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Canadian Rail 281 1975

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Canadian Rail 281 1975

Canadian Rail ~

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rrn~~ [p)1b~~~lYJ
~ ~ ~ IFi1 cc I~
S.S.Worthen and P.R.Hastings, M.D.
Photographs by P.R.Hastings, M.D.
~j))uring the bloom and full flower of its youth and
middle age, the Raspberry Branch of the Maine
Central Railroad emerged from the stem of its
erstwhile parent at Quebec Junction, New Hamp-
shire and spread north 109 miles through the upper
valley of the Connecticut River, over the height
of land between the Connecticut and St. Lawrence,
across the International Boundary, to terminate in
a tiny twiglet at Lime Ridge, Province of Quebec .
As it flourished, the sap which nourished its
growth was, in the main, traffic from forest pro­
ducts of the region, but included some through fr­
eight and passenger traffic from the Quebec Cen­
tral Railway to and from Portland, Maine.
II
o
But Like many another of its contemporaries, the Raspberry Br­
anch eventually withered an died, being superfluous as a bridge­
route and having fulfilled its destiny as a development railway for
those sections of Quebecs Eastern Townships through which it ran.
Unlike some of these contemporaries, however, the Raspberry Branch
was carefully husbanded by judicious pruning from time to time, as
it wilted, so that even today viable segments are still in operation,
)tlTHE END OF THE RASPBERRY BRANCH AT LIME RIDGE, QUEBEC, IN 1946: THE
old Maine Central Railroad depot and engine house are still in use
by the Dominion Lime Company and its ancient 0-4-0ST Number 2. The
quarry is behind and to the right of the engine house; the kilns are
behind and to the right of the photographer.
A 1937 ESSAY BY THE PHOTOGRAPHER (PRH) WITH A 120 KODAK BOX-CAMERA.
The subjects are the photographers brother, John, and an ex-Quebec
Central 4-4-0, in the cab of which the two boys had ridden a couple
of years earlier, while she switched around and took a couple of
loads of lime to Dudswell Junction. The 4-4-0 was superceded by the
ugly 0-4-0ST.
CANADIAN 168 R A I L
or ore about to be re-placed in operation. Granted, some of the orig­
inal shoots have been isolated from the parent stem and are, as of
this writing, virtually lifeless and the subjects of proposals for
discontinuance. The portions still attached to the parent plant are
also withered and practically leafless, hardly justifying the some­
times-weekly freight service advertised.
The story of the Coos Railroad Comp~ny, the Upper Coos Railway
Companies of Vermont and New Hampshire and the pendant stem in the
Province of Quebec, the Hereford Railway Company, might be consider-
ed as a classic example of the potentiation of maximum service in
conditions of submarginal operation. Born in the 1880 whirlwind of
burgeoning railroad operations in the northeastern United States, it
perished in the whirlwind which anticipated the financial dust-storms
of the 1930s.
A first g1impse of the Raspberry Branch in the 20s could only
aggravate the questions posed by the presence ofa senile Quebec Cen­
tral Railway 4-4-0, puttering around the lime-kilns near the dilap­
idated terminal at Lime Ridge, Quebec. In addition, there was one of
the prettiest little ten-wheelers to be found, switching cars around
the yards of the Canadian Pacific Railway at Sawyerville, Quebec, on
the branch from Cookshire, junction with the main line of the CPR
from Montreal to Saint John, New Brunswick.
-… :-~{-:!:
c.~~ No; the observer could hardly be aware that there was a
tionship between these two isolated pieces of trackage. But a
c~cyears later, a conversation with the engineer of a runty 0-4-0
dletanker which, in the interval, had replaced the QCR 4-4-0 at
Ridge, elicited the information that this cachectic quarry spur
once been a part of the Raspberry Branch.
I started work here for the Maine Central back in 1918.
rela­
few
sad­
Lime
had
How could such a thing be? Responding to a barrage of questions,
the engineer explained that, at one time, Lime Ridge was the north­
ern terminus of the Maine Centrals branch-line from Lancaster and
Colebrook, New Hampshire, via Coos Junction on the Boston and Maine,
and North Stratford, on the Grand Trunks line to Portland.
Incredible, indeed~ But looking around the decaying yard at Lime
Ridge, evidences of former glories were apparent. A ramshackle,three­
stall enginehouse, a turntable and a two-storey weatherbeaten frame
depot testified that this place was once something more than the end
of a 4-mile quarry branch line. The engineer-friend further elabor-
ated that he was once night-hostler for a 190-class Maine Central
passenger engine, which came in on the daily passenger train from
Lancaster, New Hampshire, as well as the 240-class freight engine
of the daily turn-around wayfreight from Beecher Falls, Vermont.
This information was more than sufficient to arouse the latent
explorer instinct of the most luke-warm railroad enthusiast and,
forthwith, the search was on. Gradually, the history of the Rasp-
berry Branch unfolded, part of the drama of turn-of-the-century ra­
ilrooding which hitherto had been relatively undiscovered and unre­
corded.
But before proceeding further, it is necessary to explain the
origin of the name Raspberry Branch. The line was so baptised by
a white-haired engineer on the Boston and Maines Mountain Road, who
in his day had piloted hundreds of passenger trains, in whose con-
sists were baggage-car loads of fresh raspberries, product of the
burned-over stretches of woods in the upper Connecticut River i:re-

CANADIAN 170 R A I L
gions. Some shipments of the succulent fruit, destined for the mar­
kets in the cities of the eastern seaboard, originated in the Prov-
ince of Quebec. All of this traffic was handed over to the B&M at
Coos Junction, just north of Lancaster, New Hampshire. And so was
established the nickname and floral analogy which thereafter provi­
ded a lively and unique description of the curious branch line! main
line railroad.
The search was on. In Channells History of Compton County,
the planting, cultivation and growth of the Raspberry Branch -or
at least the northern portion of it -was recorded. Settlement of
this portion of the Province of Quebec began in the early 1800s,when
pioneers from New England came north across the yet-unlocated Inter­
national Boundary. In the 1830s, new settlers from Scotland arrived
to take up homesteads and, ofter the completion of the St. Lawrence
& Atlantic/Atlantic & St. Lawrence Railroad in 1853, French-speaking
settlers from parishes to the north and west came to the region.
But the greatest impulse for the building of a north-south rail­
way in this developing area came with the completion of the St. Fran­
cis and Megantic International Railway from Sherbrooke to Megantic
on the lake of the same name in 1887. This was the pioneer railway
which,in the same year,would be purchased by the Canadian Pacific
Railway Company and opened, in 1889, to Saint John, New Brunswick,
the famous CPR Short Line.
There was another and equally important impulse from the south.
The immense tracts of forest around the headwaters of the Connect-
icut River had long been in the eye of lumbermen like George Van
Dyke, who had sawmills on the Connecticut at several locations and
who, in fact, was the last if not the first man to supervise log-
drives on this famous New England river.
But regardless of the origins of the impulse, its result was
the incorporation of the Hereford Branch Railway Company in 1887, to
build from a point on the Atlantic and North West Railway Company,
successor to the St. Francis & Megantic International, the Interna­
tional Railway Company and the Canadian Pacific, in the Township of
Eaton (Cookshire, Quebec) to the International Boundary in the Town­
ship of Hereford. Perhaps the term Branch was too ignominious; the
following year, the corporate title was changed to the Hereford Rail­
way Company and powers were granted to the new corporation to pur­
chase the 4-mile railway of the Dominion Lime Company from its con­
nection with the Quebec Central Railway at Dudswell Junction to Lime
Ridge and the limestone quarry where, as previously described, our
investigation began.
According to Channells history, clearing of the right-of-way
sout h from Cooks hir e Junction t hro ug h the Thirty-M ile Woods was
completed the same winter. Construction was not without drama re-
miniscent of earlier and wilder days in the Great West. To lay the
iron, a gang of some 1,200 labourers, mostly recent immigrants from
Italy, was brought to the Eastern Townships in 1888. Construction
progressed at a lively pace all summer, until one day in September,
the construction crews discovered that the contractors, Messrs. Shir­
ley, Corbett and Brennan, had decamped with $ 25,000 cash and $30,000
in unpaid accounts, leaving the workers without their pay, the local
merchants with unpaid bills, the local farmers and labourers without
monies due and the local investors without their investment.
Two days later, when the Italian construction workers came to
the realization that their wages were lost, violence erupted, as
CANADIAN 1 71 R A I L
Channels history records:
Then a tumult arose. Those hot-tempered men from
sunny Italy, strangers in this country who knew
nothing of the laws and could not understand the
language of the people, worked themselves up
into a terrible state of excitement. They final­
ly went so far as to commence destroying proper­
ty, throwing away quantities of small tools and
pulling up a piece of track. Their actions and
threats became so alarming that the people cal­
led on the Warden of the County for protection.
There were rumors of atrocities and dreadful tales were told of
great
the
of
for
train-crews savaged and murdered. The apprehension became go
that ten companies of Her Ma jestys Militia were brought from
58th. Batallion barracks at nearby Bury, to reinforce the troop
cavalry at Cookshire. The troops patrolled the line to the south
ten days and the threat of further violence finally subsided.
The Hereford Railway Company was obliged to come to the rescue.
It paid the bill of $ 4,600 for the services of the military, re-
hired -and, it may be assumed, paid -the Italian construction work-
ers and the construction was pushed on despite an unusually rainy
autumn. On January 6, 1889, the last rail was spiked in place to com­
plete the iron way between the Junction with the Atlantic & North
West Railway at Cookshire, Quebec and the brand-new Upper Coos Rail­
road of Vermont at Beecher Falls, on the United States side of the
International Boundary, which latter railroad optimistically also
afforded connections to all points in the Eastern States.
Less than a fortnight later, the first freight shipment, con-
sisting of several carloads of lumber, was dispatched to a southern
destination and the Raspberry Branch was in business.
By the summer of 89, the ombitious little line had built two
bridges and laid 13 more miles of track north from Cooks hire Junction
through the swamp to Dudswell Junction on the QCR and had recondi­
tioned the four-mile bronch to Lime Ridge. It could be presumed that
the Quebec Central Railway, a thrifty undertaking and the only rail­
way in Canada and the United States to continue paying dividends to
its shareholders during the depression of 1895, was quite incensed
at this invasion of its freight-revenue territory. But this seems not
to have been the case, since the lime from the quarries and kilns was
consigned principally to the QC s on-line pulp and paper mill~, or
to railways to which it provided advantageous connection. The -most
that the Hereford/Upper Coos partnership could hope for was the oc­
casional car of lime to the Paper mills of Groveton or Berlin, New
Hampshire, in which case the revenue was shared with the Grand Trunk
or the Boston and Maine.
Before the snow came in the winter of 89-90, the telegraph
line along the Raspberry Branch had been strung and regular pas­
senger trains were scheduled, although they were operated by the Up-
per Coos Railroad combination. It was now possible to ship freight
and transport passengers between Portland, Maine and Quebec City,
by a route other than those provided by the established companies
like the Grand Trunk and the Boston and Maine. The new route over
the Hereford and QCR was somewhat more direct and a little shorter
than that via Sherbrooke, or via Richmond and the GTR.
As a
fitting climax to the completion of the Hereford Railway,

CANADIAN 173 R A I L
the Company was entitled to large sums in subsidies from the Gov­
ernment of Quebec, less about $ 45,000 which was withheld to pay the
claims against the contractors who the year before had absconded with
the money. All in all, the Raspberry Branch had done right well in
putting in operation some 53 miles of railway in a little over a
year and, unlike so many similar undertakings, had fulfilled the
terms of its charter to the letter~ Things looked so encouraging that
in 1890 the Maine Central gingerly essayed a short-term gamble and
leased the Hereford Railway and its connections, the Coos Railroad,
the Upper Coos Railroad of New Hampshire and the Upper Coos Railroad
of Vermont for the usual term of 999 years.
Incidents in the eorly days of the Hereford Railway are stronge
and fascinating. A grandfather of one of the authors (PRH) of this
review assembled the whole family in the farmyard near Sawyerville,
Quebec, to watch the first train coming north through the woods on
the east side of the Eaton River.
It was a wood-birner, of course, he related, and the wood, cut
the previous winter, was piled high along the track, so that when
the engine got low on fuel, they just stopped and loaded what the
tender could carry and then went merrily on their way.
There were other incidents. The same uncle remembers a freight
wreck somewhere south of Sawyerville, in which one or two cars of
western corn were broken open, with corn allover the place; so much
so that the engine could hardly get started, as the corn on the rails
made the drivers spin as though the rails had been greased. We kids
thought it a great joke ta see the train stuck on western corn. This
happened when there was plenty of snow on the ground and, after the
railroad people had salvaged all they could, we were told to help
ourselves, so we took home all we could, snow and all, for poultry
feed. All we had to do was to pound up the frozen snow and the
chickens did the rest~
Similar hiatuses in operation were occurring in the early 20s
when, on a late-autumn evening, a fierce westerly wind pushed a
lone freight car over the wood trig and out of the siding at St-
Isidore-dAukland (mile 27.27 from Dudswell Junction, altitude 1,538
feet). The boxcar trundled slowly out of the siding and on to the
main line, gathering speed down the descending grade through Don-
caster and Clifton. Clattering over the curves, it just negotiated
those at the approaches to the bridge over the Clifton River and
then rapidly lost its speed on the climb up to Sawyerville (Mile 19.67
altitude 885 feet). It is said that, fortunately, the agent at
St-Isidore the next day reported the missing car to the dispatcher at
Dudswell Junction before the narthbound passenger train surprised the
maverick, stopped dead on the main line in the woods on the eastern
approach to the bridge aver the river near Clifton.
It is a matter of fact that the Raspberry Branch was largely
dependent on its three southern connections: the Upper Coos Railroad
of Vermont, from Beecher Falls, Vermont to just north of West Stew­
artstown, New Hampshire and from the State line in Brunswick to the
State line in Maidstone; the Upper Coos Railroad of New Hampshire,
from the State line in West Stewartstown to the State line in Strat-
~ ON A DAY IN 1946, THE QUEBEC CENTRAL FREIGHT, HEADED BY ONE OF THE
ubiquitous CPR D 10 4-6-0 steam locomotives, held the main line. The
branch to Lime Ridge swings away to the left.

CANADIAN 175 R A I L
ford, and the Coos County Railroad, from the Vermont-New Hampshire
State line in Maidstone to Coos Junction, where the Boston & Maines
Whitefield-Gorham, New Hampshire subdivision crossed and connected
with the Maine Central and the Coos Railroads. This multiplicity of
charters was a legal requirement to permit construction in the two
states. The swing across the Connecticut River into the State of
Vermont was necessitated beacuse the Boston & Maine had already lo­
cated on the east bank as far as Gorham and, beyond that place, to
North Startford, the Grand Trunk Railroad was the occupant.
The dates of completion of the line between North Stratford, New
Hampshire and Coos Junction are not clear. Poors Manual of Rail­
roads for 1908 states that the Upper Coos Railroad was chartered in
1884 and completed over the 55 miles from Quebec Junction and Beecher
Falls in 1891. The Report of the Vermont Railroad Commissioners for
1890 states that the Maine Central was still working on the 33-mile
portion between Quebec Junction and North Stratford and was opera-
ting trains to and from Lime Ridge, Quebec, with trackage rights over
the Grand Trunk Railroad from North Stratford to Gorham and the Bos­
ton and Maine thence to Coos Junction.
The construction of these various railroads by the Maine Central
effectively stopped the northward expansion of the Boston and Maine
up the Connecticut River valley. By constructing the line north of
North Stratford first, extension of the B&M north of Groveton was
effectively forestalled. The maine Central then built the connecting
portions at its leisure. The Vermont Railroad Commissioners there-
after reported that the line was well-built and in excellent con-
dition with best quality ballast and well-worked.
During the three decades following the completion of this hyphen­
ated route, the Raspberry Branch was in the prime of its life. It
was a healthy organism, in a rather prim New England way, but it
did not aspire to the uncouth effulgency of some of its competitors.
The aforementioned uncles reminiscences are illustrative:
Every fall, for some years, double-engined trains
came east hauling double-deck cars of lambs and
we were told they were headed for Portland and
ships for transport to the English market. It
always seemed to me that they sent thousands of
them. I well remember in my school-days that, be­
sides all the other activities on the railway
and there were plenty -just one outfit alone
loaded 20 cars of wood daily, so that two and four­
horse sleds were going from early morning to late
at night, some with squared birch to be shipped
abroad and others with saw-logs and telegraph
poles. The excursion trains were a great joy to
us kids, when we had money enough to make the
trip to Sherbrooke Fair. Most who could assembled
at the station to see the trains come and go, most
of the year round; no Ionder most of us got
train5.tis
~ COOKSHIRE, QUEBEC, WAS A WONDERFUL PLACE TO PHOTOGRAPH STEAM POWER
in 1948. A double .. headed freight lith engines Numbers 5396 and 5332
and a string of reefers are in the passing track. The Salyerville
Sub, once the Hereford Railway, runs alongside the CPR main line
and then follows the Eaton River, Ihile the CPR climbs the hill to
the summit at Birchton.

CA NAD I AN 177 R A I L
Reports on the Statistics of Steam Railways of Canada, a copy
of which is in the Billings Library of the University of Vermont at
Burlington, provide a picture of the condition of the Raspberry Br­
an c h in 1 905. The rail was s t i 11 the 0 rig ina 1 56 -po u n d s tee I, w h i c h
incidentally can be found even today on the Lime Ridge spur of the
Quebec Central. The heaviest grade was a moderate 66 feet to ~the
mile and the sharpest curve had a tight 955-foot radius. The lions
share of the freight traffic, 40,954 train-miles, was handled by
mixed trains, with but 4,615 freight-only train-miles recorded. Pas­
senger trains totalled 22,411 miles at a sedate average speed of 26
miles per hour. But the passenger train load averaged barely a frac­
tion over 1 per train-mile, so it is not surprising that the Here­
ford Railway earned only 70% of its expenses for the year. Products
of the lumber industry accounted for almast 80% of the freight ton­
nage.
To comply with Canadian Customs and Excise Department require-
ments, the Maine Central leased three locomotives to the Hereford
Railway, together with two sleeping cars for use on the Portland-Que­
bec passenger trains in the summer only, one first-class coach and
two combination baggage-passenger cars. The Baley Pathfinder Rail­
way Guide for 1905 said that there was :one through passenger train
daily from Portland to Lime Ridge, plus a daily mixed train from
Beecher Falls, Vermont to Lime Ridge. The mixed train was given a
generous five hours and fifteen minutes for the 54-~ile trip and,
from this, it might be concluded that there was a good deal of local
work.
South of Beecher Falls, only the passenger, Train 224, was shown
in the guide, suggesting that freight trains on the Upper Coos Rail­
roads were not hampered in their runs by the presence of a com­
bination or passenger car on the rear-end~
In the first yea~s of the Twentieth Century, the summer season
inevitably produced a parade of passenger extras from the south to
Beecher Falls, according to a retired Maine Central Mountain Sub-
division telegraph operator , consulted in the late 1940s. Thot
portion of the State of New Hampshires White Mountains traversed by
the connections of the Raspberry Branch became an intensely popular
summer vacation areo with the advent of rapid rail transportation fr­
om the urban centres of New England. Within a few years, the Balsams
Hotel at Dixville Notch, above Colebrook, New Hampshire, had achie­
ved all the fame and exclusiviety of the renowned Crawford Notch
Hotel in Crawford Notch, New Hampshire.
After World War I, a sort of blight set in on the Raspberry Br­
anch. It was not, as one might suppose, a direct result of the bur-
geoning popularity of Henry Fords machine. There were other, more
important economic deterrents. The handwriting on the wall appeared
in a 1923 report of the Joint New England Railroad Commission:
The Maine Central Railroad has many branches, the
longest of which extends from Portland through the
~THE END OF STEEL AT BEECHER FALLS, VERMONT, AFTER THE LINE NORTH TO
Cookshire was abandoned in 1927. Maine Central 4-6-0 Number 379 was
switching the yard, after arriving from the south with mixed Train
M-378. The turntable was located just in front of the engine house
which once had eight stalls. September 4, 1948.

CANADIAN 179 R A I L
White Mountains to Lime Ridge. Traffic, both fr­
eight and passenger, over most of these branches,
is light. In fact, a characteristic feature and
great handicap of the Maine Central is its high
percentage of unprofitable branch lines.
This was, alas, a true statement. From Lancaster all the way
north to Lime Ridge, there was not a single town or city of signifi­
cant size. After the northern postions of the Connecticut River
valley had been lumbered off, that traffic disappeared. There were
few on-line industries. There were, for a time, a good many sawmills
along the line, but as saw-logs became scarcer and the stands of
timber more remote, the sawmills picked themselves up and went where
the trees were, generally in locations well away from the railway.
The Official Guide continued to advertise through connec-
tions at Dudswell Junction for the White Mountains and Portland on
a schedule practically identical with that of 1905, but the Statis­
tics of Steam Railways in Canada told quite another story, noting
that mixed-troin mileage and lumber tonnage had declined by nearly
one-half on the Hereford Railway and the operating deficit had more
than doubled. Other remaining twigs and leaves on the Raspberry Br­
anch had long since withered.
The Moine Central sowed off the Raspberry Branch in 1925, when on
September 11, it publicly proclaimed that the heretofore existing
lease of the Hereford Railway Company would be cancelled as of the
following November 1 and that, after midnight on October 31, the
Maine Central Railroad Company would discontinue all services that
it was providing on the Hereford Railway. Presumably, the motive pow­
er and rolling stock formerly leased from the Maine Central by the
Hereford Railway had long since been returned to the former company.
On October 31, service on the Hereford Railway was discontinued.
There was an immediate public outcry. The citizens of this part of
the Province of Quebec, who had come to depend on the railway for
transportation, especially during the winter months, made an appeal
to the authorities to have the service reinstated.
But it was not until March of the following year that the Min­
ister of Railways and Canals of Canada petitioned the Board of Rail­
way Commissioners to order the Hereford Railway Company to re-es~ab­
lish service over the line. The Hereford Railway Company, through its
solicitor, respectfully advised the Board that it could not obey the
order, being financially unable. It had neither rolling stock, motive
power -or money.
Protracted legal proceedings ensued. The Minister entered
with the Exchequer Court of Canada to sell the Hereford Railway
pany by tender, with the intent of re-establishing the service
the International Boundary at Beecher Falls, Vermont.
suit
Com­
to
There could not have been very many tenders. It is probable,al­
though not recorded in books on Canadian railway history, that the
only tender was that of the newly-formed Canadian National Railway
MAINE CENTRAL RAILROAD MIXED TRAIN M-378, POWERED BY ENGINE NUMBER
379, rattles north along the Connecticut River, just south of North
Stratford, New Hampshire. The parallel line is that of the Grand
Trunk. Later in 1949, ~hen this photograph was taken, the Maine Cen­
tral obtained trackage rights over the Grand Trunk and tore up its
track.
••
UPPE OOS&ERE ~OR DS.
TiME, TABLE No.7 .
. ,. ··WINTER ARRANaEMENT.lS:~:£1
. .
IN 1;I·FI·:Cr 1:3.0 A. M MJ)~DAY, l·EBlU,;HY Mth, 11300.
SUBJECT TO. CHA~GE WITHOUT NOTICE.
Eastern St-andard lun,c. TralllG Soulh,-·Read up.
COJ1l1letiuw; all North Stmtford JUliet-ion with Grand Jlhnk
H.nilwa,y fot aJJ poi1ltli EnHt, Vest Il.ntl South. . .
. COllln.;hile .JllllctioJ1 W!t~l(!n.nfj.d!ml Paelfic Rnilwayfora.ll
point;; 1·;l:.It II-Iul Vest a.nd Ma.lltIme Pr(w1I1ces. . .
At, HIl(I~w~)1l :Jllllfltion wit~ J~(~bric C(:mtlta;] Railwa.y tM Quebec
IIlId Wax Htlltiolls. .. . . ,
,,:-itIL,4O fIDlllltlCitAons at GolebI:ookfor Ditullond Pond, DixYilleNotch,
!.Jl(l }}lJol Du ll1. ..
At VeHt ~teWl:tIt8tQWll fin (;aoaan and A. Yfl.l,n Pond: .
A t 1 1(1( (111(0 L }~!i.Us for Vlaiks ville, Pittsburg-a.II d . Conneefti en tJ.Jake;
, . I., …. .
() 1 () Shlillg, lIot a. i: nt.ioll .
• 1. lWOl LI·;Y. ~npe-K G. 8WE.t.ll,Genl Mnnag-el.
Th .. ~. ~ ;,,1 S.-,,iI!> I SI~~H ,Inll PrllI, GHI,.~;;:ihk, N. Ii.
CANADIAN 1 81 R A I L
Company, acting on the instruction of the Minister of Railways and
Canals of Canada. In any event, the tender of the Canadian National
Railway Company was accepted and the CNR became the new owner of the
Hereford Railway.
What could have been more ridiculous? The nearest CN line was
at North Stratford, Vermont or Lennoxville, Quebec, 23 and 15 miles
respectively from the Hereford Railway. A connection from Beecher
Falls could be made via the Upper Coos Railroads of Vermont and New
Hampshire, but that between Cookshire and Lennoxville was possible
only over the rails of the Canadian Pacific Railway. Of course, there
was the possibility of trackage rights over the Quebec Central from
Sherbrooke to Dudswell Junction.
Necessarily, this ailemma was resolved, when the Canadian Nation­
al was allowed to withdraw its tender and the offer of the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company, likely a considerably lower figure, was ac­
cepted on May 25, 1927.
One of the conditions of the Canadian Pacifics tender was that
the line of the Hereford Railway would be abandoned, except the part
from Malvina, Mile 34.42, to Cookshire, Mile 12.45. The Quebec Cen­
tral Railway was permitted to purchase the 4.2-mile spur to the lime­
kilns and quarry of the Dominion Lime Company at Lime Ridge, Quebec.
The Canadian Pacific pruned the Raspberry Branch with a veng­
eance. J:n 1927-28, the 14 miles from Malvina to Hereford, Quebec, on
the International Boundary, were taken up. Simultaneously, the 13.05
miles from Cooks hire through Brookbury to Dudswell Junction were
removed, together with the three-span, through-truss bridge over the
St. Francis River and the two-span facsimile over the Eaton River
at Cookshire. Dudswell and Cookshire ceased to be junctions, except
in the sense of main line/branch line connections.
Canadian Pacific continued to offer mixed-train service, daily
except Sunday, from Cookshire to Malvina, three hours southbound over
the summit and 2 hours 55 minutes northbound downgrade, in the April
29, 1928 timetable. Three years later, the service had been reduced
to thrice-weekly. In June 1932, the mixed train ran once a week. By
April 1940, once a week mixed-train service was offered in the win­
ter only.
From December 1942, gas rationing during World War II obliged
the Canadian Pacific to resume twice a week mixed-train service, but
by November 28, 1943, traffic had dwindled to the point where no reg­
ular service at all was offered.
The pruning continued. By April 19, 1945, the track had been ~–=-:-.
moved from the 15.8 miles from Malvina north to Sawyerville. And the
May 1 1973 employees timetable of CP RAIL stated that freight ser-
vice only was provided, as required, between Dudswell Junction and
Lime Ridge, 4.20 miles, and between Cooks hire and Sawyerville, 6.7
miles. An inspection of the once-wonderful Raspberry Branch makes
one marvel as to how this service is maintained.
As the twig is pruned, so is the tree inclined. Through the
years, the southern connections of the Raspberry Branch fared not
much better. In an unexpected move, the Maine Central acquired track­
age rights over the Grand Trunk and the Boston and Maine and reverted
to the 1890 arrangement wereby MEC trains used the GTR from North
Stratford south to Gorham and the B&M from Gorham to Coos Junction,
just north of the county town of Lancaster, New Hampshire, where it
regained its own rails. This permitted the abandonment and removal

r
,
CANADIAN 183 R A I L
of some 25 miles of the Upper Coos Railroads of Vermont and New Hamp­
shire and the Coos Railroad, after an interval of almost 60 years.
The weight of steel so salvaged was augmented by two two-span,through­
truss bridges over the Connecticut River in the Towns of Stratford and
Lancaster, New Hampshire.
For a period in the late 40s and early 50s, mixed-train opera­
tion was advertised for the Beecher Falls-Lancaster-Quebec Junction
branch of the MEC but, as freight and passenger traffic abandoned the
rail for the rubber tyre, this service was deleted. Soon thereafter,
diesel units replaced the 310-class ten-wheel steam engines on this
occasional service.
In the 50s and early 60s, a daily freight made the trip from
Beecher Falls to Quebec Junction on the MECs main line from Portland
to St. Johnsbury, Vermont. In the late 60s, service was pruned to
a tri-weekly event and in the early 70s, the as required qualifi­
cation appeared in the timetable. The service on the northern and
southern remnants of the Raspberry Branch was again the same.
Should your perigrinations in the pursuit of railway archeology
ever take you through the southeastern part of Canadas Province of
Quebec, you might make a detour to Lime Ridge to see what you can
discover. While the fabulous 4-4-0 of the Quebec Central has long
disappeared, you may be more than a little intrigued by the terminal
facilities which still exist at the rather remote location of Lime
Ridge and you will be more than a little surprised at the motive pow­
er which is used today to move cars of lime over the 4.2 miles to the
Quebec Central at Dudswell. If your curiosity persists, you can fol­
low the right-of-way from Dudswell to Cooks hire, through the woods and
swamps on dirt roads.
South of Cookshire to Sawyerville, the 6.7 miles of CP RAILs
Sawyerville Subdivision are still in situ, but only just, as it is
rumored that an application has been made to abandon this portion of
the former Hereford Railway. Beyond Sawyerville, the road-bed is
still evidenced by bridge abutments, embankments. and second growth,
through Clifton, St-Isidore and St-Malo, to the remote and well­
hidden location of Malvina, at the end of a very rough dirt road.
South of Malvina, the dedicated investigator can walk on the
grade down Hall Stream to Hereford and the International Boundary,
remarking en route the two places where, for reasons of grade loca­
tion, the Raspberry Branch nimbly jumped the river into the United
States for distances of 0.59 and 0.75 miles. And you may wonder wh­
ether or not passengers on Trains 224 and 225 were subjected to yet
another customs and immigration examination at these two back-woods
locations.
Reflecting on this and other suppositions, you will be catried
back more than half-a-century in the history of the Hereford Railway,
the Raspberry Branch that once grew and changed and spread, in the
halcyon days when the railways and their accessories were things of
~TRAIN 16, GRAND TRUNK RAILROADS MONTREAL-PORTLAND, MAINE DAY TRAIN,
hauled by Canadian National Railways pacific-type engine Number 5291
is about to cross the Maine Central Railroad 5 Coos Junction-Beecher
Falls line at Masons, New Hampshire, on August 5, 1948. The MECs
line, with its single-arm semaphore signal protecting the crossing,
was taken up the following year.

Miles from
Portland, Me.
154.5 154.7
154.8
157.7
157.9
158.6
159.0 163.0
163.08
163.67
166.5 168.8
170.4
171.2 172.6 174.2 176.0
176.7
178.4
183.6
186.4
190.3
193.4
197.0
198.4
201 .3
203.4
204.4 205.7
207.6
CANADIAN 1 85 R A I L
HEREFORD RAILWAY
Mileages and Altitudes
1909
BEECHER FALLS, VERMONT
International Boundary
Hereford, Quebec (formerly Comins Mills)
East Hereford (formerly Gravel Pit
Feet above
sea-level
1,085.0
1,089.0
1,085.0
1,118.0
Siding)
(Cross Halls Stream from Canada to the United
States for 0.75 miles.)
(Cross Halls Streom from the United States to
Canada.)
Halls Stream
Paquetteville
(Cross Halls Stream from Canada to the
States for 0.59 miles.)
1,164.0 1,238.0
United
(Cross Halls Stream from the United States to
Canada.)
Upper Dam
Malvina
Auckland
(formerly M~lvina) 1,437.0
(later Popevill~; later 1,538.0
St-Isidore dAuckland.)
1,585.0
1,506.0
Summit
Saint Malo
Camp Four
Doncaster Siding (later abandoned{ not in 1,260.0
1909 timetable.J
(established between 1900 & 1909) Popeville
Cli fton
Sawyerville
Eaton Corner
Cookshire Junction (later Cookshire)
(Crossing at grade with Canadian Pacific
Railway: interlocked.)
Popes
Stoketon
Brookbury
Beckwiths
Dudswell Junction (later Dudswell)
(Crossing at grade with Quebec Central
Railway: ball-signal.)
Lathrops
Dominion
LIME RIDGE, QUEBEC
1,136.0
885.0
807.0
679.0
720.1
699.3
684.0
~ ON JUNE 17, 1949, MAINE CENTRALS MIXED TRAIN M-377 SOUTHBOUND, WITH
engine Number 371, a 4-6-0, for power, ran extra on the Grand Trunks
main line between North Stratford and Groveton, New Hampshire, after
its own track had b&en taken up. The location is near North Stratford
and this view may be compared with a picture taken at about the same
location which also is presented with this article.
CANADIAN 186 R A I L
beauty and a joy to behold, an indication of progress in any commun­
ity and a servant of the people, for the people.
In the preparation of this article, the Authors are particular­
ly indebted to the following railway historians:
Mr. J. Emmons Lancaster, Portland, Maine Mr.
Douglas M. Rice, Granville, Massachuestts
Mr. H. Arnold Wilder, Westford, Massachusetts
The late Mr. William Shapleigh, Portland, Maine
Professor J. Derek Booth, Lennoxville, Quebec
Mr. J.A.Beatty, Montreal, Quebec
AFTER THE RASPBERRY BRANCH WAS PRUNED BACK FROM MALVINA, THE END
of trock was just south of Sawyerville, Quebec. This is the way it
looked in the summer of 1949. Beyond the team and wagon, the line
began to descend to the crossing of the Clifton River. In 1974,the
end-of-track is much more prosaic, being a pile of weed-grown earth
at the south end of the yard at Sawyerville.
June 1975
W!JIILLS
THE THANKSGIVING DAY 1974 STEAM SPECTACULAR, SPONSORED BY THE CAPE
Breton Steam Roilwoy, Sydney, Novo Scotia, was a complete
success reported Mr. Barrie Macleod. The day was all that
anyone could !=Isk for, being bright, clear, crisp and cool. The sun
shone all day and the blue sky was accented by a few wispy clouds.
At the head of the train was ex-GWR(England) 4-4-0 Repton
Number 926, with CBSR Number 42 adding tractive effort. Behind Number 42 was a
CNR steam-generator car, three green CBSR passenger cars,
the ex-GWR(England) composite carriage and three more green CBSR pas­
senger cars.
The train was packed, all tickets having been completely
sold about two weeks before the event.
The special departed from CNs station at Sydney at 09:30
hours, headed west towards leitches Creek and its first stop at No­
rth Sydney, where the locomotives took on water with the help of a
vintage fire-engine. There were hundreds of people at the Sydney sta­
tion to see the special leave and the crowds persisted at every road
crossing and station along the way. The media were all at the station
as the train pulled out: reporters, radio people and TV cameras.
As the train left, it seemed as though everybody jumped
into cars to follow it all the way to Iona at Grand Narrows. Four
or five miles west at Keltic Drive crossing, there must have been 30
or 40 cars jammed around the crossing to see the train go through.
The same thing happened at every road crossing and location where the
railway came close to the road.
It was a beautiful sight to see the double-header steam­
ing along the Bras dOr lakes. The leaves on the trees were a beau­
tiful flaming red, orange and gold.
The two engines had a real work-out, as they could make much
better speed on the CNs roadbed than on their own. The English
locomotive made the trip with ease, being designed for high-speed
passenger service. Number 42 was really straining, with her smaller
drivers.
A CN speeder followed the special all the way to Iona at
a distance of about one mile. It was a safety measure to make sure
that nothing had fallen from the special and that no fires had been
started by hot cinders from the two steam locomotives.
The special arrived at Iona right on time at 12:15 hours.
There has been no station here since late August 1974, when the
station shown on page 369 of the December 1972 issue Number 251 of
CANADIAN RAIL was demolished. The train backed into the siding which
runs onto a wharf and the passengers were greeted by_a pipe-band.
Buses took the passengers to different locations for dinner, depend­
ing on which dinner they had selected.
The engines were detached and run tender-first over the
Grand Narrows bridge to Grand Narrows, where they took the siding to
clear the main line for the CNs westbound passenger Train 19. While
they were waiting for the passenger train, the engines took on water.
CANADIAN 188 R A I L
This was arounf 13:00 hours.
On the return trip, Number 42 led, running tender-first,as
there was no wye at Grand Narrows. At Gannon, the special. had a meet
with eN freight Train 341, which took the siding for the special.
There wasnt a person on the special who was dissatisfied
with the days trip. Neatly everyone said they would make the trip
again next year, if it operated.
The Cape Breton Steam Railway people thought that if this
trip was such a success, they might do it again in 1975. A word to
the wise: buy your tickets early~
PIERRE PATENAUDE SENDS US A SAMPLING OF MOTIVE POWER FROM THREE OF
Canadas railways, large, medium and small~ The first pic­
ture shows Canadian National Railways MlW model S-13 Num­
ber 8516 in the new red cab paint soheme, following an overhaul at
the Pointe-St-Charles Shops in Montreal. The picture was taken at
Montreal Yard on September 22 1974.
Second in the series is GO TRANSIT GP 40-TC Number 9806 in green
and white, just out of Pointe-St-Charles Shops of the CNR, where the
unit was fitted with several noise-abatement modifications. The unit
was photographed at Montreal Yard on November 23 1974.
last in the selection is Canadian Industries Limited (CIl) AlCO
S-2 unit Number 144, SiN 73697, BID 12-46, sent from Sudbury, Ontario
to CP RAILs St-luc Yards, Montreal, for wheel-turning. This unit was
photographed on November 2 1974.
PIERRE ALSO SENDS US THE FOLLOWING DELIVERY DATES FOR THE GENERAL MO­
tors of Canada Limited GP 40-2 units supplied to Canadian
National Railways:
Road Serial Delivery
Number Number date
9481 A-3059 21 August 1974
9482 A-3060 21 August 1974
9483 A-3061 23 August 1974
9484 A-3062 23 August 1974
9485 A-3063 27 August 1974 9486 A-3064 27
August 1974
9487 A-3065 03 September 1974 9488 A-3066 03
September 1974

9489 9490 9491 9492 9493 9494 9495 9496 9497 9498 9499 9500 9501 9502 9503 9504 9505 9506 9507 9508 9509 9510 9511 9512
9513 9514 9515 9516 9517 9518 9519 9520 9521 9522 9523 9524 9525 9526 9527 9528 9529 9530
CANADIAN 190
A-3067
A-3068
A-3069 A-3070 A-3071 A-3072 A-3073
A-3074
A-3075 A-3076 A-3077 A-3078 A-3079 A-3080 A-3081 A-3082 A-3083 A-3084 A-3085 A-3086 A-3087 A-3088 A-3089 A-3090
A-3091 A-3092 A-3093 A-3094 A-3095 A-3096 A-3097 A-3098 A-3099 A-3100 A-3101 A-3102 A-3103 A-3104 A-3105 A-3106 A-3107 A-3108
R A I L
03 September 1974 03
September 1974 20
September 1974 20
September 1974 24
September 1974 24
September 1974 24
September 1974 26
September 1974 26
September 1974 26
September 1974 27
September 1974 28
September 1974 28
September 1974 28
September 1974 30
September 1974 30
September 1974
07 October 1974
07 October 1974
09 October 1974
09 October 1974
11 October 1974
11 October 1974 18
October 1974 18
October 1974
21 October 1974
21 October 1974 24
October 1974 24
October 1974 29
October 1974 29
October 1974 29
October 1974 29
October 1974
01 November 1974
01 November 1974 06 November 1974 06 November 1974 12 November 1974 12 November 1974 13 November 1974 20 November 1974 20 November 1974 22 November 1974
Units Num0ers 9481 through 9509, reports Pierre, are based at
Symington Yard, Prairie R~gion, Winnipeg, while units Numbers 9510
through 9530 are based at Calder Yard, Mountain Region, Edmonton, Al­
berta.
Pierre sent two~ illustrations of these new units. In the first
picture, Number 9511 is shown at Montreal Yard, Montreal, on November
3,1974. In the second picture, units Numbers 9494,9413 and 9509 are
shown at Montreal Yard on October 26, 1974.
MR. R.F.HARTNEY, AUTHOR OF THE GOLDEN DAYS OF RAILROADING WHICH
appeared in the January 1975 issue Number 276 of CAN­
ADIAN RAIL, noted in a subsequent communication to the
Editor that travel in western Canada, even as lote as 1946, could
be a complicated and arduous process. For example, an apparently
simpl~ journey from Regina, Saskatchewan to Edmonton, Alberta, via
the Diagonal Route of the Canodian Pacific Railway, would have
required this routeing:
CANADIAN 1 91 R A I L
Train Place Time Freguenc)::: Day Miles
303 Regina, 5 ask. LV 11 .55 p.m. daily 1 0.0
Prince Albert AR 8.25 a.m. 2 219.0
453(Mxd)Prince Albert LV 9.00 a.m. Mondays only 2 219.0
Leoville AR 3.50 p.m. 2 314.0
456(Mxd)Leoville LV 11 .20 a. m. Tuesdays only 3 314.0
North Battleford AR 6.30 p.m. 3 403.0
463(Mxd)North Battleford LV 3.20 p.m. Mon.,Wed.,Fri. 4 403.0
Cutknife AR 6.30 p.m. 4 451.0
435(Mxd)Cutknife LV 11 .25 a. m. Mon.,Wed.,Fri. 5 451.0
Lloydminster AR 5.05 p.m. 5 527.0
63 Lloydminster LV 6.45 a. m. Daily, ex.Sun. 6 527.0
Edmonton, Alberta AR 12.55 p.m. 6 704.0
There must have been an easier way, as Mr. Hartney says, and
it may well have been by covered-wagon~ He does not believe that too
many tickets were ,sold via this route.
The trip in the reverse direction was no better, as the passen­
ger left Edmonton Friday morning at 10.45 a.m. on CPR Train 64 and
arrived at Regina at 5.20 a.m. seven days later, having spent one
day at Cutknife and one day at North Battleford, waiting for mixed
Trains 462 and 457.
CANADIAN 192 R A I L
THE ITEM ON PAGE 283 OF THE WAYBILLS SECTION OF THE SEPTEMBER 1974
issue Number 272 of CANADIAN RAIL, regarding the Sixtieth
Anniversary celebration of the driving of the last sp1ke
on the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway at Finmore, British Columbia, has
caused Director Emeritus Jack Beatty to do a little researching.
Jack points out that published information in his possession st-
ates that this last spike was driven on April 8, 1914 (instead of
April 7) at Nechako River Crossing, 371 miles east of Prince Rupert.
This, Jack points out, would make the place at present mileage 96.1 on
CNs Nechako Subdivision, about 2 miles west of the present Fort
Fraser station. Of course, Jack notes, one-must bear in mind that ,
over the years, there have been changes in railway mileages and sta­
tion locations.
After further searching, Jack found that POORS MANUAL OF
WA YS for 1 91 5 s tat est hat t he G. T • P. was com p 1 e ted Apr il 7,
375 miles east of Prince Rupert. This therefore makes it two
east of Fort Fraser, as stated in the item first reported.
RAIL-
1914,
miles
—-Since the Nechako River Crossing was mentioned in one of his
sources, Jack tried to check the location of this river crossing, and
found to his consternation that his rand-McNally atlas shows not one
but two Nechako Rivers, flowing into Lake Fraser. Not a North Branch
and ClSouth Branch, just Nechako River, in each case.
Jack says that this should make us all wonder how accurate some
of the records and references are that we use in our research;
Incidentally, an inquiry of the Royal Canadian Geographical So­
ciety brought the response that the official Gazeteer of Canada, pub­
lished by the Canadian Permanent Committee on Geographical Names,
lists only one Nechako River. Moreover, said the Society, only one
Nechako River appears on other maps issued in Ottawa and Victoria, and
this is the river flowing from Cheslatta Lake to Fraser Lake. This
river crosses the Canadian National Railways line from Prince Rupert
at, or very near, Fort Fraser.
Concluding that the last spike on the Grand Trunk Pacific Rail­
way was driven on Spril 7, 1914, perhaps another reader can present
reliable data to show where it was driven, 2 miles east or west of
Fort Fraser, British Columbia.
GOSSIP IN PUBLISHING CIRCLES HAS IT THAT CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
is looking for an able writer/author to do a biography on
Donald Gordon, President of Canadian National Railways be­
tween 1949 and 1966. The authors honorarium is said to be in the
region of $ 50,000 for writing, together with $ 25,000 for research
expenses. Mr. Richard Wright, who was the late Mr. Gordons assis­
tant, is making the search.
Two writers on the short list of authors approached are Mr. Al­
exander Ross, formerly a columnist with the Toronto STAR and pre­
sently editor of TORONTO LIFE and Mr. Joseph Schull, well-known pl­
aywright and biographer of Sir Wilfred Laurier.
THERE WERE A FEW HOWLS OF PAIN FROM TRAVELLERS IN AND OUT OF MON-
treals International Airport and Torontos Malton last
November, when airlines began collecting a 10% ( maximum
$ 5.00) airport tax. CP SHIPS announced late in March 1975 that this
year, there would be a levy on every adult and child arriving and
disembarking from a cruise liner at its Vancouver piers. The fee will
be $ 2.50 per adult and $ 1.25 per child.
A total of 92 cruise liners are scheduled to use Canadian Pa-
CANADIAN 193 R A I L
cific piers at Vancouver between June 1 and October 1.
These fees are required to offset the 24.8% increase by the Pa­
cific Pilotage Authority which is effective June 1, 1975. Last year,
Penins~lar and Oriental Steam Navigation Company of London, England,
operat1ng to Alaska, averaged about $ 4,000 a voyage. This year, the
cost will be about $ 6,000 and P&O has 31 sailings scheduled.
John D. Welsh.
IN A MID-MARCH 1975 COMMUNICATION, JOHN HOFFMEISTER OF VICTORIA,B.
C., reported that what was apparently the last trip for
CP RAILs Vancouver Island Baldwin units took place on
March 11, when units Numbers 8010, 8000 and 8003 brought Train 51
into Wellcox Yard at Nanaimo. The following day, the Baldwins were
replaced by alternate power, except for Number 8000, which was sent
to switch the yard at Victoria.
It is said that CP RAIL will take the Baldwins to the main-
land by car-barge and move them from Vancouver to Calgary over the
next few months. The Baldwins, together with the FM C-Liners will
be grouped at Ogden Shops for subsequent sale.
John also reported that Crown Zellerbach of Chemainus, on Van­
couver Island, was interested in acquiring CP RAIL Number 8010; it
and Number 8000 are in the best condition of all of the remaining
Baldwin units.
If Johns predictions are accurate, this marks the end of the
remarkable Baldwins of CP RAIL on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.
In a communication dated 4 April 1975, John advised that the
last run of a Baldwin on the Island was made by CP RAIL Number 8010 on 18 March,
Wellcox to Crofton. The remainder of the Baldwins had
left for CP RAILs Ogden Shops (Alyth Yard), Calgary, Alberta,
THE KNELL HAS APPARENTLY TOLLED FOR THE 118-MILE BRANCH OF THE PENN
Central, which is all that remains of the former New York
Central Railroads Mohawk and Malone line from Remsen, on
the former 4-track main line of the Water Level Route, through the
western ramparts of the Adirondack Mountains to Malone, New York.The
S tate of New Yorks Department of Transport recently issued a study
which confirmed that at least $ 7.5 million would be required to pur­
chase and rehabilitate the Remsen-Lake Placid, NY, line and, after
this was done, freight service revenue would result in an annual de­
ficit of nearly $ 300,000. Passenger service could lose an additional
$ 500,000 annually. The NY DOT report was referred to a Citizens Ad­
visory Committee, which is studying the possible uses of the property.
The NY DOT made np recommendation. J J Sh h . . aug
nessy.
CANADIAN PACIFIC LIMITEDS DIVISION, CP RAIL, ACQUIRED THE MISSING
Link in its transcontinental rail system on December 17,
1974, when purchase of 56.1 miles of the Maine Central
Railroad, between Mattawamkeag and Vanceboro, Maine, was consummated.
Sale price of the railway and facilities was given as $ 5 million in
cash and $ 1 million in bonds. The Maine Central will be granted
running rights over this segment of its former main line, which sug­
gests that the MEC will continue to serve on-line customers between
the Keag and Vanceboro.
CP RAIL said that employment had been offered to all full-time,
non-management Maine Central staff along the line and that 29 former
MEC employees had accepted the offer, bringing CP RAILs workforce
in the State of Maine, U.S.A., to 225.
CP RAIL NEWS.
CANADIAN 1 94
R A I L
FROM TIME TO TIME, WELL-INTENTIONED BUT UNSUSPECTING READERS WRITE
to the Editor of CANADIAN RAIL, asking what certain of­
ficers of the Association look like. The Editor, being a
rather cautious type, generally ovoids providing a verbal descrip­
tion of his colleagues and, having no pictures of the Directors of
the Associatian on file, is not therefore obliged to publish them.
However, since the Association is the custodian of the E. Allan
Toohey Collection of black-and-white negatives, it is appropriate to
publish a picture of the late Mr. Toohey. The picture accompanying
this item was taken at Huberdeau, Quebec, 81 miles north of Montreal
on the Canadian National Railways Lac Remi SiD, on October 1, 1950.
This excursion was sponsored by the Association to commemorate
the 25th. Anniversary of the record-breaking run of Canadian Nation­
aIs diesel-electric rail-car Number 15820, from Montreal to Van­
couver, British Columbia, in 67 hours, in 1925.
On the 1950 occasion, CNR diesel-electric rail-car Number 15837
and a coach, Number 3409, made up the consist.
In the photograph, which was taken by the late Mr. W.G.Cole,the
gentleman on the left in the back row, wearing glasses, is the late
E. Allan Toohey, first Editor of the CRHA NEWS REPORT, which, in
July-August 1962, became CANADIAN RAIL. The
identity of the other personages in the photograph, some of
whom are still members of the Association, must be discovered for
themselves by our clever readers~
CP RAIL HAS PLACED AN ORDER FOR 40 SIX-AXLE 3000 HP MODEL SD 40-2
dies~l units with the Diesel Division, General Motors of
Canada Limited, London, Ontario. These units are sched­
uled for delivery in late 1975. The Diesel Division has just com­
pleted delivery of an order of 40 of the same model to CP RAIL.
On the production line at present are GP 40-2 units for Can­
adian National Railways. These are four-axle, 3000 hp. locomotives.
CANADIAN 1 .,
R A I L
Northern Alberto RoilwaY5 ha5 ordered four SO 38_2 unitt fro.
the Dienl Divition, GMCL, for delivery late in 1975. Theu will
be the firtt SO 38_2 unitt to be built by the Diesel Divition,GMCL,
olthough the Briti5h Colu~bio Hydro Railway hot four of this mod.l,
built by the Electro~otive Division of Gen.ral Motors in the United
States.
Th. SO 38_2 it a 2000 hp., six-axle unit d.tigned specifically
to provide high tractive effort at low speedt,
Northern Alberto Railways presently aperatel 17 dietel unitt,
10 GP 9. and 7 GMD 1 t, all_built by Dietel Division, London,
GM DieseLine5.
ON F
EBRUARY 28, 1975, THE CANADIAN TRANSPORT COMMISSION APPROVED THE
obandonlllent of 15.3 lIIiles of Canadian Nationalt Penetang
Subdivilion, fro. Mile 18.3, Elvo1o to Hile 33.6, Pene­
tang (Penetanguishine), Ontario. The Co.niion agreed with the CNR
that the line was not econo~ical to operate. Recently, service to
Penetangvithine frail Colwell, Ontario, Iunction with the Mea ford Sub­
division, had been provided by Trains 5 9-520 from Barrie, Ontario,
as required.
J.D. Welah.
AN ORDER FOR 30 OF THE 53_PASSENGER MODEL COACHES HAS BEEN RECEIVED
by the Oie5el Division, General Motors of Canada Limited,
from the Ovtoovois Regional COlllllunity Transit Co~.ission
of Hull, Quebec, The C
ity of Holifax, Novo Scotia, has ordered eight of the some
model, while the City of Lethbridge, Alberto, will be taking deliv­
ery of two.
The Calgary Transit Syltem has inc reo ted to 82 coochet itl ear­
lier order for 72 of the 53-polsenger model. The other 10 hod been
ordered originally from Western Flyer Induttriet of Winnipeg, Man_
itoba, but labour problemt there resvlted in delayt in projected de­
livery dotet.
The City of North Boy, Ontario, hal ploced on order for 13 fIIore
of the 45_polsenger model bus, while the Moncton (New Brunlwick) Tr­
an5it system has increased on earlier order for one to three.
Travelwoys of Canada Limited, Prince George (Britith Colullbia) T
ransit and the City of Chothall!, Ontario, have each ordered two of
the 45-possenger nadel coochel.
GM Di81cl.ines.
CANADIAN NATIONAl RAILWAyS ARE STUDYING A PROPOSAL FOR A S 150 MIL­
lion develop~ent on the site of downtown freight yardt in W
innipeg, Manitoba. Th. tite is at the junction of the Red ond A
s.iniboine Rivert, considered historically important as the
original lite of the City of Winnipeg in 1738 {?). Thil frOM the
FINANCIAl POST, Toronto, of March 8, 1975, via John D. Wellh.
EX_ROBERVAL SAGUENAY WHITCOMB NUMBER 18 AT UNITED RAILWAY SUPPLY LIM_
ited, Montreal, where it is prelently working 01 0 shop s¥itcher. Be­
hind NUMber 18 and coupled to it is priaer-painted 5-4, ex_Canadian
Notional RailwaYI NUMber 1, ex_NUMber 8482. Photo courtesy K.R.Goslett.
Cala ispWished monthly b)the
Cc.ladian Railroad Historical Association
PQ Be-22,Stetlon B.Montrei1I,OMbec,Canadl/H3B 3J5
E AssociatiOn Branches
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN
L.H.Unwin, S .. :retary 1727 23rd. A.nu. N,W, Calgary, Alto,T2t-I lV6
OTTAWA
W.R.Linly,Secutory P.D.Box Ul,Stotion It Otto~o,Cnodo KIN 811
PACHIC COAST
I.H.M.y .. , Stcr .. tory P.O.8o~ IOO6,Station A Vancou.r,8.C.V6C 2Pi
ROCKY HOUNUIN
J. 11. Mel I., Secutory, P. O. 8o~ 6102,5 tatian C, Ed,,,n ton,A to. T 56 4~ 5
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.Shulold,Secrttar p.e.BOK 5849 T.uinal A Toronto, Ont,II5o IP3
VssilllWl Canadian Railway Museum St..Constent:CUebec,Canada.
• Men IhiIn 100 pieces of 0QI.IipmMI on disPaY

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