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Canadian Rail 315 1978

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Canadian Rail 315 1978

Canadian Rail *=
No. 315
APRIL 1978
f
I

COVER PHOTO:
A pair of class H-5 subway cars
newly arrived from Hawker-Siddley
Canada, Ltd. posed in the Davis­
ville Yard of the TTC. Part of
a 138 car, $67 million order, several of the cars are
now in service
and delivery continues
on a regular basis from the
bui 1 der.
OPPOSITE:
Thi sis the way it was back on
July 17, 1948 as TTC Peter Witt
#2958 and trailer 3013 clattered
over the special-work in front of
Union Station. Although
these type of cars never gained great popularity in
Canada,
Toronto depended on the Peter
Wi tt type car to provi de the
backbone of their service for years. Photo courtesy
CRHA
Archives, E.A.Toohey Collection.
rSSN 0008-4875
Published monthly by The Canadian
Railroad Historical Association
P.O. Box 22, Station B Montreal
Quebec Canada H3B 3J5
EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
EDITOR EMERITUS: S. S. Worthen
BUSINESS CAR: John Welsh
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A.
Germani uk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L. M. Unwin, Secretary
1727 23rd Ave. N.W., Calgary Alberta
T2M lV6
OTTAWA
D. E. Stoltz, Secretary
P. O. Box 141, Station A, Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 8Vl
PACIFIC COAST
R. Keillor, Secretary
P. O. Box 1006, Station A, Vancouver
British Columbia V6C 2Pl
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
C. K. Hatcher, Secretary
P. O. Box 6102, Station C, Edmonton
Al berta T5B 2NO
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
J. C. Kyle, Secretary
P. O. Box 5849, Terminal A, Toronto Ontario
M5W 1 P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
R. Ballard, Sr., Secretary
300 Cabana Road East, Windsor,
Ontario N9G lA2

Toronto Transit
M.F?Murphy. . . . ..:. .,. . …
Photos and Information by Ted Wlckson
: .On january 16,T978 Ted Wickson of the TTC caught this test hain
(for motorman training) southbound on the yet to be opened S p Subway approac;,hing. EglintonW·est Station .• As the line was n.ot yet
.open to revenue passengers the crew didntt worry about .uch details
as a tOJrectly rea~ing d~&tination sign.
Toronto Transit
Most Canadian cities have various modes of public
transportation ranging from diesel surface buses to rubber tired
subway systems, but no other transit system in Canada has so
successfully integrated five modes of public transit as has
Torontos. The Toronto Transportation Commission operates both
diesel and trolley buses, streetcars, a subway, and all of these
in co-operation with the Government of Ontarios GO Transit rail
commuter system. While we have covered several aspects of Torontos
transit scene in past issues of Canadian Rail we are pleased to
bring you up to date with the fast moving developments with Canadas
most integrated transit system.
The most significant new development is the opening on
January 28, 1978,0f the new Spadina Subway. T-his 6.17 mile 1Ong
addition brings to just under thirty-two the number of miles of
subway Toronto has in service. The official opening ceremonies
were held at the St. Clair West station on January 27 where at
2;30 PM the Honorable William G. Davis, Premier of Ontario offici­
ally opened the line. On Saturday January 28, entrance to all of
the eight new stations was free to the public between 6;00 AM and
5;00 PM. Many of the architects and artists were on hand to discus~
their part in the project, with the various interested passengers.
The Spadina Subway runs south from a northerly terminal
station at Wilson Avenue, and links up with the Yonge-University
subway at St. Georges Station. Passengers have the choice of a
direct, through subway ride to and from northwest Metropolitan
area and downtown via the University Avenue, or transferring to
the crosstown, east-west Bloor Danforth subway at Spadina or
St. George stations.
Special attention has been paid to the decor of the
eight new stations (Wilson, Yorkdale, Lawrence West, Glencairn,
Eglinton West, St. Clair West, Dupont, Spadina) by the creations
of nine Canadian artists which grace the interiors.
Originally estimated at a cost of 5220 million to con­
struct, the Toronto Star reported that the final cost would be in
the order of 5215 million, some $5 million under the previous
projection. This cost is being shared by the Province of Ontario
and Met r 0 pol it anT 0 ron to, 75% and 25% res p e ct i vel y •
Several methods of construction were used in building
the line, cut-and-cover from St. Georges Station to Davenport
Road, tunnel to the Nordheimer Ravine, and again cut-and-cover to
Eglinton Avenue. From Eglinton Avenue the line continues north on
the median strip of the William Allen Expressway to the terminal
station at Wilson Avenue.
..
II
Alignment of the
Spadina Rapid Tlan/it line
Wilson
~

Yard :-t\
WILSON ~
Y; Wilson Ave.
./ A
METHODS OF CONSTRUCTION
Yorkdale Open
right of way (3.1 0 miles) _
Centre
Cut and cover (2.70 miles) 1I/III/IIIIh
Tunnel ( .37 mile) ••
YOI KDALE
I
Station ..
Existing subway

LAVI RENCE
Lawrence Ave.
WEST
Glencairn Ave.
N
• GLENC
AIRN
( EGLIN ON WEST

::
u5
….
u5
Eglinton Ave.
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St. Clair Ave. ·bST. CLAIR
::: WEST


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,
CANADIAN
104
R A I L
Each station is distinctivly different, here we see the layout at
Lawrence West Station. Passenger platforms are 500 feet long and
the design has been carefully approached with the passenger flow
foremost in mind.
CANADIAN 105 R A I L
This is the impressive TTC facility at Wilson Stotion (the northern
terminal) looking north. The station is bottom center, kiss nride
loop bottom left, bus garage center left, subway yard and carhouse
center top. Note the double tunnel under the southbound highway to
permit access to the median strip.
CANADIAN
106
R A I L
Because of initial eauipment shortages the TTC operated some trains
consisting of the origional Gloucester cars over the newly completed
Spadina line. Here we see two trains about to pass each other just
south of Glencairn station on February 17,1978.
J
I
CANADIAN
107
R A I L
!r
, ..
, .
TTCs newest subway locomotive RT-18 is seen here pushing dead cars
into the carhouse at Wilson Yard for storage until the third rail
is energized. The photo was taken by Ted Wickson in December 1977.
SUBWAY
Toronto Subway
In all underground sections of the Spadina subway,
trains will literally ride on rubber. Natural rubber components
that float the track-support system have been designed to reduce
the problem of ground-borne vibrations from trains. The new
system consists primarily of large, pre-cast concrete block
double ties supported on resilient pads of natural rubber. The
concrete ties are approximately 10 feet wide and 5 feet long. They
are spaced about two inches apart and supported on rubber pads
measuring 13 inches in diameter and 3 inches in thickness. The
ties are laterally supported from the subway structure and from
each other with rectangular pads. It is expected that this new
double insulation technique will reduce noise and vibration by 12
to 16 decibels.
Track on the Spadina subway weighs 115 pounds per yard
rail compared to the 100 pounds per yard rail used on previous
subway lines built in Toronto. This change to heavier rail was
based on results of a TTC test installation on a section of the
Bloor-Danforth subway. The heavier rail noticeably improved train
ride and, used in combination with the new concrete ties, is
expected to require less m~intenance and to have a longer life
than lighter rail.
Trains in this new portion of subway will operate in
the following maner, during mid-day and evening hours and all day
on weekends and holidays, all trains will run from Wilson to
Finch station. During morning rush hours, trains will run between
Wilson and Eglinton station and between St. Clair West and Finch
stations. In the afternoon rush hour period, trains will operate
between Finch and St. Clair West stations and between Finch and
Wilson stations.
During morning rush hours, trains will run every 4t
minutes between Wilson and Eglinton stations and also between
St. Clair West and Finch stations. This schedule provides a
combined 2t minute service over the section of line between
St. Clair West and Eglinton stations.
TORONTO
SUBWAY
SYSTEM
w ~ :.
~
z
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z
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WILSON
ORKOAlE
LAWRENCE
WEST
GlENCAIRN
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WEST
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SMEPPARO
LAWRENCE
EGllNTON
DAVISVILLE
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CL.AIR ;
SUMMeR
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W(LUSUY COlUGE OUNO-,S
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UNION
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DANfORTH
AVE.
To.ONTO
TRANSIT
COMMISSION
INFORMATION
48A-4.S44
: . ~
0 ~ z ~ 0 -~ Z
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CANADIAN 110
R A I L
In the afternoon rush hour period, trains will run
every 4t minutes between Wilson and Finch stations and also between
Finch and St. Clair West stations. This schedule provides a
combined 2t minute service over the section of line between Finch
and St. Clair West stations.
Some typical trip times from the new stations will be
as follows:
Wilson to St. George
Wilson to Queens Park
Wilson to Union
Wilson to Queen
Lawrence West to St. Patrick
Lawrence West to Queen
St. Clair West to St. George
St. Clair West to Dundas
17 minutes
20 minutes
24 minutes
26 minutes
18 minutes
23 minutes
6 minutes 16
minutes
Related changes in surface transit will affect more than
20 TTC routes. For subway train storage, a new yard at Wilson
will relieve the Davisville yard. It is expected that the Spadina
opening and related changes will boost annual total rides on the
TTC system by 12 million.
In order to provide effective service the TTC had pre­
viously ordered 134 new subway cars from Hawker-S iddeley Canada Ltd.
at Thunder Bay, Ontario. Costing some 65 million dollars these
are the first cars on the system to feature air-conditioning and
chopper controls as standard equipment. Classed as H-5 s the cars
are 74 feet long and will bring to 632 the number of units in the
TTC subway fleet. Initial acceptance of the new cars has been
help up as some 50 units lie idle because of defective motors, so
reports the Toronto Star. The manufacturer, Garrett Corp. of
Los Angeles was said to be removing the defective motors and flying
them back to the factory for repair. An additional 66 cars are
presently under construction at Thunder Bay but delivery may be
held up until the TTC is satisfied the motor problems have been
solved.
In addition to the passenger cars presently being
delivered the TTC has recently taken delivery of its second loco­
motive. Designed by the Anbel Corporation of Houston, Texas the
major assembly was completed in the Toronto area, total cost
$450,000 for the unit.
Unlike the first locomotive which has been in service
since 1968 and operates on batteries or power from the subways
third rail, the new locomotive is powered by dual diesel engines
and has a hydro-mechanical transmission. These features enable
the locomotive to operate in the subway independent of the third
rail power system. In the event of a major power failure or
de-activation of the third rail because of a disabled subway train
or emergency, this facility is particularly important.
CANADIAN
111
R A I L
The vehicle is capable of maintaining line speeds during
reg~lar subway hours and its two diesel engines can produce a
maXlmum of 700 h.p., enough to haul a disabled subway train with
relative ease. The new locomotive will also be used to haul the
TTCs two-car tunnel wall-washing vehicle and heavy equipment
associated with subway construction and rail maintenance.
Principal dimensions of the locomotive are:
Length 42 9
Width 10
Height 11 9
Weight 100,000 Ibs.
It was on March 30, 1954 that Canadas first subway,
Torontos Yonge line carried its first passengers, much progress
has been made through the years, and today Toronto possesses
Canadas longest and probably most efficient subway network.
While Toronto has progressed with their subway, so too
have they taken some decisive decisions regarding their surface
transit network, in particular the TTC streetcar operation. When
other Canadian cities were committing their trolleys to the holocost
and either ripping-up or paving over their streetcar tracks,
Toronto re-committed their belief in the streetcar as a viable
means of surface transit in the core area not served by subway.
Today the TTC operates 10 streetcar routes using a varied fleet of
some 350 aging PCC cars dating back to 1946. The situation is not
helped either with the harsh winter climate prevalent{ and the
abundent use of road salt as a melting (and corroding) agent on
city streets.
Having committed to streetcar transit,new rolling stock
had to be found, and as reported in the February issue, this took
the shape of a prototype order for six modern UTDC designed cars
placed with the Swiss Industrial Company (SIG) of Neuhausen,
Switzerland. In addition to the six 4 axle cars two experimental
6 axle cars have also been ordered and will remain the property of
the UTDC. Recent snags in the articulation joint assembly however,
have pushed the estimated delivery date for these units back to late
1979. Although prototypes are being built in Switzerland, the actual
production order for 190 cars was signed in November 1977 with
Hawker Siddley Canada Ltd.
As a result of visual inspection of the first LRVs
completed early in the summer, the TTC decided to amend the paint
scheme on the 6-car order. Changes occur in the paint treatment
given the doors and in the area around the front destination
window. Originally, the doors were to have carried a continuation
of the red, white, grey and black livery of the body; however,
the TTC has opted for simplicity and both sets of doors will be
entirely white. TTCs Safety Dept. had also threatened to order
black and yellow vertical hatch marks affixed to the edges of the
doors (similar to what has happened to the PCC fleet in recent
months) to improve their visibility (when open) to motorist at
TORONTO TR,
Equipml
ELECTRIC PASSENGE
STREET CARS
NO.OF
CLASS
CAR NOS. CARS IN
(Note 3)
IN GROUP BUILDER
INote 21
SERVICE
(Note1J
SEATING LENGTH
WIDTH
TARE/EMPTY
DATE DATE OVERALL
HEIGHT
BUILT ACQUIRED
TYPE CAPACITY OVERALL
lOver OVER TROLLEY
WEIGHT
OVER
INote 51 INote 41
Belt Rail!
ROOf HOOD OR BASE INotes 5&6l
A
430<). OEC.1941·
pce

1),5 J18 84 1017/8 11,.7.8 37.00
JUNE 1948
..,
……… 96
,.., JUlY·NOV.
38 ….
949
A·8
45CX).4!>49 49 195().!~1
JAN.·MAFICH
37.200
96
A· 45W.4~74

ST. lOUIS CAR CO. ,,7
SEPT.-NOV. 50
31,300

462!r46701 47 PULLMAN CO , … OCT. 1952 46-5 1(Y·3 11·,,·
.880
AUG. 1953
A·12 4675·4699

S1 lOUIS CAR CO. 946
OCT,-OEC.

58 4653/8 10·2718 1007/S 38.880
A·13 4700·4747 PULLMAN CO. 1946-<17
NOV. 1952·
53 46,5 10.3 II·:} 38.000
MAY 1953
L· 4000·_ 61
uroe/swlSS INOUS·
TRIAL COMPANY 151G1 LRV
SOS 8,6 1,01/
11,103/4 50.200
L· 4010·4199 11901
UTDC/HAWKER
SIDDELEY lCANAOAl
SPECIAL SERVICE STREET CARS
K· 2300 C.C. & F. co.
92
AUG. 1921
LARGE
58 51.10 8,S 11,15/8 12,0- 50.000
Win
K· 1424 OCT. 1921
p.,
16
,m JAN. 1923 SMAll
Win

41·0 108518 39,100
p.,

onAWA CAR co. SEPT.I9:2J
..
<100 PUllMAN CO. 9<6
MAY 1953 pec
53 46S S,4 10··J·· 11,J 38.000
SUBWAY CARS
G· .,

G.R.C. & W. co. 963
JULY 1963-UBWA
62 57·01/4 10·3JJ!r 11.11112 SEE NOTE 6
MAR. 1954 CAR
0· 5100·5106 954-56
DEC. 1954-A·13362
JUNE 19505 8·
G·J 52OO·SW

956
JULY·NOV. A·16648

8·16192
G~ 5110·5115
…. 59
JULY 1958-A·82B26
MAR. 19513 8..,.,,.
M· r.3OO·5335
,.
M.l.W.lTD.
196
APR. 1962-
84 74,5518 10-37/16
A·59850
FEB. 1963 8·59950
~ …. ,0> HAWKER SIOOElEY ICAN.) , ….. MAY 1966-
OJ HY·4·
,0,·56855
JAN. 1966 B·56175
H· S506-5675 10 1971
JUNE·NOV. ,0,-56700
1971 9·56150
H·J

MAY-JUNE A·62,200

6-68,300
H· 5676-5663 OJ 1914-75
SEPT. 1974-
11
A51.8t:O
DEC. 1975 B·57.6!O
H.,
5670·s.ao7 1976-n OCT. 1976-1978 16
A·61Il65
38 8·
TROLLEY COACHES
VEHICLE NO. DATE
DATE
15•A1-
OVERALL DIMENSIONS
WHEEL
TARE WEIGHT WEIGHT MOTOR
ING
NUMBERS IN BUILDER
BUILT ~ELlVERED
MODEL
CAPA-
HEIGHT
BASE
LOADED EQUIPMH
IN GROUP GROUP . CITY
LENGTH WIDTH
0 Rool Onr.1I
FRONT REAR TOTAL
(No1e 6.
MOTOR 111 H.
935
60
F.I. & T.T.C.
11
1·1968
, .

413· 102· 9·IIY, W··7Y, 2843/4 7.200 12.640 19.840 25.375 CGE 1213
,.
161·1970-n
IlSIT COMMISSION
it Department
: VEHICLES IN SERVICE
DATE: Jan. I, 1m
TRUCKS MOTOR
——,==—–WHEEL GEAR & ,_E_~::.Mc:!.:;~J:1-Tfo;;.~_..,T CONTROLLER
TYPE
~~;~L CENTRES DIA. PINION MOTORS H.P. (Notes 8 & 9)
REMARKS
M~I( £QUIP CO.
P.C.C. 6 2
SIC:
:.C. F. & co.
:.C. & F. co
RK eaulP Co
CC 8·2
•. R.C. &
W.CO.
DOFASCO
Sf INBOARD
CONTROL
CGf TYPE MAC
22 9

6-0 2S,()

S·10·· 26,0

50·4 12,6
n
6-0 22·9 lS
1·0 38.0 30
s··ur· 54·0

ELECTRIC REAR AXLE
BRAKING RATIO
REGENERATIVE 11.59:1 AND DYNAMIC
flYPOID FOUR
43:6 weco ,432J SS weC.·XMA 202 4309. <3lJ 1321, 439ft SCRAPpeo. 79 CARS REBUILT 19n1S IlNCLUDING PROTOTYPE 4J61.
weC·XMA 452
4410 & 4446 CONVERTEO TO R.T. 14 & 16 RAil GRINDING CARS. 46 CARS R£6urL T 1972-13.
see NOTE 9.
WEe ·XMA 202 4513 SCRAPPED. 49 CARS REBUILT 19]2.975
WEC.·XMA 352 PURCH. FROM CINCINNATI STREET RlWY _ 1950. ORIGINAL NOS. IlfO.1I74. 4fi64 STORED.
weC.·XMA452
PURCH. FROM CLEVELAND TRANSIT SYSTEM 1952 ORIGINAL NOS •• m-4249. BUilT WITH MU
CONTROL BUT NEVER USED; CONV(IHED fPR MU OPERATION. 19$4.4631 & 4668 CONVERTED
1914 TO SURfACE RAIL GRINDING CARS !N·lO & W·ll. SEE NOTE 9, 4&46 STORED.
PURCH.
fROM CLEVELAND TRANSIT SYSTEM
.
ORIGINAL NOS. 42fi0….U74. BUILl FOR
WECXMA 452 LOUISVILLE RAILWAYS 525.
001·524 BUT NOT OPERATED. EOUIPPED FOR MU OPERA nON.
1953-954. SEE NOTE 9,
PURCH.
fROM BIRMINGHAM (ALA,) ELECTRIC CO. 1952. ORIG. NOS, 8JO…347. 4702J(JJ/06-12I141
16-18/20122124..36/39-41143.7 SOLO OR SCRAPPED. 4100 TRAINING CAR OCT./66.
SPAR
TWO
,…,
1976 DELIVERY.
50 GARRETT

(jARRETT ~IRST CAR (-40021 ON PROPERTY DEC. 29. 19n.
15.56:11
1978-80 DEUVERY.
HELICAL
FOUR
50 KlS·XA SEE REMARK I
50:17 WH·533T4
SEE REMARK 2
HElICAL fOUR
:l5 SEE REMARK J
69:13 WH,sIOA
SEE REMARK 4
HYPOID FOUR
55 WEC.·XMA 352 PURCH. FROM BIRMINGHAM (ALA.)
E~ECTRIC CO.·I962. ORIGINAL NO. 800. TO TRAINING CAR

WEC.·l432J SERVICE OCT. 196&.
l{,,
FOUR

PCM·14AI 4
CARS DESTROYED BY FIRE MAR. Tlf83 6004, 6005.6l56 & 5OS9, CARS IS03J & 5(D4 HAD DRIVING
C.P,·~ CONTflDlS REMOVED, JULY 19117.
2
CARS DESTROYED BY FIRE MAR. TlI63, 5204, 6200.
ORIQINAl DYNAMIC BRAKE EDUIPMENT REMOVED 1968 & 1957: ALSO CP.·CI12A1 MOTORS
TRANSFERRED TO NEW SERVICE CARS.
SEE
FOUR
20 f1~Ji~E1·M.
REMARKS C.G.E.·I25IPAI
SAFETY
FOUR 6388 TO
s.391 METIRED DEC. 20, 1976 Due TO FIRE OCT, 15, 1976.
,,, A.C.E.C. m CWL·XCA248LC
11.11:11 ES648–A
FOUR
BRUSH
,,
TMC38-42
HITACHI CHOPPER
WCL·XCA248LD
FOUR
26
GARREn 68()4..QWJ7 ADDEO TO ORDER TO REPLACe SJ88..6381. AS OF 12131m, 40 CARS ACCEPTED, GARRETT CHOPPER
38 MORE ON PROPERTY.
XXl622-1
TURNING -RADIUS
TIRE SIZE
11.00·20
OR lIJ)()·Z2
BODY CLEARANCE
.
39-3
REMARK ,FIRST VEHICLE (SERIES 2300·24961 Of NEW CARS PURCHASED BY TIC IN 1921. ORJGINAllY 2
MAN CAR. CONVERTED TO 1 MAN IPROGRESSIVEL YI IN 1935/36/40. ASSIGNED AS I-IILLCREST
INSTRUCTION CAR. MARCH 14. 1951. RETIRED APRil 1963, SOLD TO C.R H.A. FDA CANADIAN
RA
ILWAY MUSEUM JULY 17, 1963. lEASED TO TIC & RfTURNED NOV 21 1974
NOT REHABILITATED.
TO BE RETURNED TO C.R.H.A. ITORONTO), 1978: .
CA NAD IAN
114 R A I L
We are pleased to present two views of # 4002 the first LRV to arrive
in Canada from Switzerland. The blind side photo was taken on Jan. 11,
1978, the first day under the wire in Toronto. The front 3/4 photo
was taken at the TTC Hillcrest shops on February 9, 1978. Last minute
news indicates that the second LRV # 4003 arrived on February 24, and
will permit MU testing at the TTC. If all goes according to plan
Toronto passengers should be enjoying their first new streetcars in
26 years sometime in the month of May.
CA NAD IAN 115 R A I L
CANADIAN
116
R A I L
J, _..7St~
A~I:::~~t2J ~I;! I 11TfIl1l, I ~fITfTIllJ,; ~ r;!Tl D~I-l ,
J~ ~L-J_~~ ~ . L-J ~IY!
II _ n nm _____________ n ____________ J·,~:;::L_____ __mm
l
[1
I-£t< -
Ii –II!
II I~
..,. -,
f =tr .. :r:r:::.::r= n_ –,r: –:;£;:li
NUMBER OF SEATS 47
STANDING ROOM … llrJ, 1 PERSON PEA 0,14 ~ 84
TOTAL PASSENGERS III
CANADIAN 117 R A I L
night. With white doors, the safety people seem to be satisfied
and have dropped the hatch marks request.
The other change in the livery involves the band of white
along the car sides above the windows. Rather than terminating it
short of the destination window, it will now continue around the
front of the car above the window (identical to the treatment around
the rear destination window).
The LRV order recently placed with Hawker-Siddeley Canada
Ltd. at Thunder Bay (190 cars) has experienced a delay in start up
due to extended negotiations between the Province and the builder
over the final price. The Province in July ordered the UTDC to
award this contract to Hawker-Siddeley, the second lowest bidder
(MLW-Bombardier was lowest), in an effort to keep a healthy transit
industry at home. Deliveries from Hawker-Siddeley will not commence
until 1979 but the contract will be completed in 1980.
The $39.6 million order with Hawker-Siddeley entails the
construction of vehicle shells and final assembly and finish of the
cars. Separate orders have already been placed by the UrDC for the
supply of major sub-components, such as the chopper control to come from
Garrett. The Ontario Government will pay the full cost of the
first 75 cars and 75% of the cost of the remaining cars. These
financial arrangements were decided in 1975. The Province, to its
credit, realized that after so much research and development had
been spent on the CLRV program by the UTDC (with generous amounts
of taxpayers money) there was a genuine fear that the high vehicle
cost (about $475,000 in 1975 dollars), even with the existing
generous provincial subsidy, might force Metropolitan Toronto (who
also subsidizes the capital cost of the CLRVs) to back down, thereby
forcing the streetcar replacement program to be abandoned and
leaving the TTC back at square one. In Canada there is no federal
aid to mass transit but in Ontario the provincial government has
filled this void admirably as evidenced by the Toronto experience.
Not only is Toronto getting new streetcars, they are also
getting new streetcar or LRT (light rail transit) routes. Metropolitan
Toronto Council, by a vote of 23-8, on June 28th. 1977, approved
and authorized funds for the $108-million 4.4 mile light rail line
which will connect the eastern extension of the Bloor-Danforth
Subway (to Eglinton & Kennedy Avenues) to the Scarborough Town Centre
(located near Hwy 401 and McCowan Rd.). A provincial subsidy will
pay three quarters of the cost of the line, which is projected to
be completed in 1982 (about 2 years after the subway extension to
Kennedy opens).
The high cost of the line may be attributed in part to
the desire by planners and Scarborough politicians for it to be a
showcase for LRT in Metro (this is the first section of an
elaborate LRT network planned for the year 2001) and the rapid
transit nature (grade separations, elaborate station) in the
vicinity of the Town Centre itself. It is hoped that, once over­
whelming public acceptance of the project is assured, future LRT
lines need not be overbuilt to this extent.
A future 4-mile extension of the light rail line to the
Malvern Town site (in the extreme north-east section of the Borough
of Scarborough) has been approved in principle by Scarborough Council
but will likely wait another 2 or 3 years before Metro gives its
approval.
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CANADIAN R A L
The above ground and below views of the massive Saint Clair West ~tn.
One thousand feet of ramps were constructed to permit streetcars to
descend from St.Clair Ave. to the below ground loading platform. Also
included is a car and bus loop which will permit easy access to the cars
no matter what the weather.
CANADIAN
120
R A I L
In the Queen City another form of electric surface transit
has received a boost with the announcement that trolley coach
operation commenced on Sunday November 20th over TTCs route 74-
Mt. Pleasant. Base service over the 1.75 mile route is provided by 3
coaches operating on an 8 minute headway,and rush service consists
of 4 coaches on a 6 min. headway.
The mode of transportation on Mt. Pleasant Road has come
full circle. Torontos first trackless trolley operation was seen
on this street on June 19, 1922 when four Packard-Brill trolley
coaches commenced service. This pioneer trackless operation was
short-lived and on November 3, 1925, streetcar service was inaugu­
rated on Mt. Pleasant Rd. (an extension of the St. Clair route).
Following abandonment of streetcar service on July 25, 1976, the
route has been temporarily operated by diesel buses until the trolley
coach overhead could be installed.
To sum it all up Toronto has a first rate transportation
network, one that all Canadians and indeed especially all Torontonians
can be justly proud of.




/} SI. Clair Av.
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SCARBOROUGH LIGHT RAIL LINE
This 4.4 mile light rapid transit line was approved by
Metropolitan Toronto Council
in June and by the
Ontario Municipal Board in September, 1977. The
light rapid transit line will link the future eastern
terminus of the Bloor·Danforth Subway, Kennedy
and Eghnton, with the Scarborough Town Centre.
Construction of the
$1 08.7 million project will begin in
1980 and the line will open in 1982 .
New generation light rail vehicles, similar to the
new street cars on order for the surface system, will
be used
on the line.
The completion of the eastern subway extension
and light rail line will bring rapid transit service direct
to the heart of the Borough of Scarborough.
The ….. M
business car
ON YOUR TOES, IF YOU ARE A TRAVELLER PLANNING TO USE AMTRAKS
Adirondack out of Montreals Windsor Station. Departure
times have been published as follows:
June /77 8:15 a.m.
Oct. /77 8:05 a.m.
Nov. /77 10:00 a.m.
Jan. /78 9:05 a.m.
Moral: enquire ill-advance-and save yourself some trouble.
But on the bright side, AMTRAK has decided to restore a 12.6 mile
length of track near Albany, which will revive direct access to the
Rensselaer, N.Y. station, east of Albany, avoiding a time-consuming
facking movement that trains must now make. This improvement will
cut more than 30 minutes from the schedule of such trains as the
Lake Shore Limited.
VANCOUVER BOUND? IF YOU WANT TO EAT IN RAILWAY FLAVOUR
surroundings, a useful summary appears in the Sandhouse
(Pacific Coast Branch, CRHA) , Jan. /78. Example, the
list is led by Frisbys Railcar Restaurant, north foot of
Carroll Street, in Gastown: 682-6888. Located adjacent to
the CP tracks, in CPR car # 8, built 1929. Six establishments
are listed, in addition to the snack bars in the two rail
stations; plus one in Courtenay on Vancouver Island and one
in Lansdowne Pork Richmond. Others under construction are
mentioned, including one using heavyweight Pullmans.
IMPACT OF TERRORISM -DUTCH RAILROADS ESTIMATES THE STATE­
controlled railway system lost the equivalent of between
$6.5 million and $8.7 million last year because of fears
raised by terrorist assaults on trains. The hijackings
(by South Moluccans) have made the public lose confidence
in the railroads, despairs M.G. De Bruin, the president­
director of the system. He calculates the growth in rail
passenger travel has been cut in half since the last attack,
when more than 50 hostages were held captive for three weeks.
(Wall Street Journal, Jan. 16/78)
CANADIAN 123 R A I L
THE ON-AGAIN OFF-AGAIN SAGE OF THE E & N MAY HAVE BEEN
resolved by resumption of freight service os of Dec. 16/77
and cancellation of passenger service as of Jan. 31/78.
John Hoffmeister of Victoria notes that freight and passenger
service was resumed Dec. 16/77 between Parksville and Courtenay
(44.5 miles) but Courtenay-Victoria passenger service was sub­
sequently killed by order of the CTC. Regular freight service
runs Tuesdays and Fridays from Wellcox Terminal in Nanaimo to
Courtenay and appeors to be at least the pre-1975 volume of traffic
when the line was closed. The bridges at French Creek and Sable
River have been rebuilt by CP at a cost of some $2 million.
COMMUTER COLLEGE ON CP RAILS MONTREAL-LAKESHORE LINE WILL REMIND
old-timers of the school cars once familior across northern
Ontario; one such car can be seen at the Canadian Railway
Museum. But the 1978 version is a joint venture of CP Rail and
John Abbott College (Ste. Anne de Bellevue) and involves the
use of a two-classroom, sound proofed car outfitted with special
educational equipment, running in train # 274, Rigaud-Windsor
Station. Registered students may take courses in French and
Business Management. Each course runs 16 weeks (from Jan. 30/78)
and costs $75.00 each (transportation not included). Class
instruction begins as the train leaves Beaconsfield at 7;48 a.m.,
with arrival at Windsor scheduled for 8:30 a.m.
—————————-e
CANADIAN
124
R A I L
MOUNTAIN CREEK BRIDGE, NEAR ROGERS PASS, B.C. IS BEING REPLACED BY
CP Rail with a new structure 600 ft. long and 136ft.
above Mountain Creek, 150 ft. upstream from the old one.
It will have a concrete ballasted deck for more efficient mainten­
ance and the elimination of fire hazards. The new bridge is the
third to span the creek since completion of the line. The original
was a timber trestle built in 1885. It was higher (164 ft.) and
longer(1086 ft.) than its successors and contained more than two
million board feet of timber. By 1902, as rail traffic grew rapidly,
a new bridge was opened, 585 ft. long; this was greatly strengthened
in 1928-29 to its present capacity. With completion of the current
project next summer, an average of 22 trains a day, in both directions,
will cross the bridge. These include the roads heaviest solid trains
carrying grain, coal, potash and sulphur.
News item from CP Rail News, Photos courtesy CP Photographic Services
and Mr. Frank Stelfox.
————————–. —————————
AND SPEAKING OF COMMUTERS, A COCHRANE (ALTA.) WOMAN HAS BEGUN
a petition to have a commuter train service daily between
Banff and Calgary, over CP tracks. She claims support from
people in Banff, from 28 people in Canmore who commute to Calgary
and skiers. Commuters already crowd the Trans-Canada Highway
between Cochrane and Calgary, a distance of about 25 kilometres,
she said.
(Canadian Press, Dec. 10/77)
A 25 TON 0-4-0 BUILT BY MLW IN 1917 HAS BEEN LOANED TO THE SIMCOE
County Museum at Midhurst, Ontario by Allan Byers of
Atherley. It worked in the Kirkfield nuarries for many
years and was bought from the quarry by Mr. Byers after they were
closed. The locomotive rests on a section of track in front of
the former CN Gilford station which has been moved to the museum
and serves as a boutique.
(Walter Bedbrook in The Turnout,
CRHA Toronto & York Div.)
THE INUKSHUK EXPRESS IS SCHEDULED TO LINK HAY RIVER AND PINE
Point, N.W.T., March 19-25/78, in connection with the
Fifth Artic Winter Games at Hay River. This first
ever passenger train in the Territories and the first over the
Great Slave Railway will carry both athletes and spectators.
Peter Lofthouse, who reports this venture (as did George France)
promises an article for early publication in Canadian Rail.
Peter explains that an inukshuk is a man-shaped, piled-rock type
of marker built by Inuit to facilitate travel across the barren
tundra.
ALBERTAS HERITAGE DAY WEEKEND (FIRST WEEKEND IN AUGUST) WILL
include a celebration of the sixtieth anniversary of
the Peace River Bridge, reports George France of
Peace River. Plans are afoot, with the co-operation of Northern
Alberta Railways, to operate a passenger train across the bridge,
to Roma Jct. and return.
TREASURE IN THE WEST? SIMPLOT CHEMICAL OF BRANDON, MANITOBA,
is rumoured to have an old DL&W SW-l (# 1) and a GE
44-tonner ex-NYO&W ( # 103), reports The Milepost of
Midwestern Rail Association Inc. Can some friendly spy add details,
please?
FANTRIP OVER THE GWWD OUT OF WINNIPEG IS EXPECTED TO BE PART OF
the convention program of the National Model Railroaders
Association, Thousand Lakes Region, May 26-28, at
Winnipeg.
CN ORE TRAIN SERVICE ON THE MARMORA SUBDIVISION WAS SCHEDULED TO
end March 31/78 as Bethlehem Steel closed its iron-ore
mine in Marmora, Onto Five-day-a-week service ran
Belleville-Marmora-Picton-Trenton-Belleville (138.6 miles) hauling
iron pellets to Picton for loading on lake carriers to the U.S.
The mine had been producing 500,000 tons of iron ore pellets a
year.
(The Turnout, CRHA Toronto & York Div.)
CANADIAN
126
R A I L
ITS ONLY MONEY -IAN SINCLAIR, CHAIRMAN AND CHIEF EXECUTIVE
officer of Canadian Pacific, was paid a total of
$330,450 in salary and directors fees in 1977.
Total includes fees for serving as chairman and/or director of
subsidiaries (e.g. Canadian Pacific Investments and CP Air).
F.S. Burbidge, president of CP, received a total of $193,950.
Keith Campbell, company vice-president and senior executive
officer of CP Rail, received $146,550. Sinclair last year
received a salary increase of $3,650.
(Toronto Globe & Mail)
CNS CENTRAL STATION AT MONTREAL IS SET FOR IMPROVEMENTS AND
expansion to cost some $15-million under a three­
phase program to be completed over the next five to
eight years. The stations shopping mall will be the first area
affected. Later work will encompass changes to the adjoining
Queen Elizabeth Hotel, parking areas, office plaza, etc.
(Montreal Star)
AMTRAKS MONTREALER WAS SCHEDULED TO BE RE-EQUIPPED WITH
new Amfleet cars, Feb. 27, despite the trains
uncertain future (the words used by an Amtrak
spokesman in Washington). Ridership figures show 102,910
passengers rode the train during fiscal year 1977, compared
to 99,960 during fiscal year 1976. Amtrak routes are being
re-.examine.d .. by the. U.S. D.E1partmen.t of T.r.a.nspor.tation, a.cting
under a congressional order. A nominee to Amtraks board of
directors has proposed the Montrealer be eliminated in favor
of a day train that would run only as far north as St. Albans, Vt.
(Ottawa Citizen)
NEWLY-FORMED ADIRONDACK RAILROAD CO., WHICH WILL OPERATE THE
ex-NYC Saranac Lake Branch from Remsen, N.Y. to
Lake Placid, has added two steamers to its fold,
reports Block Line. Joining ex-FEC 4-6-2 # 148 will be
ex-DL&W 2-6-0 # 565 and ex-CP 2-8-2 # 3254 which was formerly
stored at Ashland, Pa. The 2-8-2 will be overhauled at Reading
Shops and she and # 148 will provide regular power for the
Adirondacks passenger trains.
UNITRAIN RECORD -CP RAIL, 500 LINE, BELT RAILWAY OF CHICAGO
and Norfolk & Western have been moving 78-car
fertilizer unitrains on a 3756-mile route between
Calgary and Maumee, Ohio (near Toledo). CP provides the 100-ton
cars. Power is changed at Portal, N.D. and Chicago. Round
trips are scheduled for a 14-day turn. Service began last
October and ended in February as the spring planting season
neared. ( h 47 f R d h
TeO 0 a~lroa Ent us~asts,
Inc., Portland Div.)
OLD MAN WINTER MAY HAVE GONE FOR 1977_78 BUT NOT BEFORE OUMPING A
crippling amovnt of snow on the vsvally balmy Southwestern regi
ons of Ontario. CN wos up to mother noture however
and hod called up cob vnits 9178 and 9179 to serve on snowplow ser_
vice in this region. The units were modified in Toronto in early
January to include protective screens over the windshields, as well
as special protection for the oir intake areas. The units were usual­
ly assigned in a back-to-bock configuration but did operate with
re9ular units on occosion. Called in fro~ Western Canada these two u
ntts joined GP-9 # 4530 a notive of the region which hod also been
especially enuipped in the above manner. Gord Taylor located the
plow extra in eNs Stratford Shops being serviced on JanuClfy 14,
1978. Our thanks to Gord for keeping vs posted on snow removal oper­a
tions from Western Ontario during that me~oroble winter of 77_78.

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