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Canadian Rail 330 1979

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Canadian Rail 330 1979

Canadian Rail =
,

No 330
JULY 1979
Fla. 4.Q.-THE WATER POWER 01- filE lOlUIWSIl lU.Il.RQ …. U.
C4
FRONT COVER:
On August 6, 1950 the late Allen
Toohey photographed Winnipeg
Electric Railway Car 416 on
Portage Ave. in Winnipeg. Photo
from the CRHA Archives, E. A.
Toohey Collection No. 50-253.
OPPOSITE:
This was the original hydroelec­
tric power generating station
used to power the pioneer
electric railway at Portrush, Northern Ireland in
1883. This
pen and ink drawing is from an
1889 book entitled The Electric
Motor and its Applications, from
the collection of Fred Angus.
…… ~IAN
~IL
ISSN 0008 -4875
Published monthly by The Canadian
Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B
Montreal Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
BUSINESS CAR: J. A. Beatty
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germani uk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
60-6100 4th Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8V1
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2P1
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, Secretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
A1 berta T5B 2NO
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor,
Ontario N9G lA2
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W lP3
NIAGARA DIVISION
Peter Warwick, Secretary
P.O. Box 593
St. Catharines, Ontario
L2R 6W8
The Centennial of
Electric Traction
The Centennial
of
Electric Traction
By Fred Angus
One hundred years ago the industrial world was in the
age of steam. Since the late eighteenth century the steam engine
had been developed and improved, and by 1879 it had been brought
to a high degree of perfection. Stationary engines provided the
motive power for machines in factories, steam-powered ships were
rapidly replacing sailing vessels, while countless numbers of
locomotives were in operation on the swiftly-expanding railway
networks of the world. This age of steam was to continue until
almost the middle of the twentieth century, but competition with
other means of motive power has now greatly lessened the import­
ance of steam, especially on the railways where steam locomotives
are now rare. Most of the locomotives now in use in the warld
depend, directly or indirectly, on electric power, and it was in
1879 that the first practical application of this power to railways
was made, this being the first real challenge to the supremacy of
steam.
It was at the Industrial Exhibition at Berlin Germany
in 1879 that the famous experiment was made. The firm of Siemens
& Halske constru£ted a small narrow-gauge electric locomotive
drawing power from a third rail and pulling a train of cars on a 500
metre line which carried passengers about the exhibition grounds.
This original locomotive has been preserved and was exhibited at
the West German pavillion at Expo-67 in Montreal.
FIG. 48.-SJF::lENS DVNA:IO WITH DOLGOROUKI EXOINE.
Diagram of the Siemens dynamo powered by a Dolgorouki engine as
used in 1879 to power the first successful electric locomotive.
(The Electric Motor and Its Application)
CANADIAN R A I L
The first electric railway in Canada running at the Toronto
exhibition. This line started in 1884, but the photo dates from
the period 1885 to 1890, since power is here supplied by overhead
wire. (Public Archives of Canada C3206)
CANADIAN
200
R A I L
THE STREET RAILWAY GAZETTE. 1893
~. O. BRILL OOMPANY.
PHILADELPHIA.
Sixteen Feet Electric Motor Car Body Mounted on No. 13 Truck.
.,
The Ample· Space and Facilities at the Works enable us
to carry a Large Stock of Lumber alld All
Materiats Insuring the Best Season~d Lumber.
Cars and Trucks can be Etectrically Equipped and
Tested all our Trolley RGad at Works prior 10 Ship­
menl.
Shipment can be usuallv made on tlrills Long Indi­vidual
nat cars, securing (owest Cost of Transportalion.
.!
Twenty-five Feet Vestibuled Car Body Mounted on Brills Eureka-Maximum Traction Trucks.
Western Office: PHENIX BUILDINC, CHICACOILL.
An 1893 advertisement depicting two early electric cars supplied
to Canadian Companies by the J.G. Brill Company. The cars of the
Westminster and Vancouver company (a forerunner of the B.C. Electric)
were about the first double-truck street cars in Canada. The
detail in these hand-drawn illustrations is very impressive.
CANADIAN
201
R A I L
The idea of electricity as motive power was, of course,
not new in 1879. Ever since the experiments of such pioneers
as Farady in the early 1830s it had been known that electricity
and magnetism were mutually interconvertable, and that such magnetic
force could be made to do useful work. Numerous crude electric
motors were made starting as early as 1832, and even a rudimentary
electric locomotive had been demonstrated near Washington, D.C.
in 1851. Many of these early motors resembled contemporary steam
engines in which solenoids replaced the cylinders, the reciprocating
motion and linkages being retained, all depended on expensive
batteries for their electric energy, and so were inefficient,
uneconomical, and unreliable. It is no wonder that all these early
experiments were unsuccessful, but the researchers of that time were
true pioneers and paved the way for later succ~sses. During the
third quarter of the nineteenth century electrical technology made
great progress, and the first practical uses of electric power were
mode. Of course electricity hod been used for telegraph as for back
as 1844, but applications using any appreciable power hod to wait
until the invention of a suitable generator or dynamo. Such a machine
had been invented by 1870, and in limited use for such purposes as
The St. Catherines Merritton and Thorold was one of
electric railways in permanent operation in Canada.
of their first electric cars, obviously a converted
photographed in 1887. (Trolley Car Treasury)
the first
Here is one
horse car,
CANADIAN
202
R A I L
arc lights and electroplating. The next step was an historic one.
In 1873 it was discovered that a generator could be reversed to become a
motor, so dispensing with the cumbersome reciprocation motion, and
using instead smooth rotary operation. The story is that a generator
was connected in parallel to an operating unit, and was discovered to
be spinning by itself before it was even belted to its steam engine~
Whether this story is true or not, a practical motor had now been
found, and the stage was set for the rapid growth of the electric
power industry.
The firm of Siemens & Halske had been established in Germany
as far back as 1847, and had long been a leader in electrical develop­
ment. Its major activity had been in the field of telegraphy includ­
ing undersea cables, but the firm was in the forefront of electrical
applications of all kinds. It is no wonder that the idea of electric
power applied to railways should be considered by this firm. Some
experiments along this line had been tried as far back as 1867, but
were abandoned due to the severe overheating of the generators then
available. By 1879, however, a more practical motor and generator
was available, and the time was ripe to attempt to build an operating
electric locomotive. A standard Siemens generator acting as a motor,
was mounted sideways on the frame of the small locomotive, and was
connected to the wheels. Power, at a potential of 150 volts was
supplied by another generator which was coupled to a Dolgorouki steam
engine. This power was carried to the locomotive by means of a light
third rail, the running rails acting as the return circuit. Total
power of the locomotive was about two horsepower, and it could reach
a speed of eight miles an hour. The unit was a success from the start,
and during the run of the exhibition its tIain cariied about 100,000
persons.
Following the success of the exhibition locomotive of 1879,
work went ahead on commercial applications. Another electric line
was set up at an exhibition in Paris in 1881, and on May 12, 1881
the first permanent electric railway in the world went into service
at Lichterfelde near Berlin. Both these lines were equipped by
Siemens & Halske, and both employed electric cars rather than a loco­
motive hauling motorless trailers. It is said that cars on the
Lichterfelde line could reach a speed of 24 miles an hour if no one
official was looking~ Other small lines were set up at exhibitions
around this time, and in 1883, Siemens & Halske provided the equip­
ment for the Volks Railway along the waterfront at Brighton, England.
This line is still running after almost a century, and is the oldest
operating electric railway in the world. The most ambitious of these
early projects was the eight mile tram line from Portrush to the
Giants Causway in Northern Ireland. This Siemens-equipped line was
notable in that it was by far the longest electric railway constructed
up to that time, and it was the first to use hydroelectric power.
The opening of the Giants Causway line on October 12, 1883 was
reported around the world; the Montreal Star published a detailed
account of the event on its front page~ By 1883, therefore, the
practicability of the electric railway had been established beyond a
doubt and within a decade electric lines would be commonplace.
Until 1883, most of the operating electric railways used
Siemens equipment, but ohter experimenters were also at work and made
great developments in the 1880 s. Such pioneers as Van Depole, Bently,
and Knight, Daft, Edison, and, above all, Sprague gradually ironed out
the multitude of difficulties and made electric operation more and
CANADIAN
203
R A I L
By the 1890s electric transportation was convenient and reliable.
This two-cor train of the Toronto Railway was photographed in 1893.
(Public Archives of Canada PA 54556)
CANADIAN 204 R A I L
In the early 1900s large double-truck wooden street cars were placed
in service to operate the rapidly growing electric lines. An
important inovation was the Pay-As-You-Enter system first used in
Montreal. No. 890 was the worlds first P.A.Y.E. car, and went
into service in May 1905. Notice the large rear platform which
allowed passengers to board with a minimum delay. (C.R.H.A.
Archives, M.U.C.T.C. Collection)
CANADIAN 205 R A I L
more reliable. New motors were designed as motors rather than gen­
erators reversed, improved motor suspension and gearing, and more
practical means of current collection were all designed and improved
in this decade, paving the way for the great spread of electrification
in the 1890 s. Canada had some of the earliest electric lines in
North America, the first being a third-rail line at the Toronto
Exhibition in 1884. This line was equipped with overhead wire in
1885 and survived until 1892 when it was replaced by a regular street
car service. 1886 saw Canadas first electric street car line; this
was at Walkerville near Windsor, Ontario, and in 1887 the St. Catherin~
Merritton and Thorold Railway electrified its horse car line. Followir
the successful Sprague electricication of the Richmond, Virginia systerr
in 1888, many companies were convinced of its feasibility and convertec
their lines from horse to electric. In Canada, the era of the electric
railway may be said to have arrived beyond a doubt when the systems at
Victoria, B.C. (opened February 22, 1890) and Vancouver, B.C. (opened
June 26, 1890) were inaugurated as electric lines, never having had
horse cars at all. By 1895, most Canadian cities had electrified, and
by the turn af the century horse cars in Canada were a thing of the
past.
I n the 1890 s, electrici fication of main line railways wcs
begun, and such improvements as mutiple-unit control allowed the
operation of trains of electric cars on rapid-transit lines. In both
these new developments electric power began to challange steam, unlike
the pre-1895 installations which mostly replaced horse cand, to a
certain extent, cable power. By 1900 the possibility of large scale
replacement of steam by electricity was considered to be very likely,
but such development was slower than anticipated due to such causes
as two world wars, a rna jor depression, and, on the positive side,
further great advances in steam locomotive technology.
~–~-~.! ..
In the teens of this centry, steel cars began to replace wooden
cars. This impressive looking two-car train was built by J.G.

Brill for the Montreal Tramways Co. and began service in 1914.
Boththese cars continued to operate until 1958. (C.R.H.A. Archives,
M.U.C.T.C. Collection)
CANADIAN
206
R A I L
The greatest development in the street cars of the 1920 s was the
use of light-weight steel cars, much lighter than the trams of
the teens, but almost as strong. Smaller motors and wheels
allowed lower floors and fewer steps to climb, while lighter
weight meant less power consumed and less wear on the track.
Car No. 1985 was built for the Montreal Tramways Co. in 1929,
and was actually the very last street car to run in regular
service in Montreal on August 30, 1959. (C.R.H.A. Archives,
M.U.C.T.C. Collection)
CANADIAN R A I L
In the 1930s the P.C.C. car changed the face of street car
systems across the continent, and helped to delay abandonment in
many cases. Such cars were built from 1936 to 1951 and used in
large numbers. Canadas first P.C.C.s were built for Toronto in
1938. No. 4034 shown here at the Canadian Car & Foundry Co. in
Montreal was one of this first lot and was photographed new in
November 1938. C.R.H.A. Archives, Can-Car Collection C 5914)
CANADIAN
208
R A I L
Over the years many major railways have electrified, especial]
in Europe, but in North America the long distances and relatively
infrequent service make the capital cost of the installation prohibi­
tive in many cases. The answer was to employ electric locomotives
which carry their own generating eouipment, and the result was, of
course, the ubiquitous diesel-electric locomotive which had now ousted
steam from most of the rails of the world. While it is not unusual
to consider a diesel as an electric locomotive, it is exactly that,
the only difference being that the current is generated in the same
unit where it is used instead of being transmitted to the locomotive
by overhead wire or third rail.
In the field of the first application of electric traction,
the street railway, the mid-years of the twentieth century were
disasterous as city after city converted to the all-con~uering bus.
Recently it appears that the street car may be commencing a renaissance
as new designs are developed for North America after more than thirty
years of dormancy. While Canada has only one street car system left,
that one, the Toronto Transit Commission, it is presently taking
delivery of new trams of an advanced design, and are planning for
street car operation for the twenty-first century. One may hope that,
as oil sources become more and more scarce, other cities may adopt
the pollution-free electric car either in the form of the traditional
tram, or under such modern-sounding names as electric light-rail
rapid transit.
In the history of the world a single century is not really
a very long time, yet it is in that time that the electric railway
has developed. As we consider the vast extent of the electric rail­
way in its various forms, it is difficult to realize that there are
still people living today who were alive on that day when the worlds
first practical electric locomotive made its first run. It is even
more difficult to imagine what the next hundred years will bring.
CANADIAN R A I L
The final development of the P.C.C. in the post-war years of
the 1940s is shown by Toronto car No. 4399 photographed on a
flat car in June 1949. The provision of standee windows is the
only outward change from cars built a decade earlier: After
this design, street car development in North America was non­
existant until the new L.R.V. design of the 1970 s (C.R.H.A.
Archives, Can-Car Collection C7051
CANADIAN 210 R A I L
This is the ultimate in recent street-car technology, Toronto
Transportation Commissions new L.R.V. shown here undergoing
road tests on August 1, 1978. Photo Courtesy Ted Wickson.
f
We are pleased to present a nostalgic look at Electric Traction
in Canada thirty years ago as photographed through the lens
of the Late Allen Toohey. All photographs courtesy CRHA Archives
from the E.A.Toohey Collection.
Halifax Birney Car 118 standing in the yard outside the car barn
on May 30, 1949. Soon after street car service ended. (49-321)
CANADIAN R A I L
Quebec Railway Light and Power City Car 813 on St. Paul street
on the Champlain Route on February 28, 1948. (48-57)
CANADIAN 213 R A I L
Montreal Tramways Co. 869 in the yard at Hochelaga car barn on
April 22, 1950. This car built in 1907, was one of the first
all-steel street cars in the world. (50-84)
An impressive five-car train on the Montreal and Southern Counties
Railway, at Edison Avenue, St. Lambert on June 5, 1950. The front
cars are 504 and 514 followed by three cars of the 600 series.
(50-138)
Canadian National Railways Nultiple-unit train headed by Car M-l
posed at Val Royal on May 24, 1952, these cars then new, are still
in service. (52-087)
CANADIAN R A I L
Ottawa Street Car 654 at Preston and Albert Streets on June 6,1948.
(48-241)
CANADIAN
216
R A I L
Toronto car 2144, a former Toronto Civic Railway Car, on Weston
Road July 17, 1948. Just before that line was abandoned. (48-322)
Centre-entrance Car 202 of the Saskatoon Municipal Railway as seen
on August 7, 1950. (50-265)
Edmonton No. 81 Approaching the High-Level Bridge on August 8, 1950.
(50-281)
CANADIAN 218 R A I L
B.C. Electric Interurban Car 1211 heads a two-car train on Vancouvers
Main Street on August 10, 1950. The B.C. Electric operated the
longest Interurban Line in Canada.
( 50-328)
The· . .~.
business car
DONALD R.McUUEEN OF LONDON ,ONTARIO WA~ CONSIDERATE TO SUBMIT THE
following up-dated list af arders presently on hand at
the Diesel Division of General Motors in London, Ontario.
C-396 35 GP40-2L (W) A3428-A3462 CN 9633-9667 del 77
C-397 20 SD40-2 A3463-A3482 CP RAIL 5758-5777 del 76 C-398 10
GP40-2L(W) A3483-A3492 CN 9668-9677 cancelled
C-399 2 SW1001 to EMD NHB 7601-7602 del 76 C-400
G26CW EGYPT bid lost
C-401 2 GP38-2 A3493-A3494 TEXAS GLF. 054-055 del 76 C-402 1
MP15DC to EMD QI&T 9 del 77 C-403 6
F40PH A3495-A3500 TATOA(GO) 510-515 del 78 C-404 24 SD40-2 A3501-A3524
CP RAIL 5837-5859 del 78 C-405 16 SD40-2 A3525-A3540 Onto Hydro 5860-5864
del 78
€P RAIL 5779-5789 del 78 C-406 5
GP7L-M A3541-A3545 ACR 100-104 del 78 C-407 20 SD40-2 A3546-A3565
Ont. Hy. 5294-5313 del 78 C-408 19
HBU-4 slugs A3566-A3584 CN 260-278 del 78 C-409 20
GL22MC A3585-A3604 NZGR 1601-1620 in 79 C-410 3
G22CU A3605-A3607 CdF TOGO CC1651-53 in 79 C-411 19
GT22LC A3608-A3626 IVORY COASTCC2201-19 in 79 C-412 30
G22CU A3627-A3656 PAKISTAN in 79 C-413 25 SD40-2 A3657-A3681
CP RAIL 5790-5799 5900-5914
in 79 C-414 2
SW1001 to EMD Sask. Pwr. 1001-1002 del 78 C-415 4 GP38-2 A3684-A3687
DEVCO 216-219 in 79 C-416 65
G22W-AC EGYPT in 79 C-417
30 G22CU PAKISTAN in 80
C-418 35 SD40-2 CP RAIL in 79 C-419 12
G26CU-AC BANGLADESH in 80
C-420 2 GT22LC SENEGAL in 79
May we also take this opportunity to thank our member and friend Mr.
Ian Webb of London, Ontario who also submitted similar information.
CANADIAN
220
R A I L
SUNDAY APRIL 22, 1979 DID NOT PASS UN-NOTICED IN EDMONTON ALBERTA
as that city celebrated the first anniversary of its high­
ly successful light rail transit (LRT) system. Anniversary
posters and ceremonies marked the event. While Toronto maintains
Canadas most extensive streetcar system and has been instrumental
in the development of their moderm UTDC streetcars, Edmonton is
the model ofa totally new 20th. century LRT line. Photo courtesy
D.Wayne Brow.
CANADIAN
221
R A I L
FOR SOME MONTHS CONRAIL HAS BEEN CLAIMING THAT IT NEEDS FREEDOM
from I.C.C. economic regulation if it is to achieve
its congres~lonally-mandated goal of financial self­
sufficiency. The Federal Railroad Administration and the U.S.
Railway Assn. are working together on a study that will propose
alternatives to Conrail, these could include chopping major
chunks off Conrails route map, or subsidizing those portions of
its system that seem to be perpetual losers.
Conrail is to submit to the USRA a five-year business
plan based on the lowest traffic forecasts Conrail has ever made.
Thoughts of a new Conrail come at a time when it is almost certain
that the existing railroad has no chance of improving its desperate
financial condition without either a structural or regulatory
change. Despite pouring $1.7 billion into its rail plant, Conrail
has not improved its service as much as federal planners had hoped,
and costs have not dropped, as also hoped. (Business Week)
ALAN S. BOYD, PRESIDENT OF AMTRAK, TOOK ISSUE RECENTLY WITH THE
Carter Administrations proposal to limit the passenger
rail systems right to offer ticket discounts for its
services. Transportation Secretary Brock Adams criticized such
fare reductions since the government is paying two-thirds of the
cost of carrying the average passenger. (New York Times)
WHEN THE PRESENT VIA TRANSCONTINENTAL SERVICE CAME INTO EFFECT,
consists included cross-over cars -one on Train 3
Montreal-Winnipeg, thence Train 1 via Calgary to Vancouver;
likewise a car on Train 1 Toronto-Winnipeg, and on Train 3 Winnipeg­
Vancouver via Edmonton. The assignments were on ex-CP Rail Manor
series Montreal-Vancouver, and a Chateau series, Toronto-Vancouver.
Many members living along the route have been asking what happened
to the Manor car, as it hadnt been seen for a long time~ Actually,
so many Manor sleepers were bad-order from various causes, includ­
ing freeze-ups, they had to be replaced with ex-CN E series
4-section, 8-roomette, 4-bedroom cars. Until these CN sleepers had
their braking systems modified, they could not be run with the
ex-CP stainless steel equipment. Accordingly, the CN cars from
Montreal stayed on the Super-Continental through to Vancouver, and
the CP Chateaux remained on The Canadian, Toronto-Vancouver, and
the passengers transferred at Winnipeg. But the Manor cars are now
back in their intended service, and the CN cars are being modified
so as to be compatible with the CP equipment and its Rolakron
braking feature.
And speaking of the transcontinental service, look for
new chang~s in mid-June, when everything is reversed and Trains 3-4
Supercont~nental operate via Toronto-Capreol-Winnipeq-Edmonton
Vancouver, and Trains 1-2 The Canadian use the CP Rail route between
Montreal and the west coast (except use CN Stations at Montreal and
Winnipeg, of course).
CANADIAN 222 R A I L
BURLINGTON PUTS ZIP IN COMMUTING -SO SAYS THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE,
pointing out that the 5.00 pm commuter train covers the
28 miles between Chicagos Union Station and Naperville,
Ill. in only 32 minutes, for an average speed of 53.25 mph. Four
other trains on various lines do better than 36 mph. In the
Montreal area, we do have one CP Rail commuter train that covers
the 40 miles from Windsor Station to Rigaud at an average of
32 mph, with 11 stops. And that is a slight improvement over the
same trains schedule in the summer of 1951, when it averaged 30 mph,
with 10 stops. Of course, today we have diesel power and light­
weight double-deck cars; then we only had Pacifics and wooden
coaches.
There are differences in the fare structure, too. There
are no subsidies for commuter traffic in the Montreal area. Tickets
for the 31.9 mile ride between Montreal and Hudson are $4.95 one-way,
$75.70 for a monthly flash card, with three trains each way on
week-days. For the 29.6 miles between Chicago and Modena, Rock
Island/RTA fares are $1.60 one way, $41.40 monthly flash card, and
there are 13 trains each way on week-days. Comparing a 15-mile
journey, around Montreal you pay $2.95 one-way, or $60.00 a month,
Chicago commuters pay $1.60 single or $29.55 a month. (J.D. Welsh)
AND COMMUTERS IN THE BIG APPLE RATE A MENTION, TOO. THE IRT IS
operating a Diamond Jublee Special consisting of four
subway cars built in 1917 and 1922. The line was opened
in 1904. And Long Island R.R. passengers are happy -the line has
finally retired its last steam-heated coaches -they were cold in
winter and hot in summer. (New York Times)
THE D & H OPERATED ADIRONDACK PASSENGER TRAIN WILL NO LONGER BE
the same with the loss of its long-time conductor,
Charles Brierley. Charlie, aged 76, died January 21st.
He joined the D&H in 1920 and had been employed continuously as
a trainman and conductor up until the time of his death. In 1976,
in honor of his long service, one of the D&H coaches in the
Adirondack was renamed the C.J. Brierley.
(D&H Newsletter)
MAJOR C. WARREN ANDERSON OF SUSSEX, N.B., AND A LONG-TIME MEMBER
of this Association, was recently honored by the American
for State and Local History. His Certificate of
Commendation was awarded for his achievement in preserving and
illuminating the history of the steam locomotive in New Brunswick.
Mr. Anderson, 82, has had a life-long interest in railways and has
one of the finest collections of railway artifacts and photographs
in Canada. He worked for the Canadian National Railways and is a member
of local, national and international railway historical
societies. He has written many papers and articles on various
aspects of railway history.
(The Saint John Evening Times-Globe,
and R.D. Thomas)
THE NORTHERN ALBERTA RAILWAYS CO. HAS A NOBLE HISTORY, AND AFTER
50 years engoged in on industry that once was thought
to be stagnant, if not dying,i. a re~orkobly healthy
organization. In recognition of the Coaponys post ond to draw
attention to its future, plan. are being aode to Mork the Golden
Anniversary of the Coapony in •• veral woys. Th. golden coach
18001 will b. used to display roilway historical it ••• ond show
roilway fila. at fairl and public gatherings throughout the territory
.erved by the roilway. In addition, a refurbished .eclion handcar
will b. ~ounted on a trailer and mode oyoilable (oc parodes and
exhibits. It is proposed oliO to no~e each of the locoaotives in
theNAR fleet after norlh country historical figures, towns and
rivers. Each unit in each nUMber series will corry a nOMe of
significance to northern Alberto and B.C., in the so~e .onner that
sle.pinl cars were designated in years post.
(HAR Headlight, via The Harker)
THE ROYAL HUDSONS ARE STILL GOING STRONG. FOLLOWING HER TRIP TO
Montreal and other eastern cities in 1978, ex-CP 2860
will be visiting Alberto and Washington. The B.C.
Govern.ent wonts to show their neighbours what Good Ti.es 79
is all about. And further south (or deeper south) The Southern
Railway announces that ex-CP 2839 will be houlinV excursion trains
in Virginia, The Carolinas, Tennessee and Georgia.
(Tour is. British Calu~bio: Southern Ry.
News
Release)
CN/CP – A NEW UNIT TRAIN OPERATION COMMENCED OPERATION RECENTLY
in Northern Ontario for Ki~berly-Clark Li~ited. The train
of waodchip cars and bulkhead flats originates at Extan,
just west of Nakina on CNs lIIainline. CN handles the loaded train
ta Hanitauwodge, where it is turned aver to CP for lIIavelllent to T
errace Boy, on the CP lIIoinline just east of Schreiber. The train
operates three ti.es a week and consists of twa trainsets of 47
cors each. At Honitouwodg., then ON hands over a loaded set, CP
delivers the elllpty set.
(Dove
Scott in CRHA T6Y Divn. Turnout
Wooden Cor No. 16 of the Calgary Municipal syst •• going
the underpass under the C.P.R. Tracks an Augult 8, 1950
down into
(50_290)
.,
I
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I

.

IMPERIAl. HOTn
L
I

I

Demande en ligne