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Canadian Rail 333 1979

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Canadian Rail 333 1979

Canadian Rail ::
No. 333
OCTOBER 1979

Cover:
From the ~1ani toba Archives, this
Canadian Northern Cover Photo is
~imply titles Passenger Train at
the Water Tank, 1907 from the
collection of Robert Lindsay #14.
OPPOSITE:
John Todd 1908-1978
On the 8th, of February, 1978
Canadian Rail received in the mail a neatly packaged
article
for presentation. Postmarked Thunder
Bay, Ontario, it bore the
return address of Mr. John
Todd. John (Jack) Todd was no
stranger to Canadian Rail readers,
he had over the years contributed
numerous articles one of which, The Nipigon
Tramway inspired .
numerous favorable comments and
without a doubt remains enshrined
among our most popular articles.
John Todd passed away on March 14,
1978 at the age of 70 years. A
retired Government Grain Inspector
John turned to the CRHA and indeed
Canadian Rail as a fruitful means
of fulfill i ng hi s re ti reTIe nt years. Survived
by his wife and daughter
John was laid to rest in the River­
side Cemetary at Thunder Bay. In
keeping with his past practice,
John submi tted hi s ma teria 1 to
Canadian Rail complete in every
way. With maps supplied by his
good friend Bill Germaniuk, Johns
presentation consisted in a two
part study of the construction of
the Canadian Northern Railway East
and then West of Port Arthur, On­
tario. We are pleased to present
Part 1 of Johns work in this Oc­
tober issue, with part 11 to follow
next month in the November issue.
IAN
Publ ished monthly by The Canadian Railroad
Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B Montreal
Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
BUSINESS CAR: J. A. Beatty
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY & SOUDI WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario K
1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY t~OUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, Secretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Al berta T5B 2NO
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Wind50r,
Ontario N9G 112
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W 1P3
NIAGARA DIVISION
Peter Warwick, Secretary
P.O. Box 593
Sl. Catharines, Ontario
L 2R 6W8
TbeDriyiDI Of Tbe.Last Spikes ,,
, ,00 TheCaoadian IortherQ.Baiiway
, II I_Ontario .
:, JOHN TODD ,
,
. : :
. . .
…. ,
,
,~. .,
. . .
. . .. .

. , …
:H..Y.~rant·.s Pile Drivirig outHton ih.e Canadian. Northern Railway
. :in 1908.Photocourt.esy cif the Ma.nitoboArchives,· .Robert l.;indsoY
coilecti6n, ,,# 45 .• : . .,
Tbe Driving Of Tbe
Last Spikes On Tbe
Canadian lortbera Railway
In lew Ontario
JOHN TODD
The Lake Manitoba Railway and Canal Company, built
~y Mackenzie and Mann in 1896 from an old charter acouired
1n January 1896, and put into operation in January 1897,
was expanding rapidly on the prairies. To ensure its
continued growth an extension to a Lake Superior port was
essential in order to reach its potential from the ever
increasing grain traffic.
In January 1901, Mackenzie and Mann acauired the lines
of the Manitoba Northern Pacific Railway from the Government
of Manitoba. Then the grain that had been transported by
the C.P.R. to the Canadian Lakehead for the company was
delivered to the Northern Pacific Railroad at Emerson,
Manitoba, for shipment to Duluth, Minnesota.
The first step taken by Mackenzie and Mann in extending
their railway to Lake Superior was to acauire the charter of
the Manitoba and South Eastern Railway, incorporated in 1889,
to build from St. Boniface to the International Boundary at
the Lake of the Woods. Work began early in the spring of 1898
and 45 miles were built that season. The railway went through
a wooded country, and the main traffic for the first two years
was cord wood hauled into Winnipeg for fuel.
The Mackenzie and Mann Railways became the Canadian
Northern Railway on January 13th, 1899, the original charter
names disappearing.
In May 1899 the Canadian Northern purchased two
railways which together held authority to build a railway
to Port Arthur. The first one the Minnesota and Manitoba
Railroad~ owned by a Minneapolis lumber company, held the
charter to build through Minnesota from the International
boundary at the Lake of the Woods, to Rainy River, Ontario,
a distance of 42 miles~ The second one, the Ontario and
Rainy River Railway, incorporated in 1886, held a charter
to build from Port Arthur to Rainy River in Ontario. A
small amount of work had been done by its Ontario owners.
A third railway, The Port Arthur, Duluth and Western which
started operating in January 1893 was also purchased. 18
miles of its track could be used to take the Canadian
Northern from Stanley to Port Arthur.
CANADIAN 295
R A I L
Jt?~{~/ v~
V~~ (5).FLD/..
i~1G~~.Xi~JL~~ ~·t0~~.~·
. SUBJECT TO CGNDITIONSENDORSED HEREON
UNTIL Dec. 31sr, lIl98,. VNlE5.(l.THiWtSE..
Pass No. 233, signed by D.B.Hanna on the Lake Manitoba Railway
and Canal Company, 1898. Photo courtesy Lakehead University,
Thunder Bay, Ontario.

Work on the line to Port Arthur began almost
immediately. The Manitoba and South Eastern and the
Minnesota and Manitoba sections passed through level
country and construction went along at a fast pace.
When the railway reached the Rainy River at the Inter­
national Border a large bridge was built to cross this
wide stream which forms the border between Minnesota and
Ontario. The Ontario and Rainy River section, except for
the 55 miles along the river from Rainy River to Fort
Frances was a difficult and expensive section to build,
as the scenic Rainy Lake to the east of Fort Frances had
to be crossed. This was accomplished by building a series
of timber trestles, and island hopping. ~A few years later
a rock causeway and steel bridges replaced the trestles~
the rocky nature of the country reQuired a great deal of
expensive blasting.
With the purchase of the Ontario and Rainy River
Railway the Canadian Northern inherited a large subsidy
from b6th the Dominion and Ontario Governments. The
Manitoba Government, anxious to end the railway monopoly
in Manitoba took the unusual step of guaranteeing the
bonds of the Ontario section up to $20,000 a mile.
CANADIAN
296
R A I L
The 438 mile Canadian Northern Railway commenced
in 1899, followed the old Dawson Trail, a road and water
route from Port Arthur to Winnipeg that was started by
the Dominion Government in 1869. In late December 1901,
after two years of work, the line was completed and plans
were made to celebrate the driving of the last spikes.
The two railway owners William Mackenzie and Donald
Mann arrived in Port Arthur on Sunday night, December 29th,
1901 on the C.P.R. Express #1 from the east. Their
business car Atikokan was at once switched to the C.N.R.
where a special train awaited it, the train left immediately
for the journey to the gap in the track. Mr. Mackenzie was
accompanied by a party consisting of Hon. E. J. Davis,
Ontario Land Commissioner, Bryone Walker, General Manager
of the Canadian Bank of Commerce, Z. A. Lash, K. C. Lewis,
Lukes, Accountant for Mackenzie and Mann, J. J. Long,
Collingwood, Alexander Mackenzie and W. F. Moore, Private
Secretory to Mr. Mackenzie.
Mr. James Conmee, M.P.P. joined the party and
accompanied them for the ceremonies. Mr. Mann stayed
behind in Port Arthur to escort the local party leaving
at 7 0 clock the next morning for the driving of the
last spike. This second special train made the run to
Atikokan in four and a half hours, Mr. Mann proved to be an
ideal host making the journey thoroughly enjoyable.
A 1901 Banquet Menu Cover, presented courtesy of the Lakehead
University, Thunder Bay, Ontario.
CA NAD (AN
297
R A , L
~ j •. ft
, .
Filling in a trestle near Emo, Ontario on the Canadian Northern
Railway, Photo courtesy of the Fort Frances Museum.
• °
CANADIAN
298
R A I L
oj …
° •
Titled Canadian Narthern Train at Grain Elevator in 1910 this
photo is courtesy of the Manitoba Archives, Transportation-Rail­
way # 20.
CANADIAN
299
R A I L
Steam Crane derailment on the Canadian Northern Line in 1915
courtesy of the Manitoba Archives, Transportation-Railway # 97
CANADIAN 300 R A I L
The Port Arthur party consisted of Ma~or Matthews, D. F. Burk
and other prominent citizens, and A. J. Gorrie and T. S. White
of the C.N.R. staff. They were joined at Fort William by Mayor
Hogarth and Peter McKellar. Three representatives of
the Toronto papers, The Globe, The Mail, and The World were
with the party.
A special train which left Winnipeg in the afternoon
of December 29th, 1901, carried the western contingent made
up of the following gentlemen. D. B. Hanna, Gen. Supt.,
G. F. Shaw, Traffic Manager, Hugh Sutherland, Executive
Agent and T. A. Burrows, M.P.P. Land Commissioner, all of
the C.N.R., Hon. Colin Campbell, representing the Manitoba
Government, W. Georgeson, President Winnipeg Board of Trade,
J. Aird, Manager of the Canadian Bank of Commerce and
J. J. H. McLean. D. Risteen train master had charge of
the train, and the press was represented by C. P. Ask with
the Winnipeg Free Press, J. Bartlett, Winnipeg Telegram,
J. A. Osborne, Brandon Sun, and R. P. Laurie, Fort Frances
Times.
When the uncompleted section of the track was reached,
the party joined the Ontario delegation on the waiting train,
and left immediately for Atikokan. After a brief inspection
of the new round house the whole party assembled at 12:30 at
a point just east of the station, where the ceremonial silver
spike was driven well and truly home by Hon. E. J. Do.I.,1.s,
with Mr. James Conmee, M.P.P. for Algoma who had been
intimately connected with the negotiations for building the
road, holding the spike.
The spike used for this occasion was made from silver
from the Porcupine Mine, located adjacent to the Port
Arthur, Duluth and Western Railway, and was engraved on
four sides with the following words:
1. Canadian Northern
2. Po r tAr t h u r -W inn i peg Sec ti 0 n
3. Driven on Completion
4. December 30th, 1901
When the cheering had subsided, James Conmee, M.P.P.
made a short address congratulating the people on the
completion of this link in the new highway, and prophe­
sying that in a short time this line will be double
tracked.
Hon. E. J. Davis, who followed him, shortly sketched
his connection with the early history of the Ontario and
Rainy River Railway, and eulogized Mackenzie and Mann for
the manner in which they faced and solved the problems of
building the road, opening a new field for settlers. He
stated that he had assurance from Mr. Mackenzie that the
C.N.R. was prepared to give to bonafide settlers the lowest
rates that had ever been given by any railway company.
CANADIAN 301 R A I L
64 years of photography advancement could not improve an the clarity
of this origional glass negative photo of the Canadian Northern
gravel pit crew circa 1915. Photo courtesy Foote Collection # 969,
Manitoba Archives.
CA NAD IAN
302
R A I L
In a few words Mr. Mackenzie thanked the people for
their support all through the undertaking, without which
the construction of the road would have been an impossibi­
lity.
The whole party then boarded the cars, made up into
one train and were whirled back over the splendid roadbed,
reaching Port Arthur ahead of stipulated time.
At six oclock the special train pulled back into
Port Arthur station where it was met by a cheering crowd,
the run down had been made in splendid time and the whole
days ceremonies had made a tired but happy crowd.
Shortly after 8 0 clock, the guests began to assemble
at the Northern Hotel and with the arrival of the guests of
the evening a bonfire was started on the shore of the bay
and a torch light procession made a fitting setting to the
days proceedings.
The dining room of Northern was indeed one of the
attractions of the whole long day. Two long tables ran
along the length of the room crossed at the lower end by
another where sat Mayor Matthews and the invited guests,
except Mr. Mann, Mr. Shaw, Mr. Hanna, Mr. Lash,
Mr. Georgeson, who sat around the head of the tables
presided over by J. J. OConnor, and D. F. Burk. The
decorations were simply magnificent, Union Jacks were
hung in festoons from one end of the room to the other,
and the side walls and ceiling were a mass of flags and
bunting. On the lower end wall was a banner bearing the
firm name Mackenzie, Mann & Co. and the motto Energy,
Enterprise, Ability. On the right hand side wall was
another large motto Port Arthur to Liverpool, 4000 miles,
and on the opposite wall Port Arthur the Silver Gateway
to the Golden West. Around the tables was a miniature
railway track with trains of cars and a telegraph line,
making up the story of the completion of the track.
Of the banauet for the 150 present there is much to
be said. It was a spread that brought out much comment for
the excellence and for the promptness of the service. The
Northern had a reputation to sustain in the banauet line
and it did not suffer this night.
After the dinner had been cleared away Mayor Matthews
arose and the principal feature of the evening, the speech­
making and toasts were begun. A number of letters and
telegrams were read from distinguished men who regretted
their inability to attend, including those of Sir Wilfrid
Laurier and Premier Ross of Ontario.
Besides the honourable guests, speeches were made by
Z. A. Lash, K.C., D. F. Burk, Hon. E. J. Davis, James Conmee,
M.P.P., Hon. Colin Campbell, G. O. P. Clavet, B. E. Walker,
J. J. Long, Wm. Georgeson, G. A. Graham and D. B. Hanna.
CANADIAN
303
R A I L
Trestle over Rainy Lake, east of Fort Frances, Ontario, photo
courtesy of the Fort Frances Museum.
Wlnnlp90111
Douphln
.. -.. -.. -.. -.. -.. _ .. -.. _ .. _ .. _ .. _ .. –
Boudett,
u. S. A.
ONTARIO
LAST SPIKE AT COMMISSIONER
INLET 112 miles East of Fort
Frances
JAN. 1 1902
~
I
S Llperlor
CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY
5
YST EM
In
Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario
Region
will 2-78
CANADIAN
306
R A I L
Loading logs on th~ Duluth & Western Section of the Canadian Narthern.
Photo courtesy Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, Ontario.
I
,
CANADIAN
307 R A I L
Mr. Mackenzie, who was received with renewed and pro­
longed cheers was touched by the gratifying reception. He
outlined the gradual growth of the system from the first 100
miles in Manitoba. The absorption of the old Hudsons Bay
Road, the South Eastern and finally the Ontario and Rainy
River Railway. In spite of the difficulties in the way of
financing the firm had finally got their bonds underwritten
in London, and had at last secured the Northern Pacific
lines in the west, giving them over 1800 miles of railway
under one system.
Mr. Mann described the advantages possessed by the
new road, which would enable them now to haul 45,000
bushels in one train, and later on 75,000 bushels. Every
convenience was being added to their passenger service,
and if the west now exports 50 million bushels in 15
years it wauld export 200 million, of which the C.N.R.
expected to get a full share. Other transcontinental
lines pass through arid tracts, but their road for 1200
miles is in the rainbelt. He anticipated a vast amount
af traffic in iron ore from the region between Fort Frances
and Port Arthur. The present mileage of the C.N.R. places
it third in mileage among Canadian railways, but he meant
it to be first in every other respect, and in seven years
hoped to celebrate the completion of the transcontinental
route.
Mr. D. F. Burk spoke of the Canadian Bank of Commerce
backing up the firm, $8,000,000 had been spent on the line.
Mr. James Conmee M.P.P., mentioned that this parallel
line had been built in half the time, with half the
gradients of the C.P.R., from the Head of the Lakes to
Winnipeg.
The termination of a most successful banauet was
marked by the singing of Auld Lang Syne.
The first through train over the Canadian Northern
left Port Arthur for Winnipeg on December 31st, 1901, at
10:00 oclock in the morning. On reaching about 12 miles
east of Fort Frances it was found that there was still
some 1800 feet of rail to be laid.
At Commissioner Inlet, 12 miles east of Fort Frances
the train stayed all night. Here the 1800 feet gap was laid
by 10: 47 New Years morning, January 1st, 1902.
The last rail was laid in the shadow of a magnificent
white pine, and Mr. William Mackenzie and Mr. Donald Mann,
with overcoats off, stood on either side of the last rail,
and amid the cheers of the party, and 200 workmen, drove the
last spike home. Mr. Mackenzie spoke briefly. He thanked
the men for the loyal support and work they contributed to
the road. He was pleased their work had come to a success­
ful conclusion. As this was New Years day he had pleasure
in announcing that he and Mr. Mann would give a present of
CANADIAN
308
R A I L
Heavyweight, arch windowed passenger train on the Seine River Bridge.
Photo courtesy of the Fort Frances Museum.
CANADIAN
309
R A I L
I
~
Canadian Northern Station at Mine Center, east of Fort Frances, Onto
Photo courtesy Fort Frances Museum.
CANADIAN
310
R A I L
$2 to every workman on the line, $5 to every gang foreman
and $25 to every over foreman, in addition to their pay.
This was received with great cheers from the men, and in
conclusion Mr. Mackenzie, on behalf of the firm, wished
them a Happy and Prosperous New Year.
A pool of $75 was made up on the length the last
joining rail would have to be cut in order to fit. Mr. T.A.
Burrows won the money, his number, 19 feet being the
nearest.
A stop was made at Rainy River to inspect the fine
new steel bridge there. Brief stops were made at other
points on the line. In some of the towns flags were flying
in order to greet the first through train which arrived in
Winnipeq at 11 oclock p.m.
Notes
Atikokan -means Caribou Bones in Ojibway language.
In crossing the 15 mile Rainy Lake section, 13,900 feet
of pile and trestle was reouired.
Mr. Roderick Mackenzie in charge of construction did not
come throuqh td the opening ceremonies staying behind on
the Rainy Lake section till the last foot of track was
laid.
The special train consisted of official cars Sea Falls,
No. 90; Parlour Car 20, and the Keewatin, this car was
borrowed from the C.P.R. for the occasion. Built in
1883, it was the first sleeping car to run over the
C.P.R. tracks between Port Arthur and Winnipeg.
References used in preparing this article.
Fort William Daily Times Journal December 30-31st, 1901.
Manitoba Morninq Free Press,Winnipeg December 31st, 1901
and January 2nd, 1902.
G. R. Stevens, Canadian National Railways Vol. 2
Clarke Irwin & Company Ltd., Toronto 1962
D. B. Hanna, Trains of Recollection, the Macmillan
Company of Canada 1924.
The Canadian Northern Railway, T. D. Regehr.
The Macmillan Company of Canada Limited, 1976.
I wish to thank the following for their valuable assistance
in preparing this article.
CANADIAN 311 R A I L
Mr. Clifford Brown, Thunder Boy,-Ontario.
Mr. William Germaniuk, Thunder Bay, Ontario.
J. M. Steele, Curator Fort Frances Museum, Fort Frances,
Ontario.
Mrs. Burton Brown, English River, Ontario.
Thunder Bay Historical Museum Society, Thunder Bay, Ontario.
Mr. J. Norman Lowe, Historical Research Officer, Canadian
National Central Library, Montreal, Quebec
Fort Frances Times, Fort Frances, Ontario.
Provincial Archives, Province of Manitoba.
Winnipeg Public Library.
Mr. Norburn Todd, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
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T
HE
WORLDS GREA
TEST
ELEVATOR,
OWNED
BY THE CANADIAN NORTHERN
RAIL
W
AY
AND
OPERATED BY THE PORT ARTHUR ELE
VA
TOR COMPANY
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III Co:) …. ~ III ;U ~
Cap
a
i:ity
9,500,000
bushel
s
..
Th
is
mammoth
eleva
tor
c
an
sh
ip 200,000
bushel
s
of
wheat
(6,000
tons
).
clean
45.000
bushels.
II
~
un
lo
ad 30
cars
;
and
dry
1,000
bushels
per h
our
.
In
a
little
ov
er
fift
een
month
s
over
50,000,006
bushels
of
wh
eat,
o
at
s.
barley
and
flax
has
been
ha
ndl
ed
in
th
e
one
gr
a
in
storage
plant
.
CANADIAN 313 R A I L
, .

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..
~.
Canadian Northern Locomotive # 1327 at the Port Arthur Roundhouse
on the occasion of the visit of the Duke of Connaught, then Governor
General of Canada in 1909. Photo courtesy Mrs. Burton Brown, English
River, Ontario.
CANADIAN
314 R A I L
Canadian Northern boxcar (refigerated) at the Stanley Bottling
Works, Stanley Junction, Ontario. Phato courtesy Mrs. Clara Cook,
Stanley, Ontario.
J!1e. .
uUSlness car
A FLOCK OF CANADA GEESE RULE THE ROOST AT THE MCADAM, N.B. STATION
each summer, and the CP Rail employees who cater to the
big birds love every minute of it. Trainmen, track
workers, station employees and retired men like Walter Sangster
feed the geese from the time they drop by in mid-March until migra­
tion in the fall. Some years the crews put out close to 40 bushels
of grain in addition to regular lunch pail handouts and a variety
of donated bakery goods. A man-made pond near the Victorian era
passenger depot at McAdam is the summer home of the geese as it has
been for the last quarter century. Twenty-three of the birds are
back this year and are the centre of attraction as usual. Ralph Hoyt,
ticket agent and operator has enjoyed the geese for several years.
There are 18 birds nesting now, and that means well have 30 or
40 young sometime late next month he said. By the time migration
begins in the fall, the railroaders will have scattered the contents
of eight 45 gallon barrels of grain along the back of the pond. A
shortage of feed at McAdam often prompts a call to Saint John, where
the grain cars are cleaned. They put eight to ten bags of grain on
the first movement headed our way and make sure we have plenty of
feed, Mr. Hoyt said. Not only do the geese at McAdam rate rapid
transit on their feed, they also have the run of the freight yard,
occasionally stopping trains. The birds are not a bother ••. the
men just stop the engines and shoo the birds off the tracks, Hoyt said.
(Herb Cleaves via THE 470)
AND CPS KOOTENAY DIVISION IN B.C. IS ON THE GO, TOO. NEW TOOL
houses at Sparwood, a bunkhouse at Crowsnest, replacement
of 26 miles of rail, replacement of 10 bridges and
culverts, replacement of 120,000 ties, some rock ballasting.
(Crowsnest Clarion)
ALSO
CANADIAN
316
R A I L
COURTESY OF THE 470 .•• THE LONG ISLAND RAILROAD HAS A
qualified female passenger conductor as of 6/8. That
was the day that 24-year old Deirdre Hickey made her
first run. The road r.an now field an all~female crew as they
have women qualified in every position required to run a passenger
train.
LEAVE YOUR CAR AT HOME, TAKE PUBLIC TRANSIT TO THE CANADIAN
National Exhibition and save gas, parking costs, and
wear and tear on the car and your nerves –so says
the Toronto Area Transit Operating Authority of GO. To encourage
this, GO has not only doubled the normal rail schedule at certain
times on its Lakeshore line, and feeder busses will connect with
the GO trains, which stop at Exhibition station right in the ~rounds.
On top of that, they offer family passes. A group of two adults
and three children travelling between either Oakville or Pickering
and The Ex pays only $6.00 for a family pass instead of the
regular return fare of $11.90. And there is more~ If one of the
adults held a regular commuter monthly pass, the group pays only
$3.00 for the family pass -and if both adults have monthly passes,
they all ride free~
(GO Transit)
AND THIS MONTH, OUR GOOD FRIEND AND MEMBER JOHN WELSH KEEPS US
posted on matters financial -CP Rail is calling for tenders
for a $6 million No.1 Spot Repair Facility near its Dever
Road station in Saint John, N.B. In addition to the repair of
freight cars of all types, light repairs to diesel units will also
be carried out.
(The Telegraph Journal)
NOTHING SEEMS TO ATTRACT THE ATTENTION OF OUR READERS AS DOES A
good Traction Issue. For all your kind comments regarding
our July, 1979 Canadian Rail magazine we thank you. At
the same time we wish to point out that the Winnipeg Streetcar
as pictured on the cover is leaving Broadway Ave., and turning
north onto Main St. in Winnipeg. Mr. Dennis Furnish and Mr. Charles
Evans brought this point to our attention, Mr. Evans goes on:
Please note the square topped chimney on the
left front corner of the car. It provided the
exhaust from the stove used to heat the car
in winter. It usually burnt Winnipeg Coke pro­
vided by the Winnipeg Electric Companys gas
plant. The cars went through the streets trail
ing an exhaust of coal smoke, much like a
locomotive, but despite the heater and storm
windows clamped over the sides during winter,
the cars were seldom warm.
CANADIAN 317 R A I L
CP RAILS NEW DITCH LIGHTS ARE GETTING A LOT OF ATTENTION
these days, especially at night. Burt Van Rees
of Beachville, Ontario caught this Extra West 5723
SD 40-2 power climbing out of Woodstock, Ontario heading
for London on CPs Galt SiD. The date was August 18, 1977.
WHILE THINGS ARE ROSY NORTH OF THE 49TH PARALLEL, AMTRAK DIRECTORS
proposed eliminating six major trains: North Coast
Hiawatha Chicago-Seattle, the Lone Star Chicago-Dallas/
Houston, the National Limited New York-Kansas City, the Floridian
Chicago-Clorida, the Hilltopper Washington-Catlettsburg, Ky., and
the San Joaauin Oakland-Bakersfield. In addition they propose to
combine the Silver Meteor and the Champion between New York and
Jacksonville. Bills passed by Congress specify that to continue to
exist, a train must average 150 passengers per mile, and lose no more
that 7 cents a mile •• The trains to be dropped do not meet
these criteria.
(Chicago Tribune)
VANCOUVERS LOWER MAINLAND POLITICIANS AND TRANSPORT PLANNERS
described their dream for a two-line LRT system designed
to whisk commuters from the suburbs to the City and back
again. But, after spending $475,000 to design route alternatives,
investigate types of trains and locate stations, the local authorities
have yet to investigate the stickiest problem of all: coaxing most
of the cash from cost-conscious politicians in Victoria and Ottawa.
(The Vancouver Province)
CANADIAN 318 R A I L
GENERAL MOTORS LTD. OF LONDON ONTARIO HAS STARTED ROLLING
off a series of locomotives for the Burlington
Northern Ry., 8076 and 8077 are the third and
fourth SD 40-2s in the series. Gord Taylor pictured the
units on July 31, 1979 shortly after the units were switched
out on the eN line.
AND FROM ISLE ROYALE BARRIE MACLEOD REPORTS THAT CAPE BRETON STEAM
Railways engine 926 Repton hOl5 gone bock to Stealltown,
and the roilway is operating only their No. 42. At a
ceremony in Glace Oay, Devco took delivery of four new GP 38_2
locomotives from Generol Motors. They ore the first new ones pur­
chased since 1960, when the old StL bought three new RS-23 •. The
new units are unique in that they hove special eloctric generators
which allow them to become mobile generators. They con be plugged
into the electrical systems of Devcas collieries during a power
foilure and supply vital power to the mines.
Gord Ta
ylor happened upon No. 926 at ROU5es
siding on May 18, 1979. The locomotive was
town U.S .A. Poi
nt N.Y. on a D&H
in transit to Steom-

Demande en ligne