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Canadian Rail 379 1984

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Canadian Rail 379 1984

Canadian Rail
No.379
MARCH-APRIL 1984

Published bi-monthly by the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association P.O Box
148 St. Constant P.O.
JOL IXO. Subscription rates $23.00
(US funds if outside Canada)
EDITOR: Fred F
A~gus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A Germaniuk
LAYOUT:
Mich~1 Paulet
FRONT COVER:
C . P . R. NO RTHE RN 3101. Art is t George
Nott has depicted the
scene as a youngster waves to
the engineer of the predecessor
of the Atlantic Limited as it
goes by on ~ summer day in 1954.
INSIDE FRONT COVER:
TOP:
OLD 974 OF COURSE, SHES GOOD
FOR ONE MORE TRIP. Thanks to
George Bliss of Moose Jaw Sask.
we are able to show a photo of
C.P.R. 974 the star of the story
of the snow plow run in the 30s
that appeared in our last issue.
Mr. Bliss took the photo at Mc. Cord
Saskatchewan in April 1951.
BOTTOM:
CANADAS NEWEST RAILWAY is the
Salem &rHillsborough run by the
New Brunswick Division of the
C.R.H.A. The S. & H. got off to
a good start on November 13 1983
as the 1899 steam locomotive 42
pulled into Hillsborough with the
equipment recently moved from the
museum in Delson to New Brunswick.
Photo by James L. ODonnell.
ISSN 0008-4875
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISION P.O. Box 1162 Saint John,
New Brunswick E2L 4G7
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 22 Station B
Montreal, Que. H3B 3J5
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY P.O. Box 141, Station A
Ottawa, Ontario K1N
8V1
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.
O. Box 5849, Terminal A,
Toronto Ontario M5W 1 P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION 300 Cabana Road East,
Windsor Ontario N9G 1
A2
GRAND RIVER DIVISION
P.O.
Box 603
Cambridge, Ontario
N1 R 5W1
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.
O. Box 593
St. Catha rines,
Ontario
l2R aW8
RIDEAU VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 962
Smiths Falls
Ont. K7A 5A5
ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C,
Edmonton Alberta T5B 2NO
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60 -6100, 4th Ave.
NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
CROWSNEST & KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION P.
O. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia
V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.
O. Box 1006, Station A,
Vancouver British Coldmbia V6C 2P1
RAILROAD DAYS
(or A tale of two Artiss)
It was a first for the annual Railroad Days
summer festival held in the greater Moncton, New
Brunswick area,
but from all indications, proved
out to be one of the most popular of the many
attractions.
It took from early in March of 1983, when
two of the Maritimes known railroad artists; Cam­
eron King (Fredericton) and George Nott (Saint
John), agreed to pool their talents and stage a
Two-Man
exhibit. What better place and occasion
to exhibit railway art than Monctons Railroad
Days? So, at the invitation of Mr. Robert Cameron,
manager
of that citys larger complexes; High­
field Square,
both painters got on track and aimed
their brushes in that direction.
(Now the most learned and experienced of rail
buffs know that having a tolerant wife is a prere-quisite
to pursuing their interest. This is where
Betty King and Gloria Nott both exercised their
tolerances beautifully; relinquishing their artist­
husbands to sealed-off studio doors to dig in to
the task ahead).
Opening day June 22, dawned, and after the
initial task of hanging each of the twenty-five
completed works on seperate easels in the malis
busiest
of areas, the onslaught of viewers began.
An
how they came!
Of course both artists were subjected to the
customary and age-old questions, such as, How
long did
it take you to paint the CN R 6100 class
steam locomotive?, or However did you get the
lettering on that Canadian Pacific tender so per­
fect? Another common query was, Why did
you choose to paint engines and trains?
BOUND FOR CHIPMAN. C.P.R. 144 at Belleisle N .B.
George Nott.
CANADIAN
41
Between fencing with the standard questions,
greeting old friends and making new ones, the
lines of interested viewers grew; the very young,
to the very old and the in-betweens. Both artists
had to agree that their mutual delights stemmed
from the comments, musings, memories, and tall
tales of the elder, retired railwayman.
The memories that their paintings, locomotive
side-elevations, and running action shots evoked
among the old railway men (and women too)
were priceless and deemed most rewarding to their
efforts. An old retired hoghead or ashcat
would gaze at a painting of a particular Pacific
or Northern class, and remark, What a son-of­
a-gun
that old lady was to fire! or, using churn­
ing arms to further demonstrate a point, would
say, How that stubborn old ( …… ) would slip
and spin her drivers before digging her heels in
and grabbing onto some rail!. One delightful
lady related
her experiences in passing up the
hooped orders to passing crews on the fly. To them,
this was railroading!!
Then came other rewards, when both painters
were requested to appear before the television
R A I L
cameras, along with one or two of their works.
As
Walter Cronkite may have put it, This was the
Week ….. when the great age of steam railroading
was relived. As stated before, the exhibit had
something that appealed to varied age brackets.
Persons of the 25-and under category would view
a
painting of a steamer in full stride and remark
on the fact that fate had dealt them a bad hand;
having been born on the outer fringes of the steam
age; envying their elders that had experienced
it in all its glory. Within this realm of human dis­
cussions lay an aura of sadness for the younger
species.
Other comments were based generally around
the pitiful state that present day rail passenger
services have been relegated
to. Such are the emot­
ions generated in railway centres such as Moncton,
when governmental policies and cut-backs eat into
the very core of local economies. But, on the other
hand, some measures of consolation were derived
out of the knowledge that a CRHA railway museum
and steamtrain excursions were underway in neigh­
boring Hillsborough. Here was a chance to partly
relive the golden days of railroads and glance
BRllJGllJG UP THE MARKERS. C.N .R. caboose 78727.
George Nott.
CANADIAN
42 R A I L
firsthand into their history; to experience again,
or for
the first time, the smell of coal smoke and
sooty cinders on white shirt fronts. At the end
of the week, Cameron King and George Nott, ambassadors-at-Iarge, painters
of
railroadiana a la Canadian, and preservers of the past, left Moncton, for their habitats. Accompany-
.
ing them was a shared feeling of mission accom-
WATER STOP AT HARVEY N .B.. C.P.R.
5400.Water Colour 16 X20.
Ge orge N ott.
plished in rekindling the fires of fond memories,
and sharing the emotions of
so many.
Upon remarking of the hospitality
of Moncton­ians, one
of them expressed it this way; Although
one
of us is a King in name only, we were in actual
fact, made Kings for a Week. But
that was only natural; Monctionians are Railroaders .
THETWILIGHT OF DAy ..••. AND STEAM.
Acrylic 22 X 27.
Ge orge N ott.
ENTER T
HE NEW BREED. C.N. R. 6500. Acrylic 22 X 27.
Ge orge N ott.
CANADIAN 43 R A I L
Cameron King with two of his paintings.
Photo by Sterling Kneehone.
C.P.R. Northern. No. 3100. Watercolour 22 X 30.
Came ron King.
MAIN LINE WITH C.N .R. 6100. Watercolour 19-) X 26.
Came ron King.
C.N.R. No. 2649 Sloe view.
Came ron King.
FREIGHT WITH C.N .R. 2649. Watercolour 18 X 25.
Came ron King.
CANADIAN 45
R A I L
C.N.R. No. 5702 side view.
Cameron King.
DEPARTURE. C
.N. R. 5702. Wate rcolour 19 X26.
Cameron King.
CANADIAN
46 R A I L
C-N. R. Pacific No. 5270.
Came ron King.
BRANCH LINE WITH C.N. R. 1155. Wate rcolour 18 X 24.
Cameron King.
NIGHT TRAIN TO EXTINCTION. Last VIA Atlantic Nov 15 1981.
Ge orge N ott.
A LOCOMOTIVE THAT CUT ITS TEETH ON
the coal fields of Cape Breton at the turn of
the century became the steam-belching, whistle­
blowing
pride of Hillsborough.
A
few thousand people lined the route of the
new Hillsborough and Salem Railroad in southern
lJew Brunswick as No. 42 chugged by with eight
cars in tow.
The railway will open in June as an attraction
for train buffs and tourists, who will be able to
ride the 20-kilometre stretch behind the old iron
horse.
No.
42 is the centrepiece of an attraction that
will include a rail museum, a train station repli­
cating one from the late 1940s and more than 20

coaches, boxcars, baggage cars, and other rolling
stock in this village outside Moncton.
lJostalgia wpshed over those gathered for the
railroads christening and those who got together
at dawn to begin stoking the fires for the afternoon
debut of No. 42.
I never dreamed of anything this big or this
wonderful, said Abel Bastarache of the Railroad
Historical Association
of Saint John.
A youngster unaccustomed to the sound of the
trains whistle was in awe.
It sounds spooky, he said.
The 1899 locomotive ran out of steam twice
on its initial run -an event some joked wouldnt
have happened if it had been burning Cape Breton
coal it had once hauled for a living.
The project
is coming together with volunteered
spit and polish and government money.
No.
42 is on loan for five years from Robert
Tibbets, a paint manufacturer
from Trenton, N.S.
Canadian National and Canadian Pacific railways
donated
cars and the project will display two more
steam locomotives
from the coal fields of Minto.
S. Cornwall Standard Freeholder
The Salem and Hillsborough Railroad got its
inaugural start on Sunday, November 13th, 1983,
when
its equipment was finally moved to its
site.
The Railroad
is a project of the New Bruns­
wick Division of the Canadian Railroad Historical
Association and
will be an operating tourist rail-road along
with a Museum. The Museum is located
in Hillsborough, N.B., which
is located 15 miles
south
east of Moncton, a major CN R terminus.
The Railroad
has two operating locomotives
No. 42,
an 1899 Alco 2-6-0 and an ex CN NW-2
switcher. On loan from the C R HA Museum at
Delson, Quebec are
CPR No. 29, a 4-4-0 and CNR
No. 1009, a 4-6-0.
The Museum also
has several interesting pieces
of rolling stock such as CP R 100 ton steam crane
and a CN R early wood sheathed colonist passenger
car.
The Museum
portion is currently under dev­
elopment; however, the Railroad will be in op­
eration
from June 30th to September 30th, 1984.
Photos courtesy
of Scott ODonnell.
NO. 42, an 1899 Alco 2-6-0, is shown at Salem N.B. on November 13
1983 en route to Hillsborough.
Photo by Scott ODonnell.
No. 42 and its train cross ing the New Brunswick
countryside on November 13 1984.
James L. ODonnell.
CANADIAN
49
R A I L
FORMER C.N. DIESEL 7941 was bought by the members of the
New Brunswick Division and is now in perfect working condition.
Photo by Scott ODonnell.
A
SPECTACULAR
SERIES
OF
FOUR
VIEWS
as
the
equipment
for
the
Salem
and
Hillsborough
crosses
the
Weldon
Creek
trestle
en
route
to
its
home
at
Hillsborough
N.B.
The d
ate
was
Sunday,
N
ovember
13
1983.
James
L.
ODonnell.

by George Nott
Homecomings are most always an event that is
filled with much human emotion, excitement, and
sentimental memories. Sunday, November 13th,
1983,
was that kind of event.
The late fall air in Hillsborough
was chilly,
reminding the gathering crowds of people that
the snows of winter were fast approaching. But
the biting winds
did not deter these villagers, young
and old,
from turning out for this special occasion.
It was the homecoming of a grand old New Bruns­
wick lady, after an absense of nearly a quarter
century.
She would be wearing her traditional garb of
black, with gold and white trimmings. Despite
her
age of 96 years, she had Fared well on her
lengthy
trip from St. Constant, Quebec. Indeed,
she was a much-travelled lady in her lifetime;
surpassing the one million mile mark.
How well this writer remembered her, and an­
xiously awaiting her reappearance! I would would
often visit her during her New Brunswick tenture,
at
anyone of her three homes of Norton, Chipman
or McAdam. She had two older sisters nearby
but to me, she always had the most appeal (al­
though
my love affair encompassed all three of th­
em).
It was 1955 when I had seen her last but she
was frequently subject matter for me in either
a painting
or an article. Such was the spell that
this dear old lady had woven over me! Assured
am I, that I speak multitudes of New Brunswickers,
rail fans especially, when I
say, ….
WELCOME HOME, …. MISS 29
CANADIAN
52
R A I L
TRAIN NO.1 ieaving Salem for Hillsborough. Abel Bastarache,
shown on the steps of the engine, was the originator of the
idea of an operating steam line which became the S. & H.
James L. ODonnell.
BAGGAGE CAR 8605 was completely restored in the winter of 1982-83.
James L. O!Donnell.
~f
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– .,

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CANADIAN
55
R A I L
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT REPRESENTITIVE Romeo Boudreau drives the
last spike as other dignitaries watch.
Arnoldts Studio Ltd. Moncton N.B.
NEW BRUNSWICK AGRICULTURE MINISTER Malcolm Macleod throws the
switch, watched by John Pollard of the C.R.H.A., Eric Steeves
the mayor of Hillsborough, and Mr. Boudreau.
Arnolds Studio Ltd. Moncton N.B.
histle sto
One formula for moving small
groups of passengers at low
speeds over the short haul.
Rail travel at high speed is not possible, said
Dr. Dionysys Lardner, professor of natural philo­
sophy amd astronomy at University College,
Lon­
don. Passengers, the 19th century professor claim­
ed, would
be unable to breathe and would asphy­
xiate.
He was criticising Richard Trevithick and his
successors. Trevithicks steam coach had carried
small groups of passengers around a tiny circular
track
in London in 1801, and a modest admission
fee entitled the curious to ride in the new-fangled
contraption while the more fearful merely watched.
George Stephenson
is usually credited with the
invention of what
we now call the train. True,
Stephenson greatly improved James Watts steam
engine. Stephenson also overcame the many ob­
stacles
that had robbed Trevithick of success –
insufficient steam, lack of traction, broken axles,
fire and public hostility. And, perhaps most
im­
portant of all, he was able to gain support to create
a socially and politically acceptable environment
for
rail travel, which many felt frightening, even
threatening.
Richard Trevithick
was a clever and imaginative
English engineer. But
his most extravagant flights
of fancy could never have foreseen what would
happen
to his steam coach in less than 200 years.
Supertrains carry hundreds of passengers at a
very
high speed, comfortably and quietly. The
French TGV, the fastest train
in the world, runs
regularly between Paris and Lyons at
an average
speed of 250 km/h. The Japanese Shinkansen, or
Bullet train, runs the length of the Japanese
is­
lands at 200 km/h and has carried two billion
passengers since 1964 without a single accident
or injury. Canadas entry
in the high speed passen­
ger race is VIA Rails LRC -light, rapid, comfort­
able. Aimed at
high density markets in the Quebec/
Windsor corridor, the
LRC has a design speed of
200 km/h.
In terms of passenger volume, conventional
railroading has proven most efficient
as a mover
of
large numbers of people. Conversely, it is least
efficient for moving small volumes.
One example
by Stuart Munro
of a railway carrying small volumes in the Winnipeg­
Churchill run which passes through
the Metis
communities of Thicket Portage and Pikwitonei.
These communities of 200 people each are
less than
80 kilometres from their regional centre at Thomp­
son but there
is no road and no immediate hope
of building one.
There
is a direct rail line to Thompson but
passenger trains
run only three days a week and
schedules make return trips on the same day dif­
ficult. The schedule
gives passengers from Pikwit­
onei
all day in Thompson. But if medical or other
appointments
in the late afternoon force them to
miss the return train they have to wait two nights
for the next one. The train from Thicket Portage
arrives on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at
4:30 p.m. and returns in the morning, two days
later.
The alternative
is to charter a plane at a cost
of $80 or pay $30 for a seat on the twice weekly
Twin Otter flight. They could, of course, take a
boat or snowmobile trip to the end of the lake
and then hike
40 kilometres through bush. Or
they might take advantage
of something like Tre­
vithicks steam coach -something simple that
can move small groups of passengers at relatively
low speeds over the short haul.
Criteria for this type of transportation would,
of necessity,
be quite rigid -rural areas with an
existing rail line but inadequate passenger service
and no connecting roads.
Some answers
have been suggested. The Science
Council of Canada
has opted for passenger travel
on freight trains –
in the caboose. About 20 pass­
engers, the council claims, could ride in relative
comfort
in the caboose on such runs as the Winni­
peg-Churchill route and the Rouyn-Senneterre
route
in Quebec.
The railbus -literally a bus on rails –
has its
supporters, too. Winnipeg Hydro has operated
buses converted to
run on rails since the early
1920s, and a school bus on rails
in use today
has room for 29 passengers and nearly a cubic
metre of baggage.
In some parts of Canada, con-
The cost of running a railbus is said to be about
half the current operating cost of a locomotive
two-car train, now running about $15 a kilometre.
But there have been other objections. Heavy snow­
fall and the extreme cold of Canadian winters may
aggravate safety problems and affect passenger
verted automobiles and station wagons are used
on rails, and there would appear to be some ad­
vantages
to this concept in isolated areas with no
passenger services.
In England, in the 1920s -at the same time
that Winnipeg Hydro started its railbus operation
in Canada -Lieutenant-Colonel Harry Stephens
put flaged trucks (wheels) on buses. The London,
Midland and Scottish Railway then tried what
they called a Karrier Ro-railer
in the 1930s – a
bus with two sets of retractable wheels for
use
on rails or roads.
Recently, British
Rail (BR) gave the green light
to its new
rail bus. Initially, 20 of these, at a cost
of I: 7 million ($13 million), will begin to replace
3100 elderly diesel-powered mUltiple unit com­
muter trains.
Scientists
at B Rs Derby research centre were
the brains and the motivating force behind this
new development. The change was opposed by
dyed-in-the-wool
rail buffs and B Rs mechanical
engineers. The scientists
took two British Leyland Nat­
ional buses, already
in mass production, and wel­
ded them back to back on the chassis of a proven
high speed freight wagon. The bus bodies were
relatively cheap, and the freight chassis
is a sim­
ple four-wheel design with no bogies. It worked.
Then the expirimental design
was turned over
to B Rs mechanical engineers.
In the words of
the
New Scientist, the engineers then reinvented
the train. The bus seats were ripped
out and re­
placed with heavy train seats; and the unit was
beefed up to withstand the same stresses and loads
as B Rs standard electric trains. The weight of the
railbus car
was increased from 14 to 20 tonnes,
and –
as if this wasnt enough -they converted
it into a
less flexible double unit. Not only did
this entire engineering exercise increase costs by 50 percent, it reduced acceleration while increas·
ing energy consumption, not to mention track
wear.
The scientists countered by putting the orginal
model into experimental service. The
U.S. Federal
Railroad Administration bought one, and one
was
sold to Northern Ireland. The B R scientists have
won approval to introduce their overdue -if
slightlv battered -baby into service
in Yorkshire:
CANADIAN 58 R A I L
comfort. The advantage of the lightweight railbus
is in acceleration and fuel economy, but this may
be a double-edged sword
in collisions with wild­
life, although railbus advocates claim
that a per­
manently attached snowplow provides adequate
protection Critics also say
that new or revised
safety regu lati ons
wi II be necessa ry; poi nt to in­
compatibility with conventional rail operations
and equipment; and predict difficulties with grade
crossing devices and signal operation.
Rai Ibus proponents admit the B R version was never designed for the Canadian north. But they
point
out that Manitoba Hydro and the City of
Winnipeg have been operating a variety of buses
and
other road vehicles on rails without problems since the early 1920s.
It also has been said that a
number of Canadian vehicle and rolling stock manufacturers would
be interested in producing
a railbus. This interest was stimulated by a
U.S.
federal government trial of the B R railbus between
Concord, N.H., and Lowell, Mass.,
as a feeder for
conventional commuter trains
to Boston. Wesley Graham, manager
of the passenger policy
branch for the Manitoba Department
of Highways
and Transportation would like to
see a two-year
demonstration project, similar to
the Ottawa/
Montreal STOL service evaluation.
The concept
of the railbus is not new, he says,
but may well be a practical solution for essential
services
in low density traffic markets.
Graham feels the approach should
be to provide
a Cessna 172 service instead of the Boeing 727,
which rather neatly sums up the developing dile­
mma of the rail companies. Is this really a low cost form of transportation
for isolated communities on existing
rail lines or
is it just as expensive as services now being can­
celled? asks Graham.
1 think its certainly worth taking a close look
at this alternative, he says.
A step was taken
in this direction April 19 at
Thompson. The Canadian Transport Commission approved a pilot project for Northern Manitoba.
Now funding must be found to realize the CTCs concept, which may ultimately mean a three-year,
$1.2 million project using three Greyhound-type
buses.
The railbus may very
well form part of the plug
to
fill an increasing gap in surface transportation.
Like Trevithicks steam coach, such vehicles could,
theoretically, move small groups of travellers over
the short haul quite economically at relatively
low speeds. There has been opposition to
the
idea of the r,ailhus,but didnt Trevithick face. that
problem 200 years ago?
Reprinted from TRANSPO 83, Dept. of Transport Ottawa
Vol. 6/2
RAILWAYS OF SOUTHERN QUEBEC
Volume 1
J. Derek Booth
During the first third of the nineteenth century,
in the Eastern Townships area, southeast of Mon­
treal, settlers travelled along forest trails, back­
packing their belongings.
As small farms developed, communications changed
as stage coaches inched
their way along undeveloped roads. The second half
of the century witnessed the struggle of early entrepreneurs
to develop a network of railways.
By the end of the century, railways had been devel­
oped beyond the needs of the forest-based, agri­cultural and light manfacturing industries.
Derek Booth presents,
in very readable form,
an accurate history of the development and build­
ing of two of the dominent railways of the era –
– A TRIPARTITE AGREEMENT TO STUDY
whether Mayor Jean Drapeaus latest dream
– a supertrain linking Montreal and New York
City -makes economic sense was signed yesterday
in Albany.
The South Eastern Railway; and the Missisquoi
and Black Rivers Railway.
Frequent reference to
a series of 12 Figures assists the reader of railway
history in following the flow of events. Five pages
of selected bibliography, and six pages of notes
and references attest to the authors considerable
efforts to present accurately all of the pertinent
facts. The extensive presentation of early photo­
graphs requires three pages simply to list. Their
quality is excellent.
Additional features are numerous: The present­
ation on the inside cover pages of coloured plates
of tickets issued by The South Eastern Railway.
(Such a
pity that so many of us were not able to
buy a ticket to travel on the Sunday School Special
from West Farnham to St Pie behind a wood­
burning locomotive on July 9th. -1884, that is!)
Some SER posters, its 1883 Locomotive Roster,
and an up-to-date list of Railway Abandonments in
the area add their special interest.
Railways of Southern Quebec
Published by Railfare Enterprises Limited
Box
33, West Hill, Ontario M 1 E 4R4 C$16.95
U.S. Readers: Railfare Enterprises,
Box
A-248, Hanover,
New Hampshire.
03755 US$16.95
To Overseas, add C$4.25 to the Canadian price.
Reviewed
by Stephen Walbri e.
car
Vermont and New York State will jointly fund
the $200,000 study while Quebec undertakes a
traveller
survey to gauge the potential market.
Preliminary work by Quebec transport officials
indicates that a high-speed train linking the two
CANADIAN
60
R A I L
cities in travel time of about three hours is tech­
nically feasible.
The
next step is to determine whether anybody
could afford to buy a ticket to use it, said Jack
Bryan, a spokesman
for the New York Transporta­
tion Department.
Drapeau attended the signing ceremony at the
Albany railway station.
Pauline Marois, vice-president
of the treasury
board, signed on
behalf of Quebec, Governor
Mario Cuomo
for New York and Transportation
Secretary Patrick Garahan
for Vermont.
Drapeau has said a high-speed train link running
from the low-traffic international airport at Mira­
bel
to New York City would make Mirabel a major
continental gateway. The line would also foster
links between Quebec and the
north eastern states.
Prelimi nary cost estimates
for the high-speed
trains and special
right of way similar to the new
TGV (Tres Grande Vitesse) trains in France, which
reach speeds of close to 300 kilometres an hour,
are more than $1.5 billion, said New York trans­
portation officials.
Skeptics
say there isnt enough traffic to justify
building .such.a line.
As currently proposed the trains would run
south
from lVIontreal through Vermont and then
cross
into New York state north of Albany. From
Albany
to New York City a relatively high-speed
right
of way already exists.
The section
north of Albany would require al­
most entirely new
track.
Two rail routes currently link New York City
and Montreal but the quickest still meanders thr­
ough the scenic
Adirondack mountains and along
the shores
of Lake Champlain. It takes 8 1/2 hours
to make the journey.
Planes link the two cities almost hourly but
getting to and from airports stretches the hour­
long
flight to close to the three hours the trains
would take between
city centres.
Drapeau,
who has turned pipe dreams into
realities before, said when he first suggested the
rail
link: I couldnt even find people to laugh
at
me.
S. The Gazette
UPGRADING PROGRAM
BRIDGES REPLACED
SPECIAL PROJECTS FUND
WORK IS WELL UIJDERWAY OIJ CNS MO­
untain Regions massive $265 million capital
spending program
for 1983. This will involve
the completion
of another 201 km of double track between
Edmonton and Valemount by year-end,
and a $92.5
million upgrading program in the B.C.
North division.
As part of the regions $79.5 million road main­
tenance program, 233 km
of rail will be replaced
with new, heavier, continuous welded rail, at a
cost
of $35.7 mi Ilion. The P-811 is being used to
install much of this rail together with 25,712
concrete ties, costing $12.5
million, on the Clear­
water, Alberta and Edson subdivisions.
The balance
of the road maintenance program
includes wooden
tie renewal, ballast, culvert, bank
widening, drainage, bridge and grade stabilization
work and the purchase of new roadway machinery.
Upgrading program
The ten-year,
$600-million program to upgrade
the B.C.
North division, in preparation for the
movement
of northeastern coal, is continuing.
This work program is the largest ever undertaken
on the line from Red Pass to Prince Rupert.
lVIore than 113 km of rai I and 37,000 wooden
ties
are being replaced, at a cost of $21 million.
.. AfuHfler-$22,mi.Hi6)nis -being . spent· this, year as
part of a three-year project to install a centralized
traffic control system along the B.C. North division.
Terminal expansion
work at Prince George,
including the start
of construction of a new diesel
maintenance shop,
will involve $13 million in
expenditures. Modifications
to terminals in Smith­
ers, Watson Island, Terrace and Rideley Island,
at Prince Rupert,
are also underway.
Bridges replaced
Fifteen wooden trestle bridges on
the B.C.
North division are being replaced with steel stru­
ctures this year, and another
is to be replaced
with a culvert and fill, at a cost of $4.7 million.
The $92.5 mi Ilion remaining in the 1983 capital
fund for the B.C North division is being spent on
grade stabilization, bank widening, ballast, drain­
age and siding extension work, along with crew
accommodation and a dispatchers radio system.
Work
is progressing well on 13 sections of double
track west of Edmonton. This part of the regions
$84.3
million main line plant expansion program.
Terminal expansion
work included in this program
is also underway in Edmonton, Jasper, Kamloops,
Boston Bar and Vancouver.
Special projects
fund
The $8.4 million special projects fund includes
$4.6
million for centralized traffic control work
and additional trackage on the Alberta coal branch.
CANADIAN
61
The fund is also being used to purchase highway
equipment and machinery, construct industrial trackage, install
hot box and dragging equipment
detectors and expand the intermodal facility
in
Calgary. During this years peak construction period,
1,725 engineering personnel
will be involved in the
three major work programs: 650 for basic main­tenance, 750 for the upgrading program on the
B.C. North division and 325 on the plant expansion.
S. Keeping Track

-rHE83~YEA-R-OLD RAILROAD STATION AT
McAdam,
New Brunswick, has been designated
a national historic site by the Canadian govern­
ment. Representatives of national and provincial governments, town officials
led by Mayor Ralph
Annis, and many residents of McAdam participated
in a dedication ceremony in a railroad park near the massive granite station recently. Jean Daigle, a representative of Canadas National Historic Sites Commission, spoke at the dedication.
He
said the railroad station had a special historical significance because it was built of granite quar­
ried at McAdam more than 80 years ago. The
Victorian-era railway station was built for Cana­
dian Pacific Railroad Co. and served
as a passenger train facility until
Nov. 16, 1981, when the last
Montreal-to-Saint John train
was canceled by the
Canadian Government. A small first-floor office
was retained for railroad employees involved in
freight-train service. The imposing three-story,
285-foot-by-45-foot station was built at the end
of the 19th century. It was constructed in three stages, with the center portion completed
about
1900. Additions to the east and west ends of the
station were completed in 1910 and 1911 respect­
ively.
In the heyday of passenger-train travel, in
the mid-1920s, McAdam station housed a hotel, a lunch counter, a large dining room, kitchens and
the staff emploved by the hotel. The building
R A L
also had news-stand, mens and womens waiting
rooms, a supervisors office, mail and baggage
rooms, a telegraph and train-order office, offices
for the general agent, clerks, yardmaster, Canad­
ian Customs officials and other members of the
station staff, an express office, a police station and a small jail.
S. The 470.
VIA RAIL CANADA
INC. WILL REINTRODUCE downtown-to-downtown service between
Mon­
treal and Quebec City early in 1986, as one of
a series of moves designed
to get the oft-critici­
zed
rai I passenger network on the right track.
In 1976, using federal grants, rail lines leading
to Quebec Citys downtown Gare du Palais were
ripped
out and the station converted into a farm­
ers market. Since then, a station
in suburban Ste-Foy, more
than half
an hour by bus from the city centre,
has been the eastern terminus for Vias Montreal­Quebec City run.
Finance Minister
Marc Lalonde told a Montreal news conference yesterday
about eight kilomet­
res of new roadbed and rails would be laid, again
using federal grants, to restore the
lin k with the
downtown station.
NO COST ESTIMATE Lalonde did not say how much it would cost
to restore the
lin k.
Via also plans to upgrade the CP Rail line on the
north shore of the St. Lawrence River between Montreal and Quebec City and switch its trains
to that route from the heavily travelled south­shore
CN Rail line, cutting half an hour off the
travelling time between the two cities.
The finance minister also confirmed Vias plans
to spend a total of $306 million to build new maintenance facilities
in Montreal, Toronto, Winni­
peg and Halifax. The new centres would allow entire passenger trains
to be serviced indoors.
S. The Gazette.
-CP RAI L HAS AWARDED EMI L ANDERSON
Construction Co. Ltd., of Hope, contracts
to increase the vertical clearance in tunnels
along
the railways main line through the Fraser
Canyon and along the Thompson River Valley.
The
work will increase the height of six tunnels
along the rail line between Hope and
North 3end
and another just west of Kamloops and will allow
the railway to operate new enclosed multi-level
auto transporters and other over-sized and dimen­
sional-load rail
cars.
About 3,700 liner feet (1,128 metres) of tunnels
will be drilled, blasted and scaled to increase their
overhead dimensions by between 12 and 20 inches
(30.5 and 50.8 centimetres), bringing all clearances
to a standard 22 feet (6.7 metres) from rail head
to tunnel r~of. . .
Doub-
Ie tracking: At Twin Butte, approximately 12 miles
(19 kilometres) east of Revelstoke, new streamlined double
track is nearly completed and will replace existing track being
used here by west-bound freight.
CAPACITY IMPROVEMENTS
Approximately $450,000 will be spent on the
tunnel
work which includes rock bolting and shot
creting (applying a concrete mixture to rock
faces to prevent weathering).
Meanwhile,
CP Rails capacity improvement
work in the Twin Butte, B.C., area has been com­
pleted
this month.
About 7.4 miles (11.0 kilometres) of double
track
was laid at various points three miles (4.8
kilometres) east of Revelstoke.
The
work, which included new bridges at Twin
Butte and Greeley last year, is specifically designed
to improve service on the Mountain subdivision
between Revelstoke and Field.
Other
work included the grading of the right­
of-w~y metres) of track and the installation of automatic
signals, bridges and culverts. Some
155 men were
employed in this seasons program.
In addition
to the track work, this years pro­
gram included clearing and grading
for the 1984
double tracking project which will see an additio­
nal 8.7 miles (14 kilometres) of double tracking
constructed in the area.
In Lachine Que.,
CP Rail will spend $246,000
to purchase and install an electronic weigh scale
and complete paving at its bulk products distri­
bution centre at South Yard.
The
scale will be purchased from Howe-Richard­
son of Canada Inc. of Pointe Claire at an approx­
imate cost
of $40,000. The installation of the
scale as well as the paving of the truck operating
area will be completed by Ross & Anglin Ltd.
of Lachine. It will take about seven weeks to com­
plete the
work.
The South Yard bulk distribution centre opened
in
April, 1982 with potash and salt being the prin­
cipal commodities handled. In December
1982
CP Rail expanded the centre to transfer, ~ithout
commodity contamination, synthetic resins in the
form of plastic pellets.
The computerized weighing system
will eliminate
delays in processing the documents required
for
delivery to the customer, establishing maximum
load limits-for truckers and billing data for the
rai Iway and trucking firms.
S. CP Rail News
CANADIAN 63
R A I L
-THE PUBLIC WILL HAVE ITS SAY ON THE route for a proposed light-rail rapid transit system to link Hamilton and Oakville,
but
the system wont be shelved, officia Is say. Critics have questioned the speed
at which decisions are being made on
the $420-million line, dubbed GO-ALRT for Government
of Ont­ario Advanced Light Rapid Transit. Some wonder
if the system, expected to be operational
by 1988, is even necessary.
Hami Iton Mayor Bob Morrow, a strong prop­onent of the scheme, intended to replace
GO
Trains, stresses that to go or not to go isnt the question. Were going ahead with it,
he said, but all­
egations that the public is not being heard from are just not
true.
ELEVATED TRACKS? Critics of the proposal can air their views at a public meeting, to
be held within three weeks, before final decisions are made on the lines route and related matters,
he added.
A strong consensus has already emerged about the best route for GO-ALRT, eventually to
be extended to Oshawa, Morrow believes. The trains, developed by the provinces Urban Transit Development Corp., would enter and
leave
Hamilton along existing Canadian National Rail­
ways tracks at the lakeshore and head up Ferguson
Ave. to a new station located near the existing bus terminal,
he said. While Morrow said
he dosent care whether GO­
A L RT uses an elevated system for part of the way
or not, other groups are adamantly against any raised track. Real estate values can
be expected to plummet wherever the tracks appear, said Lorna Kippen, chairman of the Coalition
On Sensible Transit (COST).
Citizens lack sufficient information
to assess the proposed system, she charged. Hamilton needs improved transit, Kippen said, but its doubtful whether the current proposals
are improvements at all. The new system would
run three or four trains an hour from Hamilton to Oakville, where passengers would transfer to a second train
to Torontos Union Station. Existing bus lines take Hamilton passengers non-stop to the Eaton Centre
in less than an hour,
she said. GO-ALRT project manager
Kevin Pask said thousands
of leaflets have been mailed to citizens explaining the proposal and numerous public meeting held to gather opinions on it.
S. Toronto Star. A
LOW BID BY A WEST GERMAN MANUFAC­
turer to build streetcars for Sacramento, Calif.,
is interpreted by officials of Urban Transpor­tation Development Corp. Ltd.
as an attempt to blunt Canadian penetration of the North Amer­ican light
rail transit business. The
West German Siemens group and UTDC
were the survivors out of six competitors for the 26-car contract when bids were opened this week. The
West German offer of $785,000 (U.S.) a car – a saving
of $200,000 a car on the UTDC
bid -has left the Canadians baffled. We are concerned about what it might mean, said Philip Stevenson, vice-president, corporate affairs.
It was a very strange bid …. It bore no
relation to anything we expected in terms of world prices.
We think they are concerned about stopping
us from intruding into their traditional market­place.
Siemens
AG and Duwag AG of West Germany
have built LRT systems in Calgary, Edmonton and San Diego, but late last year lost to
UTDC in a competition for 50 articulated streetcars for Santa Clara County, California.
Owned by the Ontario Government,
UTDC
recently signed an agreement to build 126 subway cars for the Toronto Transit Commission, and
is
still awaiting the outcome of a proposal to build
81 streetcars for the Toronto system. Other work
in hand includes LRT systems for Vancouver, Detroit and southern Ontario. The company
is also low bidder for a $50-million con­tract to build
44 subway cars for Boston and ex­pects to
sign the agreement with Massachusetts
Bay Transportation Authority within six weeks. Last week, a bid
was entered for construction of subway cars for Singapore, but hopes for a similar contract
in Colombia have dimmed. We
were not the fir~t bidder selected for negotiations,
Mr. Stevenson said.
UTDC urban rail transit systems are produced by Toronto-based Railtrans Industries
of Canada Ltd., which operates plants at Thunder
Bay and Kingston. Railtrans
is 80 per cent owned by UTDC
and 20 per cent by Hawker Siddeley Canada Inc.
of Toronto.
S. Globe and Mail
-THE SALE OF THE OLDEST U.S. TRANS­portation company, the Delaware and Hud­son Railway Co., to Guilford Transportation Industries
Inc. was completed at a formal cere­rmny.
Guilford acquired the D and H following
an
agreement on a series of government subsidies.
S. The Gazette.
CANADIAN
64
R A I L
VIA RAIL INVESTIRA $146,8 MILLIONS A
Pointe Saint-Charles pour
se doter dun centre
dentretien de 350 000 pieds
carn~s. Les travaux
debuteront
au printemps prochain et seront ter­
mines a Iete de 1986.
Des centres seront egale­ment construits a Toronto, Winnipeg
et Halifax,
Ii nvestissement total atteignant $306 mi II ions en
incluant Montreal. Cest
ce quont annonce hier Ie ministre federal
des Finances,
Marc Lalonde, a Montreal, et Ie
ministre des Transports, Lloyd Axworthy, a Winni­
peg. VIA
Rail estime que ces centres lui permett­
ront de reduire de $55 millions ses couts annuels
dentretien, qui
seh~vent dans Ie moment a $165
millions et constituent
Ie quart de ses depenses totales.
Les sommes requises pour les investisse­
ments seront donnees a VIA
Rail par Ottawa.
La construction du centre de Toronto, au cout
de $98,6 millions, debutera prochainement
et la
mise en service est prevue pour Ie debut de 1985.
Les installations de $28 millions de Winnipeg seront erigees a compter
doctobre 1984 et seront completees vers
la fin de 1985. Quant a Halifax,
Ie centre de $32,6 millions ne sera construit qua compter davril 1986
et termine au milieu de 1987.
Les travaux de construction a Montreal creeront
au chapitre de Iemploi Iequivalent de 3 600 per­sonnes-annee.
Ce centre presentera deux grands
avantages pour
la compagnie: dabord, Ientretien
se fera a Iinterieur, plutot qua Iexterieur,comme
cest
Ie cas presentement et sur un autre plan, on pourra faire Ientretien
dun train complet qui
entrera par une extremite
et sortira par I autre. VIA sera proprietaire du centre
et soccupera de
Iadministration.
Les travaux dentretien propre­
ment dits continueront toutefois detre effectues
par
Ie CN, mais Ie contrat entre les deux parties sera renegocie.
II ny aura pas de creation demplois suite a Ietablissement des ateliers, mais
un trans­
fert des lieux actuels de travail
au nouveau. Le
site exact de la nouvelle batisse, qui sera loue
du
CN, fait Iobjet dune negociation.
M. Lalonde a par ailleurs confirme que la liai­
son de centre-vi lie a centre-vi lie entre Montreal
et Quebec sera retablie en 1986, grace a la remise
en service de
la gare du Palais, situee a cote du
nouveau Palais de justice de
la Vielle-capitale.
Presentement, on utilise une gare situee quelque part en bordure du fleuve a Saine-Foy.
Des travaux d envergure devront etre entrepris
etant donne notamment que les voies dacces et de
la gare ont ete en levees et que Iedifice, datant
du
debut du siecle, devra etre eeamenage. lis dure­ront 18 mois et, selon VIA Rail, pourraient de­buter
au milieu de Ian prochain.
Le gouvernement f~deral a sur un autre plan
transfere a VIA
la propriete des deux trains LRC qui avaient ete loues a
la compagnie americaine Amtrack. Cette derniere a decide de
ne plus sen
servir,
et ils sont presentement gares a Iusine de
leur constructeur, Bombardier, a
La Pocatiere.
Ces trains netant pas de la meme famille que
les LRC en service au Canada, VIA etudie la pos­
sibilite de
la adapter et de les mettre en service sur une liaison partant de Montreal.
Par ailleurs,
les cinquante voitures LRC retirees
il y a une semaine a cause dun risque de bris d­
essieu sont progressivement remises
en service
apres inspection et, sil y a avait lieu, reparations.
Huit trains (28 voitures) parcouraient
Ie corridor Quebec-Windsor hier, nombre qui augmentera a
douze trains (40 voitures) lundi ou mardi prochain.
S. La Presse.
THEY FORGOT JUST
ONE THING AT THE NEW
train passenger depot at Sicamous in the south­
ern B.
C. Interior. Access. There
is no road in.
It seems that when CP Rail built the new pass­enger shelter, it failed
to get a right-of-way agree­ment through certain property. The woman who owns the land simply told
the
railway it couldnt go through her property and
threatened it with trespassing
if it tried. She lives
.in Oregon and the case is in litigation. That
is no help to the people who want to get in
and out of Sicamous, to and from Vancouver and Calgary. Right now, they have to mount or dis­
mount
in the twice-daily train up the highway a
bit, where the tracks cross the road.
S. Vancouver Sun.
THE ESQUIMALT
& NANAIMO ROLLS ON Since the last hearings were held on this service,
VIA has assumed responsibility from
CPo As the
original discontinuance application was filled by
CP, the railway was again named as the applicant
in this months hearings. As the service no longer costs
CP anything, the CTC decided in its first day
of hearings
that it was conducting a regulatory
review rather than
an application for discontinu­ance. VIA stated
that while it was not willing to
spend any money on improvements, it would
continue it until
the future of the PCL bus service had been determined. The
CTC indicated that it wants improvements made and
will hold future hearings
to deal with the matter.
S. Transport
2000
Calgary.
CANADIAN
65
CNS ATLANTIC REGION HAS COME UP
with a sure-fire way to let all Canadians know
New Brunswick celebrates its 200th anniver-
sary in 1984.
What looks like a giant billboard on wheels
is
actually a fully functional 15.2-m steel box car.
The car wi II work its way from coast to coast
in 1984 carrying
freight and, wherever it goes,
spreading the word that New Brunswick is having
its 200tl1 birthday.
The
box car officially went into service at Monc­
ton
with Ilew Brunswick premier Richard Hat-
fiels officiating. .
The car
will be placed in general revenue service
and, when this
is not possible, will travel on com­
pany service.
It will return to its home base at
the Moncton main shops periodically
for cleaning,
touch-ups and inspections.
The all-white car
has the bicentennial symbol
and other approved material applied
in the off­
icial blue and green shades.
The inaugural trip took it on a newsprint del­
ivery
to the Globe and Mail in Toronto from Chand­
ler, Quebec. Subsequent trips will take
it all the
way
to Canadas West coast with stops in mo.st
of the provinces along the way. The box car will
continue travelling on CN Rail mainlines until
December, 1984.
S. Keeping Track.
R A I L
VIA RAIL CANADA INC. AND BOMBARDIER
Inc. of Montreal have solved problems with
the hydraulic banking system on LRC passenger
trains so they should be as Iight, rapid and com­
fortable as their name suggests by mid-February,
says Via president Pierre Franche.
The modifications
have been field-tested and
the fleet
of 50 coaches is being adjusted as equip­
ment
can be brought into the shop.
However, the banking system –
which allows
the LRCs
to take turns at higher speeds than con­
ventional
passenger trains –will not be used until
all the coaches have been mod ified.
We
have to interchange our cars, Mr. Franche
said.
You cant put one coach thats banking with
another coach thats not banking. You have to
wait for the whole fleet to be converted.
Restoring the banking system will
save seven
minutes on a Montreal-Toronto trip that now
takes four hours, 35 minutes.
S. The Gazette.
I F
YOU NOTICE ANY NEWS ITEMS THAT MAY
be of interest to our readers please clip them
and mail along
with a black and white crisp
photo if available to :
The Business
Car c/o Peter Murphy,
75 Sevigny Ave., Dorval,
P.Q. Canad~ H9S 3V.8.
Please indicate the source of the Item so It may
be correctly credited.
Contributors this month inc!ude:
Fred Angus
Peter
Murphy
Stephen Walbridge
F. J. Hermann
Carroll
C. Sait
Lon Marsh
Edward A. Wright
Norris Adams
Alwyn Marshall.
Photographs
used this month courtesy of B. ~.
Rail, C.P. Photographic Services, C.N. Photographic
services and
from our contributors.
C.R.H.A. .
communications
CRHA COMMUNICATIONS is published by the
Canadian Railroad Historical Association. Con­
tributions of items about CR HA Divisions, mem­
bers, etc.
including photographs, newspaper art­
icles
are solicited and should be sent to: Bruce
Ballantyne 266
McElroy Drive, Kanata, Ontario
Canada, K2L 1Y4. Telephone 613-836-5601.
All membership enquiries including change
of
address notice should be sent to Jim Patterson,
Membership Services at Box 282, St. Eustache,
P.O. Canada, J7R 41<2. Telephone 514-473-7766.
Mail
for the Canadian Railway Museum and the
Board
of Directors of the CR HA should be sent
to P.O. Box 148. St. Constant P.O. Canada JOL
1
XO Telephone 514-632-2410.
The addresses
of all C R HA Divisions appears
on
page three of this magazine.
MEMBERSHIP
Your efforts are being rewarded, there are over
1000 members renewed
to date with over 50 new
members included therein. The 1983 deliquants
will have received their second notice by the time
you read this and membership kits will have been
sent to those whose names appeared on the 1984
invoices
as prospects. We still need your help in
promoting the CRHA and Canadian Rail when
ever possible.
We have lots of promotional litera­
ture available and a
quantity has been sent to each
Division. If you need some please let us know.
We will keep you posted on the membership sit­
uation
throughout the year.
TO OUR AMERICAN MEMBERS
A few U.S. members have asked why do we
request that they remit their dues in U.S. funds.
The
CR HA maintains a U.S. fund account for the
deposit
of your cheques. As you know the U.S.
dollar is converted to Canadian at approximately
$1.15 Cdn.
to $1.00 U.S. However the 90st of
postage to the United States is no longer the same
as for Canada and we pay $.21 per issue in extra
to U.S. destinations. For our international members
we pay
an extra $2.25 per mailing. This is only
for the bare Canadian Rail. The gap widens if
inserts are included therein and dont forget the
extra
is also applicable to the mailing of member­
ship cards, invoices, notice
of meetings and the like.
Canadian Rail contains no advertising
our only
source of revenue is your dues. In the case of our
U.S. members the exchange on your currency pays
for the extra cost of postage. In addition it saves
you the trouble of obtaining a Canadian money
order
or bank draft, all you do is write us an ord­
inary check.
We hope this explains it and were
proud
to have you as members of the CR HA.
CRHA DIRECTOR HONOURED
On Dec. 22, 1983 it was announced that the
Governor General
had appointed Dr. Robet V. V.
Nicholls
to be a member of the order of Canada.
Dr. Nicholls
who is, of course, our Honorary
President, joined the
C. R.H.A. in 1932, the year
of its founding, and served as President from 1961
to 1963. He has continued in an active role in the
association ever since,
and is presently archivist
as well as a member of the Board of Directors. He
and Mrs. Nicholls have established the Miner­
Nicholls Fund
to provide financial support for the
Nicholls Archives.
In 1936, Dr. Nicholls became the
first editor
of the first C.R.H.A. publication The C.R.H.A.
Bulletin. This publication
was a casulty of World
War
II, being discontinued in 1940, but its suc­
cessor is Canadian Rail.
The order
of Canada is the latest in a series of
honours for Dr. Nicholls who previously received
The Confederation Medal (1967) and
theOueens
Jubilee Medal (1977) for his work in preserving
Canadas Railway Heritage.
Canadian Rail congratulates Dr. Nicholls
for
this well deserved honour.
NEWS FROM THE DIVISIONS
Calgary & Southwestern Division
The Divisions participation in the November
Calgary and
area Model Railway Show resulted in
an encouraging amount of interest in C R HA and
the Division. There
was sufficient material and
artifacts
to result in plenty of conversation between
visitors and members minding the booth;
Work continues on plans
to restore the ex­
Milwaukee road signals
that the Division recently
acquired. A
trip to Deer Lodge Montana (900
miles!!)
was required to bring it back to Calgary.
It will be erected in Champlain Park when refur­
bishing
work is completed.
The annual general meeting
was held in Novem­
ber
with the election of the following officers:
President:
Secretary Treasurer:
Directors:
Editor· Flagstop:
Hadrian Evans
Lorne Unwin
Eric Johnson
Jim Wallace
John Sutherland
Mike Western
Niagara Division
The Division held its Christmas Party at a local
restaurant at which movies were shown and a
small N
scale layout was displayed. Mention was
made of one memb.er mistaking a tree on the lay­
out for a bit of parsley! The book Steam in Nia­
gara previously mentioned in Communications
is now available at $22.95. It is a 112 page picture
book on Steam Railroading on both sides of the
Nigara River. Historical captions describe
each
photograph. There is even a laminated colour
dust jacket. The supply
is limited so order now
from the Division (address on page 3).
Rideau Valley Division
The Division has been busy in the Smiths Falls
Ontario
area with respect to two railway land­
marks.
Efforts are being made to have the CN
S;herzer Rolling Lift Bridge preserved along with
the old Canadian lJorthern Railway Station nearby.
By the time you read this it is hoped the station
will
have been declared a national historic site.
The Division,
besides having the old CP Rail
Speeders in its collection
now have acquired the
CN outside frame boxcar from the Tunnel Bay
Railroading
of Brockville. It will be moved to
Smiths Falls when lease arrangements for some
of the CN yard have been finalized.
By town Railway Society
Work continues of the interior restoration of
car 27. Crews are also hard at work refurbishing
the locomotives in the National Museum
of Science
and Technology.
The 1984
edition of the Societys book A
Trackside Guide to Canadian Railway Motive
Power
will be available by mid-March. The new
edition
is expanded and now includes V IA pass­
enger equipment, rapid transit equipment and
streetcars. The railway and industrial locomotive
listings
have been updated.
There
are now 158 pages (1983 edition had 118).
Price
is now $9.50 postage paid. Order it from
the Society.
Whose address is on page 3.
The annual meeting
was held in January and the
following resulted from the election of officers.
President: Earl Roberts
Vice Pres: Ches Banks
Secretary: Helen Tucker
Treasurer: Mike Iveson
Directors: John Halpenny
Dunc du Fresne
Paul Bown
St. Lawrence Valley Division
At the Divisions recent meeting the following
directors were elected.
Pierre Comete
Lionel Bissonnette
Fred Angus
Jim Bouchard
Bob Cox
Stephen Wray
The officers will
be elected at a future meeting
of the Division. Membership to the St. Lawrence
Valley Division
is $4.00 for 1984 and dues may
be sent to the address on page 3 of this magazine.
Regular meetings
are held the second thursday
of every month and any members wishing to pre­
sent a program should
drop the Division a note
with his proposal. Meetings are held at the Snow­
don Campus
of Vanier College, 5160 Decarie
Blvd. Montreal at 19.30 hrs.
Pacific Coast Division
Better late than never ….. On May 14, 1983
members
of the Pacific Coast Division enjoyed a
guided
tour of BC Rails Squamish Shops. All
members wore the official PCD hard hat for pro-
tection each emblazoned with the Divisions crest
and members
name. Norris Adams is behind the
camera. other members from
left to right are as
follows:
No.1 Ron Meyer
No.2 Bill Cooke
No.3 Bernie Tully
No.4 Bob Kerr
No.5 Percy Jones
No.6 Greg. Kennelly
No.7 Doug. Battrum
No.8 Mike Green
No.9 Ricl< Shantler
No. 10 Ralph Oakley
No.
11 Bob Deno
No. 12
Earl McKeown
No. 13
Sam Macrae
NEW CRHA DIVISIONS?
There are three geographic areas of Canada
where the C R HA is not represented: Saskatchewan,
Manitoba
and Newfoundland. We are pleased to
announce that interest
is being shown in two of the
three
areas for the creation of CR HA Divisions.
In Winnipeg Mr.
Paul Schuff, 14 Reynolds Bay,
Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3K
OM4 (204) 837-2714
is proposing the organization of the Keystone
Division
to serve members in the Province of Man­
itoba.
If you live in Manitoba or would like to be
a founding member of a new division please con­
tact
Paul at the above address.
Anyone living in Newfoundland or interested
in the unique narrow
gauge Newfoundland Rail­
way
is invited to join the Newfoundland Trans­
port Historical Society. You may contact Dr.
Ben Hogan 35 Pine Bud Ave., St. Johns, New­
foundland, A 1 B 1 M4 (709) 726-6028. The
Soc­
iety is interested in all modes of transport in New­
foundland
and has secured a 99 year lease on a
museum site
to display its exhibits. The Society
is extremely busy at this time trying to get their museum established
for the summer season and it
is hoped that they will formally join the CRHA
family in the not too distant future.
SPECIAL NOTES
John Prigge of the Fort Erie Historical Rail­
road Museum
sends along information on the
museums tenth anniversary events
in 1984.
He has also provided a number of pictures of
some of their restoration work on CN 6218 and
two railway stations.
On June 30 there will be special celebrations
for the anniversary and for Ontarios bicentennial.
Guides will
be available in the Ridgeway and
8-1 stations, within the CN 6218, the caboose
and on the grounds to answer questions and
instruct. There will be displays of railroading
in Ontario,
and the actual dispatching of tele­
graph
messages will be performed by former
CN employees. The International Division/N F R
of the National Model Railroaders will provide
a display
of Canadian model railroad craft.
A miniature live steam engine will travel through
the grounds.
Local officials, our
MP and representatives of
the CN R will be present to dedicate the newly
refurbished
8-1 station and a fireless Porter
0-4-0.
THE FT. ERIE RAILROAD MUSEUM –
Historical Background
The CN 6218 was delivered in September 1942
from the Montreal Locomotive Works.
It is the
18th locomotive
of a class of 34 designed for
fast passenger and freight service. Routing from
Montreal,
it traveled to Halifax, Toronto, New
York, White River Jet.,
Vt. and crossed the pra­
ries to Saskatoon. The engine served 18 years
until replaced by the diezel in 1960. In the Fall
of 1964 it was put into service for excursions with
50,000 railfans enjoying the ride.
The last
of a once 4,064 strong fleet of CN
steam was finally retired in July 1971. The rail­
road wanted a permanent home
for the engine.
Many organizations and communities
across Canada
expressed interest in obtaining this significant
historical artifact. Ft. Erie
was chosen.
On October 27, 1973 the engine was presented
to the town at the Catharine St. rail crossing for
official ceremonies led by Mayor John Teal and
Maurice Archer of Canadian National. CN 6218
remained in the
CN yards until a suitable location
could
be found.
The 6218 Citizens Committee was formed in
the Fall
of 1973, headed by Ken Rayner. A portion
of Oakes Park was acquired. Donations and vol­
unteer labor by local citizens
and businesses pre­
pared the locomotive and newly acquired CN
caboose for their permanent location. June 30,
CANADIAN
69
1974 marked the official opening of what was to
become the Ft. Erie Railroad Museum.
6218, trailed by a
bright orange caboose was
in its present location. There was no Ridgeway
station, no
8-1 station, no landscaped yards. Action
by the museum and the town saved these bui Id­
ings
from demolition. They now join the 6218 in
a constantly enlarging
exhibit of steam-era rail­
roading.
This
is our 10th Year! We are proud of the
museum and what
it offers the citizens of Ft.
Erie and visitors
from allover the world.
The most frequent comment we receive is Take
care of our past.
Wewill.
R A I L
ROYAL HUDSON 1984 SEASON
Norris Adams has provided the schedule for
the Royal Hudson excursion train out of Van­
couver
B.C. for the 1984 season as follows:
Train Schedule
First run -Saturday, May 19th
Final run -September
16th
Train will operate five days per week –
Wednesday
to Sunday and holiday Mondays
which are:
May
21
July 2
August 6
September 3
Departure time –
10:30 a.m. from B.C. Railway
Station -North Vancouver
Boarding starts
9:30 a.m.
Arrive at Squamish –
12:20 p.m.
Stop over – 1 hour 40 minutes
Depart Squamish –
2:00 p.m.
Arrive North Vancouver –
3:55 p.m.
TICKET PRICES
Return Fares
Adults -$12.00
Senior
and Youth -(12 to 18) -$9.00
Children
(2 and under 12) -$7.00
Children under 2 -free
Group rates
for May and June are being determined.
Master
Charge and Visa accepted.
SWITCH LIST
Item 84-6
John Mayell, 7 Littlefield Rd. Amherstview
Ontario K7N 1
S1 is looking for photographs
of CP 4-6-0 No. 1095 while in regular service
No. 1095
is now on display in Kingston
next
to the old Kingston and Pembroke
Railway Station -John believes the engine
ran out of McAdam New Brunswick at one
time.
PHOTOS FROM MEMBERS
Mr. Andre Corbeil of 636 rue du village, Morin
Heights, P.O.
JOR 1 HO submitted the following
two photos of CNs now abandoned Montfort
Sub. Both pictures were taken at Sxiteen Island
Lake the
first in 1910, at that time the sawmill
was still in opertation, it was dismantled in 1920.
The second
photo taken August 1948 shows CNs
4-6-0 No. 1408 and train at the station. 1408
was
ex Canadian Northern (as was the railway) and
was built by Montreal locomotive works in 1913.
She had 22 x 26 cylinders, for submitting the
photos and
to CN Steam Power for the technical
information.
I F YOU NOTICE ANY NEWS ITEMS THAT MAY
be of interest to our readers please clip them
and mail along
with a black and white crisp
photo if available to The Business Car c/o Peter
Murphy, 75 Sevigny Ave., Dorval, P.O. H9S 3V8.
Please indicate the source of the item so it may be
correctly credited.
BACK COVER:
SALEM AND HILLSBOROUGH No. 42 at Hillsborough N.B.
on November 13 1983, the day the S. & H. was innaug­
uratea by the New Brunsv,ick Division of the C.R.H.A.
The number 42 brings to mind the days of C.P.R..
train liThe Atlantic Limited which carried nwnbers
41 ana 42 and provided fast overnight service between
Montreal and Saint John N.B. Arnolds Studio
Ltd. Moncton.
Canadian Rail
P.o. Box 282 St. Eustache, Que., Canada
J7R 4K6
Postmaster: it undelivered within
10 days return to sender. postage guaranteed.
first premiere
class classe
PERMIT ~
Sl·E … ac,,-. 0 ..
fI~OII.iotIl>tndlll

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