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Canadian Rail 325 1979

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Canadian Rail 325 1979

Canadian Rail foOo;iijI

No. 325
FEBRUARY 1979

COVER:
Yes its that time of the year
again as CP Rails snowclearing operations
swing into full alert.
Burt Van Rees was fortunate to catch
this CP plow extra on the St.
Thomas Subdivision hard into
it on January 11, 1978.
OPPOSITE:
A veteran CP Rail plow raises a fountain of
snow near Osgoode, Ontario foll
owing a recent winter storm. Photo courtesy
of Canadi an
Pacific from the collection of
Mr. J. S. Fisher.
ISSN 0008 -4875
Published monthly by The Canadian Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B
Montreal Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
BUSINESS CAR: J. A. Beatty
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary 60-6100 4th
Ave. NE
Calgary, Alberta T2A 5Z8
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, ~ecretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Al berta T5B 2NO
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W lP3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor, Ontario
N9G lA2

n
by George Moore
partll
So you would like to enjoy 0 good old foshonedwinter, just
like the ones Grandad talks about, well you should have been around
the Maple Creek Subdivision, two miles west of Gull Lake in February
1978.
Photos courtesy Mr. C.S.Darby
Assistant Sup t.
C.P. Rail
Medicine hat, Alberto
by George Moore
part 11
A brief glimpse into Canadian Pacifics
continuing battle with the elements
The story begins on Tuesday, February 7th, 1978 when train
First 965 Snowplow was dispatched to run west on the Companys
main line from Swift Current, ahead of several freight trains.
The snowplow train encountered heavy drifting enroute but made it
to Gull Lake where it paused to let a following freight train
close the gop between them. This would provide the freight with
better track conditions in the journey ahead. As the gap closed,
the snowplow train consisting of General Motors Diesel SD-40-2
locomotives 5727 and 5757 moved out of Gull Lake shortly after
The bitter winds have subsided and off track enuipment has been
brought in to rescue the frozen enuipment. After much digging first
965 snowplow finally begins to emerge from its tomb of snow. Note
the two men in the background standing on the snowbank. Photo cour­
tesy CP Rail, Public Relations & Advertising Dept., Calgary Alberta.
CANADIAN
39
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6:00 p.m. They had travelled only a very short distance when
they encountered very heavy snowdrifts. Although ramming the
drifts at speeds in excess of 40 miles per hour, the snowplow
troin was often slowed to less than 10 miles per hour due to the
mountains of snow. The powerful, modern locomotives finally
met their match at mileoge 37.0 in the form of 0 snowdrift
measuring over 2000 feet in length and varying from 10 to 14
feet in depth. Although manoging to penetrate to the halfway
point of the drift, the lead unit stalled and shut down due to
snow entering the electrical system (you can almost hear the
chuckles coming from that steam locomotive roundhouse in the
sky). Attempts to pull the plow free with the remaining unit
proved futile and the plowing operation ground to a halt.
A call for assistance went out to the following freight
train which was now at Gull Lake. Two diesel units were sent
ahead to the snowplow train, 5652 and 4512, and arrived at
mileage 37.0 pushing an eight foot mOJild of snow into the cut
which had already been opened by the snowplow train before it
became inoperative. The mound of snow had to be cleared before
the 5652 could couple onto the caboose of the snowplow train.
The lead unit of first 965 snowplow, No. 5727 slowly takes shape
once again as a front end loader works to remove hard packed drift
snow which held it captive. Photo courtesy CP Rail, PR & Ad. Dept.
,
CANADIAN
40
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With as much snow inside the units as out thoughts turn to thoughts
such as will they ever run again ? This is first 965 on February
9, 1978. Photo courtesy CP Rail, Public Relations & Advertising Dept.
CANADIAN 41 R A I L
This is CP 5652, one of the I rescue locomotives being dragged out
at mileage 37.0, Maple Creek Sub. Photo courtesy CP Rail, Calgary.
CA NAD IAN
42
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Tingling flesh and numb fingers were common at this point due to
-20 degree celcius temperatures and winds gusting up to 80 kilo­
meters per hour. Several unsuccessful attempts were made to
remove the snowplow train, during which the second unit on the
snowplow train, 5757, also succumbed to the elements with snow
fouling its electrical system. In the meantime, diesel units
5652 and 4512, borrowed from the freight train, continued with
their efforts to free the stranded snowplow. The train was
completely immobilized by the heavy snow and refused to budge.
Diesel unit 5652 was the next casualty to be declared as she
bowed to the same fate as the other two dead locomotives; a
snowbound electrical system. Retreat seemed a sensible move at
this stage of the game and it was decided to take the caboose,
with all personnel onboard, eastward to the Gull Lake station.
The storm had other plans however, and only allowed the men to
escape for a distance of three pole lengths where 4512 became
thoroughly entrenched in the deep snow, being blown against the
side of the unit by heavy winds. Another call for assistance
went out by radio to Gull Lake, this time with a renuest for a
snowmobile to evacuate the stranded men. Three four-wheel drive
vehicles followed a road grader to the trapped train and removed
the men to Gull Lake where they were served a hot meal on
arrival 0100 and put to bed for the night. The stranded loco­
motives, plow and caboose were left to cope with the elements;
the units being drained and heater fires extinguished in the
plow and caboose. It wasn(t until Thursday morning, February
9th that off-track enuipment in the form of front-end loaders
.• and caterpillar tractors, arrived to free the frozen eauipment.
·f· It would be another eighteen days before the Maple Creek Sub­
division was returned to normal. In addition to the traditional
snow clearing enuipment used in the operation, some r; 100 sticks
of dynamite were used to blast snow walls. Officials were
pleased to report that no injuries were sustained as a result of
the storm or subsenuent massive cleanup operation.
It is obvious that Canadian Pacifics encounter with
winter will continue on one scale or another, and these brief
glimpses into the winters of 1882-83, 1942-43, 1947 and 1978,
are but three isolated examples of the worst of these encounters.
There were many other memorable winters and many more yet to
come. Snow clearing operations as well as preventative measures,
now cost Canadian Pacific in excess of $10 million dollars
annually, and this does not account for any damage caused by the
storms. The battle against the elements has assumed scientific
proportions, and nowhere in the world does such a highly expe­
rienced team of experts exist to cope with the ills of winter.
REFERENCES
1. Canadian Pacific Facts and Figures, (Montreal 1946), page
93 Men Against the Storm by Marc McNeil, Press Relations
Officer, C.P.R.
2. Canadian Pacific Staff Bulletin, March 1947, page 4.
3. Ibid.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The author wishes to express sincere gratitude to Mr. M.
Potoroka, Canadian Pacific Public Relations Representative at
Winnipeg for his kind assistance in the preparation of this
article. Mr. Potoroka personally took many of the photographs
of storms appearing in this article and his first hand know­
ledge was invaluable. For first hand knowledge you cant beat
an Assistant Superintendent. Mr. C. S. Darby holds that posi­
tion at Medicine Hat and was present in the lead unit of First
965 Snowplow that fateful night of February 7th, 1978. He co­
ordinated the rescue of Company personnel from the scene and
was kind enough to share his photographs and memories with the
author. To both Mr. Potoroka and Mr. Darby, as well as Mr.
Bob
Peggie and Mr. Jim Fisher of Canadian Pacific, my sincere
thanks for your support and cooperation.
Finally the loaders and bulldozers succeed in opening up the line
to the front end of the plow. Work continues by hand to free the
crusted in sides of the plow and units. The depth of the snow makes
the whole scene appear to have been staged for a Hollywood production.
Photo courtesy CP Rail, Public Relations and Advertising Dept. Calgary.
CANADIAN
44
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As if the initial problems of CP Rail were not enough, look what
happened to yet another rescue attempt. Dispached out of Swift
Current, Sasketchewan on February 10, 1978 snowplow 400634 and
units 5539,5688,4565 derailed on account of a broken rail. This
mishap added insult to injury and lengthened the overall time it
took to get things back to normal in Sasketchewan. Photo CP Rail.
CANADIAN
45
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An overall view of the derailed plow extra, off track eouipment was
again brought in to free the frozen units and permit their extraction.
Our thanks to CP Rail, Winnipeg and Calgary for the prievous photos.
East 1S east and West 1S west,
1n the good old
wintertime.
Part
by S.S.Worthen
The title of this article may look impressive, but you
ought to be warned that it is a book review. ~! you want to stop
reading ribW, you can.
All of the wiseacres who make statements about such
things, have been repeating recently that railfans ought to spend
their summers cat~hing up on their reading. Well, anyone who knows
GP 40-2s fro~ Club-foots also knows that any rail fan worth
the name is spending most of the long, hot time patrolling the
railroads across the country stocking up on colour shots of motive
power for the long, cold winter evenings ahead.
The only reason, then, for preparing this personal view
of last summers crop of railway books is that it may provide
(eventually) a few suggestions on what to ask Aunt Elsie and
Uncle Hormer for, in cases of birthdays, holidays or just any days.
The new books which have come my way have originated
principally in three areas: North America east, North America
west, and elsewhere, elsewhere being the UK, the Channel Islands
and New Zealand.
Leading the field in Area I is a book which was published
in 1974 by the Baggage Car of Strasburg, PA, USA. This is Edward
A. Lewis Vermonts Covered Bridge Road, dealing with the life and
works of the St. Johnsbury & Lake Champlain Railroad, that improbable
line from St. Johnsbury to East Swanton, Vermont and (today)
Fonda Junction on the Central Vermont Railway. Why the subtitle
The Story of the St. Johnsbury & Lamoille County Railroad was
chosen is a mystery. The original corporate title was, of course,
the St. Johnsbury & Lake Champlain Railroad. This was its style
CANADIAN
47
R A I L
and title for three score years and ten, while the Lamoille County
version expired after twenty-five years of existence in October 1973.
It was surprising to find quite an extensive explanation
of Canadian Pacifics 1935 lease of the Essex County Railroad
(west bank of the Connecticut River to St. Johnsbury, Vermont),
but this reviewer was disappointed to find that the only mention
of the connection between the St. J&LC and the South Eastern
Railway (Montreal, Portland & Boston Railway) was one sentence on
page 15. More than that. While the author says that this connec­
tion was never built, there is a persistant oral tradition that
it was and that but one train operated over it before the rails
were lifted forever.
The illustrations in Vermonts Covered Bridge Road are
really something super. Contributors include Roger Cook, Dwight Smith,
Philip R. Hastings, M.D., Jim Shaughnessy, The 470 Club Archives,
the Archives of the Railway & Locomotive Historical Society and
many other individuals and societies. The pictures are quite
extraordinary and, by themselves, justify the cost of the entire
volume. Readers who can evoke even a mild enthusiasm for short-line
TRAINS OF NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND
Kraus, J. & Bailey, F.
Quadrant Press Inc., 19 West 44th Street, New York, N.Y. 10036,
USA. 275 x 212.5 mm, coloured, soft cover; 96pp.; 28 full-page
113 part-page b&w pictures, 1 map, other amenities. Price
US$ 7.50 postpaid.
CANADIAN
48
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railways in northern New England will find it difficult, if not
impossible, to resist purchasing this attractive book.
Well-known photographer Johnny Krause and writer Fred Hailey
have collaborated to produce Trains of Northern New England, a
collection of short monographs on the former Rutland Railroad, the
Boston & Maine, the Central Vermont Railway and the Maine Central
Railroad. CP Rail (vice Canadian Pacific Railway) in Vermont and
the Grand Trunk Railway (granduncle of Canadian National) in Vermont
and New Hampshire are awarded minimal mention, and their ~erigrina­
tions in Maine, together with the life and times of their contemporary,
the Bangor & Aroostook, are nowhere to be found. The reason(s) for
this cavalier treatment are not given and, of course, there is a
limit to what you can do in less than one hundred pages~
The first twenty-odd of the five-score pages are devoted
to (what once were) important junction points on the Vermont side
of the Connecticut River in the valley of the same name. Sharp
eyes will discover that some of the captions for the intriguing
pictures are a little queer. And there is a further uneasy imprecision
in some portions of the text and, indeed, in some of the pictures.
Diesel power on northern New England railroads is always
of interest. In Trains of Northern New England, the steam;diesel
picture balance is bad. There are but four diesel units in a
wilderness of steam engines in the first twenty-one pages. The
B&M portion, twenty pages rates about 5 units; the CV section gets
one S-2 and one (borrowed~ CN CLC-FM A plus B (CN 8718 and unidentified
B unit) on a southbound run-through at Milton, Vermont. Thi~
situation in a 1977 publication is just plain unreal.
But if you are interested in the days of smoke and cinders
on some of the railroads in northern New England, then this book
is your dish.
It is good quality, but not the top, tender-burning
material.
Number Three in the consist is a modest effort in black­
and-white entitled Northern Rails -1978 edition, put together by The 470
Railroad Club of Portland, Maine, USA, under the editorship
of Ron Johnson of that organization. This book was produced
originally in 1967 by Dwight A. Smith, presently President and
General Manager of the Conway Scenic Railroad, North Conway,
New Hampshire, USA.
In the eleven-year interval since the first edition, the
Canadian Pad fic Railway has become CP Rail, but not in the 1978
edition. There are brief histories of the (US) Class 1 & 2
railroads in Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont, together with
altogether inadeouate pictures of steam and diesel-powered trains
on these lines. But then, you could not reasonably expect to find
detailed corporate histories and full-page pictures in such a
modestly-priced volume.
CANADIAN
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R A I L
Northern Rails
1978 EDITION
A Complete Guide To The Railroads Of Maine-New Hampshire-Vermont
C()nway Scenic 2·8·2 No. 109 crossu the Swift River oul of Conway, New Hampshire on 18 mald&n run. 8/13/77
Maine Central RY-2 powered
by four U-1885 rumble p.sllhe Intervakt, New H.mpslllr. depol. 7/18n6
Published by THE 470 RAILROAD CLUB Editor: RON JOHNSON
NORTHERN RAILS -1978 edition 470 Railroad Club,
Ron Johnson, Editor. The 470 Railroad Club, P.O. Box 2468,
South Portland, ME 04106 USA. 212.5 x 275 mm, black-and-white
soft cover, 32 pp., 38 small & 9 medium-sized b&w pictures,
2 maps, 27 rosters. Price US $3.80 postpaid.
CANADIAN 50 R A I L
Railroads included in Northern Rails -1978 edition are
the Bangor & Aroostook, Boston & Maine, Canadian Pacific (Vermont)
and Canadian Pacific (Maine), Central Vermont, Delaware & Hudson
(how did that happen?), Grand Trunk and Maine Central. All of these
lines are described in a little less than 8 pages. Also presented
are one to four liners on thirteen short lines and one three-nuarter
page picture. Thats just not enough visuals for this reviewer~
Chapter Three is title Short Lines and packs thirteen
of them in six pages. Rosters, as current as may be, are included.
Regrettably, there are few pictures to supplement the text.
Gazetteers of Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont occupy Chapters 6,7
and 8. Other topics are the Connecticut River Line, Passenger
Train Service and Photogenic Highlight~. The information in these
chapters seems to have escaped revision for the 1978 edition.
In the final chapters, there are some excellent one-third
page illustrations of diesel-powered freight and passenger trains
on New England lines.
This reviewer would gladly, yes gladly, exhange the pages
devoted to railroad museums, tourist lines, fan clubs, activities,
railroad slang and radio frenuencies for ad~itional pictures of
diesel-powered trains and nuipment in northern New England. But it
looks like this innovation will have to wait for the next, revised
edition.
There is a good chance that the other books received will
be reviewed in a forthcoming issue of this publication.
Some Important Details
VERMONTS COVERED BRIDGE ROAD
Lewis, Edward A.
The Baggage Car, Box 223, Strasburg, PA 17579 USA.
212.5 x 275 mm, soft cover, 14 full-page, 32 half-page and
153 small b&w pictures, several maps, tickets, annual passes,
public and employees time-tables.
(Im sorry to have to admit I have lost the invoice for this
publication. Thats why I cannot tell you the price.)
The … .
business car
GO MARCHES FORWARD~ THE FIRST MAJOR CONTRACT ($3.62 MILLION)
for the upgrading of GO Transit commuter facilities in
Toronto Union Station has been let. Work will start
immediately, with completion by March 31st, 1979. A new GO
concourse, featuring greatly improved ticketing and passenger
handling facilities, a new shorter and faster route to the TTC
subway and a new pedestrian entrance to Bay Street will be
developed in the lower level of former Postal Terminal A. The
GO platform will be upgraded with eight improved stairways to
the tick,ting area replacing the pfesent four. And the platform
will be raised 10 inches, making the step to the coaches much
lower. Work is expected to start this fallon the upgrading of
the rail corridor between Union Station and Bathurst St. The most
spectacular feature of this construction will be a tunnel
designed to carry GO traffic under other trains, eliminating a
major source of GO Train delays. (Ont. Ministry of Trans­
portation) •
TRINITY
VALLEY RAILROAD CLUB REPORTS THAT THIS MAY BE THE LAST
summer in which traditional Domeliners will be operating
on most of Amtraks long distance western trains. Con­
struction has been resumed at Pullman Standards Hammond, Ind.
plant on Amtraks new fleet of bi-level Superliner passenger
cars. These 284 cars will eventually replace all of the con­
ventional eauipment now used on such domeliner equipped trains
as the Empire Builder, North Coast Hiawatha, etc, The present
Amtrak fleet consists of 42 dome coaches, 25 dome lounges and
13 dome sleepers, all at least 20 years old. (470 Railroad
Club)
WHERE DO THE SINGLE DECK CARS GO WHEN GO TRANSIT ACQUIRES THE
new bi-level equipment previously mentioned? To the
MBTA, thats where~ They have been leased beginning
October 1978. These cars, plus 17 F-IO locomotives, will help
phase out some RDC units and leased B&M powero (470 Railroad
Club)
CANADIAN
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MAJOR TRANSPORTATION EXHIBIT AT 1978 CANADIAN NATIONAL EXHIBITION
As a f~tt~ng tr~bute to the centenn~al of Torontos Canad~an
National Exhibition, the TTC, GO Transit and various museum
groups participated in the largest transportation exhibit since the
1946 fair. The display of 10 vehicles was set up at the north side
of Centennial Square, just east of the Dufferin Gate. The develop­
ment of the electric streetcar was illustrated by 5 vehicles: The
Van de Poele car (a replica of the equipment in operation 1883-1892
inside the Exhibition grounds);
Car #306 (single-truck, built 1894, ex Toronto
Railway, ex-TTC; on loan from the National Museum, Ottawa);
Car #1326 (double-truck, built 1911, ex Toronto
Ry, ex-TTC; on loan from the Ontario Electric Ry. Historical
Associations museum);
Peter Witt car #2894 (built by Ottawa Car Co.
1923, ex-TTC; on loan to TTC from Ontario Rail Association);
m.u. PCC #4456 (1948, typical of the post-war,
all-eJ.ectric PCCs -chosen because it had been scheduled for routine
shopp.,ng and painting just prior to the Ex; courtesy TTC);
and TTC);
LRV #4000 (built by SIG, 1977), courtesy UTDC
Other eauipment in the display included: ex-CPR steam locomotive
#136 (built 1883), ex-CNR colonist car #322 (Esauesing), GO Transit
bi-level coach #2056, ex-TTC Fifth Avenue double-deck bus #1 (built
1921), a GO Transit MC-8 bus and Mississauga Transit Orion transit
bus. (Elsewhere on the C.N.E. grounds at the Metroshow exhibit
was a TTC mini-bus).
Part of the CNE display consisting of GO bi-level 2056, TTC, PCC
car 4456, and new LRV 40000
CANADIAN
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Replica of the Von de Poele experiment locomotive (1883-1892),
this was the first commercially successful electric railway in
North America. All 3 preceeding photos and information courtesy
of Ted Wickson.
CANADIAN
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Toronto Railway Car 306 which was built in 1894 and is here shown in
the special Transportation Exhibition at the 1978 CNE. The car was on
loan from the National Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa
where it is permanently housed.
CANADIAN
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Our Lakeside, Ontario correspondent Gord Taylor reports that with
the retiring of the N&W cab units they are using some US built
power into St. Thomas, Ont~rio. 2703, 2709, 2707 are GP-18, EMD
built and were photographed on July 23, 1978 at the joint CN &
NW yard in St. Thomas, Ontario. Meanwhile over at the C&O yards
we find 8&0 4244 mued to C&O 3788. You just dont seem to know
what to expect these days on the high iron. Our thanks to Gord
Taylor for thinking of Canadian Rail.
CANADIAN R A I L
Dave Wilkie of Victoria B.C. reports that the September 4, 1978
doubleheaded BCR excursion for the N.R.H.S. came off without a
hitch except for the weather, camera settings were forced to f/4.
The train consisted of 2860 & 3716, water tank car, box/baggage,
four coaches and a semi open observation car. Michael Wilkie
snapped the action along Howe Sound at mileage 37.5, Squamish
Subdivision.
CANADIAN
57 R A I L
LOOKING FOR SOMETHING DIFFERENT TO RIDE ••••••• TRY THE NORTHERN
Albertas twice weekly mixed from Ft.McMurray to Edmonton.
If you do you will stop at Lac 10 Biche for supper as there
is no dinner in the diner ••••••• in fact theres no diner at all.
Power for the May 26, 1978 run consisted of NAR 301 and 305. Both
photos taken in lieu of supper at ••••• yes Lac la Biche by Ted
Wickson.
CANADIAN
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1978 MARKED BELLEVILLE ONTARIOS CENTENARY YEAR AND PART OF THE CELE­
brations consisted of a railway week which was held in late
May. Special displays including the ONRs Northlander and of
course 6060 excursions were offered to make the week complete. Mr.I.
C.Platt of Sydenham, Ontario was fortunate to capture CN 6783 pulling
away with train 44 alongise 6060. Our thanks to Mr. Platt for sub­
mitting the picture to Canadian Rail.
AN AGREEMENT THAT TOOK NEGOTIATORS MORE THAN A YEAR TO COMPLETE,
and one which is likely to have far-reaching effects for
the railway industry in Canada, has been signed by CN
Rail and the United Transportation Union. It provides for
reduced crew operation on most through freight trains on the
Prairie and Mountain Regions of CN. In return the union has
been guaranteed a share of the resultant savings, protection
against lay-offs as a direct result of the agreement, and
significant other benefits. Although effective immediately,
the plan will not be implemented until detailed discussions
have been held with the union representatives concerned – a
task that has already begun. The agreement allows for the
operation of freight trains with one conductor and one train­
man, different from the previous one conductor -two trainmen
operation, on territorie~ where manual flagging to the rear is
not required. The plan applies to approximately 80 percent of
all freight trains operating in the west. (CN Keeping Track)
CANADIAN
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RESIDENTS OF METRO TORONTO ARE UNDOUBTEDLY WELL AWARE OF THE
following. But when a News Release dated March 8th,
1978 (for immediate release) only reaches you the
following October, your choices are limited: fire the mail­
boy, or try to disseminate the intelligence to those in the
baandocks.
GO Transit has done it again! Last March, they put into regular
service the first seven-car trainset of bi-level rail coaches
on the heavily travelled Lakeshore line between Oakville and
Pickering. The cars are 85 feet long, weigh 54 tons, have newly
designed wheel assemblies and suspension system to provide
increased ride comfort and lower noise levels. They have been
eauipped with two double-width doors on each side to improve
passenger flow to and from the cars. They seat 162 per car, an
increase from the 94 in a single-level GO car. Electric heating
and air-conditioning is designed to provide comfortable interior
temperatures through outside ranges from -20C to l5C. But in
extreme temperatures it is not possible to do this when car doors
must be left open for several minutes during layovers at ter­
minals. So, another new feature has been added. Beside one set
of doors on each side of a bi-level coach will be found a sauare
aluminum panel surrounding a sauare plastic button. Doors can be
left closed while standing in a station, and the passenger can
open them himself by pushing the button.
On July 19, 1978 Ted Wickson caught this impressive display of
new bi-levels clattering westbound through Sunnyside in suburban
Toronto. Note the locomotive on either end of the train.
CANADIAN
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The inaugural Richmond Hill GO Train southbound in the Don Valley
was pictured by Ted Wickson on April 30, 1978. Thats the Bloor
St. Prince Edward Viaduct in the background.
IN A WAY, IT WAS SIMILAR TO THE GOOD OLD DAYS THIS PAS T JUNE
when the Santa Fe assigned helper engines to the Hill
over Cajon Pass during a shortage of motive power. But
this time they were modern diesels, not the 2-8-2 and 2-10-2
types that helped trains up the hill each June until 1952.
(Wheel Clicks Pac. RR Soc.)
TTC STREETCAR ROUTES TO BE GIVEN NUMBERS. THE TORONTO TRANSIT
Comm~ss~on has dec~ded to ~ntroduce route numbers to its tram
routes in the spring of 1979 when the new LRVs enter service.
It is planned to have the conversion of route and destination blinds
on PCC cars done overnight. The new route numbers are as follows:
501 -QUEEN
502 -DOWNTOWNER
503 -KINGSTON RD.
504 -KING
505 -DUNDAS
506 -CARLTON
507 -LONG BRANCH
508 -BATHURST
512 -ST. CLAIR (EARLSCOURT to be branch of ST. CLAIR)
~~~ -Special Exhibition Services
It is worth noting that the route name will no longer be dis­
played -only the route destination will appear with the number. TTC
passengers (and staff) traditionally have never been number oriented.
Although bus routes have assigned numbers, they are seldom referred
to.
:=
CANADIAN
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R A I L
Mr. S ;M. DONALDSON OF PEMBROKE ONTARIO SENDS ALONG THIS UNIQUE
photo of the Sydney and Louisburg roundhouse, probably
taken sometime in the late fourties. This is an excellent
example of the mixed bag of steam power as accumulated by small
roads in their hey-day. Anyone with more information on the photo
may contact Mr. Donaldson through the CRHAs Box 22, Address.
FALL 1977 SAW A COUPLE OF UNUSUAL LOADS MAKE THEIR WAY BY RAIL
from Victoria, B.C. to Cochrane, Alberta. These were a pair
of deethanizer towers, each 133 feet long by 13 feet diameter,
weighing 185 tons, plus a 9 foot skirt piece shipped loose, des­
tined for the Alberta Natural Gas ethane extraction facility being
designed and built by Fish International Canada Limited at Cochrane.
Each column was loaded on a pair of high capacity drop­
centre flatcars, base and accessories were shipped on a separate
flat car. As CN had only the one pair of suitable cars available
in Western Canada, the towers had to be shipped one at a time.
The high capacity cars bore numbers 672000 and 672002, the flat
car carried number 667385.
ri
, I
D~
<&,72002 G>72.oo
CANADIAN
62
R A I L
j
,
The journey from the Victorio Machinery Depot on Vancouver
Island comeenced by Seospon roil equipped barge to ~oinlond B.C.
The more direct CP mainline could nol be used due to clearance
restrictions through obstacles such as the Connought and Kicking
Horse Spiral Tunnels, so the longer eN route via the fraser and
Thompson Conyons, Yellowheod and Edmonton was employed. The towers
left Vancouver in the consist of the bi-weekly special diMensional
freight, the cars being hot-shclted bock over the direct CP line betw
een loads. At Calgary they were transferred to CP Roil for the
losl few miles to the Cochrane Spur just west of Calgory.
These were not the only unusual loads to hove been moved
by roil in the west recently, several other large vessels for the
oil, gas and petroche~icol industries have been observed. This
project also .ow on industriol gos turbine shipped from the Hor_
iti~es by eN ond ports of a large waste heat recovery unit arrived
in Cochrane on Koty line cushion cars.
,
Our thanks to Hr. H.Westren and Fish International for the
obove news ite~ ond photos.
Flonger raised, horns blairing, CP Roil
Ingersoll, Ontario on Jonuory 11, 1978.
Von Rees, Beochvill~, Ontario.
plow extra swoops throug~
Photu courtesy uf Burt
…,.

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