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Canadian Rail 317 1978

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Canadian Rail 317 1978

Canadian Rail =:
No. 317
JUNE 1978

1
COVER PHOTO:
We are pleased to devote our June
issue to the Maritime Provinces, Canadas
Atlantic playground. In
this regard only the late Allan
Toohey could have photographed our cover photo.
The place is
Port-aux-Basques, Newfoundland.
It is October 1954 and the New­
foundl and rai 1way s narrow gauge
passenger train is patient1y wait­ing
on the dock. Gone ~re the .
train as well as the vlntage sall­
ing ships. Photo courtesy CR~A
Archives, E.A.Toohey Co11ectlon.
OPPOSITE :
CNs train No. 725 headed up by
road switcher 3835 has just
arrived at the CP station in Wood­
stock, New Brunswick. Ken Ganse1
snapped the arrival on 4 February,
1975.
~—IAN
ISSN 0008 -4875
Published monthly by The Canadian Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B Montreal
Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
EDITOR EMERITUS: S. S. Worthen
BUSINESS CAR: John Welsh
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
1727 23rd Ave. N.W., Calgary Alberta
T2M lV6
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, Secretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Al berta T5B 2NO
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W 1P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor,
Ontario N9G lA2
CN 5 t.rain # 725 bfeaks. tracks through ,the n,ewlyfallen snow at CPs
(3urtt>s Corner, New.Brun~wick:
This u~usu~l way-fr~ight
switcbes from
CN to CP tr,ackage flve tlm.es ln coverlng ltS .177 mlle r.un. Photo
courte·sy Kenn.eth Gansel.
.

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Diaryof
ON train no.725
by Kenneth AW. Gansel
————————-
Canadian National Train No: 725 ,runs from Saint John, New Bruns­wick
to Centerville, N.B. a distance of 177 miles. What makes this
train so unusual is the fact that it runs over the Canadian Pacific
Ry. three times and on the eN tracks twice, this works out to 79.1
miles on the CPR for 44.6% of the total trackage, and 98.2 miles on
the CNR for a total of 55.4% miles of trackage. There is only one
other place in Canada where a Canadian National train operates over
another railways trackage, tliat being the Great Slave Lake llivi­
sian in northern Alberta, at one time there was an operation in the
Okanagan area of Britisli Columbia which exists no longer.
This then is the story of CN 725:
0500 Canadian
lIational yard at Saint John, N.B., Tr: 725 is
ordered to depart at 0500 with engine No: 3835 a MLW
RS-ll and 7 cars.

……
. ~
. ~,
.
.

Two miles out of Woodstock, N.B. at Upper Woodstock our ambling way­
freight crosses the St.John River in a truly Maritime setting. Photo
courtesy of the author.
I
I,
CANADIAN 167 R A I L
0530 CN Train gets under way and enters the CP tracks at the
West end of the yard.
0615 Our train stops to register at Westfield Beach, we have
now left the CPR and are back on the CN Oromocto Sub­
Division having come 14 miles on the CPo Southbound
CPR train No: 42 (Atlantic Ltd.) checks this register
on the days that No: 72S operates.
0925
As the train works its way to Fredericton, it picks up
and sets off cars at: Gagetown (CFB Gagetown) and Oromocto.
CN South Devon
Train 725 arrives, and the crew changes at the station,
725 has come 84 miles.
South Devon is located on the East bank of the Saint
John river opposite Fredericton. It has a small yard
and a 3 stall engine house. There is a Monday to
Saturday switcher which works South Devon to Fredericton
(0700 -1500). 725 will set off all its cars in the
yard and pick up the cars for the run to Centerville.
Also of note, South Devon is the CPR junction and the
CPR Fredericton yard switcher comes across the bridge
from time to time.
1045 Train 725 departs the CN yard and enters the CP Gibson
Sub-Division. The CP line runs along the Saint John
river to Keswick and then turns north to Burtts Corner.
1115 Burtts Corner the CPR line from here to Southampton is
inaccessible. One can catch up with the train at South­
ampton a drive of about 30 mins.
1200 CP Southampton, on arriving at Southampton, CP train No:
81 to Hackawic is just leaving the Gibson Sub, therefore
725 will have a clear track to Newburg. This CPR train
is usually ahead of the CN train by about 45 mins. And
at times there is the CP train from Minto ahead (No: 79)
but today this train is behind 725 by an hour or so.
1245 CN train 725 arrives Southampton. The train stops to
pick up some orders and it is off.
At this point the rail fan has two choices,
1) you can take the rough road to Clarkville, N.B. #585 and then
onto Newburg, however in the winter this road
is very slow and you might not catch up, or
2) go south on H.B. #605 to Nackawic and then on to
the Trans-Canada to Woodstgck. I chose the second
choice, because it was -14 and blowing snow on back
roads is no fun.
1345 Arrive at Upper Woodstock CP bridge.
be

I 0 Aroostook
Centerville
~
,
(

NEW
BRUNSWICK
Southampton (Millville)
Corner
South Devon
()Mlnto
;;>:::.} .
o Newcaatle

o MoAdam
M AI N E
(U.S.A.)
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not to scale
Westfield Beach
ROUTE OF C. N.R.
T RAI N N2 725/726
-C. P. R. tracks
—C. N.R. t rae ks
Original drawn by K.A.Gllnsel
Redrawn by W.J.G.
CANADIAN
169
R A I L
1350 CP Newburg, train 725 registers and calls the CP dis­
patcher for clearance to Woodstock. The CN train leaves
the Gibson Sub for the Shogomoc Sub and the 4 mile trip
to Woodstock.
1355 CN train crosses the CP bridge at Upper Woodstock.
1400 CN train arrives at the CP station in Woodstock a stop
of about 5 mins. is made for orders and a clearance for
another 2 miles to Valley and the junction with the CN
tracks.
So far the train has come 147 miles, 77 miles of it on
the CPR.
1435 CN Woodstock, the CN train is back on home track. There
are two railway stations in Woodstock and the eN station
is about 3/4 of a mile from the CPR up the Holton Road.
The reason this train takes such a route is that the
original line from Fredericton to Woodstock along the
vlest side of the Saint John river was removed when the
dam was built at t1actaquac. The lake which was formed
by the dam covered the tracks with water up to 45 deep.
You can still see the old roadbed up to the dam and can

~
/, .. ,- ,
,.1 –
With an initial puff of exhaust CN 3836 operating on train 725 pu~ls
out of CP Newburg, New Brunswick after registering, Photo courtesy
of the author.
find it again around Pokiok, this was the CNR Valley
Sub-Division. Because of the dam CN had running rights
to use the CPR tracks to get to its line to Centerville.
It is the potato industry that keeps the CN line to
Centerville in business. The Centerville line is in
the heart of New Brunswicks potato belt. Most of the
cars are refrigerators and on todays train there were 2
of them out of the 4 cars we had.
After spending about half an hour or so at Woodstock,
checking with agent as to what work is to be done
along the line, the train sets out for Centerville.
The time now is 1535 there is still 26 miles to go and
it will take about 2 hours to reach Centerville. The
train will spend the night at Centerville and tomorrow morning
will take the same route back to Saint John.
Train 725 runs Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday to Cen­
terville, and returns the next day, Wednesday, Friday
and Sunday as Train 726. It does not operate on Monday.
So ends a day in the life of CN train 725.
N.B. All
times shown are Atlantic Standard Time. Even
th-ough CP tlses E-me foritsOjHlratiolis in
New Brunswick.
All clear as # 725 rumbles through eN South Devon on 4 February 1975.
Photo courtesy Kenneth Gansel.
by Max Macleod
They say Im the oldest loco~otive in Canana and I sup­
pose thats something to puff about. Ive rested here on Archi­
medes Street in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia since 1967 when I was
finally moved from deteriorating quarters near the CN station as one
of the towns centennial projects. Ive had some strano~
travels since being built in England in the early 1830s by Timothy
Hackworth. The hauling of coal was the work of strong
horses, originally, of course, but the English started to use steam
engines, prompting the General r~ining Co. who Ilere mining coal near
New Glasgow, N.S., to build the first standard gauge iron railway
to haul coal to the East Ri ver Loading Ground for vlater shipment.
I was the first to use it giving me the 0istinction of being the
first locomotive in 8ritish America to run on all iron rails.
That was in 1839.
The next time youre snapping a picture of our fine
looking piper statue in Carmich~el Park in New Glasgow, take a
look at Terrace Street adjacent to the park and youre seeing
the original roadbed of that railway. Its so rough sometimes
even today many motorists find that easy to believe. I trav
1 edt hat ro a db ed, abo u t six mil e s 1 0 n g, Ino not 0 n 0 u sly haul in,
that hard earned coal for almost thirty years, some say. Tt-.
site of the Scott Kraft Hill was roughly my destination from
the old Stellarton mines. Little did I know that a hundred
thirty-eight years later Id be back in New Glasgow proudly I
cased in this glass shelter on Archimedes Street.
It was a circuitous route which included a visit to
Chicago Worlds Fair in 1893, auspices of the Baltimore and Ohio
Railroad. I didnt make Expo. After being in the States
until 1928, thanks to the efforts of caring gentlemen of both
the United States and Canada, I found myself placed on display
in a shed at the station in Halifax. At least, I was nearer
home but it took many years yet before prolonged efforts to re­
turn me to Pi ctou County proved success ful.
After all, I had it good in Hal ifax and enjoyed the
hustle and bustle of the city station. I felt right at home
when the powerful, panting Northerns 6100 series pulled in from
Montreal and enveloped me with hissing steam mingling with the
freezing breath of passengers hurrying by on frosty winter
nights. They did hurry by, though, by the thousands over the
years giving me scarcely a they were engrossed in their arrivals and departures oblivious
to the fact that there I stood, Canadas oldest locomotive. I seemed to
sense, though, the people from Pictou County. Im
sure they were the ones who lingered a little and sometimes
with a small boy by the hand spoke to him and pointing at my
funny looking wooden boiler, whispered, Thats the Samson.
CANADIAN
172
R A I L
Eorly photogroph of the SAMSON under steom on the Albion Roil Rood, ond
probobly ot the Albion Mines, now Stellorton N.S. Photo courtesy
the Scotion Roilrood Society, Jefferson Collection.
CANADIAN 173 R A I L
In the summer of 1949 the city of Halifax was en fete celebrating
the 200th. anniversary of the founding of that city and in the cele­
bration parade was this CNR float proudly displaying the SAMSON all
newly painted. The float is turning from Quinpool Road onto Oxford
Street in Halifax N.S. Could that be the same 6400 model that is in
the CRHA s collection and presently on display at the Canadian Rail­
way Museum in Toronto? Phoro courtesy the Scotian Railroad Society,
Jefferson Collection.
CANADIAN 174 R A I L
The ~ayor of New Glasgow, thOllcrh, the Hon. Michael
Dwyer, a ~an who rose from office boy in 1893 with the Nova
S co t i a S tee 1 an d Co a I Co. , to II i n i s t e r 0 f Min e sin the An cr us L.
MacDonald cabinet, never passed by. He stopped and reme~bered.
And planned. He wanted me back in New Glasgow for his towns
75th Anniversary Celebrations in 1950, temporarily at least, and
he succeeded. My heart leaped up when it was agreed that I would
be housed in a building on the original roadbed on Terrace Street.
How befittinQ! ~Ihilt a homecoming! Alas, it wasnt to be,
exactly, and for one reason or a~other, an attractive loq cabin
built for me ilt the station in New Glasgow became my home for the
next fifteen years. It wasnt all that pleilsant and failed to
a 11 ow for eilsy vi ewi n9 and soon I WilS 1 e ft much to mysel f.
I enjoyed the neilrness to the tracks again though, ~ith
the sounds of the Mountain engines wit~ their 4-8-2 wheel arranqe­
ment or the Mi~ado freight engines with 2-8-2 arrangement passing
day and night on the Sydney run, their thunder rocking my little
cabin like a violent storm. Oldtimers would stand and marvel at
my size and whisper, Samson, you would have enjoyed being here
in the thirties when the Consolidiltion 1800-1900 steam series rum­
bled through here with their long lines of coal hoppers to the
Acadia Coal Co. pier at Pictou Landing.
Yes, I thought, this is ~herc I belong. (Jut back to Ar­
chimedes Street. Thanks to the Pictou County Historical Society,
lIe f t· OY ~ira the r c ram p e dan din a c c e s sib 1 e log Cit bin by the t rack s . The
yo eJ;o:ti;t~ 0 n to my pre sen t mod ern h 0 IJ sin g, ash 01/ cas e 0 f 9 1 ass , was p a
tIt;; Q:f: the C en ten n i a 1 c e 1 e bra t ion sin N e 1/ G 1 as q 0 1 i n 1 96 7 .
… ·}~:~:1!~Y:::·
… -So here I am, all twenty feet of me, proudly standing
fourteen feet high to the top of my stack, back where I started
from, to stay. I can see the tracks across the streets here in
the heart of New Glasgow. I like to imilqin~ thilt that short extra
toot of the 3000 hp. freight diesel whistle as it approaches the
crossing at Bells Corner is just maybe …. for me.
The SAMSON as she appeared on display in Halifax Union Station on Moy
30, 1949. Photo courtesy CRHA Archives, E.A.Toohey Collection.
.—-From~
Our Archives
In this edition of FROM OUR ARCHIVES we are pleased to present a
collection of excellent photos from the CRHAs E.A.Toohey collection
and depecting various Maritime scenes as they were in 1949. For those
of you fortunate enough to be visiting Canadas Atlantic Provinces
this summer the scenery will be just as beautiful, but that long lone­
some whistle will no longer be present. All the following photographs
courtesy CRHA Archives, E.A.Toohey Collection.
On May 26,1949 Allen caught this around the curve view of Canadian
Nationals train #5 near Merigomish, Nova Scotia.

,This excellent photo Of Maritime Railway No. 5 a,rrd coach 150, ~a,s taken
or;rMay
28,1949-atRive,r I-(ebert, Nova,S,cotia. The foc,omotive was pre- s:
erved and is in the CRHA 5 collecti,o.n at the Cana,dian, Railway ,Museull), .

in St.Gonstant, P.Q. Built by the Pitt:sburgh Locomotive,Co.in 18~6
this 4-6-0, wa.s acquixed in 1961 after ye,l3rs of faithful servic,e on
the Maritime RailwQy~
CANADIAN 178 R A I L
Self Propelled enthusiasts will appreciate this photo of Canadian
National 15843 and trailers taken at McGivney, New Brunswick on
May 25,1949. The oil electric is an all-express while the trailers
provide the passenger carrying capacity.
I
,)
CANADIAN R A I L
.
1949 action on the Dominion Atlantic Railway included this D-10
4-6-0 # 1092 which was on freight service and photograph~d at Truro,
Nova Scotia on May 26.
CANADIAN
180
R A I L
, .
. …
.
,
1

.
Another hard-working railroad was the Sydney & Louisburg Railway which
is represented here by No. 74 a 2-8-2 which was snapped as she worked
the mine at Sydney, Nova Scotia.
;
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is
classic
Ccmadian
Pad
,
fic

consiSt
wasJl~oto
,
g;raphed
at
E;dmu

nds.to
,
n,
New
Brunswick
on
Moy
24,
1949.
This
4-6.,.0
was
b~ilt

at

CPRs
Angus
shops
in
MontreaL
ih
1915
and
in
t
his
scene
,
is
e,mittin
gfqr
less

polllJtants
tho

.,
mcis~
mo
:
dern
dies

d

s~
..
,
:
o p z p o p z III …. r:/:J …. III
:u p r
CANADIAN
182
R A I L
.. .,
No Maritime visit would be complete without a representative of the
Cumberland Railway and Coal Company. Our selection is that of 2-8-0
No.9 shown hauling a drag at Springhill Junction, Nova Scotia on
May 28,1949.
CANADIAN 183 R A I L
Later in the day Allen Toohey caught Canadian Notional 2-8-0 No. 1927
easing out of Pugwash, Novo Scotia on a local freight.
CANADIAN
184
R A I L
,. >
f
… ,
)..
Where else could one photograph a doubleheaded narrow gauge 10 car
passenger train skirting the Atlantic Shore other than in Newfoundland?
The date is October 1954 and the train is the eastbound Caribou just
north of Port-aux-Basoues, Newfoundland.
Atlantic Canada only ever enjoyed the serv~ces of seven street-railway
companies
t
these being located in: Halifax
t
Yarmouth
t
Moncton
t
Pictou
t
SydneYt Milltown and St.John N.B. The last of these services that of
Halifax and St.John lasted until 1949 before finally yielding to the
cutters torch. Halifaxs system had already turned its lost wheel
when Allen Toohey took this car barn shot on May 30
t
1949. If you
peek out the for doors you can see the cars being dismantled. All
preceeding photographs from the CRHA Archives
t
the Late E.A.Toohey
Collection.
The .
business car
UPDATE ON VIA -PRESIDENT J.F. ROBERTS APPEARED BEFORE THE HOUSE OF
Commons Committee on Transport in Ottawa last Nov. 28.
From a condensed report of his remarks, the following
points emerge: There will probably be an increase in the general
level oLI,ates – a VIA fare str.uctUI.e .will be implemented June 1/78 ••.
I do not believe we should talk about transportation centres as
close to the centre of town as possible -with railway services,
inter-city bus services, ~unicipal bus serv~ces, service~ to ~he
airport all in one place Ln a central 10catLon. Our polLcy WLll be
to strive to keep the transportatLon centre downtown ••• I think
there is a tremendous need for a self-propelled car in Canada. There
are many runs, even inter-city ones,where one or two cars would do
the job. In our 5-year plan we hope to increase set occupancy from 30-35%
to 60% and to do that we have to go to a self-propelled car.
We have 96 of these in CN and CP ownership and these will be coming
to VIA. We will apply the specifications for the interiors of the
new LRC trains to the Budd cars. National Research Council have a
system to improve the riding qualities of the truck of an RDC and
we want to modify them •.• We have a train (the Scotian) that does
47 stops between Halifax and Montreal. That run will not have new
equipment. But we are going to see an improvement in equipment
on the Montreal -Campbellton -Halifax run ••• At the present time
I would be inclined to say that there will be five LRC s in the
West, three in the corridor (Montreal-Quebec) and two in the Maritimes­
as we see things now this would be the distribution for 1980 ..•
From April 1/78 until 1982 there will be a reduction in the amount
of equipment used. What we really will be doing is using self­
propelled cars rather than conventional equipment in many areas
(to increase load factors). We are going to pool existing CN and
CP equipment to take the best. About 300 cars would drop out of a
system like that •.• The VIA 5-year plan envisages a 60% load factor,
an increase of 15% in passenger miles, a reduction of 11% in train
miles and 21% in car miles. The 5-year plan is said to have a
target date of May 1982 for completion of the RDC rebuilding referred
to by Mr. Roberts —–
At a Vancouver press conference, Feb. 7/78, Mr. Roberts
gave assurance that from April 1, VIA will continue operations
into both CP Rail ond CN stations in that city for at least six
CANADIAN 187
R A I L
months. CTCs endorsement of the CN terminal notwithstanding,
the decision on which station is retained will essentially be up
to VIA, Mr. Roberts said. We are going to have to work with the
B.C. government on this.
Speaking in Winnipeg, Feb. 17/78, Mr. Roberts said that
administrative costs for rail passenger service will quickly
decline when VIA takes over April I, according to press reports.
In Ottawa, Feb. 20/78, Transport Minister Otto Lang
announced that VIA will become a Crown corporation in the spring
when its outstanding shares are bought from CN. VIA was to be set
up as a CN subsidiary. As a Crown corporation, it will be easier
for VIA to treat CN and CP Rail equally. This will also ensure
that VIA is directly responding to government objectives rather
than CN objectives, Mr. Lang said.
In a VIA Operational Plan released in late 77, the follow­
amplifies earlier information on proposed Quebec-Montreal-Ottawa
service:
In the spring of 1979, Quebec-Montreal-Ottawa service will
consist of six daily trains departing CPs St. Sacrement Station
in Quebec, proceeding via CP to Jacques Cartier Jct., crossing to
CN and proceeding through the Mount Royal Tunnel to Central Station,
Montreat. Five of the trains will continue on CN to the new cross­
over near Vaudreuil, thence on CP to Ottawa. The sixth train will
depart Central Station and run on CN making all local stops on CN s
Alexandria Subdivision to Ottawa. The VIA OPERATIONAL PLAN notes
that, in addition, the transcontinental train departing CN Central
will proceed on CN to the new crossover near Vaudreuil, then on CP
to Ottawa. Train service in the opposite direction will be identical.
(No mention is made of CPs Montreal-Ottawa service via Lachute and
Montebello .)
Latest official information re proposed western trans­
continental schedules to be effective from June 1/78 comes from Mr.
Roberts (Feb. 23/78): In essence this (Phase 1) will involve
a train from Toronto to Vancouver via Winnipeg, Regina and Calgary,
on a schedule approximately two (2) hours ahead of the present
Canadian service. From Montreal to Vancouver via Winnipeg,
Saskatoon and Edmonton, there will be a second train operating on a
schedule which closely approximates that of the present Super
Continental. Final schedules are being prepared by the respective
railways and will not be available for some time.
CANADIAN RAIL IS SAD TO REPORT THE DEATH ON MARCH 17,1978 OF LUCIEN
LAllier, former chairman of the Montreal Urban Transit
Commission. Mr.LAllier was a longtime Honorary Member of
the CRHA and had the honor of commencing our trolley line at the
Canadian Railway Museum on September 21, 1972. Mr.LAllier was app­
ointed as Chief Engineer in charge of the origional Montreal Metro
project in 1961, and chairman of the Montreal Transportation Comm­
ission in 1964. In 1970 when the MUCTC was formed Mr.LAllier became
its first Chairman, he retired in 1974. Mr.LAllier will long be
remembered for his kindness shown the CRHA and the Canadian Railway
Museum during his term in office.
CANADIAN
188
R A I L
CN IS USING A COMPUTER TO READ AND ANALYSE DATA FROM HOT BOX
detectors along the Montreal-Oshawa line. The system
is based at Belleville and became fully operational
last fall. Winnipeg is being considered as the next location
far this type of system. Hot box detectors along the track
monitor wheel bearings on passing trains. When an overheated
bearing could cause a derailment is detected, this shows up on
the readout at Belleville and the dispatcher can notify the
locomotive engineer about the potential problem with his train.
The computer is more consistent than manual reading for detector
data now displayed on tapes.
(CNs Keeping Track, March!78)
STREET CAR LINES IN FRANCE NUMBER ONLY TWO, NOTES HEADLIGHTS NEWS
Journal Feb.!78) which gives a summary of current
operations in St. Etiene and Marseille. The St. Etienne
line of four miles, meter gauge, is operated with 35 French and
Belgian PCCs including five articulated units. In Marseille, the
line is only two miles long but includes a trolley subway, a
boulevard, private right-of-way and narrow back streets. The
sixteen Belgian PCCs are double-end, standard gauge, and have
six sets of double doors, leaving enough room for 16 seated
passengers .
. -~~:-..
Red bargain fares? VIA Rails new equipment? Amtrak up-date? Wrong on
all counts, its simply a 1939 version of a CRHA excursion. At that
time interested ladies and gentlemen were invited to be the guests
of the Asbestos and Danville Railway in the Asbestos region of Quebec.
Fortunately the June day selected turned out to be magnificent, and a
fine time was had by all. Photo from a photo album in the CRHA Archives.
THE
by
CA NAD I AN
189
R A I L
FIRST RICHMOND HILL-TORONTO GO TRAIN WAS FIRMLY SCHEDULED
for May 1/78, according to GO NEWS of Feb/78. A pre­
inaugural trip, April 29, was to see the GO train escorted
a coal fired, whistle blowing, vintage steam train.
Don McQueen of London Ontario visited the erecting floor of GMD on
March 3, 1978 and dropped Canadian Rail the following note: The
complete group of F40PHs for GO transit are on the floor in various
stages of completion. C403-1 which will become, GO 510 had just had
the cab and cowling put on the completed frame while C403-2 was com­
plete with prime mover, generator and trucks. Although on first appear­
ances the DD version of the F40PH looks similar to the US version
there will be subtle differences. Behind the above order was the first
ACR GP7R rebuild. Upside down it was having final work being completed
on the underside. This group of re-builds C406 to become ACR 100 to
104 will follow the GO units out the door. Initial frame preparation
was underway for the next batch of SD40-2s on order C405 for Ontario
Hydro to be painted and numbered into CP Rail. Six similar units
have already been delivered ( 5779 -5784 ) during February and early
March 1978.
C-396
C-397 C-398 C-399
C-400 C-401 C-402 C-403 C-404 C-405 C-406 C-407 C-408 C-409 C-410
35units
20
10
2
2
1
6
24
16
5
20 19 10
3
GP40-2L SD40-2 GP40-2L
SW1001
GP38-2
MP15DC
F40PH
SD40-2
SD40-2
GP7R
SD40-2
HBU-4
GL22MC
GL22MC
SUMMARY OF RECENT ACTIVITY
G.M.D. LONDON
A3428-A3462 A3463-A3482 A3483-A3492
to EMD #
A3493-A3494
to EMD
A3495-A3500 A3501-A3524 A3525-A3540 A3541-A3545 A3546-A3565 A3566-A3584 A3585-A3594 A3595-A3597
CN
CP Rail
CN
NHB
Tex.G.S.
QIT
TATOA(GO)
CP Rail
Ont .Hyd.
ACR
Ont.Hyd.
CN
NZGR
CdFTOGO
9633-9667 bIt. 3-5/76
5758-5777 del. 2-3/76
9668-9677 order cancelle(
7601-7602 del. 8/76
054-055
9
510-515
5837-5859
CP nos.
100-104
5294-5313
260-278
1600-1609
bid lost.
del 10/76
del 3/77
for 4/78
for /78
for 3/78
for 5/78
for 7/78
for 12/78
for 3/79
for 3/79
Our thanks to Don McQueen for keeping readers of Canadian Rail informed
of the happenings at GMD London Division.



On Horch 18,1978 the Saint Lawrance Valley Railway Society operated
what might well be the last CP conventional excursion train. Ever
increasing fares as well as the advent of VIA Roil Canada make the
excursion organizers grow grey hair. Jim Shaughnessy of Troy New
York was kind enough to forward Canadian Roil these three excellent
shots of that run. First we see 4071 and tow grocing the shores of
the Conneticut River south of McIndoe Falls, VerMont. Next an on
the bridge shot of the train over the Conneticut River between Wells Ri
ver Vt. and Woodsville New Hampshire. Our third photo was token
at St,Johnsbury Vt. on the southbound trip. Our thanks to Jim Shaugh­
nessy for thinking of Canadian Rail in his travels.

Demande en ligne