Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 275 1974

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 275 1974

Canadian Rail ,.::.::.;a

No.275
December 1974
.. r-
11 :

THE
BIG
AND
THE MOUNTAIN
The late
HILL
SECTION
Thomas Huntley Crump.
Editors Note
Mr. Thomas Huntley Crump, the father of th. rlorris
R. Crump,was successively a brakeman, conductor,
trainmaster and divisional superintendent for the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company, beginning in 1890
Qnd ending when he retired in 1935. At varying ti­
mes in the period 1890-1910, Mr. T.H.Crump worked
out of Field, British Columbia.
On October 21, 1940, the following notes
were assembled by the late Mr. Crump to describe
some of the turn-of-the-century operations around
Field, before the days of the Spiral Tunnels ond
grade reductions.
These notes have been provided through the
courtesy of Mr. H.A.Price of Vancouver, British Col­
umbia and Mr. Norris R. Crump of Calgary, Alberta.
Additions to the notes are placed in paren­
theses.
,

ON A COLD, SNOWY DECEMBER DAY IN 1952, JIM SHAUGHNESSY WAS AT THE STA­
tion at Jackman, Maine, to catch the Megantic-Brownville Junction,Me.
Canadian Pacific Railway mixed train with engine Number 2229 heading
an abbreviated consist.
~SAFETY SWITCH NUMBER 1, AT THE TOP OF FIELD HILL, 6 MILES EAST
Field, British Columbia, at the beginning of the 4.4% descent.
switch-tender, standing beside the switch-stand, has the switch
for the main line and the unidentified 4-4-0 coming up the hill
the bridge over the Kicking Horse River, shown on the diagrams
Safety Switch No.1. The picture Vas taken by M.t1.Stephens, the
agent at Field, in 1898. The switch-tender was Pete Thibodeau.
photograph is from the collection of Mr. N.R.Crump.
OF
The
lined
from
of
CPR
The
CANADIAN 356 R A I L
I
n the early days, the Western Division of the
Canadian Pacific Railway extended from Port
Arthur, Ontario to Donald, British Columbia.
Mr. W.Whyte was General Superintendent; Mr.
W. Cross, Master Mechanic; both (were located)
at Winnipeg. Canmore, Alberta to Donald, British
Columbia was known as the Mountain Section and
came under Superintendent J. Niblock of Medicine
Hat (Alberta), where the dispatchers office was
located. Mr. J. Cardell was Locomotive Foreman
and Trainmaster at Canmore. Mr. G. Ericson was
Roadmaster at Field.
Operating rules were embodied in the timetable. Five minutes was
allowed for variation of watches on time order moves. Red signals,
displayed on the engine, indicated a following section. Trains going
toward Winnipeg -eastward -had the right of track. The stations at
Laggan -(todays) Lake Louise -and Field, were old cars. The pay-
car ran monthly from Winnipeg on freight trains and employees were
paid in cash.
Trains were searched at Laggan by the North West Mounted Police
(todays Royal Canadian Mounted Police) to prevent liquor smuggling
from British Columbia to the Territories. Passenger trains usually
consisted of five or six cars, (with) no diner. A 30-minute stop was made
at Field for meals. On one day a week, there was no mail car.
Passenger engines, at first the small 4-4-0s and 4-6-0s and
finally consolidations (2-8-0s), ran between Canmore and Donald
(119.4 miles). The passenger train crews worked through between Me­
dicine Hat and Donald (364 miles). Later, they worked (from) Medicine
Hat to Banff to Donald, and return.
Many operating problems were met and handled by rather extra­
ordinary measures. At Laggan, trainmen applied clamps to the miller­
bars on the coaches to prevent uncoupling on the Mud Tunnel curve,
west of Palliser. At Hector on Field Hill, westward passenger trains
were met by hill crews. Here, the small passenger engine was cut off
and run light (down the steep grade) to Field. The train was taken
down the Hill with the hill engine, using reverse-motion or water­
brake on the heavy 4.4% grade. Hand-brakes were used on the train.
Eastward passenger trains were pushed up Field Hill and the pusher
was cut off on the fly west of Hector. Hill crews handled the pusher
engines.
There were four consolidation (2-8-0) engines stationed at Field.
These were Numbers 313, 314 and 315, Baldwin-built consolidations with
24,000 pound tractive effort, and Number 404, (a) CPR-built consol­
idation (with) 20,000 pound tractive effort. These engines handled all
the business between Laggan and Donald. Freight business between Can­
more and Laggan was handled by the small 4-4-0 engines, 13,000 pound
tractive effort. One freight crew was stationed at Canmore and three
at Field. At first, the small engines were not equipped with air­
pumps and had hand-brakes on the tender only. Freight cars were equip­
ped with hand-brakes on one truck only and had link-and-pin couplers.
Freight trains were handled down the Big Hill by consolidation engines
only, using reverse motion on the heavy grade from what was known as
the Blue Cut, about 1t miles west of Hector, to the Little Tunnel
two miles east of Field.
Hill engines were equipped with two air-pumps, straight
brakes on the drivers and automatic air-brakes on the tenders.
-air
In
t
Hl{lll:ll ml:
!l~
o
z
m L
:t ~
~ .,..-.:::.-:.:-;!
.au_
FROM THE ENGINEERING OFFICE OF CP RAIL, THIS PROFILE OF THE CANADIAN
Pacific Railway main line between The Gap, Alberta and Pitt River,
British Columbia, on the line from Quebec and Montreal to Vancouver
City. The profile is dated February, 1886. Courtesy of Mr. R.W.Webb.
addition, each had back sand-boxes and headlights. When descending
the Hill, trainmen would drop off the head-end to watch for skidding
wheels and would .catch the last car as it passed.
Between Hector and Field, there were three safety switches. The
normal position for each switch was lined for the safety track, wh­
ich ascended rapidly and was designed to catch a train or cars not
under control. As a train approached the safety switch, the engineer
would whistle a pre-arranged signal to the switch-tender, to indi-
cate to him that he had his train under control, whereupon the
switch-tender would line the switch for the main track. Before leav­
ing Hector, conductors would 1 phone the first switch-tender, who
would advise the others in turn:Train coming down.
The switch-tenders registered all trains. Later, an
recorder was installed.
electric
In later years, the link-and-pin couplers were slowly replaced
with automatic couplers -Trojan, Heins, Simplex and others. About
this time, Superintendent J.N.Niblock, or J.N. as he was commonly
called, wrote to the conductors asking them for their opinions of
the new couplers. One day, J.N. noticed a conductor (T.H.Crump)
wrestling with a knuckle at Hector and promptly fined him one dollar
for not answering his letter~
Owing to the different types of knuckles breaking frequently,
emergency knuckles were used to a great extent. About the time this
was corrected, freight cars began to be equipped with air-brakes,
although the instructions were not to use them to control, unless
four-fifths of the train was so equipped.
No caboose was used between Laggan and Field. Trainmen rode the
last car and, at night, displayed a red lamp. When a train with only
one engine was run from Field to Hector, the cars were pushed and a
trainman rode the leading cor.
In the spring of 1892, there was a strike of trainmen for about
one week. A strong detachment of the North West Mounted Police was
PIG! Q ~O,t Prof, I
5wdcQ No
-,
r~~~,–;,?o;—c~~o=–~-.
11 I c:.. J1 INC
0
PIl>.I II
Sc~. {~ 00–,,;
Pro,.. …… d v,o..,..
i., dolt.d Irxt
f

]0S1. –
sent to Field, which was considered to be a key point. However, very
few of the trainmen belonged to the organization, so, being in doubt
as to the affair, (they) booked sick and went to Banff. The strike
was settled by an arbitration board of three engineers, chairman, the
late Ash Kennedy, without prejudice. Shorter hours per day were gain-
ed by the trainmen. The gang at Banff were having a good time, so
(Locomotive Foreman) J. Cardell wired Dr. Brett to get them going
back to work. The N.W.M.P. detachment was given a good send-off and
returned to Calgary. One of their number became, a few years later , a
bank manager at Penticton (British Columbia). Another, some years
later as a British Columbia Provincial Constable, was shot by a
prisoner escaping from (the sternwheeler) S.S.SICAMOUS.
The winter and spring, 1893-1894, saw many events. It was a
period of depression and the train crews waived their guarantee for
a while. The winter was very severe and snow-plows, of wooden con­
struction and entirely hand-operated, were scarce. On one occosion,
a Field plow worked through to Swift Current (Saskatchewan). In the
spring, the Mountain Section was badly disrupted by washouts, es­
pecially between Palliser and Golden. A pile-driver, equipped with
a straight-air pipe, was brought from Winnipeg on a passenger train.
The train, with J.N. (Niblock) aboard, was held at Ottertail be-
I
I
CA NAD I AN 359 R A I L
cause the water was over the tracks. After the situation was looked
over, it was considered that the track was unsafe for an engine but
would carry the pile-driver. Work train engine 313 was west of the
trouble spot, so the crew waded over to the pile-driver, unreeved the
line, coupled it to some spare lines and took it over to engine 313
and commenced to pull the pile-driver over the bad spot.
J.N. was riding it, when about half-way across, the track
slid out and the pile-driver overturned on the south side, clear of
the track. J.N. jumped off and waded over to engine 313, which went
west to make repairs around Palliser with brush and rock. This was
continued until the curve west of what is now Cloister was reached.
The entire curve to the tunnel partal was washed out. This was known
as the Big Washout. The water then went down and pile-drivers rea­
ched both ends to effect repairs. During the several days which were
occupied in repairs, passenger trains were transferred.
Upon another occasion, engine 314, working west of Glenogle, had
the dump slide out from under it, leaving the engine in a precarious
position off the track. The engineer could not get a turn out of th~
drivers. A pile-driver cable was secured and tied onto the marooned
engine and about 200 men heaved and assisted getting the engine moved
to a safe place. A large amount of cedar cribbing was later placed
in the Kicking Horse Canyon, some of it remaining to this day.

r—
I
I
.
PI rS -/
PrQr-…. o,:l.~ ….. • ..s
,,. .::taU. • …,.,
, , …. ,.
——_.-
—~
/
P/~t;:2 v P,ofde
–Sfi;1ferY SWltCQ ffo?J
—~,-,,——
I< I C. X IN G
p,..~d ~ho…nq ••
10 d.c.d. It ….
F I
PLAN AND PROFILE OF SAFETY SWITCHES NUMBERS 1, 2 AND 3 ON FIELD HILL,
British Columbia, after some relocations and improvements had been
made in 1902. The pencilled notation on the plan for Safety Switch No.
2 notes that the extension and realignment of the tail-track had not
been built. Courtesy of Mr. R.W.Webb.
In 1897, when the Klondike boom began, the first detachment of
N.W.M.P. under Inspector Constantine was handled through on (a) pas­
senger (train), bound for the Yukon. Troops and supplies followed
later.
In 1898, the heavy increase in lumber shipments to the Crows
Nest construction necessitated a large increase in power at Field.
In addition, three crews with engines 200, 201 and 202 were assigned
to what was known as through-run, Canmore to Donald, westbound. These
crews were met at Hector by a hill crew, with two engines. The 200-
class engine was cut off and ran light (down) to Field. The hill
crews brought the train (down) to Field in two sections, where it
DIAGRAMS
Columbia
No. 1 is
noted.
CANADIAN 361 R A I L
… ,,;;~;:~tt~~; .
…–. -/. ~!i::::iiJ;~; .. ~.~ ,~JZJT<~ .
> :y j/ –.. ,~~.:~~::::~:~:~r~~~–., ~
……
>. . . >–<~k::--.
. . . —
If

OF SAFETY SWITCHES NUMBERS 1, 2 AND 3 ON FIELD HILL,BRITISH
after the 1902 improvements. The relocation of Safety Switch
shown. The additional land required for the tail-tracks is
Courtesy of Mr. R.W.Webb.
was
consolidated and pushed by a hill crew to the summit three miles we
st of Field. Eastbound freight trains were handled by hill crews
(from Field) to Hector ond Stephen. Hill crews also assisted through
crews to Stephen, where they filled out (the trains tonnage). A dis­
patching office was established at Field to cover this territory.
CANADIAN 362 R A I L
(Also) in 1898, the Paci fie Division took over (the line from)
Donald to Laggan. The Mountain and Selkirk Sections were consolidated
into the Mountain Section. Passenger engine crews ran Laggan to Revel­
stoke and train crews Laggan to Kamloops. By this time, passenger
trains were all equipped with the latest type of air-brake and were
handled down Field Hill by the regular crews. Freight trains between
Field and Laggan continued to be handled by hill crews. Wyes were
built at Hector and Golden. Cabooses were used between Hector and
Laggan. Laggan became the terminal for Alberta District crewsiField,
the terminal for Revelstoke Division freight crews.
In 1901, the Governor Generals Train and the Royal Train were
handled west and eastbound. Westbound, double-headed engines cut the
lead engine off on the fly and (it) took Stephen passing track with­
out stopping (the) trains. A trainman stood on the pilot, uncoupling
the air-hoses, and running tests were made on the level. The Royal
Train had five engines, including three helpers cut in the middle
and one on the rear, which was cut off on the fly at Stephen.
In 1902, the Ottertail grade-revision eliminated the need of a
helper westbound from Field to Ottertail. Helpers were begun between
Golden and Leanchoil. Later in this year, trains and the right-of-way
were closely watched by the N.W.M.P. for a desperado named Cashel,who
had escaped from the guardroom at Calgary. Eventually, he was cap-
tured near Calgary and executed.
In 1906, the grade revision was commenced between Field and
Hector. Construction camps were established at various sites. Por­
tions of the new track were built from Hector west and from what is
now Yoho west to the portals of Number 1 or upper tunnel and from Yoho
east and from the tunnel east of Field to the portals of Num­
ber 2 or lower tunnel. This enabled all equipment and supplies to
be delivered at (the) work (sites) by unassigned crews. No assign­
ments were made until required for ballasting from Hector Pit. At
this time, the staff system was put in operation between Field and
Hector. Work proceeded without interruption until the fall of 1909,
when it was completed. Laggan to Field was absorbed into the Alberta
District. Field became the terminal for all crews and the old Big
Hill became a thing of the past.
A few days after the new grade was completed, a rock-slide from
Mount Stephen came down on the track, bringing with it a shed which
contained 0 carload of dynamite and a quantity of gasoline for a
mining company -which was difficult to clean up.
During the twenty-three years of operation on the Big Hill,
there were four mishaps due to freight trains getting out of control.
In 1889, engine 314, backing down the hill, derailed west of the
third safety switch. The fireman and one trainman were killed. The
engineer had jumped about a mile bock. The conductor and trainman
were on the last car. In 1895, engine 317, backing down, derailed at
the third switch. The engine turned over and, as it was still in
front gear with the throttle open, the drivers were still turning.
~THE EASTBOUND TRANSCONTINENTAL PASSENGER TRAIN THUNDERS UP FIELD HILL
with engine Number 562, a 4-6-0, and two unidentified consolidations,
about 1905. The switch-tenders cabin is visible over the top of the
third passenger car and the safety siding can be seen through the
smoke of the pusher engine on the rear. It took three engines to move
eight cars up Field Hill in that era. Photo courtesy Corporate Ar-
chives, Canadian Pacific Limited.

CANADIAN
365
R A I L
There were some boarding cars in the spur at that point and the cook
went out and closed the throttle. The crew had all jumped some dis­
tance bock, as soon as the train got up speed. No one was injured,
but the general opinion was that the crew had funked it.
Backing down (the Hill) in 1898, engine 317 went into the first
safety switch. The engine went over the end and butted into the rock.
Several cars buckled and turned over. The crew stayed with the train
(and were) unin jured. It was New Years and 50 degrees below zero. A
section man, picking ice at the switch, stepped aside and, after the
train went by, calmly resumed picking ice until told by the switch­
tender to see if anyone was killed.
Among the several cars turned over was one of eggs and one of
whisky in barrels. The eggs had to be transferred quickly to avoid
freezing and, while this was under way, a supposedly reliable man
was assigned to guard the whisky. Presently, it was noticed that the
extra-gang labourers, working on (transferring) the eggs, were get­
ting somewhat hilarious. The water-boy was filling his pail from the
whisky barrels and distributing the rye by the cupful.
In 1903, engine 732, heading down with eleven loads of coal,
went into the third switch and left the track at the (switch) points.
The engine went into the hole and the eleven cars piled on top. The
engineer and the fireman were killed. One trainman was injured.
Then, there were what might be called freak mishaps. In 1900,an
engine with a snowplow left Field in a severe blizzard. Snow was
drifting badly between Field and the tunnel to the east. The plow was
hand-operated and a number of boxes of spikes were in the front
to weigh the nose down. There were about seven men, including the
trainmen, in the plow. About two miles east of Field, the plow de-
railed and went down the dump about 200 feet, nose first, and cut
a swath through the trees. No one was injured. The engineer did not
miss the plow until the engine went into the tunnel. He shut off the
throttle and said to the fireman,Where the hell is the plow?.
Damned if I know, replied the fireman, she was on when we
left Field.
In 1902, when the Ottertail grade revision was under way, the
switch leading to the new line was just west of Field west mile-board.
Field yard limits extended to the summit three miles west of Field.
Engine 409, on a construction train, had automatic air-brakes on the
tender and steam-brake only on the engine. One foggy morning, engine
736 was taking water at Field tank, when the work-train loomed out
of the fog, caboose on the point. No particular attention was paid
to it; however, it kept coming and, in moments, the caboose had
piled into engine 736. The fireman was knocked into the coal pit,but
not injured. The trucks of the caboose went under the tender and were
still on the track. Next, were two flats of rock, then the engine,
headed east.
As none of the crew showed up, the engine was looked over and
was found (to be) minus crew and tender, lever in front gear, throt-
SHORTLY AFTER THE UPPER AND LOWER SPIRAL TUNNELS EAST OF FIELD, BRIT-
ish Columbia, were completed in August, 1909, this view was taken
from the upper portal of the lower spiral tunnel. Directly across
the Kicking Horse River valley, on the lower slope of Cathedral
Mountain, the new line is visible, emerging from the upper spiral
tunnel. Phato courtesy Corporate Archives, Canadian Pacific Limited

,it THIRTY-ONE YEARS AFTER THE SPIRAL TUNNELS EAST OF FIELD, BRITISH COL­
~I umbia, were completed, Mr. A.F.Trickey of Calgary, Alberta, went with
his camera to the siding at Yoho, B.C., midway between the Upper and
Lower Spiral Tunnels. .
First to appear on the ·s:::ene was Extra 5363 east, puffing slowly
up the siding, in anticipation of a meet with a westbound freight.The
head-end brakeman was riding Number 5363 s pilot, so that he could
open the switch at the east end of the siding, without bringing the
heavy freight to a stop.
The pusher for Extra 5363 east turned out to be engine Number
5310, cut into the train ahead of the van. The westbound freight,
coming down the hill on the main track, has a clear on the semaph­
ore signal, visible over the caboose marker-light.
Before engine Number 5310 and the van could clear the road cros-
sing, westbound Extra 5125 came coasting down the hill on the main
line, while the wig-wag, light and bell of the crossing-signal oscil­
lated, flashed and rang excitedly. Soon, Extra 5125 would rumble over
the Kicking Horse River, while Extra 5363 east blasted through the
Upper Spiral Tunnel east to Stephen and Lake Louise, Alberta. These
pictures were taken by Mr. Trickey in July, 1940.
tIe wide open and steam driving brake not set. About this time, the
crew showed up, walking in. It developed that (engine) 409, backing
west, had collided with an eastbound train -engine 683 -about a
mile west. The fireman, who was running engine 409 when engine 683
showed up, threw the lever into front gear, opened the throttle, and
jumped. The tender jammed into engine 409 and, as there was no auto­
matic brake on the cars or engine, the whole remaining consist star­
ted back to Field. The train crew, expecting a collision, jumped.
In 1907, engine 408, with caboose only, was backing down, Hector
to Field. West of the second (safety) switch, the engine began to
skid. The engineer and fireman, who were green on the hill, jumped.
The train crew then cut off the caboose and were able to slow it down,
but could not bring it to a stop. Engine 408 ran up the switch and
stopped, with the rear wheels of the tender over the track-end. Then,
as the engine was in front gear with the throttle open, it started
ahead. The tender wheels climbed the rails again and the engine went
full speed down the (safety switch) track, meeting the oncoming ca­
boose opposite the switch-tenders shack. The train crew (in the
caboose) jumped, without injury. The caboose was badly damaged. The
switch-tender was some time figuring out what had happened at his
very door.
Once,
Near Winnipeg I

George Harris
N
ot so many years ago, there were
many and interesting sights to
be seen of railways and their
equipment, in and around Canadas
midwest city of Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Today, many of these once-familiar
sights are no more, but, happily,
photographic records of them re­
main.
In the series of pictures accompanying this text, most
enthusiasts will recognize the familiar outline of the City
nipeg Hydro engine Number 3, the famous ex-Canadian Pacific
4-4-0 which nowadays is Number 3 of the Prairie Dog Central
This picture was taken when Number 3 was back in the bush,
her pilot plow was removed and she was brought out to the
lights of Winnipegs suburbs.
railway
of W in­
Railway
Railway.
before
bright
On a fine day in August 1937, Canadian Pacific Railways Train
3 stopped for water -and passengers -at Brandon, Manitoba, on its
way to the Pacific Coast. Royal Hudson Number 2829 was on the head­
end.
In 1974, many prairie stations like that of CP RAIL at Deloraine,
Manitoba, are being closed and removed. This picture was taken on a
day in September 1955.
For more years than most of us can count, a passenger train in
a railway station was a familiar sight across most of Canada. A Can­
adian Pacific Railway post-war passenger train, with pacific-type
Number 1200, paused at Treherne, Manitoba, about 75 miles southwest
of Winnipeg, in September 1955.
That same month and year, Canadian Pacific passenger Train 3 rum­
bled into the station at Elkhorn, Manitoba, 1,603 miles west of Mon­
treal.
And just in case you were under the impression that the country
on Canadas prairies is flat, here is a view of the East Prairie
Freight of Canadian Pacific on the east hill at Minnedosa, Manitoba.
In October 1938, the consist included an ancient daycoach, used as a
drovers car, and 2-10-0 Number 5790, puching on the rear. The smoke
of the train engine was visible over the top of the coach, around the
shoulder of the hill at the right of the picture.
These are but a few of the many interesting railway scenes near
Winnipeg, in the era of the steam locomotive.

December 1974
WE ARE GRATEFUL TO MR. W.B.McCARVELL OF GUELPH, ONTARIO, FOR ADDITION­
al information on the lake steamers pictured on page 151
of the May 1974 issue Number 268 of CANADIAN RAIL. The
S.S.NORTHUMBERLAND was built at Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England,in 1891,
for the Charlottetown Steam Navigation Company, for service between
Prince Edward Island and the mainland. She was bought by the Govern­
ment of Canada in 1916 and sent to Lake Ontario for the Toronto-Port
Dalhousie service, running opposite the S.S. DALHOUSIE CITY. The
NORTHUMBERLAND hod accommodation for 1,050 day passengers. She was
powered by two triple-expansion engines generating 2,500 horsepower.
She was destroyed by fire at Port Dalhousie, Ontario, the day before
her first voyage of the 1949 season.
The S.S.TORONTO was built by the Canadian Shipbuilding
Company of Toronto in 1899 for the Richelieu and Ontario Steam Na­
vigation Company. She was approximately 3,000 tons and had 330 berths.
From the beginning to the end of her career, the TORONTO sailed in
the Toronto-Rochester NY-Prescott service, first for the Richelieu &
Ontario and, after 1913, for Canada Steamship Lines. She was laid up
at the end of the 1938 season and was scrapped in 1948.
The S.S. CAPE TRINITY, builder and year built unknown, was
purchased by Canada Steamship Lines and operated on the Toronto­
Bay of Quinte-1000 Islands Route until 1929, when she became a vic-
tim of the Depression. In the photograph mentioned, the legend
Canada Steamship Lines appears on the ships bow. The S.S. CAPE
ETERNITY, her sister ship, was formerly the S.S.ROCHESTER, which op­
erated from Rochester NY to the 1000 Islands. She was bought by Can­
ada Steamship Lines and used on the Toronto-Bay of Quinte-l000 Is­
lands Route until 1929, when she was taken out of service.
WHEN THE TENDERS FOR AN ADDITIONAL 423 CARS FOR MONTREALS METRO
were opened by the Montreal Urban Community Transit Co­
mission in mid-1974, two of the three companies which
had tendered were surprised to find that the successful bidder was
Bombardier Limited, the well-known manufacturer of SKI-DOO* snowmo­
biles. While Bombardiers successful bid of $ 117.79 million was
higher that that of Canadian Vickers Limited of $ 117.65, the MUCTC
said the latter was rejected because it did not specify the required
type of couplers on the cars. Vickers called the award misguided,
and, after considerable publicity in the local papers, mode no fur­
ther public comment.
Delivery by Bombardier from one of its plants not yet
designated will begin late in 1975 and will be completed by 1978.
Editorial Stoff.
A FEW H-16-44 FM UNITS AND C-LINERS CONTINUE TO APPEAR ON THE CROWS­
nest Pass route of CP RAIL fairly regularly, Pat Webb
CANADIAN 373 R A I L
of Lethbridge, Alberta reported in July 1974. C-liners
Numbers 4105, 4104 and 4065 were operated quite frequently, but their
days seemed to be numbered. Number 4057 had not been in the Lethbridge­
Macleod area for some time.
THE MAINE CENTRAL RAILROAD HAS BEEN ORDERED TO RESTORE SERVICE FROM
North.Stratford, New Hampshire to Beecher Falls, Ver­
mont, parts of which were damaged and washed out in
June 1973 by a torrential rain. The MEC asked the Interstate Commer­
ce Commission for permission to abandon the 23 miles and, in antici­
pation of approval, ceased service. The States of Vermont, New Hamp­
shire and the ICC asked the courts to compel the MEC to restore ser­
vice until the request for abandonment was ruled on. U.S. District
Court Judge Albert Coffrin ordered resumption of service, the lack
of which has cost the Ethan Allen Furniture Company of Beecher Falls,
Vermont, about $ 200,000 in additional freight charges for the 12
months the line was out of service.
Under the court order, the Ethan Allen Furniture Company
will pay $ 52,000 towards repair of the track, with the remainder of
the estimated total cost of $ 100,000 coming from the MEC.
In August 1974, the MEC appealed the ruling and the case
was pending in the U.S. Court of Appeals, New York City. THE 470.
RECENTLY, THE EDITOR HAD AN EXCHANGE OF CORRESPONDENCE WITH MR. DUN­
can du Fresne, past-President of the Ottawa Branch of
our Association, on the subject of volunteer organiza­
tions in general and irreplaceable officers, directors and members,
in particular. While volunteer organizations of all kinds rely heav­
ily on the abilities and/or talents of their members, the adjective
irreplaceable, characterizing these members, must be used with
care.
To support this contention, Mr. du Fresne submitted the
following poem:
THE IRREPLACEABLE MAN
Sometimes when youre feeling important –
Sometimes when your egos in bloom –
Sometimes when you take it for granted
Youre the best qualified in the roomi
Take a bucket and fill it with water,
Put your hand in it up to the wrist,
Pull it out, and the hole thats remaining
Is a measure of how much youll be missed~
ONCE UPON A TIME (1902-1959) THERE WAS A CURIOUS LITTLE RAILWAY, ONE
and one-eighth miles long, near the village of Hunts­
ville, Ontario, in what is today Algonquin Park. Being
quite remote, it was relatively unknown to railway enthusiasts. Its
corporate title was very nearly as long as its main line: The Hunts­
ville, Lake of Bays & Lake Simcoe Railway and Navigation Company.
Mr. Carol Homuth of Harriston, Ontario, discovered this
anachronistic 3-foot 8t-inch anachronism in 1940, and photographed
its name train, The Portage Flyer, first at South Portage and
then at North Portage, the two terminii.
Twenty-three years later, Mr. Homuth was interested to
find that the HLB&LSR&NC had been moved, lock, stock and barrel -as
you might say -to Percy Broadbear s Pinafore Park at St. Thomas,
CANADIAN 374 R A I L
Ontario. Today, after considerable refurbishment performed by Mr.
Broadbear, the diminutive 0-4-0ST steam locomotives and the open­
bench, former electric streetcars merrily puff along, carrying crowds
of happy passengers. Mr. Homuth photographed this operation, too, and
has kindly sent us the result.

CANADIAN 376 R A I L
PIERRE PATENAUDE HAS WRITTEN TO PROVIDE THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION ON
various diesel doings:
Canadian National Railways has placed order number C-372
with the Diesel Division, General Motors of Canada, for fourty GP 40-
2 L units. These will have road numbers 9491 through 9530, with cor­
responding serial numbers A-3069 through A-3108.
CP RAIL has placed order number C-374 with DD-GMC for
fifty SD 40-2 units. Rood numbers will be 5800 to 5805 with LOCOTROL
and 5675 through 5718. Serial numbers will be A-3113 through A-3118
and A-3119 through A-3162.
Canadian Notional Railways has a total of 160 diesel lo-
comotives on order, 130 GP 40-2L units from DD GMC and 30 M-420
wide cabs from MLW Industries, Montreal.
Pierre kindly sends some photographs to accompany these
items. The first is Canadian National Railways GP 40-2L Number 9416
at Montreal Yard on April 17, 1974i the second is of Ontario North­
land Railways two RS 3 and two RS 10 units, retired from service on November
26, 1973 and thereafter sold to MLW Industries. Here they
are -Numbers 1403,1305,1309 and 1402 at Longue Pointe Yard on June
8, 1974, bound for MLW. The third of Pierres photos is one of Can­
adian National Railways Number 2530, class MR 20b, the first unit of
the second order of M 420 wide-cab units, waiting at Montreal Yard on
June 15, 1974. Last, but not least, Number 4010 of Union Carbide is
a re-manufactured ex-Reading Railroad NW 2, Number 90. The unit was
in CNs Longue Pointe Yard on June 8, 1-9.74, in transit to Union Car­
bides plant in Montreal East.

CANADIAN 378 R A I L
OUR DEDICATED TRAIN-WATCHER FROM THE SAGUENAY-GASPE-PRINCE EDWARD IS­
land region has reported that Roberval-Sag~enay SW-1200
N~mber 23 has been p~rchased by the Canada & G~lf Ter­
minal Railway -Chemin de fer de Matane et d~ Golfe. In mid-A~g~st,
the ~nit was in the CFMG shops, becoming that road s N~mber 103.
The car-ferry service to PEl operates only at night in
the s~mmer, with a triple-header of Canadian National RSC 13 units,
class MR 10d 1700-series units leaves Sunnyside every second day
for the ferry port at Borden. Our friend is trying to obtain a good
photograph for publication in CANADIAN RAIL of the natural stone
station at Kensington, PEl. This is a rare sort of building; it was
constructed about 1905.
NOTRE CORRESPONDANT DE PORT ALFRED, QUEBEC, M. GERMAIN BOULIANNE,
no~s a in forme en mi-aoOt 1974 que les deux M420 TR du
chemin de fer Roberval-Saguenay sont revenus et ont
circule entre Port Alfred et Arvida depuis Ie debut de juin, apres
diverses modifications aux ateliers de la MLW Industries d Montreal
et plusieurs essais sur les rails des chemins de fer Nationaux.
Les modifications les plus apparentes concernent les
surfaces vitrees de la cabine qui ont ete diminuees, comme vous Ie
verrez en comparant la photo ci-~ointe avec celIe publie dans CAN­
ADIAN RAIL, edition 268, mai 1974.
On a egalement ameliore lisolement et linsonorisa­
tion de lhabitacle. Dautres changements ont ete faits aux bogies
pour ameliorer les qualites de roulement d basse vitesse que les
equipages trouvaient inconfortables. Apparemment ces derniers per­
fectionnements auraient beaucoup ameliore Ie roulement.
Our Port Alfred, Quebec correspondent, Mr. Germain Bou­
lianne, has advised us that, in mid-August 1974, the two M420 TRs of
the Roberval-Saguenay Railway returned to the Port Alfred-Arvida run
at the beginning of June, after undergoing various modifications at
the shops of MLW Industries, Montreal and several test runs on Can­
adian National Railways lines.
The most obvious modifications to the units were in the
window portions of the cabs, which were reduced in size, as can be
seen by comparing the accompanying photo with the one published in
CANADIAN 379 R A I L
the May 1974 issue Number 268 of CANADIAN RAIL.
In addition, the insulation and sound-proofing of the
cab was also improved. Other modifications were made to the trucks
to improve their adhesion at low speeds; the crews found that the
riding qualities of the trucks were poor at low speeds. Apparently,
these latter improvements in fact greatly improved the riding char-
acteristics.
THE FOLLOWING DELIVERY DATES AND ASSIGNMENTS HAVE BEEN RECEIVED FROM
Pierre Patenaude for the Diesel Division, General Motors
of Canada order for GP 40-2L units from Canadian Notion-
al Railways:
Road Serial Date
number number delivered Assi9ned
9400 A-2978 19 Mar 1974 Toronto Yard, Great Lakes
9401 A-2979 19 Mar 1974 Toronto Yard Region
9402 A-2980 23 Mar 1974 Toronto Yard 9403 A-2981 23
Mar 1974 Toronto Yard 9404 A-2982 27
Mar 1974 Toronto Yard 9405 A-2983 29
Mar 1974 Toronto Yard 9406 A-2984 30
Mar 1974 Toronto Yard 9407 A-2985 30
Mar 1974 Toronto Yard 9408 A-2986 30
Mar 1974 Toronto Yard 9409 A-2987 30
Mar 1974 Toronto Yard 9410 A-2988 08 Apr 1974
Toronto Yard 9411 A-2989 08 Apr 1974
Toronto Yard 9412 A-2990
11 Apr 1974 Toronto Yard 9413 A-2991 1 1 Apr 1974
Toronto Yard 9414 A-2992 16 Apr 1974
Toronto Yard 9415 A-2993 16 Apr 1974
Toronto Yard 9416 A-2994 19 Apr 1974
Toronto Yard 9417 A-2995 19 Apr 1974
Toronto Yard 9418 A-2996 19 Apr 1974
Toronto Yard 9419 A-2997 19 Apr 1974
Toronto Yard 9420 A-2998 24 Apr 1974
Montreal Yard, St. Lawrence
9421 A-2999 24 Apr 1974 Montreal Yard Region
9422 A-3000 27 Apr 1974 Montreal Yard 9423 A-3001 27 Apr 1974
Montreal Yard 9424 A-3002 30 Apr 1974
Montreal Yard 9425 A-3003 30 Apr 1974
Montreal Yard 9426 A-3004 30 Apr 1974
Montreal Yard 9427 A-3005 07
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9428 A-3006 07
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9429 A-3007 10
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9430 A-3008 08
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9431 A-3009 10
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9432 A-3010 14
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9433 A-3011 14
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9434 A-3012 16
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9435 A-3013 16
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9436 A-3014 17
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9437 A-3015 17
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9438 A-3016 23
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9439 A-3017 23
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9440 A-3018 25
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9441 A-3019 25
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9442 A-3020 29
May 1974 Montreal Yard 9443 A-3021 29
May 1974 Montreal Yard
9444 9445
CANADIAN
A-3022 A-3023
380
31 May 1974
31 May 1974
R A I L –
Montreal Yard
Montreal Yard
Pierre sends us some pictures of CN motive power, as follows:
(1) DD GMC GP 40-2L units Numbers 9418 & 9412 and GP 9 Number 4505
at Montreal Yard, west departure yard, for Train 937 on May 16, 1974.
(2) CN GP 40-2L units Numbers 9424 & 9434 were used as power on pig­
gy-back express Train 202. After cutting off the train, the units
waited at Turcot West for a clear block to proceed west to Montreal
Yard, on June 15, 1974.
(3) More GP 40-2L and GP 38-2 wide-cab units on CN: Numbers 9416 and
5563 on Train T-090 at Parsley, Montreal Yard on May 5 1974. Clearly
visible is DD GMC s version of the wide cab ….
IN A LAST-QUARTER 1974 COMMUNICATION, EXECUTIVE DEPUTY COMMISSIONER
John K. Mladinov, Department of Transportation, State of
New York, clarified the arrangements between AMTRAK, the
Department of Transportation of the State of New York and the Del­
aware and Hudson Railway Company, as follows:
Funds from (State of New York) Governor Wilsons $ 30
million Rail Services Preservation Program. made it
possible for the New York State Department of Trans­
portation to negotiate with AMTRAK and the Delaware &
Hudson Railway to resume passenger operation which was
discontinued, as Im sure you remember, in 1971 when
AMTRAK assumed the responsibility for intercity trains.
The $ 30 million program is in direct response to the
most immediate rail needs in our State and to those ex­
pressed by the National Regional Rail Reorganization Act.
Each part of this triad is doing its part to make
the operation a success. The State has provided the ini­
tial funds necessary to restore a much needed service to
economic self-sufficiency. State funds are being used
to buy equipment and to improve facilities which our
railroads cannot presently finance themselves. The D&H
is operating the train for AMTRAK, as well as providing
trackage and passenger cars. Under an agreement with
the State DOT and the D&H Railway, the service will be­
come part of AMTRAKs national rail passenger network
by their paying 1/3 of any operating deficits, if the
cost of service is not met from revenue. Two-thirds of
any remaining deficit will be absorbed by the State. It
is for this reason that AMTRAK is advertising its ser­
vice.
Under the (U.S.federal) law which created AMTRAK,
railroads which had been providing intercity rail pas­
senger services at the time of AMTRAKs creation had
either to enter into a contract with AMTRAK (which then
absolved the railroad from having to continue to provide

CANADIAN 3
R A I L
possenger service on its own} or to continue to provide
possenger service without the possibility of obondonment
until Jonuory 1, 1975. Since the D&H entered into the
AMTRAK controct in 1971, it wos then absolved of pro­
viding passenger ~ervices as of May 1, 1971. The con-
tract however provided that roil possenger services
could not be provided by the roilrood in the future,
other than through AHTRAK. Thus, the Stote of Ne …. York
and the D&H had no option but to have AHTRAK operote
this Ne …. York to Montreal service. It is being done un­
der the provisions of Sections 403b and 403c of the
Roil Passenger Service Act of 1970, by which the Stote
has to beor no less than 2/3 of any operating deficit. The
Stote s objective is to restore the roil-
roods economic viob~lity by restoring its competitive
position as a passenger and freight carrier. Our in­
vestment will benefit every citizen of the State, not
only in the for~ of la …. er costs of products Moved by
roil, but also in energy conservation and environMen_
tal improvements.
Acc
ording to reports compiled by the Delo …. ore &
Hudson Rail …. ay and AMTRAK, the ridership figures for
the first three weeks of operation are extremely suc­
cessful. It should be even eoreso …. hen AMTRAK pub_
lishes its new notional roil passenger tieetable this
lIonth (Seplelnber, 1974) including the Adirondack
service.
We
ore very Much indebted to Hr. Hlodinov for this detailed in_
formation and for his per~ission to publish it.
~THE INAUGURAL RUN OF THE NEW YORK STATE DOT/AMTRAK/D&H ADIRONDACK
passenger train service on August 5, 1974 was of intense interest to
the citizens of every village, town and city along the route fro~
Albany, New York, to Montreal, Quebec. Jill Shoughnessy, skilled pho­
tographer and D&H Official Historian recorded the passage of the
first Adirondack through Saratoga, New York.
1.,0tl 24 APRIL 1973, DOMHHO~l ATLANTIC RAILWAYS BUDD ROC DAYLHIER
……. Number 9059, bound for Halifax, Novo Scotia from the
Valley, made a connection …. ith …. estbound Canadian
National Railways passenger trains at Windsor Junction, Nova Sco­tia.
Corl Sturner of AUDIO VISUAL DESIGNS, Earlton, NY, who took
the picture, offirms that the cut of tank cars …. os on on odjoining
siding and not port of the passenger train~
Canadian Rail
is p,bIished montNy by the
Caladian Rairoad Historical Association
PoD. Box 22, Station8,MofltINl,OueOee.~H36 3J5
EditOf;S.S.Northen Production; p Mu]llly
Association Branches
CALG,uy II SOUTH WESTERN
L.tI.Unin, S.c OTTAWA
W.R,Liney,Secetary P.O.B,.x 141,Stotion
,
Ot10o,Cono PCIHC COAST
R,H.Meye., Secretory P.O.Bo~ 10M,Stotlon

Vancouver,8.C.V6C
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
J.t..ikl •• S.cr.tory.P.O.Bo~ 6102,5tot;0 C. Ed~anton. Al to. T 58

TORONTO II YORK DIVISION
P.5htrgold,S,cretory P.O.Bo~ 5849,T.uinol

Toronto,Ont.MSW

A.ssociation Representatives
……. -,. 0 <_ ... .. ,,, . , .... ,, .... ,., ....
, .. un _.e. ……
,_. ,
,. —
, ,

J..
,,OU <.G._ ..... , ,. I •••.• ,.

.. .. …•. 0,., 210
, …. …… , …. , .. ,,,,
I ..
. . , .. s …. ·,, …. ·
,,,

:0.1. !lIla .J..,.,., , .. ..
…. ,. ,po h •••• 1 I,. ,
I- …. ~ ,-110.
• ,.f. I _._ ,., .. ~
9 .
– . ..
… .,, U OC1
1-…. ~ ,,,,0
-..10-
.,,,-,, .. 0 ……. , .. ,
.,.
II~ ~I_
-…
– …… Y, ,.,. . .oe ..f •.• , ..
hi.·
VlSittlMl Canadian Railway Museum SlComt&nt,Queboc.Canada.
• Mote than 100 pieces 01 ~ on dispIav.
l

Demande en ligne