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Canadian Rail 274 1974

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Canadian Rail 274 1974

No.274
November 1974

1
THE BRIDGE
ON
THE
KENNEBECASIS
C. WARREN ANDERSON
AND
S.S.WORTHEN
I
t is sometimes very difficult to under-
stand, a century later, why a railway
was built when it was, where it was.
There are the obvious instances, af
course, like the St. Lawrence and Atlantic,
the Grand Trunk and the Canadian Pacific.
These companies were formed and construct­
ed for ~he primary purpose of making money.
But how do you account for the incorpora­
tion of the Central Railway Company in New
Brunswick, Canada, in 1871, to build from
Fredericton, in the St. John River valley
to the head of Grand Lake and to a point
on the Intercolonial Railways line from
Moncton to Saint John, behleen Apohaqui and
Sailsbury?
I

Well, a look at a map of New Brunswick will reveal that Freder­
icton, the provincial capital, is some distance from Saint John, the
port city, and that the former should be accessible from the east
(Halifax, r~.s. and Moncton, N.B.) by a direct line of railway,rather
than by the roundabout route via Saint John. By 1869, the Western
Extension of the European & North American Railway was offering ser­
vice to Fredericton, via Fredericton Junction. The line from Saint
John to the State of Maine did not pass through the pravincial cap­
ital. So, by the time the Central Railway Company was beginning to
build its lifie, there must have been other reasons for doing so.
One of them may have been the mining of coal around Coal Creek
on Grand Lake. Another was likely the lumbering industry. In addition,
in the early days, passenger traffic Has heavy. But, primarily, the
Intercolonial Railway needed coal for its locomotives, running from Moncton
to Saint John. There was also a potential export market for
Coal Creek coal, through the port of Saint John.
Perhaps this potential export traffic encoucaged the incorpor­
ation of yet another railway, the St. Martins and Upham RailHay Com­
pany in 1871, to build a line from St. Martins on Quaco Bay, an arm
THE STATION OF CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS AT NORTON, NEW BRUNSWICK,
on the Moncton-Saint John line of the former Intercolonial Railway.
About 5 eptember 1973, the station was still in use under caretaker
service. The Kennard Patent Iron Girder-Type Bridge over the Ken­
nebecasis River Can be seen in the distance, to the left of the
station. Photo courtesy Mr. Ted Mcquinn.
t
WITH MR. JOHNNY MYERS AT THE THROTTLE, CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAYS
mixed train Number 159 with engine Number 144 leaves Norton, N.B.
on the morning of June 14, 1956. Photo courtesy F.F.Angus.
~ SEVEN MILES UP THE LINE FROM NORTON, AT BELLEISLE, NEW BRUNSWICK,
NumbeLJ,44 wa§,)Iorkin,g the mixed train on New Years Day, 195.1.
Photo CRHA E.A.Toohey Collection.
of the Bay af Fundy, 28.85 miles to Hampton on the Intercolonial.Some
10.7 miles northeast of Hampton on the Intercolonial was Norton, the
town that was to be the terminus -eventually -of the railway to
Coal Creek, Chipman and Fredericton (Gibson).
But nothing af the above has much to do with railway bridges,in
particular the two-span, bax-girder, pcitent iron bridge which, in
1860, was ardered from the Kennard Iron Works in England by the Euro­
pean and North American. This iron bridge was needed to span the Sal­
mon River at Plumweseep, New Brunswick, 14 miles north of Norton,and,
upon receipt, there it was installed.
The Central Railway Company had a hard time keeping the ledger­
entries in the block during the first years af operation. Even after
it acquired the St. Martins & Upham Railway as its Southern Division,
it had a hard time. But it continued ta operate the St.M&U until
October 1, 1897.
The Eurapean & North American Railway become part of the Inter­
colonial Railway Company on Navember 9, 1872 and the twin-span, iran
bridge at Plumweseep carried ICR trains fram that date until 1905
when the ICR decided that a new bridge would be required to carry
the increasing weight of locomotives and cars. Thereafter, the ICR
ordered a new bridge and saId the two-span Kennard Potent Iron Gir­
der Bridge to the New Brunswick Coal and Railway Company to replace

CANADIAN 327 R A I L
on earlier bridge over the Kennebecasis River at Norton, N.B.
The NeH Brunswick Coal and Railway Company, chartered in 1901
to build a line from Chipman on Grand Lake to Gibson, near Frederic­
ton, purchased the Central Railway Company in 1903. It was a rather
bod bargain. Five years later, the Government of New Brunswick held
an inquiry into the muddled affairs of both companies and thereafter
appointed a Board and two Commissioners to operate the railway. The
Central Railway Company had completed its line from Chipman south to
Norton on the ICR by 1888 and thereupon required a bridge to cross
the Kennebecasis River, a quarter-of-a-mile west of the station at
Norton.
Thus it was that in October 1905, the Intercolonial sold the
two-span bridge at Plumweseep to the New Brunswick Cool & Railway
Company for the river crossing at Norton. The bridge was moved by
the Canadian Bridge Company of Walkerville, Ontario. During the rais­
ing of the bridge from its central pier and abutments, the ICR wreck­
ing crane picked it up off-balance and thereby derailed itself, and
upset. It took a good deal of time and energy to construct the crib­
work necessary to support the bridge and thereafter to re-rail the
c ra n e.
Once the bridge was rebuilt over the Kennebecasis in November
1905, it carried trains of the NBC&R and the Canadian Pacific Rail­
Hay, the successor, until the spring of 1962, when service was dis­
continued over most of this CPR subdivision. Complete abandonment
took effect on September 1, 1963, authorized by Order 111442 of the
Board of Transport Commissioners of Canada, issued June 10, 1963.
The NeH Brunswick Cool & Railway Company hod been leased to the
Canadian Pacific Railway Company on February 2,1915, for the usual
term of 999 years and this explains Hhy, forty years later, Mr. John
Myers was piloting CPR 4-4-0 steam locomotives Numbers 29, 136 and
144 on this subdivision.
From the time that Kennards Potent Iron Girder-Type Bridge was
erected over the Kennebecasis near Norton, there was usually trouble
with flooding each spring, when the ice went out of the river. The
couse was said to be the centre cement pier, which prevented the
larger ice-cakes from floating freely dOHn the river to Hampton. When
the CPR stopped using the Minto Subdivision, the Department of High­
ways of NeH Brunswick lost no time in making plans for the demolition
of the bridge and the offending pier.
The Saint John N. B. Telegraph-Journal of November 22 1973 no-
tified residents in the Norton area that eleven militia-men from
Sydney, Nova Scotia and four from St. Johns, Newfoundland, Hould
work with 30 sappers -regular army engineers -from Canadian Forces
Bose, Gagetown, New Brunswick, in the removal of the bridge over
the Kennebecasis. The demolition of the bridge and pier was schedul­
ed for November 28-29, 1973. The Hhole thing was to be demolished in
two ~tages and it was said that 700 pounds of explosives would be
requ~red.
~ ON JUNE 14, 1958, THE MONCTON TRAVEL AGENCY SPONSORED A SPECIAL TR­
ain over the Norton-Chipman line. The late Mr. Fred Stephens recor­
ded the event: Number 136, an 1883 Rogers product provided the pow­
er and Mr. Johnny Myers was the engineer. In the second picture,Mr.
Myers was oiling the locomotive during a water-stop at Perrys,N.B.
CANADIAN R A I L
Shaped charges were to be used on the superstructure to direct
the blast away from the station side of the river at Norton, so that
no damage to property would result from the concussion or from the
flying debris. Residents were requested to leave house doors and win-
dows open on the morning of November 28, to minimize any possible
effects of the concussion, when the explosive charges were detonated.
The bridge superstructure would be blown up (down?) first and, later,
the central pier would be demolished.
On the morning of November 28, members of the militia and the
Second Canadian Engineer Field Squadron, under the command of Major
Reno Cyr of Oromocto, New Brunswick, made last-minute preparations
for the first part of the exercise. Four hundred pounds of explosive
had been placed around the box-girder spans. As the nearest buildings
were about 160 yards from the bridge, no unusual effects were anti­
cipated. The area was cleared of non-military personnel. As zero
hour approached, members of the military took shelter in their as­
signed positions.
At precisely 10:00 hours, the explosive charges were detonated.
There was a very loud BOOM -and a large cloud of dust and smoke
rose up into the oir, over the bridge on the Kennebecasis.
The town of Norton -and its citizens -were severely shaken by
both the concussion and the ground-tremor. One or two people were
knocked off their feet, so it was reported. The windows in most of
the houses nearest the blast were completely shattered and some, homes
were alleged to have been moved on their foundations. Most of the dam­
age was suffered by houses on the station side of the Kennebecasis.
The awesome sound of the explosion was heard as far away as Penobsq­
uis, 18 miles to the northeast, and Hampton, 11 miles to the south­
west. Simultaneously, the explosion did succeed in knocking the two i-ron
spans .. off th.eir fou.ndations and i-nto the. river. I.n this r.espect,
the exercise could be said to have been a success.
On the day following, Major Cyr announced that the demolition
had gone quite well and as planned. However, he was obliged to
admit that the operation was only half-finished, since the centre con­
crete pier was still in place. Chief Highway Engineer G.D. Reeleder
was a little more objective in his remarks about the cancellation of
Part 2 of the demolition.
We want to go in and look at the situation, he said.
Were hesitating to report the damage. There appears to have
been more damage than we anticipated. We will assume responsibility
for the damage.
This was rather cold November comfort for some of the citizens
of Norton, New Brunswick. Mr. Irvine Swift had 31 windows blown out
in his home and a former store connected to his house. China dishes
were also knocked out of his kitchen cupboard and broken. Mrs. Jean
Snyder, who followed instructions and left her doors and windows open,
nevertheless had every window-pane in the house smashed. The home of
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clement was severely damaged, with window sashes
and casings being torn from the walls, windows br~ken, a large hole
left in a kitchen wall where the plaster had been torn off, a septic
tank ruptured, all the dishes in the house broken and the cement
wall of the basement cracked in several places. The Clements house
is on a hill overlooking the Kennebecasis, about half-a-mile from
the bridge.
Realization of the enormity of the damage was slow in coming,
but by December 6, the Kings County-Sussex Record was estimating
THE TWO-SPAN IRON GIRDER-TYPE BRIDGE OVER THE KENNEBECASIS RIVER AT
Norton, N.B., was quite an impressive structure, even after nearly
one hundred years of use. C. Warren Anderson recorded it on film on
November 24, 1973, about a week before the Awful Norton Blast.
AFTER THf ~LAST,.T~E PI~CES OF THE BRIDGE TUMBLED INTO THE RIVER,
to be re~oved bybulldoi~rs and cut up for transport to the scrap­
yard. This picture is from the Kings County-Sussex Record.
CANADIAN 330 R A I L
the damage at between $ 15,000 and $ 25,000, and the awful results
af the Norton Blast were echoing in the legislature at Fredericton,
particularly. in the office of the Ministry of Highways. The Honorable
Wilfred G. Bishop, Minister, said in a statement that the Province
would be responsible for the damages.
Part of the problem -what to do with the superstructure of the
bridge -was resolved on December 4, when bulldozers came to the
site and, after attaching chains to the pieces of the bridge, pulled
them out of the Kennebecasis. There, they were cut up to manageable
size with oxyacetylene torches. And, until the spring break-up in
the spring of 74, the problem was apparently fixed. But the single
mid-stream cement pier was still there~
With all this stuff from the blast in the river, flooding could
become worse during next springs run-off, some residents of Norton
said. Others were of the opinion that it really was not the bridge­
pier that caused the flooding, but the bend in the river which held
up the ice-cakes and caused ice-jams.
At some time since the Awful Norton Blast of November 28, 1973,
the mid-stream cement pier was removed in a very mysterious manner.
The winter of 73- 74 was a mild one and the run-off in the spring of
74 was nothing to speak of. Only succeeding spring run-offs will de-
monstrate whether the flooding has been eliminated, or whether it
continues to occur.
It is quite probable that the Awful Norton Blast, with all
its pros and cons, will be incorporated as part of the towns history.
It is certain that everyone will never agree as to why things did not
work out as planned. But, do plans ever work out in the way in which
they are expected to happen?
In any event, the blast provided a remarkable climax to the
history of the 113-year-old Kennards Patent Iron Girder-Type Bridge
at Norton, New Brunswick, the Bridge on the Kennebecasis.
JDISTRESS WANT
PAJD&W
John Todd
I
t is probable that all the excitement in 1883-84
surrounding the advent of the Canadian Pacific
Railway to the Lakehead Region of Canadas Pro­
vince of Ontario was responsible for the propo-
sal to build a railway in a southern direction
from Prince Arthurs Landing, along the western
shore of Lake Superior, to Duluth in the adjacent
State of Minnesota, U.S.A.
~
o
Whatever the stimulus, the Thunder Bay Colonization Railway was
incorporated provincially on February 1,1883, to construct a rail-
way from Prince Arthurs Landing to some point southwest of Arrow
Lake. The some point southwest of Arrow Lake turned out to be
Gunflint, Ontario, 86.07 miles into the scrub and woods from the
town of Prince Arthurs Landing, later Port Arthur and, later still
Thunder Bay, Ontario.
The promoters of this project ihclud~d some of the leading ci-
tizens of Port Arthur: Messrs. James Conmee, D. F. Burk and Thomas
Marks. The latter gentleman was elected President of the new Company.
President Marks felt that it was unlikely that the capital re­
quired to construct the new line could be obtained in Canada at that
time and he therefore travelled to Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota,
in July 1889 to consult the bankers there. His trip was a successful
one and he returned to Port Arthur with enough money to build the
first 50 miles of the projected railway. He then asked the town coun­
cil of Port Arthur for a grant of $ 50,000 to support the project.
The town council decided to hold a referendum among the citizens and
they approved the proposal with a majority of 354 in favour and 14
against.
The officers of the Thunder Bay Colonization Railway believed
that its construction and completion would o~en up the country to
farming, would permit development of several silver and iron mines
and would facilitate access to large stands of white pine, which
could be developed by the loggers of the lakehead.
Reassured by their initial successes, the Director~ changed the
name of the company to the Port Arthur, Duluth and Western Railway
by provincial statute on April 23, 1887 and the railway was declared
~o be for the general benefit of Canada by fed~ral government statute
on May 4, 1888. Under the appropriate acts of legislation, $ 271,200
came to the PAD&W from the federal government, $ 255,571 in provin­
cial government subsidies and $ 40,000 in municipal help. This rep­
resented a very tidy sum of money for the building of a railway.
CANADIAN 332 R A I L
The Directors of the PAD&W planned to make an end-on junction at
the International Boundary with the Alger Smith Railroad, a line to
be built north from Duluth, Minnesota to Gunflint, thus providing a
through connection between the two western Lake Superior ports of
Duluth and Port Arthur. Access would also be obtained to what was to
become the great iron mining region of the Mesabi in northern Minne­
sota.
Unfortunately, the Alger Smith line was never built and the
PAD&W terminated officially in the woods, 86.07 miles from Port
Arthur. Unofficially, the railway built a branch line from a point
near Gunflint, which penetrated six miles into the State of Minne­
sota, over a switch-back, to an iron mine. However, nobody seemed to
pay any attention and, in fact, the extension could not have endured
very long, as there is little or no mention of it in local newspapers
of the period. Surviving local and regional records of the railway
make no mention of this branch.
The Po r tAr t h u r, D u 1 u t han d We s t ern Rail wa y , dub bed the P e e­
Dee, wound its way through picturesque country. Leaving the wide
lakeshore at Port Arthur, it ran southwest to the Kaministiquia Ri-
ver valley and up this valley to the town of Stanley. Leaving the
Kaministiquia, the Pee-Dee took the Whitefish River valley to
Whitefish Lake, thereafter passing a whole series of beautiful lakes
and streams to the end of steel at Gunflint, on Gunflint Lake and
the International Boundary.
The PAD&W was completed and opened for service on June 1, 1892,
having cost $ 1,296,000 to build. The standards of construction had
not been very high; for example, light 56-pound steel roil had been
used and the many bridges on the line were mostly of timber construc­
tion. Opening day was, of course, celebrated by a trip to Gunflint,
with many of the local dignita-ries on the train. On the return trip,
the special stopped at Whitefish Lake, where a banquet was served by
the lumbermen at a large lumber camp.
Motive power consisted -after a time -of four locomotives, sh­
opped and shedded in the railways engine-house on the lakefront at
Port Arthur. This lake front property was valuable, even then, and
it would prove to be the reason why the PAD&W lost its independence
only seven years later.
The first and most famous of the Pee-Dees engines was the
woodburner Black Auntie, a little 0-4-0 tender engine, whose ori­
gin is unknown. Black Auntie was so named because she had a cast­
iron figure of a negro woman bolted to her smokebox door. She had no
number. Later, this 0-4-0 was used to ballast the Port Arthur Street
Railway and she ended her career as only a boiler, which was used to
heat the roundhouse at Atikokan, Ontario, after 1912 the first di­
visional point west of Port Arthur on the Canadian Northern Railway.
PAD&W engine Number 2 was a new standard 4-4-0, built by the
Canadian Locomotive Company, Kingston, Ontario. Number 3 was built
by the Canadian Locomotive Company at Kingston in October 1891, ac­
cording to Canadian Northern Railway records, although no logical
engine occurs in the CLC records. As it was a bar-frame locomotive,
it has been suggested that it was a former Grand Trunk Railway loco­
motive, built at the GTR s Pointe-St-Charles Shops at Montreal. Num­
ber 4, built by CLC in 1889, came second-hand from the Quappelle,
Long Lake and Saskatchewan Railroad & Steamboat Company and was the
only six-coupled engine that the PAD&W had. She is said not to have
been used much, probably because of the weight on her drivers and the
light construction of the track.
t
TWO EARLY PUBLIC SCHEDULES OF THE PEE-DEE WERE PUBLISHED IN THE LO­
cal newspaper. The first was in effect on October 1, 1895 and the se­
cond on September 11 1896. The terminii were the same; the stations
were a little different. From the Authors collection.
There were a number of silver mines in the Rabbit Mountain ond
Silver Mountain areas, about 40 miles from Port Arthur, which had
been discovered by Oliver Dunais, the Silver King, who had come from
Quebec. He was searching for a lost vein of ore, rich in silver,
which was said to run from the Silver Islet Mine near Port Arthur,
just off the north shore of Lake Superior. It was from this circum­
stance that the town of Port Arthur was called The Silver Gateway.
The ore from these mines was shipped from the stamp mills and
concentrators to Omaha, Nebraska, U.S.A., for smelting and refining.
Of more,importance in the economy of this region was the lumber, and
several large companies were soon busily engaged in taking out white
pine sawlogs, timbers for pilings for the grain elevators ot Port
Arthur, railway ties, pulpwood ond cordwood. Among the better known
of these companies which worked this area were the Pigeon River Lum­
ber Company and the Northern Land and Lumber Company. The station at
Nolalu was named for the latter firm, the name being composed of the
first two letters of each word in the Companys name. The forest pro­
ducts were shipped to various parts of Canada and the United States.
These commodities from mine and forest were the PAD&W s chief traffic.
The Pee-Dee provided access to a hitherto unexplored lorea of
Ontario which was, in truth, a sportsmans paradise. One of its most
frequent visitors wos Jomes Oliver Curwood, the well-known, turn-of­
the-century author of stories of adventure and romance, who lived in
Detroit, Michigan, U.S.A. On his trips into the woods, Curwood gath­
ered materiol for his novels, one of which was written around the
Port Arthur, Duluth & Westerns line and wos titled The Country Be­
yond.
CANADIAN 334 R A I L
Perhaps as a result of his many trips up and down the PAD&W,Cur­wood
is said to have nicknamed it Poverty, Agony, Destruction and
Want, while others later amended the title to Poverty, Agony, Dis­
tress and Want, because it seemed to be more distressed than des­
troyed -at that time, that is. Curwood gave the name The Cannon­
ball to the mixed train on which he rode, allegedly because it took
24 hours to cover the 69 miles on one trip he made. After the Can­
adian Northern Railway acquired the PAD&W, the trip appears to have
taken about eight hours.
The railway, being lightly constructed, did have an abnormal num­
ber of derailments. There were also small mud-slides and washouts,es­
pecially during the spring run-off, when the roadbed was soft and the
water high. Many stories are told of hunting, fishing and berry-pick­
ing expeditions by the train crew, while they waited for the wreck­
train to arrive to re-rail the engine, or one -or more -of the cars.
It is said that one enterprising member 6f the regular train crew
had a trap-line which he tended all winter -on his daily run.
When Mackenzie and Mann of the Canadian Northern Railway started
their eastward drive from Winnipeg in 1898-99, they looked around
western Ontario to see what poor-paying or defunct railways they
could acquire to weld into a main line from Winnipeg to Port Arthur
and the east. They purchased the Manitoba and South Eastern Railway
which gave them a line to Sprague, Manitoba, near the International
Boundary.
FonT A THUR
1>. F. BURK. ROSS THOMPSON,
VI« -Prosldenli.
This l;tihlIf WaS built to POll lip the iI); ;I,J silr … ~, tlr~ Ii-; part tJ( Y:-otetn fhf.:fl·jo. ft ha,si.~,hl .. t; • ..;h (;1. :-:-ix. rd~}.:~ iHttl
• tl;:, )f,,;I~1 r.lll) Hauge,,,r fiullIota. .com;hl,t:hk 111;llllili~s of ~:
J·;tH;HI~wl. .hhTiMI, l~;;lt: <,.liiI:( H:~ .,., :r /:L.::~ ~1., .... ,: r(.,
, . tJIt!, fUIUOU,f J t
AN ADVERTISING CARD FROM THE PAD&W DESCRIBED THE GENERAL NATURE OF
the raih/Oy and also referred to the six-mile branch into the Mes-
aba Iron Range of Minnesota. Courtesy Clifford A. Brown.
They then built the Minnesota and Manitoba Railroad through the
State of Minnesota to Rainy River, Ontario and the Ontario and Rainy
River Railway to Port Arthur -almost. For the 19-mile stretch on­
ward to Port Arthur from the town of Stanley, the Canadian Northern
purchased the Port Arthur, Duluth and Western; this acquisition was
justified because it provided the Canadian Northern with an entry
into Port Arthur and the waterfront property of the PAD&W.
After Mackenzie and Mann bought the PAD&W in May 1899, they in­
tended -so they said -to extend the line from Gunflint Narrows to
CANADIAN 335 R A I L
the Mesabi Iron Range in Minnesota. However, the eastward march of
the Canadian Northern and, later, the advent of World War I resulted
in a tightening of the worlds money morkets and before the exten­
sion could be built, Mackenzie ond Mann were broke and bankrupt and
the Canadian Northern Railway, now token over by the Government of
Canada, become part of the newly~organized Canadian Notional Railways.
But in 1901, the main line of the Canadian Northern from Atika­
kan and Rainy River came down the Kam River volley to Stanley and a
junction there with the Pee-Dee. The Canadian Northern mode a steep
descent from the Kam Volley and Kakabeka Falls to the lower valley of
the Kaministiquia River. The Canadian Northerns line from Winnipeg
was completed and opened for through traffic late in December 1902
and a silver spike was driven at Atikokan on December 30 1902, after
the last gap at Bear Pass on the eastern end of Rainy Lake was com­
pleted.
The town of Stanley was noted in those days for its pure spring
water and a company had been incorporated to bottle and sell this
water. Now, the town became an important point on the Canadian Nor­
thern main line, with operators day and night, a coal chute and a
water tank, the water for the latter being piped by gravity from a
spring on a nearby hill.
Traffic on the new line from Winnipeg was heavy, as eastbound
grain shipments, farmerly rauted from Winnipeg over the Northern Pa-
cific Railway to Duluth, Minnesota on Lake Superior, could now be moved
over the Canadian Northerns awn line to the large, new ter-
minal elevator at Port Arthur, which the Canadian Northern had built
expressly for this traffic. To reduce the westbound grade from Part
Arthur to Stanley, the Canadian Narthern civil engineers located a
new line which ran fram Kakabeka Falls to the east side of the vil­
lage of Rosslyn, one station east of Stanley. This new operating po­
int was named Twin City Junction and, from here, the Canadian Nor­
thern used the PAD&W main line onward to Port Arthur.
t
EVEN IN ITS LATTER DAYS, THE STATION AT STANLEY ON THE PAD&W WAS
sturdy and utilitarian structure. Courtesy Miss Claro Cook •
A
• THE JOINING OF THE PAD&W AND THE CANADIAN NORTHERN AT STANLEY WAS THE
~ occasion for the operation, in the summer of 1900, of a special pic­
nic train, consisting of a flat car with plank seats and sides, hauled
by the venerable Black Aunti€. Photo from the Authors collection.
CANADIAN 337 R A I L
Once the cut-off was completed, Stanley reverted to a branch-
line station. In 1974, about one mile of the original line of the
Pee-Dee is still used to provide access to the brickyard at Rosslyn.
After 1923, when the Canadian Northern had been amalgamated with
other lines to form Canadian National Railways, business on the
branch to Gunflint Narrows had declined. The trouble had started a few
years before when a large wooden trestle, 800 to 1000 feet long,
on the line southwest of North Lake burned out completely. The Can­
adian Northern could not afford to replace the trestle and service
t-was thereafter only to North Lake, 71 miles from Port Arthur.
In addition, the silver mines had run out and the timber had
been depleted. Mixed-train operation was cut back 36 miles to Mack­
ies, on the upper end of Whitefish Lake. This settlement was a ga­
thering-place each autumn for the Indians from both sides of the In­
ternational Boundary, who came to harvest the wild rice which grew
in profusion in the shallow parts of the lake.
While the 35-odd miles to Gunflint Narrows were closed to train
service, the rails were left in place as far as the burned-out tres­
tle and, beyond that, to the end of track. These derelict sections of
the line were often used by members of the Forest Fire Service of the
Province of Ontario, who patrolled the area on track-cars, gas-jig­
gers. Some hunters, fishermen and campers, who were able to persuade
the CaNor sectionmen to take them up the line to their favourite spots
also used the line -unofficially~
When the mine at Silver Mountain closed, the railway could no
longer afford an agent and so the station became 0 combination rail­
way station, general store and post office. The whole enterprise was managed by
Miss Dorothea Mitchell, a lady of English origin, who had
worked in ~he mine office and later in the lumber and sawmill bus­
iness. Miss Mitchell became known as Lady Lumberjack and this pro­
vided the title for a book which she wrote in 1966.
In the later years of the PAD&W, the mixed trains thot ran on
the branch from two to five days a week carried a train-agent. This
gentleman travelled on board the train and conducted essential bus­
iness at each stop where there was no agent. The best known of these
train-agents was a Scotsman, Mr. John Hume, who was known and liked
by everyone. Other well-known and popular members of the train crew
were Jack Lalonde, Peter Whalen, George McLeod, Red Agnew, Robert
Galt, Dad Spaulding and Sam Brandford. Mr. F.A.Bowell, now in his
ninetieth year and living in Calgary, Alberta, was a machinist in
the railways shops at Port Arthur. Mr. Cousins of Thunder Bay, On­
tario, was a call-boy for the Pee-Dee in Port Arthur.
The Poverty, Agony, Distress and Want was the object of many
pranks, jokes and stories, over the years, but everyone was sorry
indeed to see the last train run on March 24 1938. It was the end of
a most colourful career and the district was much poorer without it.
But you cannot run a railway on colour and local affection~
Today, much of the former roadbed of the PAD&W is used for
district roads, but the last 20 miles to Gunflint Narrows has revert­
ed to the wilderness and can only be traversed on foot and with more
than a little difficulty. Nonetheless, it is still the gateway to a
wonderful, naturally beautiful area, which appeals strongly to the
conservationists and lovers of nature.
It is almost a certainty that, had the Pee-Dee made a connec­
tion for a through line to Duluth, it would be a very busy railway
t
THE PEE-DEE MIXED TRAIN PAUSES AT THE STATION AT NORTH LAKE, MILE
71 from Port Arthur, on a summers day in one of the turn-of-the-cen­
tury years. Photo from the Authors collection.
today. Four paper mills have since been built at the Lakehead, as
well as three pulp mills, and most of their production is exported
to the United States. Additional large amounts of groin and grain
screenings move to Duluth and Minneapolis, but the routeing is some­
whatroundabaut, via either Fort Francis (CN) or Sudbury and Sault
Ste. Marie (CP RAIL). In the reverse direction, there are consider­
able imports of consumer goods, fruit and vegetables from the south
to the Lakehead and the neighbouring area.
In the spring of 1974, CP RAIL took steps to reduce their ex-
tended mileage by announcing a cor-ferry service from Thunder Bay to
Superior, Wisconsin, twin city to Duluth, Minnesota. While car-ferry
operation was planned to handle only freight cars of newsprint ini­
tially, indications were that the service could be expanded to in­
clude other commodities, as the traffic warranted. In March 1974,work
was under way on the docking and loading facilities at both Thunder
Boy and Superior.
While water transport is cheaper and operation year- round on
Lake Superior is almost a certainty, the speed and reliability that
the railway would have offered would certainly have provided sig­
nificant advantages in the second half of the Twentieth Century. Too
bad the Pee-Dee did not survive to see i t~
Afterthoughts.
Further investigation of the former right-of-way of the Port
Arthur, Duluth and Western Railway in May 1974, by Mr. Clifford Brown
and his son, has suggested that the Canadian Northern gave the order
in 1904 to remove the roils on .the section west of the big trestle
CANADIAN 339 R A I L
over the arm of North Lake. It is probable that forest fires in this
part of Ontario and adjacent Minnesota in 1902 and 1903 were respon­
sible for the burning of the trestle. Mr. Brown discovered the stubs
of the burned pilings across the narrows of North Lake.
Mr. Brown has also found copies of inward Canadian customs man­
i fests for eight cars of logs, dated January 21 1907, at the port of
Gunflint, Minnesota, consigned to the Pigeon River Lumber Company at
Port Arthur, Ontario. Seven more cars were shipped on January 22
1907.
This disproves the contention that the railway was closed in
1904 and suggests strongly that it was used up to the time of the big
fire in the region in 1907. It also confirms that the Pigeon River
Lumber Company had a spur from the PAD&W at Gunflint Narrows, Ontario,
six miles into the State of Minnesota. Mr. Brown brought back some
railway spikes, square timber spikes and drift pins from the old
trestles on the switch-back line to the iron mine.
The two modern-day explorers procured a boat and rowed down the
Canadian side of Gunflint Lake, where they found two brick baking
ovens, apparently used during the construction of the railway three­
quarters of a century ago. They also found a cross, erected over the
grave of a workman who was killed in a blasting accident on this re­
mote and long-forgotten railway line.
Acknowledgements
The author would like to thank the followin~ persons for their
• THE WORN-OUT MIXED TRAIN, CANADIAN NORTHERN TRAIN 1, TAKES THE SID­
~ ing at an unrecorded location -possibly Silver Mountain -apparent­
ly to allow an opposing train to pass. Courtesy Clifford A. Brown.
t
IN LATER YEARS, THE STATION AT SILVER MOUNTAIN BECAME A COMBINATION
railway station-general store-postoffice and was supervised most ef-
ficiently by Miss Dorothea Mitchell. Courtesy Clifford A. Brown.
assistance in providing photographs
tion of the foregoing article:
and information for the prepara-
Mileage
00.00
13.00
19.00
29.00
40.00
50.00
55.00
60.00
65.00 71.00
86.07
Miss Clara .Cook Mr.
Clifford A. Brown Mr.
F.A.Bowell
Mr. Elford Cousins
S tanl.ey, Onta,r io
Thunder Bay, Ontario
Calgary, Alberta
Thunder Bay, Ontario
PORT ARTHUR, DULUTH & WESTERN RAILWAY
Original Stations -1892
Name
Prince Arthurs Landing station
West fort
Slate River station (Rosslyn after 1904)
Stanley station (Stanley Junction after 1902)
Harstone
Flint
Hymers station
Sellars
Nolalu
Silver Mountain station
Suomi
Mackies station (Gravel Lake)
(End of line after 1923)
Sandstone Lake station (Sand Lake)
Iron Range Lake
Addie Lake station
North Lake station
Gunflint station (Gunflint Narrows after 1912)
Altitude
615 ft.
722
1,282
1,541
1,609
1,572
1,569
Miles from
Stanley
19.0
0.0
1.3
5.4
8.0
10.0
12.4
13.6
16.8
18.2
21.0 23.8
28.1
33.2
34.3 36.6
45.3
48.0
52.0
55.2
60.3
CANADIAN 341 R A I L
CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY
Duluth & Western Branch -1912
Port Arthur, Ontario
Stanley Junction (with Ontario Division, CNoRy)
Kaministiquia River
Whitefish River
Silver Creek station
Murdoch station
Whitefish River
vJhitefish River
Whitefish River
Beaver Dam Creek
Silver Mountain station
Whitefish Lake station
Brook (unnamed) Summit between
Stanley Junction and North Lake Sand
Riller
Sand Lake Summit between Sand
Lake and Addie Lake Addie Lake
North Lake station
Arm of North Lake Summit
between Addie Lake and Gunflint Lake
Altitude
615 ft.
722
717 766 807
877
913
1,000
1,095
1,162 1,282
1,348
1,445
1,552
1,539
1,541
1,692
1,609
1,572
1,562 1,627
THIS 4-4-0 IS PROBABLY NUMBER 2 OF THE PAD&W, HAULING THE PERENNIAL
mix e d -t r a in. 0 nth e left is G e 0 r geM cL eo d, the eng i nee r; 0 nth e rig h t
is John Hume, the popular train-agent. Photo Authors collection.
CANADIAN 342 R A I L
63.0 Gunflint Lake
66.5 Gunflint Narrows station
This table courtesy Mr. Clifford A. Brown,
1,553
1,569
Thunder Bay, Ontario.
TRAINS GOING WEST
Read down
No. 3 Frt. No.1 Mxd.
Mon.,Tues.,
Wed.(Thurs. Fridal:
6k 9k
6:20 9:30
6:35 9;45
7:05 10: 15
7:45 10:45
8:30 11 : 25
8:40 11.45
10:00 13:00 10:20
13:20
11 .00 14: 00
14:30
15: 15
16:00
16: 40
17:00k
D.B.Hanna
July 24, 1901
CANADIAN NORTHERN RAILWAY
Time Card
Duluth Section
Effective 7th. July 1901
Miles from
Port Arthur
0 LV Port Arthur 86
3 Fort William 83
6.0 West fort 80.0
13.0 Slate River 73.0
19.0 Stanley 67.0
27.0 Silver Creek 59.0
29.0 Hymers 57.0
TRAINS
No.2 Mxd.
Fridal:
AR 14: 30
14: 15
13:45
13: 1 5
12:45
12: 00 11:
50
40.0 Silver Mountain 46 11 :00
43.0 Whitefish 43.0 10:45
50.0 AR Gravel Lake 36 LV 10: 1 5 55 Sand
Lake 31 9:30
65 Addie Lake 21 8:45
71 North Lake 15 8:00
83 Leeblaine 3 7:20
86 AR Gunflint 0 LV 7k
A.J.Gorrie
GOING EAST
Read
u~
No. 4 Frt.
Mon.,Tues.,
Wed. (Thurs.
16.15
16:00
15: 45
15:20
15:00
14: 15 14: 00
13:00
12:45
l2:00
General Superintendent, Winnipeg Superintendent, Port Arthur
G.H.Shaw
Traffic Manager, Winnipeg
(This time table courtesy the Port Arthur DAILY TIMES JOURNAL)
LOCOMOTIVES OF
THE PORT ARTHUR( DULUTH AND WESTERN RAILWAY
Information courtesy of Mr. R.F.Corley
Road number Tl:pe
0-4-0 tender Black Auntie
2 4~4-0 Built 1886/1890* SiN 386 Canadian Locomotive
Company, Kingston, Ontario. 17X24 cyls. 62
drivers; 140 psi boiler pressure.
3 4-4-0
4 2-6-0
t f
CA NAD IAN 343 R A I L
Renumbered: Canadian Northern Railwau Number 1,
August 1897;
Apparentl
a
renumbered: JBR Number 15;
Renumbere : Canad1an Northern Railway Number
NoTE: A second Number 1 existed 1907-1911.
ReriUmbered: Canadian Northern Railway Number 1,
in 1912 renumbering.
Scrapped: Trenton, Ontario, September 24,1918.
* This locomotive shown as built September 1886
& October 1890 in different records. It is be­
lieved that the engine was built for stock by,
CLC in 1886 and shipped new to PAD&W in 1890.
(Canadian Northern Railway records say this lo­
comotive was built by Canadian Locomotive Com­
pany in October 1891, but no logical engine oc­
curs in CLC records. Perhaps she was purchased
second-hand, but it is nit presently known from
whom.) 16×24 cyls.; 140 psi boiler pressure.
Scrapped: ca. 1910.
Built October 1889 SiN 365 Canadian Locomo­
tive Company, Kingston, Ontario. 18X24 cyls.
57 drivers; 150 psi boiler pressure.
Built as: Quappelle, Long Lake & Saskatchewan
Railroad & Steamboat Company No.1;
Became: Port Arthur, Duluth & Western Railway
Company Number 1;
Renumbered: Canadian Northern Railway Number 19
in August 1897;
Renumbered: Canadian Northern Railway Number 107
in 1912 renumbering;
Renumbered: Canadian National Railways Number 470.
Scrapped: June 1927.
AFTER THE LAST RUN ON MARCH 24 1938, THE CANADIAN NATIONAL WASTED NO
time in pulling up the rails, loading them on flat cars and hauling
them away to the scrap yard. That was the last of the PAD&W~
Photo from the Authors collection.
Novemher 1971+
STATEMENT
The Boord of Directors of the Canadian Railroad Historical Associa­
tion and the Editor of CANADIAN RAIL consider it desirable that the
following statement be published:
-Articles, reports and other items published in CANADIAN RAIL
do not represent the official position of the Canadian Rail­
road Historical Association on any matter, unless designated
specifically as official statements or opinions of the Asso-
ciation; .

Manuscripts, photographs, news items, books for review and
similar items are always welcome for possible publication in
CANADIAN RAIL; however, their safe return cannot be guaran­
teed, despite the assurances suggested by registered mail or
guaranteed express.
It should be pointed out that the Officers and Directors of the As­
sociation, its Branches and Divisions and members responsible for its
projects, .s.erve v.oluntarily and without r.emunera.tion.
RECENTLY, IN CANADAS HOUSE OF COMMONS AT OTTAWA, MR. J-P. GUAY,
Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport
replied to a question by Mr. Cossitt regarding the old
right-of-way of the Brockville & Westport Railway, later (1903) the
Brockville, Westport & North-Western Railway Company. This line was
opened for service from Brockville, Ontario to Lyn Junction, 4.5 mi­
les, on January 11, 1886. Control of the railway was assumed by Mac­
kenzie,cMann and Company on July 1, 1910 amd sale was consummated by
court order to the Canadian Northern Railway Company on December 14,
1911.
The Board of Transport Commissioners authorized the
abondonment of 40.51 miles between Lyn Junction and Westport, Ontario,
under order 79236 dated June 8, 1952 and the line was dismantled in
the same year.
Mr. Cossitt wanted to know what sections of the right­
of-way had been sold, to whom, for what price and what Canadian Na­
tional Railways plans were for the portions of the right-of-way
still owned by this company, as successor to the lines and proper­
ties of the Canadian Northern Railway Company. Mr. Guay
said that, of the 40 miles involved, a strip
approximately 11 miles in length, extending from a point near New­
boro to a road allowance between Concessions 7 and 8, Township of
Bastard, is to be retained by the CNR for possible rail penetration.
He said further that it was not CN policy to disclose the names of
purchasers of old rights-of-way, nor the purchase prices for these
portions of railway lines.
John Welsh, who sent in this item, wonders why.
CANADIAN 345 R A I L
MONDAY, AUGUST 5, 1974, WAS A MEMORABLE DAY FOR PRESIDENT CARL STER­
zing, jr. and the Delaware and Hudsan Railway, when pas­
senger Train 35, the ADIRONDACK, left Rensselaer NY,the
connection with the Penn Centrals Hudson River main line, opposite
Albany, New York, en route ta Montreal. In General Order 3-30, D&H
Superintendent J.G.Cassick established the maximum authorized speed
for the new Trains 34 & 35 at 50 mph and noted that Time Table Num­
ber 3 of the Second, Third and Fourth Subdivisions of the D&H was
modified accordingly.
Train 35 of that Monday was scheduled to arrive Rouses
Point NY at 17:05 hours, but was almost two hours late, due to a
late departure from Rensselaer and various celebrations along the
way.
Regular service was begun the following day. The sched­
ules of Train 34 (south) and Train 35 (north) were as follows:
Train 35
11 : 40 hr s •
11: 57
12:05
12: 27
13:02 13:29
13: 55
14: 02
14: 34
15: 17
16: 18
1 hQ5 hrs.
Effective Tuesday, August 6, 1974.
LV Renssaler (PC) AR
LA Cabin
f Colonie (West Gate) f f
Mechanicville f s
Saratoga Springs s s
Fort Ed~ard s
AR Whitehall LV
LV Whitehall AR
f Fort Ticonderoga f f
Westport f s
Plattsburg s
AR Ro,,!ses Point NY LV
Train 34
16:30 hrs.
16:05
15: 58
15: 36
14: 57
14:30
14: 05
14:01
13: 31
12:47
11: 48
11 : 10 hrs.
Assuming that the ADIRONDACK will operate over the Napierville
Junction Railway from Rouses Point NY to Delson, Quebec and CP RAIL
from Delson to Windsor Station, Montreal, on the former schedule of
D&H Trains 34 & 35, the following times have been calculated for the
remainder of the run:
17:10 hrs.
17: 20 17
~40
18: 12
18:35
18: 43
18:50
LV
AR
LV
s s
AR
Rouses Point NY
Lacolle, Que.
Lacolle
Delson
Montreal West
Westmount
Montreal-Windsor
AR
LV
AR
s s
Station LV
10:51 hrs.
10:39
10:35
10:02
09:42
09: 36
09:30
The stop at Lacolle in each direction was for United States tind
Canadian Customs and Immigration purposes.
The consist of the inaugural Train 35 was as follows:
D&H PA 1 Number 17
D&H PA 1 Number 18
D&H Couch Number 1012
D&H Coach Number 1001
D&H Dome Coach Number 35 Willsboro Point
D&H Coach Number 32 Bulwagga Bay
The
consist of the
D&H PA 1
D&H PA 1
inaugural ADIRONDACK, Train 35, was as follows:
Number 17
Number 18
CANADIAN 346 R A I L
D&H D&H
D&H
*D&H
*D&H
*D&H
*D&H
D&H
D&H
Coach Number 1012
Coach Number 1001
Coach Scenic-Dome Number 35 Willsboro Point
Coach Number 32 Bulwagga Bay
Coach Number 31 Au sable River
Coach Number 34 Whiteface Mountain
Coach Number 33 Mount Marcy
Cafe-Lounge Car Number 43 Champlain
Business Car Number 200
The
coaches marked with an asterisk originated in Grand Central
Terminal, New York City, and were worked north on AMTRAK Train 71 to
Rensselaer-Albany.
For the new ADIRONDACK service, the D&H has leased CP RAIL Sky­
line dome coaches Numbers 500 & 507, has repainted them in the D&H s
own blue and yelloH and has renamed them Willsboro Point and Bluff
Point, respectively. Jim Shaughnessy sends the accompanying picture
of CP RAIL dome coach Number 500 beinQrepainted and reletteF,ed at
the D&H s Colonie Shops.
r
Rostered for the northbound ADIRONDACK for August 6 Here D&H
RS 11 units Numbers 5020 & 5004, 1800hp. ALCO units, without steam
generators. Meanwhile,to provide steam-heating capabiliti~s for the
autumn and winter days ahead, D&H leased two Boston & Maine 1600hp.
RS 3 units, Numbers 1508 & 1536 and re-installed the steam gener­
ators which the B&M removed when locomotive-hauled passenger trains
were discontinued on that line. When these units have been overhaul­
ed, they will replace the RS 11 units, opposite the PA 1 s.
CA NAD IAN 347 R A L
1823
CELEBRATING iTS SESQUICENTENNIAL YEAR
AMERICAS OLDEST TRANSPORTATION COMPANY
150 YEARS OF SERVICE
DELAWARE AND HUDSON
RAILWAY COMPANY
AND ITS
CONNECTIONS
0 OfnCU
ltiE BRIDGE ROAD LINKING NEW ENGLAND AND EASTERN CANAOA
WITH THE SOUTH ANO WEST
,
1973
CANADIAN 348
R A I L
However, by for the most startling report, unconfirmed at that
time, was that the D&H would purchase two RF 16 Baldwin sharknose
1600hp. units from the Monongahela Railroad, Numbers 1205 & 1216,ex­
P&LE, ex-PC, would have them re-engined by Morrison-Knudson of Boise
with 12-cylinder 251 ALCO prime-movers, would odd steam generators
and would place them in ADIRONDACK service opposite the PA 1 units.
For variety of motive power, the D&H is certainly in the front
rank, along with the British Columbia Railway.
PA 1 units Numbers 16 & 19 are in bits and pieces at Morrison­
Knudson, Boise and are expected to return to Colonie in mid-December.
According to the United States federal low, the new ADIRONDACK
service should have been port of the AMTRAK service. Initially, the
service was restored by the State of New York, whose Governor, Malcolm
Wilson, signed a landmark $ 30 million railroad preservation bill in
1974. While the State of New York was protecting the D&H against any
operating losses, it was said that one-third of the loss was being
paid for by AMTRAK. That explained why the equipment was totally D&H.
The New York State Deportment of Transport also agreed to pay
for the rebuilding of the four PA 1 units, the repair and renovation
of the cars, the 90-day rental of the CP RAIL Skyline dome coaches,
the rentQI of the B&M RS 3s, the refurbishing of some stations and
track repair and upgrading. Who knows? NY DOT may even pay for the
ex-P&LE sharknoses~
IT ~/AS A DAY TO REMEMBER, AUGUST 12 1 974, -IHU~ THE TWO SHARI<~WSES
arrived at Calonie Shops of the Delaware & Hudson Rail­
way. Goslett and De Jean didnt believe it and Stan
Smaill made a hurried trip south to make sure it was true.As usual,
Jim Shaughnessy was on hand with his trusty Speed Graphic to make a
visual record of the event. What more could the diesel Fan ask
for?
It is rumored that the Sharknoses will be used in push­
er service on Richmondville Hill, when they arent powering the new
ADIRONDACK passenger service. Unfortunately, their electro-pneumatic
controls wont permit MUing with ather D&H power.

CANADIAN 350 R A I L
MR. ROBERT KLEIN, DIRECTOR OF TECHNICAL RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT FOR
CP RAIL, told delegates to a mid-year international con­
ference -and the citizens of British Columbia, indirect­
ly that electrification of CP RAILs main line from Calgary to
Vancouver was at least five years and $ 250 million away from reali­
zation. The real shocker was Mr. Kleins statement that electrifi­
cation was not even a possibility until Canadian Pacific limited was
assured that Nationalization of its system was no longer being ser­
iously considered by the Government of Canada.
Nevertheless, Mr. Klein told his audience that the es­
timated savings resulting from the Calgary-Vancouver electrification
were equal to the minimum rate of return on investment desired by
Canadian Pacific limited. With a 50kv system and feeder substations
at 50-70km intervals, capital costs could be kept to a reasonable
level. With high-horsepower, thyristor-controlled locomotives, train
speeds over the heavily graded line through the Rockies could be ac­
celerated and more tonnage could be hauled with fewer locomotives
than are presently required.
cation will
its present
by 50% over
But Mr. Klein pointed out that the case for
also depend on the cost of electric energy
price against that of diesel fuel, which has
the last 12 months.
electri fi­
maintaining
escalated
Winnipeg Free Press.
THE CAPE BRETON STEAM RAILWAY BEGAN ITS 1974 OPERATIONS ON JULY 1,
wrote Barrie Macleod of Sydney, Nova Scotia. From that
date to September 2, trains were scheduled for operation
Monday through Thurs~ay, between Glace Bay and Port Morien and on
Sunday from Victoria Junction to Port Morien, via Glace Bay. Fares
were advertised as $ 3 first class and $ 2.50 coach for adults Glace
Bay to Port Morien and return. On the total tour on Sundays, the
return fare Victoria Junction to Port Morien via Sydney was $ 6 first
class in the saloon car and $ 4.50 in the coach, for adults. The
saloon car boasted bar service and, on some trains, sandwiches were
available.
Barrie noted that engine Number 42 operated from the
start without problems, but the ex-Southern Railway (England) Scho­
ols class three-cylinder 4-4-0 Repton Number 926, had running -in
problems. On July 6, Repton made a test run to Port Morien from
Glace Bay, and return. The following day, she made her first run in
revenue service. She is a beautiful locomotive and looked very smart
in her new paint scheme of dark green. Her former company name and
number -Southern 926 -were retained and an electric headlight and
diesel air-horns (~) were installed to comply with Canadian Transport
Commission regu~ations.
The English-type whistle was installed on Repton when
she arrived at Sydney and is being repaired. It will be installed as
soon as the repairs have been completed.
On July 7, Repton failed on the return trip
Mor ien and had to be hauled back to the shops the followir -, –. I ,
Mechanical problems were said to be the cause of the fail­
necessary repairs were completed by July 12.
Robin Russell visited the Cape Breton Steam
August 10-11 and was surprised to find Dunc du Fresne a,,~
of Ottawa already on the scene. The temptation of an English three­
cylinder 4-4-0 had been too much for Dune to withstand. Robin re-
ported that Repton was working well, although the track 6n the
CANADIAN
,,,
R A I L.
Port Marien branch was of substandard quality. The ex-Great Weltern
Railway (England) first and second-class coepasite coach in its
chocolate and spilt .. ilk livery was also in revenue service.
IN
LATE JULY 1974, LAKESHORE COHMUTERS TO AND fROM MONTREAL WERE
surpriled to lee green and block on aluminum carl frae
GO TRANSIT, Toronto, in their local CP RAIL station, re­p
lacing _ for the moeent, at least _ the high_capacity double-decker
{vaitures_illperiales) coochu of CP RAIL. The experililerot began on 27
July and eroded on 2 August 1974, when the nine CP RAIL double-deckers
returned fronl Tororoto and the 13 GO TRANSIT single-lovela returned to
Toronto. It
was reported that GO TRANSIT officials had to take
jUlt one rioe on the CP RAIL bi_levels before reaching the conclusion
that they HAD to have sOllie of theae cora. Montreal coeeuters, on the
other hand, were cool to luke_ware in their appreciation of the GO
TRANSIT equip.ent. One commuter de~cribed the GO TRANSIT cars as
~parton, while another ~aid they were functional. Both said that
the CP RAIL bi_levels on the Town Troins were siliooth-riding and
co .. fortable, in cOllpori~on. Wayne Hoogland.
Iu FROM LETHBRIDGE, AlBERTA, PAT WEBB, OUR TRUSTY OBSERVER, REPORTED IN
I~ mid-July 1974 that the Conadion Railroad Historical AI_
~ociation s ex_Canadian Pacific Roil war 4_4_0 steae 10-
co.otive NUlliber 144 and ex_CPR Business Cor NUlliber arrived safely
at Alyth Yard, Calgary, late in the week of June 30, together with
the vintage 1890 boxcar and passenger car frOIll Canadian Pacific Lill_ i
teds historic rolling stock collection. Nu.ber 144 and the other
vehicles cae. south to Macleod, Alberto, on CP RAIL freight Troin 71
on July 4.
The display crew had 0 hard tilile preparing the engine
ond cars ready for their friday 1II0rning dote with the public (July
5), as a nu.ber of itelllS, including 144 s headlight gloss, hod been
left occidentally in Montreal.
NUllber 144 and the other cars were on disploy for three
days at Macleod, ending on Sunday night, July 7. The engine and cars
deported Macleod an Monday lIorning behin~ CP RAIL Geep NUlliber 8491,
scheduled at 25 mph. lIaximu •. The trip back to Calgary, about 100
lIiles, would have tak.,n about five haurt, with stops. The consist
lIIoved as freight Train 73, the regular freight fro. Macleod to Cal­
gary. Leaving Macleod at 12: 15 hrs., Train 73 arrived Calgary just
after 17:00 hour$.
At
High River, Train 73 stopped lang enough for Pat to
talk to the engineer of Number 8491. The latter said that Nueber 144
was running beautifully, not even worm. Aside frail Orle extra baxcor,
the Geep had only the di,play train on its coupler, well back be_
hind CP RA.IL privote cor Mount Stephen, being used by CP BYGONES.
Also in the troin, behing NUlliber 144, was the display caboose Nu .. ber
436954, trailed by her identicol working sister, NURIber 436926. The
only difference between the two, Pat laid, was that plywood covered her
sides and the lIIultilllark, and she had on unusual location in
the train.
Pot followed Train 73 about 50 miles north towards Col_
gary, taking about 50 3511111 slides in the process, only to find on
his return to Lethbridge that the camero hod eolfuroctioned~ It was a
good thing that Pots 10-year-old son was along, for he snapped t
hree or fallr pictures of Number 8491, Number 144 and the display
train~
Canadian Rail
is PlIJjished monthly by the
Canadial Railroad Historical Association
P.O. 90K 22.station B. Montreal,Ouebec,Canllda/H38 3J5
Editor;5.S.Worthen Production; R Murphy
Association Branches
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L.H.Unin, S.c~.t,,~y 1727 23r OTTAW,,
W. R.L inley, 5 ec reta ry P.O. Box lI,Stotion
,
Ottawa,Conada
PACIFIC COAST
R.H.Heye., S.cutory p.o.ao~ IOO6,Stction
,
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