car barns and all the equipment
burnt to the ground, a total loss. The Nelson Electric Tramway
was officially out
of business. When the embers cooled the
people
of Nelson decided that they didnt want to give up the
status
of operating a street railway.
Now it would be 2 years before Nelsons patrons had the
privilege
of a streetcar ride again. On Dec. 21, 1910 a new
venture was off to a flying start with the newly incorporated,
Nelson Street Railway, promoted by local businessmen. The
inauguration run was again marred by mishap.
This time the new streetcar
# 2, one of two built by the
Ottawa
Car Co., spun out climbing Cedar Street the steep hill on
the new loop, and began to slide backwards on the slick tracks.
The poor motormans hands were tied, all he could do was hope
for the best, hang on tight and ride with his captive audience that
were paralyzed with fear. A chorus
of screams erupted just as
car # 2 crashed to rest in the ravine at the foot of the hill. Most
occupants were badly shaken up but only Superintendent
Ingram has a serious injury to his leg
that later had to be
amputated.
.-.:.:.
148
Car 3 of Nelsons electric tram company is gaily decorated for a Victoria day celebration in 1900. Note the curved window posts
which indicate that it is, or is identical to, a convertable car built by the Duplex Car Co. of New York in 1899. This unusual type
of car had curved sides, including the window glass, which could be slid in groves into the roof of the car leaving the sides entirely
open. See Cassiers Magazine, August 1899.
All photos courtesy of the Nelson Electric Tramway Society.
After the investigation air brakes and sanders were fitted to
the cars and 3 emergency runaway diversion switches were
installed on
Cedar Street. If a runaway repeated the track
switches would automatically shuttle the streetcar to safety.
Frank Ingram was fitted with an artificial leg and he hobbled
back to work to supervise the affairs
of the line.
Things were rosey for a few years, the street railway ran
successfully without any earth shattering events until 1919. In
that year car
# 2, the culprit again, shoved its running mate, the
sweeper car through the wall
of the car barn into the Cottonwood
Creek ravine. This accident happened during regular service
work. As Mr.
Woods, the maintenance man, was dressing the
switch contacts (filing burned contacts
of the drum-controller)
and not realizing the power was still on he inadvertently engaged
the controller.
It all happened so fast he didnt realize what was
going on. The streetcar was left perching
in mid air hanging out
of the car bam while the sweeper car was totally smashed down
below. Miraculously old
Mr. Woods wasnt electrocuted that
day.
As the line gained popUlarity a spare car was needed so
arrangements were made in 1924 to purchase a retired one from
Cleveland Ohio. This
car, which affectionately became Car 23
was a true veteran having survived the volatile streetcar wars in
Ohio provoked by Mayor Tom Johnson. The streetcar,
originally built in 1906 turned out to be a faithful addition to the
N
.S.R. roster. Car 23, just recently rebuilt, is the only Nelson
streetcar that has outlived those hectic years. Over the years the tramway had many faithful employees,
names like Dave Webster, Lou Blakely,
Ed Jackman, Scotty
McCandlish, Bill Curran, Charley Bounce, etc., bring back a
flood
of nostalgic memories. Perhaps the Hall family stand out
for being involved in the tramway
for the longest period of time.
First G. W. Hall worked his way up in the system and later
served as superintendent from 1924 to 1932 when poor health
forced him to retire.
For a short period a son Wilfred worked on
the streetcars but went into postal work while the other son
A. C.
(Les)
HaJJ followed the steps of his father becoming super­
intendent, serving the company till its closure in 1949. Many
people remember being amazed at how the Halls had the skill to
nurse the ailing obsolete equipment, keeping it on track for so
many years.
During the 1920s very
few people could afford to own an
automobile so nearly everyone travelled on the streetcar
service. The cars themselves and the employees that operated
them became woven into the very fabric
of Nelson.
The kids themselves, not to be outdone, acknowledged the
presence
of the system by dreaming up pranks against it. One
dark Halloween night many years ago a group
of the youth built a
scarecrow like figure dressed with human clothes filled with
straw.
As the streetcar approached they arranged it to be
standing among a group of people.
To the sheer horror of the
motorman this figure fell under the wheels as the streetcar
passed.
The crunching sounds sent tremors down the poor
operators spine. Kids even in those days had no mercy.
An embarrassing moment! One day in 1919 the
controller
of car 22 was accidently engaged
with the result that the car pushed the sweeper
through the back wall
of the car barn and into
the
deep ravine below. This was how car 22
stopped, almost in
mid air.
Car 22 appeared like this during the 1930s before it was
modernized.
149
Other pranks included putting homemade pungent smelling
sulphur bombs under the wheels or hiding behind a bush and
shaking a guy cable on a power pole to disengage the overhead
trolley just
as the car passed by. This unnecessary delay irked
the motorman trying to maintain his schedule.
The favorite in winter was to divert the attention of the
conductor and empty his sander before the car climbed the hill.
The school kids thereby gained a few precious minutes of
freedom while the school bell rang, the wheels spun, and the
upset conductor cursed them.
After running fairly smoothly
for over 20 years the street
railway had 2 spectacular runaways down Stanley Street during
the
1940 s. Previously, during the depression, in an effort to
inflate the apparent size
of the line, cars 1 and 2 were
renumbered to
21 & 22. For unknown reasons Car 2 or 22 was
jinxed, it was involved in every serious accident.
On
Oct. 10, 1942 Streetcar Number 22 loaded with
passengers applied its air brakes and began to slide on the tracks
soaked with tree sap. Flying out
of control the streetcar almost
delivered its load into the Royal Bank on Baker Street. Luckily
no one was serious
ly injured.
Again
in 1945 the same streetcar lost its air brakes coming
down Stanley Street and flew off the track, ending up against the
Hoods Bakery Building. Buerges Freight truck was damaged
in
the accident. The subsequent investigation revealed that the
motorman failed to switch on his air compressor when
he
commenced his run. By now people were beginning to protest
against the aging streetcars.
150
Nelsons venerable car 23, decked
with advertising on its side, waits
to pick up passengers on Baker
Street.
The last day
oj street car operation in Nelson after fifty tears oj
service. June 20 1949.
After the end of the second World Was the whole area was
ready for a change. People no longer wanted to look backwards
but ahead to new and better things. Changing trends became the
order
of the day. Many old Victorian buildings were covered
over and modernized, the sternwheelers were all but phased out
by this time and many people thought that a progressive city like
Nelson should have new and modem buses.
The maintenance
on the obsolete streetcars was becoming a nightmare and a
referendum showed that the majority wished to replace the aging
Nelson Street Railway. Many people wanted trolley powered
buses but these were not available so gas powered buses had to
be settled on.
The last run of the streetcars was made on June 20, 1949 with
a special ceremony that included 3 invited guests
that had ridden
on the first streetcars 50 years previously. When it was all over
the gritty, old, eccentric streetcars that had clattered along
Nelsons streets so long were retired and replaced with the new
placid, sleek, docile vehicles
of today. Flooded with fond
memories a
few people were very relunctant to part with their
beloved streetcars that had served Nelson so faithfully.
151
The Nelson & Fort
Sheppard Railway
by F.M. Barone
The Nelson & Fort Sheppard Railway was one of the early
shots
in the wars between the business tycoons, politicians and
railways over who was going to profit most from the wealth
of
B. C. s southern interior. Of the many lines built in the area
during the
1890s and on to WW 1, it is one ofthe few to remain
in its entirety -so far.
The
N&FS was built by D.C. Corbin of Spokane,
Washington as a Canadian extension
of his Spokane Falls &
Northern. The only other railway south
of the C.P.R. mainline
at the time was the Columbia and Kootenay between Nelson and
Castlegar. All other transportation then was by sternwheelers
and mule trains. Since, by the 1880s there was the glimmer
of
Great Wealth to be had in the mountains of the Kootenay
District and on west to the boundary district, the only question
was which way was the wealth and the ores going to flow?.
B. C. politicians of course saw it as one way traffic to Vancouver
and Victoria which they still do today, while American tycoons
saw it as wealth to be grabbed and sent south. Who won is a
matter
of conjecture since the high grade ores began running out
about the same time the railway boom began to wind down.
By
the time the depression hit, all that was left, of any consequence,
were the Sullivan Mine
in Kimberly and the smelter at Trail.
Local conjecture though
is that about half of the city of Spokane
was built by the wealth
of the Kootenays, a substantial part of
which traveled down the N &FS/SF &N.
Corbins entry into Canada was not particularly easy. He did
however prove to
be a little craftier than B.C.s politicians. his
first application for a railway charter
in 1890 was rejected,
because he was an American .
I His second petition however
was presented by some B. C. business men while he presented a
grandiose plan to run a line from the interior to the coast via the
Kettle River Valley. This petition of course created a big stir
in
the B.C. legislature. The N&FS petition made it past the
politicians while they were patting themselves on the back for
keeping that American out. Corbin started construction
immediately and barely finished by the December 1893
deadline.
Construction
wasnt without its problems either since Van
Horne and the
C.P.R. were also looking at the Kootenays
probably with a lot more dollar signs
in their eyes than patriotism
in their hearts. Just as Corbin Construction crews were coming
down the narrow valley South
of Nelson, the C.P.R., through
the Columbia and Kootenay laid claim
to the shore along
Kootenay Lake, east to a point about 5 miles from Nelson. This
effectively blocked the
N&FS from entering Nelson. Corbin
was therefore forced to locate the N
&FS station at Mountain
Station
in South Nelson about 800 above the city, then extend
the line eastward down the hill to Kootenay Lake to the edge
of
FOOTNOTE:
1: McCuliochs Wonder, Sanford, B., PG. 21.
the area claimed by the C.P.R. at this point, called Troup
Junction, a wharf was built to connect with the lake steamers.
To this day part of the line on either side of mountain station
mark the municipal boundrys
of Nelson. Eventually Corbin was
able to secure some access along the shoreline and was able to
build westward from troup, where he constructed a loop, to
within one mile
of Nelson in a district called Bogustown ,
today called Fairview and within the present city limits. This
stretch
of track today forms part of the C.P.R. line East out of
Nelson and is apparently still owned by Burlington Northern.
While Corbin was to remain outside the cities boundrys,
leaving access to the N
&FS difficult-800 up the mountain side
or, initially,
five miles out along the lake, this problem was to be
partly solved when the city built the Nelson Electric Tramway
to run street cars from downtown to Bogustown. This may have
been
OK for the transportation of people but what about the
transportation of ores? The author has not been able
to ascertain
whether any ores ever traveled down the line from Nelson,
although ores from the smaller mines on line may well have,
despite the fact that, for a short time
Northport, Washington
was the only town
in the area with a smelter, one built by Corbin
at that. Under
GNR auspices however, the line reached Nelson
proper before the tramway line was completed.
In 1898 Corbin lost the N
&SF /SF &N. Upon hearing that
some unknown person was buying up the company stock,
Corbin, fearing that it was his main rival, Van Horne and the
C.P.R., had J.P. Morgan buy N&SF/SF&N stock. When
Morgan discovered that it was J . J. Hill who was the unknown
buyer, he sold the stock that he had acquired to him. Hill, now
with controlling interest, fired Corbin. Two years later, Hill and
the C.
P.R. reached an agreement one of whose provisions was
that the N
&SF was granted running rights on that last mile into
Nelson with the C. P.R. being granted rights to Troup.
It wasnt
until 1907 though before the
N&SF operations were amalga­
mated into those of the G. N. R. final sale
of N &FS stock and
merger into the.
G. N. R. did not occur until 1944. From there it
was carried into the Burlington Northern.
As
for Corbin himself, his loss to Hill didnt stop him from
building railways
in Canada. His next venture was the Spokane
International Railway which
he built from Spokane, in a
Northeasterly direction to join up with the
C.P.R. at Yahk,
B.C., about 100 rail miles east of Nelson. This railway was
eventually bought out
by the C. P. R. and became part of the
route of the
Soo-Spokane Flyer, a Chicago-Spokane
passenger train via the C. P. R. during the 1930
s, it was jointly
owned by the
C.P.R. and Union Pacific becoming part of the
U.P.R.
in the 1940s. Today, it is the route of the CP/UP
Calgary-Portland trains, a daily freight with pooled power.
152
GN SD9 # 578 and GP9 #686 sit on one of the shop tracks in Nelson. It was generaly dijJicu/t to get photos of these engines in
Nelson because the train arrived
in the evening and left early in the morning. For some unknown reason the train arrived mid
morning and left mid afternoon on this occasion. These engines were regulars on the run for many years. Often the SD9 was the
only power necessary. The
686 became BN 1838 that remained in service on the line until recently.
Johno:Rushton Photo.
Mid 1960s.
BN 1839 and 1832 enter the Nelson yard about 7:30 pm on a
warm July evening
in 1971. The engines will back the ralher
typical consist, into the siding behind the train, this
was standard
procedure and then be parked
on the shop track to the left of the
picture for servicing. 1839
is X GN 687. 1832-well also be an X
GN engine but I have not been able to track down its number.
Photo by author.
BN 1806 and another unidentified GP9 are leaving Fruitvale –
Northbound -After switching the sawmill behind the photographer.
1806 is one
of the X GN (733) units that showed up rather
regularly for 20 years or more.
Photo by author. July 1974.
153
EN 1806 and 1805, X GN 733 and 732. Two of the most common denizens afthe N&FSfor so long, are in the process of
switching the small Salma yard in this late cifternaon July 1974 picture. Once the chores are complete, the crew will park and have
supper
at one of the local restaurents before continuing on North ta tie up in Nelson for the night.
Photo by author.
TRAFFIC
Despite the fact that in 1898 a smelter was built at Northport
Washington, about 6 miles south of the border on the SF &N, it
appears that the dreamed of ore traffic never really developed
along the N &
SF / SF &N, for much of it continued to flow by
barge up the Arrow Lakes to the C. P. R. mainline at Revelstoke.
With the construction
of smelters at trail (Cominco 1896) and
Nelson (1898 Hall
Bros.~this traffic was redirected. Some of
the profits though continued to flow south since the trail smelter
was built by another American
F.A. Hienze who sold his share
of the smelter, mines and railway (Columbia and Western) to
the C.
P.R. in 1898. The Northport smelter limped along until
1921 on ore from some
of the mines in Rossland traveling down
Corbins other raiiways, red mountain railway (Canadian side)
and the columbia and red mountain
(US side) tojoin the SF &N
at Northport. Constructed in 1895, these two were lost to Hill
and the G.N.R.
in 1898.
While ore traffic didnt develop, lumber traffic did as a
number
of small saw mills sprang up along the line. Even with a
larger mill
in Nelson, traffic remained at a volume throughout
most
of the century sufficient only for a couple of trains per
week.
As for passenger traffic, initially a passenger train and
engine, baggage car and coaches was run almost from the
completion
of construction. By 1928, the number of passengers
had dwindled so much that a General Motors
Doodlebug was
used on the line. In
1941 the passenger train was discontinued.
MOTIVE POWER AND ROLLING STOCK
Corbins equipment consisted of three locomotives, alI4-4-0s
typical
of the era and about 57 assorted cars. It is uncertain
whether any of this equipment was ever lettered for the N
&FS
since existing photos only show SF &N lettering. The track as
originally .constructed was not well done and was never
upgraded to any significant standard. Consequently motive
power remained relatively small, the largest being
GNs
2-8-0s. 4-4-0s remained on the passenger train until the
advent of the Doodlebug. With the coming
of the diesel, a single
ALCO RS-3 was deemed sufficient. In time they gave way to
GM GP9s and SD9s. With the formation of Burlington
Northern, the same four
GP9s were assigned to the run for 18
years, making it most boring for railfans. In recent years though
the
GP9s have been removed from BNs roster to be replaced
by GP35s and GP38s. Sometimes, even rare GP30s show
up on the trains. In spite of all this horsepower, the trains remain
small, 20 cars being a big train and track speed remains
20
MPH.
Freight cars remained throughout the years primarily those
concerned with the lumber industry; boxcars, bulkhead flats,
the
latest Centre Sill flats and wood chip cars. Interestingly
though the road names on these cars are not confined to BN and
its predecessor roads. Cars big and small, Canadian and
American regularly show up for loading. Many
of the small road
named cars do however have
BN reporting marks. Other types
of cars do periodically appear
in the trains such as 100 ton
covered hoppers and tank cars but
Ive never been able to
154
BN -CP 8657, 8630. In March 1984 the CP sent a second crew down the line because of repeat washouts North of the Beaver
Falls Bridge. This time they sent two engines. While the sight
of these engines would have made J.J. Hill See Red or turn over
in his grave, the thought of stealing some of CPOs traffic through the reload centre for Cominco s Ores would have, no doubt, brought a smile
to his face.
Bob
Lynn Photo.
BN -CP8653. This BN freight occured the first time that CP
sent a crew down the N&FS to pick up the loads stranded when the
BN experienced a series of washouts just North of the Beaver Falls
Bridge (about
3 miles South of Fruitvale). On this first tnp in
November 1983, CP sent one unit. The second time, March 1984,
they sent two units. The train
is North bound about 8 miles South
of Sal mo.
Photo by author.
BN 2733 and caboose are parked on a short siding in the North
end
of Fruitvale. During a three week period in the spring of 1984,
because
of the washouts, this engine was left idling on this spur to
make a bi-weekly trip to Nelson.
Photo by author.
155
BN 2214, X GN 3014, with 2580, a GP35, drift down grade toward the southern end of the N&FS about 2 milesforther. The area
to the left and just above the highway is the approximately location of the proposed reload centre for the ores destined for
Comincos smelter at trail, which
is partly responsible for some of the background haze above the hill.
Photo by author. September 1987.
BN 2255, a GP 35, and X GN GP9 # 1787, are crossing the Pend
dOrielle River and are about
to enter the U. S. At the Wanete,
B.
C. border crossing. This is the southern end of the N&FS. The
road bridge
to the left of the train is the original railroad bn·dge.
Photo
by author. November 1985.
ascertain whether they were on line loads or simply transfer
movements between
CP and BN. There was also a never
repeated experiment with an
89 auto carrier that must have
caused the train crew a
few headaches.
FUTURE PROSPECTS
The future of this line remains uncertain at this time. The mill
in Nelson was closed several years ago drying up most
of the
traffic for the last twenty miles. The train continues to
go to
Nelson only once a week now, terminating in Salmo about 30
miles south on the second trip. Apparently the
BN would like to
abandon the section
of line between Nelson and the village of
YMIR (20 miles). From YMIR south the line will remain
active on a twice weekly basis as long as the mills enroute
prosper.
Recently though the southern most
few miles have become
secure. A partnership
of BN and TRI-MAC Transport (a
Calgary based trucking outfit) have won the contract to haul the
Red
Dog Mine ores from North Vancouver to Cominco
(Heinzes trail smelter). Red
Dog is Comincos new lead/zinc
mine in Alaska from which concentrates will be shipped
by
freighter to North Van for transfer to rail cars. eN rail will tum
the cars over to BN
in Vancouver from where they will travel on
the
BN mainline through Washington state and tum north onto
the
SF &N IN &FS. An unloading center will be built about 3
miles north
of the border where the ores will be transfered to
TRI-MAC trucks for the remainder of the trip, about 5 miles, to
the trail smelter. This partnership beat out
CP Rails bid for this
business.
CPs route is about 200 miles longer and since CP no
longer owns Cominco
(at least not directly), it no longer has
much sway on company decisions.
Further, some of Cominco s
acid shipments to its US customers have been taking the reverse
route lately to
go south on the N &FS, being transfered from
truck to tank car about 1 mile north
of the proposed unloading
building location. Apparently other products are also to be
156
Engines such as this GP38 #2719 and GP30 #2200 X GN 3000, are what finally replaced the GP9s only with the last 2 or 3
years. In this June
86 photo the train is leaving Fruitvale and is southbound back to Kettle Falls, Washington. Photo by author.
BN 2214, X GN 3014, and 2580, models which are now fairly
common sights, continue
to drift south with a typical load (of
money). At this point the train is about 1 mile north of the Pend
dOrielle River Bridge and the Waneta bor4er crossing.
Photo by author. September 1987.
BN 2225, an X CB&Q GP30 #948, and GP35 #2507 are
heading north from North Port, Washington
on the Spokane Falls
& Northern, Corbins first line. The train has but a few miles
to go
to enter the N&FS portion with this rather a typical consist with so
many covered hoppers.
Photo by author.
shipped south on this route so the transfer area is to become a
general reload centre. Concern about the dust from the ores
is
quite great because the trucks must travel through downtown
trail
to reach the smelter. When the daily 15 car trains are
unloaded, the building will be completely enclosed and the
trucks
will be washed down before leaving. Further, the track
will be up graded to permit 50 MPH running as opposed to the
present 20
MPH limits. The remainder of the N &FS will not be
up graded.
It is hoped that the up grading of the lower portion
will ensure continued service to the lumber mills along the
remainder of the line.
INCIDENTS
Like all enterprises, the N &FS is not without its share of
tales. Barrie Sanford in his book McCullochs Wonder,
relates how J. J. Hill, upon arriving at Bogustown on an
inspection tour, had his train stop at the end
of the G N portion of
the line into Nelson. From there he walked the last mile into
Nelson rather than ride the rails
of the CPR. Hills hatered of the
CPR has to some extent carried on to this day amongst the
present day railway men (managers?
), although not with quite
so much vivre.
For example, when the BN had a series of
washouts about 3 miles south of Fruitvale, which effectively
isolated
all the lumber mills, considerable pressure had to be
brought
to bear by the mill owners to have the CPR send a crew
down from Nelson to pick up the many loaded limber cars.
Rather than have the
CPR service the mills during another series
of washouts at the same location as above, the BN had the
CPR
take a GP38-2 and caboose from Grand Forks, over the Farron
Hill to Nelson. The engine and caboose were then parked
in
Fruitvale for about 3 weeks, making the regular bi-weekly trips
north to interchange the cars with the
CPR. During the entire
period the engine was left idleing when parked.
CP for its part did on a number of occasions hold the BN
train at Troup Junction for up to 3 hours to allow passage of a
CP
freight which was at Creston, B.C. 70 miles away before
allowing the BN to enter the
CP controlled track for the 6 mile
trip into Nelson. On another day though when the BN crew put
their engines off the end
of the Y at troup and almost into
Kootenay Lake,
CPs big hook from Nelson was quickly there to
put them back on the track.
The engines were then taken to
Nelson to do the necessary temporary repairs so they could be
sent south for
full repairs. Apparently, this cooperation was
part of one of the agreements made between CPR and GNR
early in the century. Without this, who knows, perhaps none of
this railfan type of entertainment would have happened.
ADDENDUM:
Rather than attempt to copy or trace maps to be included with
this article, it was decided to recommend to the reader that they
refer to the nicely detailed ones
in Roger Burrows Railway
Mileposts: British Columbia
voI2. The maps in this book give
track arrangements that occured over the years for example
those at Troup Junction. Reference to maps of other rail lines
in
the area will help clarify this historical overview.
157
Also to be recommended is G. Doeksens Railway of
Western Canada vol 5. This book is a collection of N &FS
photos many by the author and many of historical subjects from
other sources.
Since this article was written, some additional points
regarding future prospects have come to light.
First, the fmal
contracts for the reload centre have not, as of May 1989, been
signed however construction
is expected to start this Summer or
Fall pending signing. The track layout though has been surveyed
and the track center line stakes have been placed.
Second, some track repair
is being carried out from the reload
center north however it
is not known yet just how far north. A
recent discussion with some train crew indicates
that the trip to
Nelson has not been made for a couple of months and that for the
past while the only trips there were made when interchange was
to occure. This would suggest that track repair may only be to
Salmo.
Finally, some
of those GP9 s that were thought to have been
removed from
BNs rooster have again appeared on the trains
occasionally. Also, new to the motive power parade are blue ex
conrail leased
EMD GP35 so These engines have the EMD
Hearld on the nose and body and are numbered in the 700 and
800 series.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Bain, D.M., Canadian Pacific in the Rockies, vol 6. Pub.
British Railway Modelers
of North America Calgary, Alta
1980.
Burrows,
R.G., Railway Mileposts: British Columbia vol 2.
Pub. Railway Milepost Books.
North Vancouver, B.C.
1984.
Doeksen, G. Railways
of the West Kootenay -Parts 2 & 3.
(Railways
of Western Canada -vol 3 & 5). Pub. G.
Doeksen, Montrose, B. C. 1984 & 1988.
Kennedy, W.
G., Canadian Pacific in Southern British Columbia

The Boundry Subdivision. Pub. British Railway Modelers
of North America Calgary, Alta. 1986.
Riegger,
H., the Kettle Valley and its Railways. Pub. PFM
Publications, Edmonds, Washington no date.
Sanford, B., McCullochs Wonder. Pub. Whitecap Books.
West Vancouver, B.C. 1977.
Sanford, B., the Pictorial History of Railways
in British
Columbia. Pub. Whitecap Books, West Vancouver, B.
C.
1981.
Turner,
R.
D., West of the Great Divide. Pub. Sono Nis Press,
Victoria,
B.C. 1987.
158
Darlington and Port Union Stations
by Robert G . Burnet
STATION BACKGROUND
Living in and working around a railway station has been
diminishing for many years. Since the 1960s
or earlier –
depending on
ones perspective -the fate and existence of the
railway station was dramatically written. Some
of the reasons
were predictable, such as declining passenger service; govern­
ment mismanagement, ineptitude and disregard for the needs
of
the people and, expensive upgrading for tracks, passenger and
freight cars, facilities, rising costs and wages.
Today, many of
the stations listed in Figures 1 and 2 are memories, photographs
and factual words.
The aura, essentially, is gone and history
continues to repeat itself under VIA.
Most
of my maternal family were born in different railway
stations over four separate railway companies. Only one
member still lives to fire my enthusiasm and love for what once
was and will never
be again. A major bonus to this article has
been my mothers assistance
on Station Life -few, if any, with
this kind
of memory and personal involvement now live. Some railway station background
is essential. When the
Champlain and St. Lawrence Rail Road first opened in 1836, a
new type
of building was required to accommodate the paying
passenger and to store freight. This resulted
in the station .
Early stations were
called Road Stations by the Grand Trunk
Railway
(GTR) on the Montreal-Toronto route. Most Road
Stations were small, rectangular, wooden-framed one storey
structures with broad-eaved gabled roofs and no paint. The
larger railway centres such as Kingston and Belleville, were
often two storey buildings with elaborate woodwork designs and
made
of brick or stone. As stations developed, other types were
created for other needs, such as the more common
way
station where freight and passengers shared an elongated
station platform. Off to the side, there would be the accompany­
ing freight shed
and/or hut for the track gangs maintenance-of­
way tools. Living quarters, for example, were provided by the
GTR to our family with a separate two storey house such as at
Mallory town, approximately 100 feet south
of the station
proper.
It is exciting to note that this home still survives in most
Figure One -July 2, 1894 GTR Map. The GTR railway map shows most stations between Montreal-Toronto. Note the faint line
for the CPR. Family stations are marked with a dash.
(F. Angus Collection).
.For additional wburban 3ervice between Yo/k and Toronto and Toronto Bell .
LiNo;~~;o~e~~i~f~val at netroit and Ohi~agO. ne. Stratf~rd, lee page 3(; ….
TiR ~~)~~~~o~e:r!l~g~e~oe be~e6n Mo~tr6al and Cornw~ll, ~d. depar~ .. :
~~10uaa:~~~!: ~fee;r:lrcf:rI2°pottland to Chicago, via Stratford
No. S CHa~ 1~~Il;..!;Buffet Sleeplng CaT Montreal to Toronto. Purtmtln .
tog Car Ottawa to Toronto viR C.P. and G.T. Rys.
No. & 8SJ1 Pu-lh1lnn Sleeping Car Rost.on to Chicago via B. & bf.~. C. &,
M B & M C V G T (via Hamilton) and C. & G. T. Ry Puuman
Sl~ep~g Car Montrealto loronto (wUlrnn to Chicago ift.hrough pfl.8.SeDge~8.
cannot be located in .8ostoo· car. . ~.
.. Dally:
159
STA.TIONS. E~8. E~. p~. p~,. E:P. M~d
. DaUy.
Mile,
LEA vx ~ ~ P.iL ~ ~ A:M.
o Toronto 137 (Un. Stn.) … 16 55 t 8 55 II 20 t 6 30 .. 8 40
U~ ~~~k:::.::::·.:::::::::::::::::: ~ ~5: …. :: } ~~ ~ ~~ ……. .
8.98 Scarboro Jet…… .. .. ……. 7 n . 1 63 6 00 9 14 . 10.75
Markbam Road Crea,ing… …… . ……. 1 67 6 04 ……. .
16.43 Po,t Union …………… :…….. 7 ~O … :….. 2 08 6 16 . 9 27.
~:~ ~~·;::r~ii::.:::::.::.:::::.:.:. . .. ::.::.::. /~ lh~ ~~ ……
23.30 .Piok.ring……………… …….. 7 53 …. :…. 2 24 6 28 ………
29.56 WhItby Jot ……………… _. 805 flO 01 2 37 640.9 67
~:~ g~~;~~oii·:·: .. ·:·.. g ~~~:09 ~ ~~lr ~ ~~10 .. D.5 .
42.7J Bowman.lll. ……. 8 40 10?:l 3 06 7 04 10 25 .
~ … ~ ~:::::~ …… ::.: … ::.:::: ~ g.} ;::::: . ~ U ~ ~~ :::::: ..
62.69 Port Hope Jot 105 _. 92S 11 05 3 50 745 11 06 : ……..
93.72 :.~::g:::.:P. 2h)-1-::9~() 11 20 … ~ 12.8 65 1126::::::
69.5O. 0 • ……… Iv. 945 Jl 2S 4 09 J1 30
~U~ g~~~.::::::::.. l~ ~ :……. nL1H~
91.55 Brigbton .. ….. 1025 6 03. 12 13. 100.90
Tr I06.2h Sldn.y ………………………….. 1053 . 6 36 .
11279 n.n.vllle JOL ….. j F.~ ii ~ g 1~ b : ~~ i gg ;~~::::::
119.89 Shannonvin ………. :.:… 11 25: 623 649 …… .
126.41 MaryvIll ………….. :.. 11 37…. 643. .. …… 7 10 ……. ..
129.68 D … rontoJo~. 80.·….. 11 44 120 663 .. -….. 1 35 722 ……. ..
134.36 n.,.ronto ………… ; 1 arT T2liO T4li 72ii == 230 7BO :::::::::
via B. o! Q. Ry…. Ive 1115 12 66 6 16 ……… 1 15 7 00 …….. .
134.49 Napane.90.. .. ……. li50 126 705 –l4l735 :::::::::
183.49 Tw •• d viA B. of Q. I T:~TIC 7 .~~ ~ ::-:::-:: lO4s To45 :=::.
Ry… . 6 40 6 ~ 3 00 ……. 3 00 ……. __
i~:~ t~!:C,*burg:. 12 01 ……. V7 22:::::::::::::: 752
152.89 Colllno Bay.. . 12 J1 ………. 740 20 8 12
16039 Kingston Jot. , …… arr U ~~ …. 2 .. 10 ~ ~~ :::~ . 2 25 ~ gg ::::
162.96 KIng.ton 66._ ……….. arr 100 21ii 845 A:M. 240 915 …….. .
. (S .. pag 27). ITe 12 20 1 66 8 10 f 6 00 2 05 …………… .
l~~ ~113gstonJct.L ……… IV·1f6&230B36lr~ 15 23ii~:::::::::
~:: ~:::Oq::.~~~.~:~::~~~:I~n: r!!! ! ~ ·T~:::::: .:::::::
V … T:l.Ry ………… {.!v. 100215 865 6~5 215· …… · …….. ·
186.89·
Lan,down ……………………. 146::::::::: 9T7 740:::::::::::::::::::::::::::
19~.1I M.Uorytown.;…… 2 00 10 10 806 ..
~n~ i;~~~~lle·lc:·:::::.:m ~ ~~ 4 00 t~:~ g ~. 3 45
280.77 Ottawa, via C. P. Ry .. Af~ 6 35 C93S ::::::::: –. .. 9 55 ::::::—
2()/.77 rockville IL ……… 1.e 21ii TG5 –930 350 —-. –
212.83 Maltlaod. ………………. -….. /2 40 ……………… r 945 J …. ..
219.49 Pre.cott 109 ………. –…….. 2 621 4 27 …… 10 05 4 II
. 228.61 Card1n!l …………. :.: ……… 3 08/4 43…… 10 34 V. 4 n
~gg .. !roquo………………………. 3 181/4 62…… 1060 f 4 36
249.24 ~rr1~urg………………….. 330 605…… 1l10V( 47
~H$r~:j=-~<:i;·::~ .. :: .. ·H~::~:.~:: ~:~::~. U H .~::
2&.63 . Montreal andamtaiat Ottawa via C.,
.A. RV ….. p_ 21. . – .
Montreal 86 …… : ………. / 16 36/t 150/ ……… 1600 7 35
. A..luuvE P,lI. P.H. Y.M, p.Id:, A.M, A.M.
333.00
Ff» additWnal.mburban eroict bttween Toronto and· York and 7orofl.to
. Belt Li:::£n:~:.u~~~fO~~l!l~~.p:;~r :J~:.i~=~~~e~~~e ~~cago
No.2 Rae Pullman Slem1ng Car, CW.ca20 to ~rontre.a.J, via 6. &. G. T,losnd G.
fr:l~8p~H!,!~I~~~·ng~:T:r~~~~to~~~D~~aG. :f~r~~:fo.p .~~~:
No. 4. ~~m~:i~!:~~er sfe~~·u~rigf: ~~~Ogst!°B:~;f~~g~:~ l~ro~~:
(via Stratfo,d, C. V., ~. & M., C. & bl. and B. & M. Ry,; lU,mm
Sleeping Car Chicago to Portlana via. C. &. G.T. and G. T. RYB. ,: .
Daily. t Except Sunday. / Flag station. .&u~ 8ttJ.MflrdTlm.e. .
b No. 24 mi.ed from B.UevUle. c Subjoct to C. P. R. mued leaving:Ilrook 1
.-ville ~.OO p.m.· .. re&ehlng Carleton Jet. in tim. to oonn.oot with local p8&-
unger train.tor Ottawa. .: ….. ~ . . …. ,
Figure Two -July 2, 1894 Timetable. This timetable details all stations between Montreal-Toronto. Comparing the CPR
Timetable (Canadian
Rail Issue 409 Page 42) with this table: The GTR took 11 hours 34 minutes to Toronto, averaging 28.8
MPH over a distance oj 333.21 miles from Montreal; the CPR (O&Q) took 11 hours 10 minutes to Toronto, averaging 30.8 MPH
over a distance oj 344 miles via Peterborough.
(F. Angus Collection).
160
of its original form; today though, modem improvements have
been made by the most recent owner, a retired
CNR employee.
When the
CNR took over officially in 1923, this house passed
from
GTR ownership to the CNR then later to the public
market.
Many
of the stations that are left-and there are precious few
-were designed before World War I. However, the rural station
design changed little, remaining plain and similiar. Most
of these
stations followed a standard plan that was repeated
in various
locations, such as on the Prairies.
At times, attempts were made
to match the towns character
or major industry to the station
architecture; failing that, the standard design was implemented.
After 1960, the railways began to slowly demolish their
stations. This was due to line closures, line abandonments,
elimination
of passenger services on existing routes, resulting in
longer distances between communities and faster traveling
speeds, and the reasons mentioned above.
It was easier and
more cost effective to close
or dismantle a station than to
maintain or renovate.
With respect to our family, up until the formation
of
Canadian National, the GTR (including Canadian Pacific)
provided living
space for the Station Master/Agent and his
family.
The GTR/CPR also paid a wage for station duties and
property upkeep
in the rural setting. For instance, Finch Station
(CPR nee Canada Central), Bathurst Station (CPR nee Ontario
.. and Quebec) to the Bancroft Station (CNR nee Central Ontario)
.. :to GTR stations of Mallory town and Darlington, had free

Jodgings for my grandparents and family. Other stations like
Photo One -Darlington Station -Front View. Note the two storey
wooden frame construction; painted block side lettering; the
semaphore signal position; a three-wheeled dolly and, single track.
(Burnet Collection).
Photo
Two -Darlington Station -Rear Side View. Note the second storey balcony; a livery wagon filled with people Jor a social
event; block lettering; raised plal/orm; garden and, my
Uncle Spencer resting against his bicycle and my mother in front oj the
wagon.
(Burnet Collection).
161
Photo Three -Darlington Station -Platform August 31, 1919. Note the Grand Trunk Bulletin Board with train origins and when due On Time at Darlington.
a/unique interest is the Great North Western Telegraph Cable Office sign.
Grantifather: Robert Hamiltoll McCa/pill and his
wife Cynthia Victoria McCalpin.
(Burnet Collection).
Gananoque Junction which met with the Thousand Island
Railway, was a single storey structure with no living space.
It
was in Gananoque that my greatgrandparents and grandparents
established the McCalpin Homestead;
Port Union, Danforth
and the Mimico Yard Office, had no accommodations provided,
but travel passes were free.
The CNR began in 1923 to
effectively cut
all station master live-in positions with the
exception
of some locations. This type of arrangement is all but
history now.
DARLINGTON STATION -PHOTOS 1/2/3
In 1792, Darlington Township was surveyed. Not until 1794
did arriving United Empire Loyalists and Scottish immigrants
begin to settle the area
just north of Lake Ontario and between
present day Bowmanville and Oshawa (Figure 1). Settlement was initiated
by Governor Simcoe with his free land to
settler
s offer. By 1805, farming was the mainstay of the local
economy. About three miles east, Darlington Mills opened
in
1823 where the present site of Bowmanville exists. In the area
today, agricultural farming persists, a large cement
plant is in
full operation, the Darlington Nuclear Plant is n~aring comple­
tion, and other industries are establishing themselves.
As a
result, on January 1st, 1974, Bowmanville, Darlington, the
Village
of Newcastle and Clarke Township were amalgamated
into the Regional Municipality
of Durham.
My grandfather, R.H. McCalpin, learned from the
GTR
that a new station was to be built on this site. Around 1914-
1915, he made a seniority bid for the proposed station and was
granted the position. Moving from Gananoque Junction
Station, the family settled into a tent provided
by the GTR while
station construction progressed. A farm was established on
162
Photo Four -Port Union Station -Side View. Points of interest: a 10-Wheeler; the GTR hopper car and Model T in back of the
station; the semaphore position; bay window; a four-wheeled dolly. Note particularly the double track which would have been only
three or four years old. The GTR began double tracking
in 1887 from Montreal to Toronto. Except for a single track section of 46
miles between
Port Union and Port Hope (which included Darlington -Photo 1), double tracking was not completed until 1917.
My grai(gjiilher is in the foreground wearing his Grand Trunk Station Master hat. Even when it became CNR, he kept the GTR on
his cap …
>. -.~:
(Burnel!C;;o/lection) .
GTR land with:1)arn and stable behind the station. Once the
station wasconipieted, about 1915 and living quarters arranged
inside, my mother was born, the
lastofthe children in this family
to be born in a railway station under
GTR markers.
Around 1919, my grandfather became ill.
At this time, a
major
flu epidemic was assaulting southern Ontario. Upon
recovery, his health had greatly diminished.
He was left with a
severely weakened heart.
No longer able to maintain a country
station, a bid was made
for Port Union closer to Toronto, which
he secured by bumping out a man with lesser seniority. A home
on Monarch Park Avenue was now purchased in east end
Toronto.
It was close to Danforth Station making it possible to
commute to
Port Union.
After the family moved, Darlington burned to the ground.
The fire was blamed on a spark from a passing steam
locomotive,
in fact, many tinder dry wooden stations succumbed
to this end. Darlington was never replaced. Passengers now
caught their trains at Bowmanville or Oshawa.
Fortunately, these
few photos remain intact in our family
album. They are the only known photographs
of Darlington. In
searching
GTR and CNR Archives, no others have been
discovered.
PORT UNION STATION -PHOTO 4
Port Union began as a hamlet. Its actual origin and date are
unknown. However, because
of the hill at this site, heavy freight
and passenger trains occasionally needed assistance.
It is safe to
assume, therefore, that
Port Union began as a GTR railway
push engine location.
The station was a wooden frame structure, but unlike
Darlington, it had a single storey, so family accommodation was
impossible.
As a result, my grandfather commuted from
Danforth Station. As can be noted from Figures 3
and 4, little
traffic stopped at
Port Union over these years. However, station
duties
as mentioned below, continued. With dieseJization and
lowering roadbeds, the need for push engines ended. In 1931 my
grandfather died .
The last official stop was on April 29 , 1967 -Figure 4. The
April 30,1967 timetable does not list Port Union. Sadly, this
station was demolished in the early 1970s, and its railway
significance with it, even though the push engine and siding
tracks remain.
In short, Darlington and
Port Union Stations were standard
designs. Because the communities were small, appearance was
secondary. Neither station had pillars nor porte-cocheres nor
palladian windows. They were simple, functional stations with a
character unique to themselves. Although Darlington was
painted red,
at least it never knew the insulting insul-brick facing
that scorned
Port Union for many years, until its death.
STATION LIFE
My generation has little to no experience of past rural station
life.
It seems, not unlike many occupations today, a job has
become only a pay cheque.
The human element has diminished.
Seldom
is their conversation of a general nature in a station
today -it
is all business, silent mouths, blank stares. One today
visits a station only long enough to get a train -stay longer, and
someone will remind you about the consequences
of loitering.
163
TORONTO -KINGSTON-(OTTAWA) -MONTREAl
. !., .~~;.L,~:
,,. (:, I~
I
. ~.
Inter· Inter-M.pl. /./),
TAaLE 80
national
li~itfed
Le.f
{:;.
limited
wlIlrn Tim.
Pool Pool Pool 32 Pool Pool Pool Pool
21~{ ADV.14 14 & 19 119 Ex. Sal. 22 1& 10 34
Mile. READ DOWN Daily Daily Ex. Sun. Sun. and Sun. Daily Daily Ex. Sun. Daily Ex. aL<:
———-

Toro~to. Onto @ ~. lUI. A.M.
.M..
P.M. P.M.
.M.
,..M.
.M. .M. …111. Po ••
0.0 Lv Union Slation … 9.15 9.35 4.15 8.45 9.35 9.45 11.00 11.30 12.30 11.30 11.010
Don C.P. Station Leaaide C,P.
Staljo~
9:28 9:47 8:59
Wili
11.17
12:43
Ii :47 Ii :51
52 Danforth
950 nol
I~j
Sce.rboro operalo 112.50 No
Port Union on / 1.00 Ghoo
22 3 Picketing
10: 13 /9:31
holidays 1.10 .,.e …. ·
2~9
Whitby
10:02
10: 21 1.22
tu
3 .J O.ha…, •. O : 10.27 4 58 9.52 10.35 17.:01 12:21 1.38
43.0 Bowmanvtlle IC.42 10.11 10. SO 12.16 1.53
474 Newcastle 10.49 10.58 2.03
63.1 Port Hope ~ : 10:35 11.13 I 5:28 10: 44 11.18 C 12:44 C12:55 2.26
U~
69.8 Cobourg ~ , •
11.21 10.52 11.29 1253 C 1.06 2.39 77.7
Orafton .. ,.
Ii :40 C Ii :24 C Ii :45
/2.49
84.3 Colborne
2.59 . .
91.9 Brighton
11.51 11·35 / 11.55 3 12
..
Trenlon C.p.Slalio;
li:11 li:07 Ii 10
i :35
332
i:so.
101.0 Tronlon Jet. . 11.55
r~
1131 t( BoIlOYlllo (Tabl~; I ;5: 1;6; .:::.
IU6
12.25 6 Il 12.10 12.25 Ii: 43 2:00 i :55 3.50
12.30 6.16 12.30 12.35 11.48 200 2.02 P.M.
1349 Napanee 12.01 1.0l 1.15 1.17 C 2.36
siopo .. , 160e
Klngton 6 12.36 1.40 7: 14 2.00 205 SIC)PS 3.20
179.9 Oananoque Jet. B. 2.03 237 2.38 at C.P. at C.P. .
187.3 Lansdowne 2.48
~.50
Stations S~tlQf1I
195.5 Maltorytown . : : : : : : :
i:40 605
~.oo
.00 i
:35 4: IS 2082 AI Brookville Union Station ~ 30 .25 325
,E.x.:.Mon. Mon.
——
0.0 Lv Srockvllle Union 81a1lon , .. , , .••. 2.55 825
/:
27.S t(Smitha Fall, C.P. Station ……..
3 40 9.03
26
5:SO
n~ 3.55 9.06 19 6.00 :
44,:~ At Carleton Place C.P. Station ….•.. 4.25 9.26
—-L2(L —DiL
.7_6. AI Ottawa Onto Union,~tation®~_._._ . ….!…..:
. U~. .-.!Q,JL Daily Ex. Sun .
A,M. A,M. A.M.
….. I.
208.2 lot Brookville Union Station f .40 2 50 8.10 3.40 /.SO Runs on 4.25 5.45 Ex. Sun •.
220.0 Pre8COtt F. < 1.50 305 4.02 C.P. Lines C 4.44 606
Trlln24 229~
Cardina.l C 3.15 Via 620
233. I roQuoi, C 323 Belleville, 6.29 will not
!
241.2 Morrisburg
3 31 Perth 6.41 oper,
252.8 InoJeside . and 6.56 froml ,
258·1 long Sault
2:38 4:03 9:09 5:07
Smiths
5:36 7.10
1;.N;
265.8 Cornwall 6 Fall, 728
274.2 Sumrrnlrstown 7.40
~ ;3
2799 lancaaler
r
49 I·
285.2 Bairl8vill., .ont.· . .
.5B Apr 14·
2Xl4 River Beaudette, QU8. B.07
294.0 SI. ZOtiQU8 .. .
4:36 5:39 e 6:09
I B.13
2%.0 Cot .. u (Tabl .. 75. 130) B.24
2990 Wilson vale … 829
302· 5 SI. Dominique 8.35 304,6
Cedars
5:55 8.39 309.4 Vaudreuii (Dorion) .
3:25
c
i,:55 e i,:30
8.45 3
13.0 Sle Anne de Bellevue e 4.54 6.01 e 8.51
316.2 Beaurepairo
318 ~
Beacoosrlold Operate.
9:01
~19
Pointe Claire o.c.
20.4 lakesido 20.21. 321.0
Valois 23.24.
321.6 Strathmore 20,27.
9:
)23.5 Dorval 28.30.
324.6 Dixie 31.
5: II C 6:22 C 6:57
/9 4 325.9
lachine Jan. e 9.1S.
~268 Convent 2,30nl) 9.20
f72
Dominion
9:32 31.2 Turcot East C.N.
010:15 7:25 Montreal W68t C.P. Woslmount
C.P. 010.22 7.32
335.3 AI Montreal, Qu •• ~. : :
Windsor Station C. 8
4:20 5:45
10.30
6:55 4: 15
7.40 7:30 9:50
Central Station C.N. .
P,M. P …. P.M. A …. A., A.M. A …. A.M.
Ex. Sun,
and Mon,
OOL lONlS-Toronto-Montreal and Toronto-Ottawa (vic Peterboro, Smitlll Falls or Brockville) I •• Inerchangeabillty of fickes under Table 15.
FERENCE MARKS-TABLE 80
t Except Sund:?;. ~ Meal Sution. ~ Rent-a-Car Service. e Slops on signal (or revenue passengers.
o No local tra Ie between ontrNI Wast. Wutmount And Windsor Stations. I Stops on sionat.
8 Connaction with Thousand Island. Raih-lY to and from GananOqu8. r Frequent ferry &e~vice to and (rom Ogdenaburg.
C-Tralna ,hewn will mako oondltlona ,top fol revenue pa … ngerl at nulon •• lph.Mtleall) lilted b.low:
Train No. Stops at To entrain for To detrain trom Train No. i Stop, at To on train tor
–,—–
-_.
.. ———-,
14 Cardinal lachine and beyond Kinoston and beyond 10 Napanoo Montrealand beyond
10 Cobo.1lI Montreal and beyond Toronto and beyond 16 Port Jio pe
18 CoI~rne Danforth and beyond 22 Montreal and beyond
118 Danforth and boyond 16 Prescott
16 Cotoou
whine ·.rid beyond
Toronto and be)ond 14 Sle A~,ne de Bellevue
14
lro~uoi
Kingston and bayond ADV. 14 14
lac,,!ne Cornwall and beyond 16
16 Toronto and beyond 22
IB Cornwall and beyond 18 Vaudreuil Montr.aIarKi°beyond on Sun.
EQUIPIIENT-#AGE 31
~
To dBtrai rrom
Toran to and beyond
Toronto and beyond
,.
~ ~
Toronto iridbeyond
Cornwall and beyond Toronlo
Ilnd beyond
fg~g~~ :~~ :~~ , 0;
.L .i .. j.·.
.. ( ….. .
Figure Three -Oct. 27, 1957 -Apr. 26, 1958 CNR Passenger Timetable. Stations between Montreal-Toronto outlining the Pool
Train services. Comparing it
to Figure 1 reveals many interesting station changes.
(Burnet Collection).
Coming
in
6
7
~
CN
TURBOS
r
To speed you between
Toronto
and
Montreal in record-breaking time.
Three a day each way.
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Figure Four -Oct_ 30,
1966 –
Apr.
29, 1967
CNR Passenger Timetable.
This is the last time Port Union is scheduled in a timetable. She was
demolished in the early 1970s. Note the Turbo
ad
.
(Burnet Collection)_
20
TIME
TABLE No.
49
.
JUNE
bch.
1980
~STWARO
TRAINS
_111
· .
INFERIOR
DIRECTION
BELLEVILLE
SUBDIVISION
187
~

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J
11
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ST
A
TIONS
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EASTWARD
TRAIN
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SUPERIOR
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FIRST
CLASS
188
1_
1901
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187
BELLEVILLE
SUBDIVISION
FOOTNOTES-PAGES
21
.
24
1
730
1213
0,
,.
~
rl,
!
Suno.iy
s. 1881190
F
ig
ure Five -June
8,
1980 CPR Employee Timetable.
It
is interesting to note
that
/o
r some unknown reason, CP Rail
STILL
recognized Darlington
Station in their timetable
61
years after it had burned down. The
CNR
remo
ve
d it long ago. A hold over from the Pool Train days, or the Company picn
ic
s
to
Cobour
g?
(Burnet Collection).
-01 ~
Early station life was different. Photographs I , 2 and 3 reveal
much
of the site and what no longer is present-they do not detail
activities, thoughts, conversations
or the lives of the people.
Only imagination
can do that now.
On arriving at Darlington Station in 1915 and during its five
year life, one was greeted by a garden
of flowers , vegetables and
bee hives. Station
Masters/ Agents had competitions for the best
garden and prizes were awarded, but it
is not known if my
grandfather ever won one. Station family members might
be
playing on a swing, performing their assigned chores at the bam
or one might see the youngest feeding the chickens or tossing hay
to the animals in the stock pen.
On walking up the stairs onto the
wooden platform, a huge Call Board would detail the status
of
the trains (Photo 3). Opening the Waiting Rooms screen door
where a wearing rusty spring to pull the door shut
dan~ed
against the frame, one saw a black pot-bellied stove with a
locomotive likely embossed on the fire door
in the centre of the
room.
The smell of kerosene from the wall lamps and single
ceiling lamp penetrated the nostrils in the winter and was
tolerated
in the summer. One might even see one of the station
children
in our family cleaning the kerosene soot from inside the
glass funnel that surrounded the flame, either
in the morning or
evening. The smell of coal smoke lingered, mixing with the smell
of new wicker suitcases, and cigarette smoke from male
passengers drifted in the air. Soldiers may have been present,
impatiently waiting to board one
of the many troop trains. One
could sit down on oak carved benches arranged in a horseshoe
shape around the waiting room.
Tr.avel posters and GTR
Regulations of Tariffs enlivened the walls. Fresh flowers from
the garden often adorned the dull atmosphere, giving
it a more
homey, friendly feeling.
To the right of the waiting room door
was the Ticket counter where
one purchased tickets, asked
about train times and even carried on the latest gossip. Looking
beyond the window through the protective chicken wire and
widely spaced bars, one could see the mechanical railway
typewriter for hammering out train orders that would later
be
hooped to a passing train crew. My grandfather hated the
typewriter, preferring to write
out most orders/messages in pen
and ink. Many different railway forms could be seen pigeonholed
neatly across the top
of the bay window and off to the west side.
Forms for train crews and telegrams were ever present.
The
GTR grumbled about getting into the Express and telegraph
business, but it proved to
be a major boom for their business.
The
key and oscillator sat prominently on the mahogany
desk, centred between the bay windows, where one could see
oncoming trains and passengers waiting on the platform. Above
the key was a large metal handle, used to adjust the semaphore.
On the wall, a railway windup clock with swinging brass
pendulum kept perfect time.
Beyond the ticket windows east wall, was the Baggage
Room. Parcels, freight and mail were sorted by route and
district. Mail was kept sealed
in a burlap sack for the next mail
train call –
it is interesting to point out that in 1854 the GTR
became the rust North American railway to get into the mail
business by converting baggage cars with specially fitted mail
sections. Baggage was kept on a three-wheeled dolly.
The second storey at Darlington had approximately five
rooms; three bedrooms, a kitchen and living room space. Meal
165
time depended on the railway timetable and duties. Track crews
were often invited
in for rest and meals. My grandmother
provided meals to these men, including the odd Chinese
worker. Since my grandparents were strong Scottish
Presby­
terians, members of the Temperance Society and Free Masons,
discrimination was not permitted, nor was alcohol or swearing.
At night, when speci~1 duty was required, the operator six
code had to be sent every thirty-minutes so that along the line all
knew no
one was asleep. The Station Master job was seven days
a week with the occasional Sunday off.
The platform came alive when a train arrived or departed.
My grandfather would be out surveying the arrival of the train
and pushing the dolly filled with luggage to the baggage
car. The
children might join in talking to the locomotive crew, passing up
orders, watching for smoke from the journal boxes on the
cars or
carrying baggage for a penny. News might be given about private
railway matters, special trains or jobs that one could bid for
ifthe
seniority was right.
As the train departed, its train number and departure time
was keyed to the next station. Eyes
also spotted coaches and/or
freight cars for dragging equipment or a frantic wave from a
passenger who might have forgotten their luggage or just did not
get off
at this stop. It all was well, the train conductor watched
for
the high ball signal from the platform. Passing trains were
greeted with waves.
No train was ever left to chance as someone
had to watch for problems.
Shortly, another train would approach
and/or stop, and the
process repeated itself.
STATION SUMMARY
All railway stations are historic landmarks. On average,
stations were built on the
CPR Montreal-Toronto via Peter­
borough every 6.88 miles; stations on the
GTR Lakeshore route
averaged 8.33 miles apart.
The station, in short, determined
where communities would develop -the community depended
on its own success and inventiveness to maintain and grow.
When the railway station closed, the towns fate was often
signalled and altered.
With the newly formed
CNR, station life changed. Stations
were closed in the name
of cost efficiency and dollar maximiza­
tion. Upgrading, where needed
in larger centres, was done
accurately and aesthetically; smaller communities received,
in
many cases, the standard design features. When maintenance
was required, rural stations were treated with awful looking
insul-brick until such time was their usefulness was determined.
Most of the stations are gone. The rural town station, the way
station, the brick and wooden framed two and single storey
stations with ornate woodwork. In many places today, stations
have taken the modern bus stop shelter appearance, creating
nothing for the eye to look at with pleasure. My generation
knows little
of the creaking floors, the kerosene smell, the
conversation, the sense
of community and family. Discovering
such photographs
in our family album leaves one awestruck,
angry and disappointed.
As my greatgrandparents and grandparents were at the Age
of Railway Creation, my generation and what follows, will just
have to seltle for an age of re-creation -and dreams.
166

Lord Kitcheners Last Rail Journey
(OR JOURNEY OF ANY KIND)
by Ian G. Morris
At the height of the 1914-1918 war the Secretary of State for
war set out on a long journey
by train from Londons Kings
Cross Station to Thurso in Scotland, the most northerly point on
a British Railway line.
Here a boat was taken across the
Pentland
Firth to the Orkney Islands and Scapa Flow, safe
haven
for the British fleet; Lord Kitchener joined H. M. S.
Hampshire in preparation for the journey out into dangerous
waters.
The special train made up for Lord Kitchener and his suite
was composed
of four bogie coaches hauled by a 4-4-2
locomotive, no. 252; crew consisted of Driver H. Collarbone
and Fireman A. Stevens.
The date was Sunday 4th June, 1916, a typical British
Summers day as it was raining quite heavily, possibly a meanful
sign at the future prospects
of the Secretary of State. Guard C.
Barnes noted in his logprior to departure that it was raining
and Driver Collarbone brought his engine from Kings Cross
Top Shed at 17: 10 -running light to the station and arriving at
17:30,
After coupling up to the train the train left at
17:45 and moved
on to the down main line immediately, departure time was 5
minutes late which according to the guards log was
Time lost
by Traffic Dept.
The weight
of the train was about 100-112 tons and no fast
speeds were attempted as the war-time schedules were adhered
to. An average speed
of 53.9 m.p.h., was maintained on the
105 mile run to Grantham, arrival being at 19:42.
The train passed Hatfield at 18:08 where shortly afterwards
1 minute was lost through having to slow down for relaying work
in
Wood Green Tunnel, the next station to be passed
by was Hitchin at 18:22 and Huntingdon at 18:49 only to lose a
further 2 minutes due to the Engineers Dept., at Sandy.
Driver Collarbone brought the special past Peterborough at
19:08 pulling into the first stop at Grantham at 19:42. This was
the recognised first change
of locomotives on both Great
Northern and London & North Eastern Railway after 1922,
Engine no. 252 was now uncoupled and its crew drove it into the
shed area before going for a welcome rest themselves.
Another
4-4-2 loco., this time driven by Driver A. King with
Fireman W. Hall as his mate, backed down on to the train.
Engine
no. 284 was 1 minute behind time in departure from
Grantham at 19:46 and
Guard Barnes, who was travelling
through
to York entered Wind and Rain in his log, as well as
1 minute lost by Traffic Dept .
Newark was passed at 20:02, Retford at 20:23 and
Doncaster at 20:55 where
10 minutes were lost by a signal hold­
up, then Selby was passed through at
21: 17 and the driver pulled
into York station at
21 :34. Average speed for the 83 miles from
Grantham worked out at 46.1 m. p. h.
Meanwhile back at Kings Cross t!lese had been a hectic
period which casts a possible shadow on the organisation and
running of the British Civil Service.
It had been necessary to find empty coaching stock and a spare locomotive to make up a
second train. Approximately half an hour after the Kitchener
special had departed, an official
ofthe Foreign Office arrived at
Kings Cross with important papers which
had inadvertently
been left in London, these had to
be taken to the special as they
were needed by the Secretary
of States party,
Immediate arrangements were made to make up a second
train, this time
of two bogie coaches with another 4-4-2
no. 1442, on station pilot duty at the time. It was booked
through at
as high a speed as possible, the crew being Driver J,
Day and Fireman W. Jeffries with Guard Wilks in charge of the
train.
Engine 1442 left the shed outside the station at 18:35 and
backed down on to the coaches, at 18:50 the train pulled out on
time.
It was still raining according to the guards log and 2
minutes delay occurred
as there was a caution going through
Wood Green Tunnel caused by engineering work.
The train passed Hatfield at 19:16, Hitchin at 19:28, Sandy
19:38, where a further two minutes were lost through work on
the line, Huntingdon 19:51, Peterborough
20:06, with arrival at
Grantham at 20:37. The
105 miles had occupied I hour 41
minutes net running time, or with four minutes deducted for
slacks, I hour 37 minutes, or roughly 65 m. p.
h., average speed.
Loco., 1442 came off and was replaced by a
4-4-0 no. 57
driven
by R. Robinson and fired by A. Skewitt Junior, a fresh
guard joined the train and wrote in his log
Rain , the weather
was still miserable obviously!
The special pulled away from Grantham at 20:40 and passed
Newark at
20:54, Retford at 21:10, Doncaster at 21:25.
Shaftholme Junction was passed at 21:29 with Selby
necessitating a
five minute stop through a signal check. In fact
the train was held up at intervals through signals from
Shaftholme right into York, the cause being a slow passenger
train up ahead.
There was a 2 minute hold-up at Shaftholme itself, the 5 at
Selby, 6 minutes at Barllsy Junction outside the goods yard at
York and a further 5 at Riccall loco
., cabin near the station.
Arrival at York was 22:17 where the second special was
attached to the 4 forming Lord Kitcheners train, this had been
notified at Grantham and held at York to await the extra trains
arrival.
Although it had
lost 18 minutes through signals, the 20:40
departure from Grantham had covered the 83 miles to York,
exclusive
of stops, at a little over 63 m.p.h.
The second special started from London 1 hr. II minutes
after the first train, but arrived at York, in spite
of losing 18
minutes en route, only 43 minutes after the arrival of the first
train. A creditable performance indeed.
Lord Kitcheners party travelled on overnight to Thurso,
boarded H.
M. S. Hampshire at Scapa Flow and sailed into
Russian waters; news reached United Kingdom sources a
few
days later that the ship had struck a mine and had sunk with all
lands.
167
The 1939 Royal Train An Update
by Lon Marsh
Our member Mr. Lon Marsh of Edmonton Alberta sends us these five excellent pictures plus additional information about the
Royal train of 1939. Mr. Marsh writes:
I much enjoyed the story of the 50th anniversary of the 1939 Royal train in the May/June 89 Canadian Rail.
Enclosed please
find a few more Royal train photos I would like to share with C.R. readers.
Mention was made
of information lacking on CNR pilot engines in the Royal train. Here is a partial listing of some of them I had
come across the other day.
VANCOUVER-KAMLOOPS
KAMLOOPS -JASPER
JASPER -EDMONTON
EDMONTON -SASKATOON -WINNIPEG
EASTERN REGIONS
MARITIMES
ROYAL
5117
6057
6047
6047
6400
6028
PILOT
5118
6058
6048
6051 (6048?)
6401
6027 or 6029 (not sure)
It is interesting to note that Royal train engine 6057 was never painted in the Royal livery as this train ran at night through sparsely
populated areas, and
CN decided not to bother as few would notice it anyway. This engine is often overlooked in Royal train stories
probably because of its standard
CN livery.
There was also a
Guard Train which travelled a few minutes behind the Royal train between Saskatoon and Winnipeg. The
reason why
is very unclear. The engine was 6052.
It is interesting that after all these years the 1939 Royal train still generates a lot of interest.
CNR locomotive 6047 taken at Calder yards in Edmonton Alberta on May 3 1939. The Royal coat-oj-arms and the crowns on the
rnnning boards have yet
to be applied at Winnipeg. Engine 2168 is behind 6047s tender.
Provincial Archives
oj Alberta, photo KS 25.
168
Calgary Alberta May 26 1939. The car in the background is either the Silverton or Riverton . Does anyone know which?
Provincial Archives
of Alberta, A. Blyth Collection BL473/8a.
Banff Alberta May 27 1939: The Autos sign was where you could book a cab ride into town or to your hotel.
Provincial Archives
of Alberta, A. Blyth Collection BL473/36.
169
Jasper Alberta June 1 1939. Note the two guards with their special Royal train tour ann bands. The Royal train, hauled by 6057,
is on the right, while 6058 with the pilot train is on the left.
Provincial
Archives
of Alberta, A. Blyth Collection BL473/35.
Jasper Alberta June
1 1939.
Provincial Archives of Alberta, A. Blyth Collection BL473/40.
170
by Douglas N. W. Smith
MAJOR PORTION OF DOMINION ATLANTIC
TO BE ABANDONED
On July 13,1989, the National Transportation Agency (the
Agency) determined that
CP could abandon 140.4 miles of the
Dominion Atlantic Railway between Kentville and Yarmouth,
Nova Scotia. This includes Mileage 4.6 to 58.4
of the Kentville
Subdivision and the entire 86.6 miles
of the Yarmouth
Subdivision.
The Dominion Atlantic Railway
(DAR) was formed in 1895
through the amalgamation
of two companies: the Windsor and
Annapolis Railway
(W &A) which extended from Windsor to
Annapolis Royal and the Yarmouth and Annapolis Railway
(Y&A).
The W &A had completed its line between the two towns in
its corporate title in 1868. At Windsor, connections were made
with the Nova Scotia Railway for Halifax. Starting January 1 ,
1872, the
W&A began to operate its trains directly into Halifax
as the Dominion government leased the portion
of the Nova
Scotia Railway between Windsor and Windsor Junction to the
W
&A and accorded the W &A trackage rights into between
Windsor Junction and Halifax.
The Y
&A was formed in 1893. Its predecessor, the Western
Counties Railway
(WC) built the line between Yarmouth and
Digby during the 1870s. Throughout the 1880s, connections
between the
WC terminus at Digby and the W &A terminus at
Annapolis Royal were made by ferry boat. Frustrated travellers
called this section
the Missing Link.
The WC lacked the resources to undertake the costly
engineering works required to reach Annapolis Royal which
included two long bridges. In an attempt to improve the fmancial
position of the
WC, the federal government turned the lease of
the lucrative Windsor-Windsor Junction line over to the WC in
1877. The main condition of the lease was that the WC should
complete the Missing Link by 1879.
The only tangible result
of this arrangement was the
poisoning
of relations between the W &A and the WC. This
resulted
in schedules which missed connections at Windsor. As
the WC had not even started construction of the Digby­
Annapolis Royal line
by 1879, the government cancelled the
WCs lease of the Windsor-Windsor Junction line and restored
this line to the W
&A.
The federal government finally undertook the construction of
the Missing Link in the late 1880s. The first through train ran
from Yarmouth to Annapolis Royal on July 27, 1891.
BOSTON-HALl fAX
NEW YORK-HALifAX
AND ALL POINTS IN NOVA SCOTIA
AND NEWFOUNDLAND
Land of Evangeline
Route
GEORGE E. GRAHAM
Vice-President and General Manager
Kentville, N. S.
V. C. KERR
General Agent
50 Franklin Street, Bost0!1, Mass.
ARTHUR T. SMITH
General Freigh t and Passenger Agen t
413 Barlngton Street, Halifax, N. S.
171
. ,
The Weymouth station was one of the most ornamental along the DAR. With a multi-hued point scheme to highlight the decorative
wood trim. the station must have made an impressive sight when the photo
was taken on September 29. 1910. At this time.
Weymouth
was the terminus for a tri-weekly mixed train from Yarmouth and a way station for a tn-weekly mixed train between
Yarmouth and Annapolis Royal as
well as a daily except Sunday passenger train between Yarmouth and Halifax. The station
remained in use up
to the coming of VIA which replaced it with a shelter.
Photo Credit: CP Rail Corporate Archives. Photographer
J. W. Heckman.
Photo Source: Douglas
N. W. Smith.
Lawrencetown had a much more restrained station than the one at Weymouth. The design was used at a number
of smaller
communities along the DAR. The buildings
to the left of the station are warehouses used to store apples. The DAR promoted the
apple industry
in the Annapolis Valley which became a major source of traffic for the railway. This photo was taken by CP
photographer J. W. Heckman on October 6, 1910.
Photo Credit: CP Rail Corporate Archives.
Photo Source: Douglas
N. W. Smith.
172
Canadian National had narrow gauge locomotives on its roster many years before it took over the Newfoundland Railway. CN 25,
a 4-4-
0, was built by the Canadian Locomotive Works at Kingston, Ontario for the Prince Edward Island Railway in 1901.
Rendered obsolete by the introduction
of standard gauge operations, it was one of 9 narrow gauge 4-4-0s retired by CN in 1923.
Photo Credit: National Archives
ofCanadaIPA-171768.
Photo Source: Douglas
N. W. Smith.
The DAR played a major role in the development of the area
along its rail line.
The company carried freight and passengers
on its steamships which ran from Yarmouth to Boston, from
Digby to Saint John, and from Wolfville to Parrsboro.
To
stimulate tourism, the DAR built hotels in Yarmouth, Digby
and Kentville as well as a park
in Grand Pre dedicated to the
heroine of Longfellows epic poem, Evangeline. Evangeline
figured extensively in the corporate image of the
DAR. Her
figure was used as part of the DAR herald and her name in their
slogan
Land of Evangeline Route. Freight service played a
major role
in the development of the industry in the Annapolis
Valley. CP leased the
DAR in 1912.
During the
1980s, freight traffic volumes have fallen
tremendously.
In 1987, only 572 carloads were carried on the
two Subdivisions. Most of the traffic was destined to the airbase
at Kingston.
The operating loss in 1987 exceeded $1.6 million.
As
no evidence was forthcoming which would indicate their
was a reasonable possibility
of this trackage becoming economic,
the Agency approved
CPs abandonment request. As VIA Rail
operates passenger service over the line, the Agency set the
abandonment date one year from the date
of its order in order to
allow VIA to acquire the line if it so desires.
PEl FOLLOWS NEWFOUNDLAND
On july 12, 1989, the Agency released its decision
authorizing
CN to abandon all its rail lines in Prince Edward
Island.
At the time of the Agency decision, the following lines
remained officially
in service:
Mileage
Between
Terminal
Subdivision
Terminals Points Points
Souris
Royalty Junction and 55.0
Souris
Montague
Mount Stewart Junction 25.6
and Montague
Murray Harbour Maple Hill and Uigg 17.8
Borden
Charlottetown and Borden 42.4
Kensington
Emerald Junction and 84.6
Tignish
Elmira Spur Harmony Junction and 5.0
Baltic
Mount Herbert Spur Lake Verde and 4.6
Mount Herbert
Rounding out the decision was pennission to abandon the
35.4 mile Tonnentine Subdivision which linked the
CN main
line at Sackville to the ferry tenninal at Cape Tonnentine, New
Brunswick. The history of the Sackville-Cape Tonnentine line
was featured
in the article, The Grand Connection, which
appeared in last years September-October issue
of Canadian
Rail. [Copies of this issue are available].
When the assembly voted in
1871 to build a 36 narrow
gauge railway the length
of the island from Georgetown to
Alberton via Charlottetown and Summerside, PEl was a
prosperous self-governing colony. While Charlottetown had
been the site of one of the conference leading to confederation,
the settlers on the island had spumed an offer to become the
fifth province in the newly established Dominion of Canada. In
1873, PEljoined confederation largely because it faced ruin due
to the extravagent expenditures on the railway.
In 1875, the line
from Georgetown to Alberton and the
branches
from Royalty Junction to Charlottetown, Mount
Stewart Junction
to Souris, and Alberton to Tignish were
officially opened. Late
in 1884, the 12 mile branch line from
Emerald Junction to Carleton was opened. At Carleton, a
connection was made with the mail boats from New Brunswick.
173
More than twenty years would elaspe before the next
addition to the system. The 47.7 mile rail line between
Charlottetown and Murray Harbour as well
as the 4.4 mile spur
between Lake Verde and Vernon was opened in November
1905. The following year, the 6.3 mile branch between
Montague Junction and Montague opened. The 9.9 mile branch
was completed from Harmony Junction to Elmira
in November
1912.
The last major line
to be constructed, aside from a spur to the
air force base at Summerside, was the line
from Maple Hill to
Lake Verde Junction. This 10 mile line, which opened in
September 1930, was built to by··pass the frail bridge over the
Hillsborough River at Charlottetown which could not tolerate
heavily loaded standard gauge cars.
In December 1917,
CN completed new tenninals at Cape
Tonnentine, New Brunswick and Borden,
PEl. Service over the
lower 2.1 miles of the bran.ch to Carleton was discontinued and
trains began to operate over the new 3.3 mile line to Borden.
Several tracks in the Borden yard were laid with a third rail
to
accommodate standard gauge rail cars which were ferried over
the Northumberland Straits. This was the first time loaded rail
cars were ferried to the island. Prior
to this, rail shipments were
This 1952 view shows the locomotives which replaced CN steam locomotives on PEl. Due to the light weight of the rails, CN
decided to order small 70 ton locomotives for use on the island. An order for 18 units was given to Whitcomb. Ajler the delivery of
the first four units in 1949, CN cancelled the order. The Whitcomb units proved unsatlfactory due to engine problems and a
misalignment
of the engine shafts which results in frequent down time. CN then ordered a similar number of 70 ton units from
General Electric
which proved much more durable. This photo is believed to have been taken in Charlottetown in 1952.
Photo Credit: Paterson-George Collection.
174
In 1975 and 1976, CN converted a number oj its RS-18 m units into RSC-14 s Jor service on lightweight rail lines. The original
B-B wheel sets were replaced with A-1-A wheel sets and the horsepower was reducedJrom 1800 to 1400. In September 1982, two
oj these rebuilt units, the 1750 and
1753, were highballing a freight Jrom Borden to Charlottetown. A quick moving train and a
lack oJ intermediate switching meant only one photograph
was possible between Emerald Junction and Charlottetown. The building
along the track
is one oj the potato wharehouses which at one time provided the major source oj traffic Jor the railway.
Photo Credit: Douglas
N. W. Smith.
unloaded at Cape Tormentine onto the ferry and then repackaged
into freight cars at Carleton.
Following the conclusion
of World War I, the government
corrunenced to standard gauge the lines on the island
in order to
eliminate the expensive and laborious trans-shipment
of goods
between standard and narrow gauge cars.
By September 1919,
the Borden-Emerald Junction and Charlottetown-Surrunerside
lines were laid with a third rail to accorrunodate standard gauge
equipment. Between 1923 and 1930, the remainder
of the lines
were widened to standard gauge. The last section
of line to
operate with narrow gauge equipment was the line from
Charlottetown to Murray Harbour.
A major change
in the operations of the railway in the
southeastern portion
of the province occurred in 1951 when the
bridge over the Hillsborough River at Charlottetown was
abandoned. Thereafter, passengers travelling to Charlottetown
from this area were subject to a long detour via Mount Stewart
Junction.
Attempts were made
in the early 1980s to stem the loss of
potato traffic, the main corrunodity produced on the island, to
trucks.
Bulk potato loading centres were built at three points but
proved unsuccessful.
CN has retained a share of the potato traffic moving from the
island to Central
Canada through its intermodal services.
Truckloads of potatoes are moved
by road and ferry to Moncton where the trailers are loads on flat cars for furtherance to Central
Canada. Without the potato shipments, the traffic on the
islands lines rapidly dwindled. In 1987, the total traffic handled
on
PEl totaled 1,667 carloads. The operating loss totaled $1.2
million.
MORE OF LE&N TO GO
On August 2, 1989, the Agency determined that CP could
abandon 20.2 miles ofline from a point just north
of Brant ford to
Cambridge, Ontario. This includes 19.4 miles
of the Simcoe
Subdivision 0.8 miles of the Waterloo Subdivision.
The only shipper on this line is located at Paris. In 1987,
forty nine carloads were handled and the operating loss was
$313,176.
This trackage was built
by the Lake Erie & Northern
Railway, an electrified line which ran from
Galt(now part ofthe
regional municipality of Cambridge) to Port Dover. A brief
history
of this railway appeared in this column in the last issue of
Canadian Rail.
In this decision, the Agency ordered CP to continue to
operate the line for one year from the date
of its order. This was
done in order to allow sufficient time to negotiate the sale
of a
portion
of the line to a new short line railway. The Ontario
Locomotive and
Car Company (OLC) wishes to purchase
approximately 6.7 miles
of trackage north of Paris. The
company plans to rebuild a connecting link to the CN main line
in Paris in order to serve freight customers and to operate
tourist train service over the scenic portion
of the line along the
Grand River.
CN LEAVES PETERBOROUGH AREA
On June 12, 1989, the Agency approved CNs application to
abandon the Campbellford Spur between Lindsay and Peter­
borough, a distance of
2l.9 miles, and the Lakefield Spur
between Peterborough and Lakefield, a distance
of 9.5 miles.
When
CN applied to abandon this trackage on June 16,
1988, the application included the 0.72 mile Ashburnham
Branch
in Peterborough. Five days later, CN wrote the Agency
seeking to withdraw its application on the condition that the
Agency concurred with
CN that the three lines were spur lines.
Under the provisions
in the National Transportation Act, the
railways may abandon spur lines without the Agencys
approval. The Agency ruled that the Campbellford and
Lakefield Spurs were branch lines and that
CN would have to
obtain regulatory approval for their abandonment.
The
Ashburnham Branch was deemed to be a spur and hence could
be abandoned without Agency approval.
On June 12, 1989, the Agency approved the transfer
of six
miles of main line track and industrial spurs in the Peterborough
area from
CN to CP. Only two carloads were handled in 1987
over those portions of the line which will be abandoned. The
1987 operating loss was calculated to be $ 54,000. Train
operation over the Lakefield Spur ceased in 1986, when
CN
began to serve the major shipper in Lakefield using intermodal
truck service from the railhead
in Peterborough.
The trackage under consideration was built by three railway
companies during the Victorian era.
The first section to be built
was completed between Omemee and Lindsay
in 1857 by the
Port Hope, Lindsay & Beaverton Railway
(PHL&B) as part of
its line from Port Hope to Lindsay.
The
PHL&B was incorporated into the Midland Railway in
1869. The Midland opened the line from Peterborough to
Lakefield
in January 1871.
The ill-fated Toronto & Ottawa Railway
(T &0) was formed
to build a line between the two communities
in its corporate title
via Peterborough. After the Midland took over the
O&T in
1882, it built 14.5 miles of line under the charter of the T &0
between Peterborough and Omemee in 1883.
The
Grand Trunk leased the Midland system in 1884. Nine
years later, it took over the Midland.
OBSCURE RAILWAY TO BUILD NEW LINE
On August 7, 1989, the Agency approved the connection of
the Alberta Resources Railway
(ARR) Daishowa Spur to the
ARRs main line. Construction ofthe $27 million 10 mile spur
began
in April 1988. The spur is part of a $62.5 million
infrastructure package offered by the provincial government to
Daishowa as an inducement
for the multi-national firm to build a
large pulp mill
in the province.
The
ARR is owned by the Government of Alberta, but is
operated by CN under lease. The ARR is located in the
175
northwestern portion of the province. Its 230 mile main line
extends from ajunction with
CN (the former Northern Alberta
Railway) at
Grande Prairie to Brule on CNs Edmonton­
Vancouver main line.
The main line, which was completed in
1969, was built to open up this isolated section of the province
for resource development.
SHORT TURNS
On July 26, 1989, the Agency ruled that CN could abandon
its downtown yard in Edmonton and the 1.2 miles of its
secondary main line trackage from a point west
of the VIA
station through the yards to 116th Street. This will sever the
passenger line thereby requiring VIA to back the
Super
Continental into the station thereby adding upwards of 15
minutes to the passenger train schedule.
On July 12, 1989, the Agency approved
CPs application to
remove its station building
at Oshawa. The structure dated back
to 1914 when the line through the community was opened.
MAINE EVENTS
Two important events occurred on Canadian railways
operating
in the state of Maine. May 17 1989 was the last active
day of Grand Trunk operation
in Maine prior to this line being
taken over by the St. Lawrence & Atlantic, while June 2 1989
marked the 100th anniversary
of the opening of Canadian
Pacifics Short Line across Maine. The later event was
commemorated by a special run
of steam locomotive 1201 and
train over the Canadian Atlantic Railway to Saint John
N.B.
Both of these events will be covered in more detail in the next
issue.
1201 and train on ship pond trestle at Onawa Maine on June 2,
1989. Here, as has recently been discovered, the ./inal connection in
CPOs Short Line was completed on December 30, 1888.
Photo by Fred Angus.
176
CRHA CODtDtunications
REPORT OF AWARDS COMMITTEE
It is with great pleasure that the Association announces the
results of this the second year
of its awards program honouring
those who have contributed so much during the past year
towards the recording and preservation of Canadas railway
history. Those persons as outlined herewith
to receive the
CRHA Annual Awards for 1988 certificates will receive them
at official functions
of the Association at a time convenient to
them.
The
LIFETIME ACHIE VEMENT AWARD goes to Mr.
Ray Corley. As a member
of the Panel of Judges he abstained
from voting
in this category of the awards. Ray Corley has been
actively involved
in gathering and sharing Canadian railway
information
for many years. Most Canadian railway history
publications have at some time printed his name as an
information source to some author.
He shares his research
material with established archives and updates these papers as
more information comes to him.
He has co-authored several
books and many articles
in railway publications . Runner-up in
this award category was Wentworth D. Folkins of Toronto.
He has endeavoured to preserve, through the medium of water­
coloured paintings, the vanished world of the steam era. His
portraits of steam locomotives often include railway structures,
combining a painstaking accuracy with a flair encapsulating the
human side of his subjects.
The winner
of the ARTICLE AWARD in a CRHA
Publication is Mr. Allan Graham for THE GRAND
CONNECTION which appeared in the September/October
1988 issue of Canadian Rail.
The most outstanding feature of
this article
is that it addresses the very local aspects of service to
this area yet it places the railway line
in the context of an
important interprovincial link.
The article truly adds to the
national character of Canadian Rail. The author has taken the
time to carry out site visits and interview local long time
residents. Other nominees were Douglas N. W. Smith for
Farewell to the
T.H.&B. in May/June 1988 Canadian Rail,
Peter Murphy
for The Barbados Railway in the March/ April
1988 Canadian Rail, and Joe Smuin for Night Crawler on the
Princeton Sub published
in The Sandhouse, newsletter of the
CRHA Pacific Coast Division, Vol. 13, No 2, Issue 50,
September 1988.
The ARTICLE AWARD will be presented to Mr. Philip
Jago
for Curtain Call for the B.&W. in the September 1988
issue
of Branchline published by the By town Railway Society.
This article reviews the history of the Brockville and Westport Railway, with specific reference to the line it used to access the
city
of Brock ville. The article is one of the few which reviews the
integration
of Grand Trunk and Canadian Northern lines by
Canadian National in the 1920s. It represents a tasteful
combination
of good research and personal experience and
observation . Another nomination was Tumbler to Tidewater
by Mr. Bruce Van Sant
in the May 1988 issue of Railfan and
Railroad.
The BOOK AWARD has co-authors as winners in this
category
of the awards. Mr. David Cruise and Ms. Alison
Griffiths will share the
CRHA Annual Award certificate for
their book
LORDS OF THE LINE, published by Penguin
Books
of Canada in 1988. The book is not about the CPR per
se, but rather about six remarkable men who directed the
course
of this vast enterprise over a period of almost a century .
Other book nominations were Steam to Oakville by Allan
Paterson and Dick George,
and Statuatory History of Railways
in Canada: 1836-1986 by Robert Dorman and D.E. Stoltz.
The CRANBROOK RAILWAY MUSEUM was chosen to
receive the
PRESERVATION AWARD with the Port Stanley
Terminal Rail
as second choice. For their on-going work of
high quality in restoration of railway equipment and structures.
It
is well focussed in that it takes a particular era circa 1929 and
has restored several examples of railway cars in service on
C.P.R. s Trans Canada Limited of that day . Research work has
been very carefully recorded and some of this recording has
occasionally appeared
in Canadian Rail. Another nominee
was
Mr. Steve Hunter of the Smiths Falls Railway Museum.
Once again the
CRHA Annual Awards Committee is greatly
indebted
to the Panel of Judges who were very thorough and
diligent
in making their selections. Some concern has been
expressed by the judges that some submissions were fairly
uneven and that some means should
be developed to provide
guidelines. Overall, some categories seem
to attract consistently
high standards.
Presentation
of the awards to the above named recipients will
be made as soon as arrangements can be made, so please watch
Canadian
Rail Communications for photographs and details of
these presentations.
You are urged to make your own selections for the
forthcoming
CRHA Annual Awards for 1989, by setting aside
all material you might read now and to the end of 1989 which you
could use
in your own submissions to the awards. It would be
your way of encouraging those persons who do so much to
preserve and record
Canadas railway history.
177
tsusiness ca~fUIItT/I:::~lIf
ADVANCED COMPUTER SYSTEMS
KEEP FIRM ON TRANSIT TRACK
MONTREAL -Transportation has always been a major
interest
of Quebec-based Bombardier ever since it created the
snowmobile a
few decades ago.
Over the years, the
firm has found new business in the skies
with production
of the sophisticated Challenger executive jet,
and also underground with the design and construction
of
subway cars.
In September 1987, Bombardiers
Mass Transit Division
delivered the last
of 825 subway cars ordered in 1982 by the
Metropolitan Transit Authority
of New York. Delivery of the
vehicles was spaced out over a four year period.
The $1 billion
contract was the largest
of its type ever awarded by a North
American transit authority.
Manufacturing transit vehicles
is an extremely complex
process.
To move to, and stay at, the forefront of the industry,
Bombardier invested
in a network of computer systems and
constantly upgraded them to improve the efficiency
of all aspects
of vehicle production.
The firms system design and programming teams have spent
years developing sophisticated, fully integrated softwa
re
programs. Just before the New York contract, the division
bought an
HP 3000 system with Image, an HP database. With
this, engineers transposed the French
CIMT methodology used
earlier for the Montreal subway program into a series oflogically
constructed computer programs.
But eventually, the system and its 180 databases became
overloaded with information, and with the New York contract
the division had
to find solutions to increase system performance.
The companys first move was to upgrade the equipment
configuration.
At its La Pocatiere, Quebec plant, equipment in
the main data processing centre went from an HP 3000 Series
III to a 64 model. This was later replaced by a 68, and then
again
by a 70. Now, the division uses a Series 950 based on HP
Precision Architecture.
To respond more efficiently to new information demands,
program structures had to be thoroughly revised and improved
methods had to be defined to access the enormous reservoir
of
data accumulated over the years. The divisions staff achieved
this
by developing a set of powerful computer application control
tools which almost totally automate information management.
These tools are called
CIA for contr6le informatique des
applications, and one of their functions is to refine the systems general information access mode which can now
be obtained
more selectively by using a
data bank of diversified parameters.
The system also manages user access through personalized
hierarchical menus.
The report generating module processes all
identical requests in a single operation and automatically
redistributes the results through the network. The automatic
scheduling and execution
of batch jobs saves five hours of
processing time per night.
Thanks to its advanced application management, commu­
nication tools and computer equipment, Bombardiers Mass
Transit Division
is now a strong player in an increasingly
dynamic market.
Source: Plant
Canadas Industrial Newspaper, May 17,1989.
AMTRAK FINES NO-SHOW SLEEPERS
Amtrak, the U. S. rail passenger service, has begun levying
penalties for cancelling sleeper-car reservations within 48 hours
of the beginning of a trip. The policy went into effect May 21.
Penalties range from
$ 20 U. S. to $150, based on the sleeping­
car cost, which
is added to the basic coach fare.
The purpose
of the new policy, according to an Amtrak
spokeswoman, was, in view
of the big demand for sleepers, to
encourage travellers to notify the company that they did not need
sleeping accommodation so that other people could make use
of
them. Previously, the company levied penalties on fares and
sleepers combined; now they are solely for sleepers.
If sleeping accommodation costs $ 50 or less for a trip, there
is no penalty. If the cost is $50 to $100, the penalty is $20;
$101 to $200, the penalty is $35; $201 to $300, $65; $301 to
$400, $90; $401 to $500, $110, and $501 and higher, the
penalty
is $150.
As an example of sleeper rates, on the New York-Miami
route, a single slumber coach costs
$ 75, one way; dual slumber
coach,
$129; roomette (for one person), $195; and bedroom
(for two),
$347. New York-Chicago: single slumber coach,
$
51 , dual, $ 87; roomette (one person) $148; and bedroom (for
two),
$272.
Roomettes and bedrooms are in first class and their rates
include meals; the policy also applies to slumber-coaches, which
have smaller berths than other sleeping cars and do not include
meals.
Source: The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, May 31, 1989
178
BOMBARDIER UNIT IN BELGIUM LANDS
$38-MILLION ORDER FOR LIGHT-RAIL VEHICLES
Bombardier Inc. got more good news in its quest to become a
major player in the European
mass-transit market with the
announcement yesterday that its Belgian subsidiary has received
an order to supply 23 light-rail vehicles for London Regional
Transport. .
It was the third order awarded to BN Constructions
Ferroviaires et Metalliques
SA under a contract signed earlier
this year with the London transit authorities.
It brings the
number
of cars to be supplied by the Belgian manufacturer to 44.
The new order-worth approximately $37.9 million-pushes
the contracts full value to $
72.6 million. The Belgian
subsidiary may provide additional vehicles -described by
Bombardier as
modern tramway cars -as the London
Regional
Transport holds an option to buy another 30.
The announcement is further justification of Bombardiers
decision
to invest in
BN, said Helene Crevier, an official with
Montreal-based Bombardier.
Bombardier and
BN, the largest Belgian transportation­
equipment maker, were awarded a
$425-million contract to
supply locomotives and train cars to the English Channel tunnel
project.
The so-called channel deal, in which Bombardier and BN are
part of a British-led consortium, was the second-largest transit
contract
in the Montreal firms history.
These contract announcements are really showing the
benefits
of the strategies used by Bombardier to become a global
player and bode very well for the future , said Montreal analyst
Jon Reider of Richardson Greenshields of Canada Ltd.
Bombardier, which also makes snowmobiles and aircraft
has been striving to become a major figure in the
Europe~
mass-transit market before the European Community drops
trade barriers
in 1992.
Bombardiers acquisition
of the Belgian manufacturer has
proven the springboard to its penetration
of the market, said
Fred Schilling of Nesbitt Thomson Deacon Inc. in Montreal.
Bombardier purchased 30 per cent
of BN in 1986, boosting its
holding to 90 per cent last year.
Also,
BN is in the running for a $100-million share of a
contract to build a high-speed passenger train for the channel
tunnel.
That announcement is expected at the end of the
summer.
Bombardier recorded a profit
of $69.6 million or $1.03-a­
share on sales of $1.4-billion in the year ended Jan. 31.
Its designs on the European market were further bolstered
in
June when it struck a deal with the British government to buy
Short Brothers PLC, a Belfast-based aircraft manufacturer, for
$60 million.
Source:
The Gazette, Montreal, Thursday, August 3,1989
STRASBURG RR ROLLS OUT REBUILT NO. 89
Engines return to service climaxes 10-year, $150,000
project.
Following a complete restoration that saw it dismantled to its
bare frarne, Engine
No. 89 is back on track to haul passengers
on the
Road to Paradise at the Strasburg Rail Road.
The 79-year-old 2-6-0 Mogul engine, built by the Montreal
Locomotive Works, was rebuilt
in the Strasburg shop over the
past 10 years.
And, it joins the ranks of Strasburg rolling stock that have
been featured in films ranging
from Hello Dolly to safety
training programs.
No. 89 is seen in a Prudential-Bache
television commercial currently airing nationwide.
The Strasburg Rail Road shop is one of only a few in the
nation that could undertake such an extensive restoration
job on
a vintage stearn engine, said Ellis Bachman, vice president,
administration.
We took the boiler off and dismantled the running gear. We
stripped it down to the frame. Then, all the machinery and
suspension was rebuilt and realigned, Bachman explained.
The lathes, milling machines and cranes able to lift pieces of
the locomotive have been collected over the years from railroad
shops
that have closed. In some cases, Bachman said, Strasburg
was given the equipment just for hauling it out a building
that was
being torn down. Jobs such as mounting new steel tires
on the
wheels are things the railroads crew has learned by doing.
There arent any old-timers here who remember building
steam locomotives.
The restoration was spread over 10 years. Because it was
such a big
job, the railroads restoration crew worked on it
intermittently while they also repaired and restored the
railroads other vintage rolling stock. In total, about two man
years and
$150,000 have gone into the restoration of No. 89.
The steam engine was purchased by Strasburg in 1972 from
the
Green Mountain Railroad in Vermont. Linn Moedinger,
vice president and chief mechanical officer, was appointed to
ride with the locomotive on the 555 -mile journey to Strasburg.
Participating carriers gave the old engine preferential
treatment
in their scheduling and in three days it reached Wilkes-Barre,
Pa.
Then, disaster struck. Hurricane Agnes swept through the
area and the Susquehanna River overflowed its banks.
Moedinger took refuge in the second floor of a nearby firehouse.
When he looked
out of the second-floor window the next
morning, he saw a muddy, brown sea just a few feet below him.
Engine
No. 89 was submerged.
It took days for the water to recede. Freight cars had been
tossed around the railroad yard by the force
of the floodwaters.
But the weight of No. 89 kept it and its tcnder on the track. Arter
the mud was washed out, another engine rescued No. 89, and
Moedinger continued h
is jourocy to Strasburg.
In March 1973, following minor restorntion and cosmetic
work. No. 89 began service pulling the daily passenger trains 00
the round-trip between the East Strasburg sunion and Leaman
Place. In 1979, th.c railroad decided to completdy rebuild the
engine.
Now the complete restoration is finished and rail fans can
look forward to many years of service from this old locomotive
·,Its almost like new. Bachman said. We should get 30 or40
years of service
from it without any more major repairs.
FOOD FOR THOUGHT
This item is reprinted without commen! from Odds & Sods
from Transport 2000 Ontario Volume 2, Number 2. September
1989. The follOWing. brief quotes all come from The Last
S
traw. published by the PC Party when in Opposition. We
would humbly rerui
nd current govemment mcmbers of the
following policy statements:
.. . special groups
of Canadians, such as the disabled.
elderly and economically disadvantaged,
to whom other
passenger modes are physicaUy or financially impossi
ble,
will be severely [affected) by the cutbacks.

… the cuts are a serious blow to thousands of commuters
who depend on rail service to get to and from Lheir places of
employment.
the cuts will have a damaging effect on much of
Canadas tourist industry and thereby wiU be a further blow
to the countrys balance
of payments.
govemmeflt policies to impro
ve regional economic
opportunities are often offset
by contradictory policies of
reducing transportation services 10 thosc same regions.
. . there is
a widespread view that instead of being reduced.
r
ail passenger services should be expanded; instead of being
a mode of the pas
t, it can and should be a key transportation
mode
in the future .
AU of those things were concluded by a Conservative Task
Force and implied as being
PC policy.
ACTION/REACTION You wrote a letter to an elected
la
dy or gentlem:m; you received a polite answer, sometimes
agree
ing with your ideas, sometimes firmly arguing that your
ideas
arent practical. You sit back, happy and fulfilled that you
have
DONE SOMETHING and go on about other things.
WRONG! WRONG! WRONG! Whatever the subject of your
179
letter, surely it was and is important enough to see that
something really happens
concerning it, right? So you get back
to them, u~l1any a number of limes. For those agreein!). ask
exac
tly what THE Y have ~en doing abom it, step by step, and
what comcs nexI, and
soon. For those whodis38reed, begin by
pointing out as unacceptable the answer they gave you, and
ruquire
them to change the .~ituation. In the lalter case it requires
a great deal of lener writing. perhaps over a. per.i.od of several
years. Please remember that this i:. a long term campaign to keep
and expand the r
aU passenger ~ystem in Canada.. So keep those
cards and letters coming!
INFORMATION WANTED
The writer is currently assisting the Town of High River to
assemble a typical CPR prairie branchline
freight train, to
represent transportation in the post World War II Alberta
economy. A con
certed attempt is being made to acquire freight
cars from
the 1938 [0 19S2 period. The consist will include a
stock car representing cattle ranching, a flatcar mounted tractor
and combine harvester for grain farming,
a tank car for
petroleum production, and a hopper car for coal mining among
others. Unfortunately,
a source of a CPR ice-activated
refrigerator car.
to represent meat packing, is proving to be
elusive.
Your readers assistance in this quest is hereby sought.
The ideal candidate would be
a steel sheathed example, of
which two variations were constructed: those with the traditional
hinged folding doors and a later model with a sliding
plug
door. The former would be the more typical and would be
preferred. These cars service numbers were believed to have
been
in the follOwing series: 37000-39939, 280007-280132,
280700-280795.
281001-283499, and 289508-289934 .
Some of these cars were later used in CPR work service, and
were renumbered accordingly.
The
hope is that a reader may know of one either forgotten on
an obscure siding. or perhaps being used as a storage car at some
yard facility. As a last
resort, even a re(rigerator ear body in
good condition being used, for example, as a fann shed would be
acceptable. The
eITori would then be made to restore it to a rail
car.
Anyone
wl;Jo can provide assistance is requested to contact
the undersigned at:
632 Oakwood Place S.W., Calgary, Alberta, T2V OKS.
BACK COVER:
TOP:
Alone lime, CN o~raltd mony lrains oUI qf Lindsay, Onlon·o. so jusli!y;ng the pralision oj 0 large looomolil~ shed. No las Ihon
Ihm /ocomOlivn are Iisible ;n lhis view at Lindsay. Number 757, a 2-6-0. was buill by the Grond Trunk ;n 1902 ond sen-rd ulllif
1947. hilt 2536. a 2-8-0. aJ in service/rom 1906 anri11956.
National Arrhill~s olCutluda Murilen Colll{lion PA-/6 7625.
AIInb,Hed /(} Jumts Adam,.
BOTTOM:
The CharlottelO …. n shops …. ere Ihe major rail …. ay lacililY on Prince Edward Island. 8([cre /900 Iht shops bailt locomotives and
CO. bUI by 1982, … hen Ihis photo ,m loken, Ihey did OIIly light work. Here we see 1755, an RSC-U and JO, a G£ 70-lOnner,
/lanking a bod-order bt>x car. Another 70-loner stands nt.xt 10 a fine a/ sno, plows on the lar right. Tht sno plows tre
necusar) tojrghllhe legendary snowslorms
Ihal sweep Ihe island in Ihe !Iinter …… hile Ihe 70-lOm/ers ere required d1le /0 the lighl
rail on the lines in /he sou/hemtern portion ollhe pfOl;nCt.
Photo by Douglos N. W. Smith.

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