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Canadian Rail 219 1970

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Canadian Rail 219 1970

1VO. 21..9
1..970
TI18U61 TIl 8GIIIS
01 I-IIUII
S.S.Worthen
~ he cover of the December,1969 issue
of CANADIAN RAIL carried a photo­
graph of the concourse of Cana­
dian Pacific Railways Hindsor
Station,Montreal,as it appeared
during the Christmas season,twen­
ty two years ago.
The magnificent Christmas tree,with its myriad scintillating,
shimmering decorations has annually immersed in wonder succeeding
generations of wide-eyed,1r.nocent-faced little children. Over the
years,variations in this annual,anticipated exhalation of angels
have taken place, but all the while the custom has preserved the
Christmas mistique which is properly the property of children,-as
long as they believe in Santa Claus.
This year,the illusion 11avered slightly,when what to their
wondering eyes should appear but four diesel units,complete with
multimark,hauling a long freight, complete with multimark,up the de­
clivities of Kicking Horse Pass,on CP RAILs main line west thr­
ough Canadas Rocky Mountains,while the CANADIAN,in all its luxur­
ious splendour of passenger cars (two domed) and two units, the lat­
ter with multimark,blissfully flitted in and out of the famous Sp­
iral Tunnels which tittivate the innards of Mounts Cathedral and
Ogden.
And would you believe that this miracle of modern technolo­
gy was accomplished with N-gauge model railway equipment ( bought
stuff-yuk) purchased at a distance from Montreal no greater than
that of Canadas capital City?
It was not done with mirrors or hullabaloo but with plaster­
of-paris and sections. Constructed to permit easy assembly and pre­
cise train control, the 95 actual feet of model main line represen­
ted a distance from about Lake Louise, Alta. to Field,B.C.,which ,
according to CP RAILs current time-table is a distance of twenty
miles horizontally and 972 teet vertically. The most impressive of
the two model trains was the 32-car freight (since the CANADIAN
boasted only six cars),sporting on its cars a multitude of multi­
marks,some lazy worms,a few billy-goats and something resemblin~ a
tank of unnatural gas labelled FERROVIA.
The trains wound out and in the insides and outsides of Ca­
thedral Mountain and Mount Ogden, mornings, noons and nights of week­
days and afternoons and evenings of Saturdays and Sundays, from
December
15th. to the Feast of the Epiphany,some time in January,
1970, In that time, the N-gauge equipment ran for 275 hours, cover-
CANADIAN R A I L
ing about 65 real (yes,Virginia) miles,which must constitute
kind of an obSCi:ire first. Fuel and maintenance costs were
revealed.
some
not
High on the flank of Mount Og­
den,the CANADIAN eastbound em­
erges from the upper Spiral
Tunnel,while the freight slow­
ly comes out of the lower Spir­
al,on the way down to Field,B.C.
• ••
. …
The eastbound six-car CANADI~
on its way up from Field,B.C.
to the Lower Spiral Tunnel.
A CP RAIL 32-CAR N-GAUGE FREIGHT crosses over itself in the Lower Spiral
Tunnel,-a feat sometimes accomplished in standard-gauge operation. The
model
ran over 95 feet of line for 275 hours. Photo courtesy CP RAIL.
CANADIAN
68
R A I L
Operating problems appeared to be minimal and accidental de­
railments on the tight curves in the depths of the Spiral Tunnels
apparently caused no embarrassments. Two mice, especially trained
and equipped with toothpick-horns to simulate giant-sized wapiti
elk at Lake Louise Station, refused to cooperate and were banished
from the display. Train movements were, in general,semi-automated ,
but an operator was provided to make sure that train speeds did
not vary too much and that the freight passed the CANADIAN at poi­
nts in the line where sidings were available.
While this years marvel of modern movement in mineature mes­
merized the multitude (there were scarcely any little children with
shining eyes and innocent faces, gazing in rapture at the beautiful­
ly decorated Christmas tree 11ith its myriad, twinkling lights), next
years plans will doubtlessly stupefy at first glance hundreds of
avid model railroaders who have begun to haunt this annual perfor­
mance. Moreover, this years show 11aS good enough to attract den­
izens of CP RAILs passenger sales and data process ing departments,
an occurrence unheard of in modern times and terrifying in its im­
plicat ions.
The renown of this marvel in mineature permeated even to the
vastnesses of Central Station and the Place Ville Marie and, in the
process, enticed some of the inhabitants of the headquarters build­
ing of the other railroad and the other air-line, to view the im­
pressive landscape-in-mineature. One of these latter visitors be­
came highly incensed and swallowed his wad, when he observed that
the proportion of freight cars moving over the line during one
days operation,was 30 to 2 in favour of CP RAIL. One wonders what
he really should have expected!
Say what you will,it was a darned good show and one that could
only have been planned and executed by the talented personnel in
CP RAILs Advertising Department,assisted by the wise words, sage
saws,papier-~che and wiring diagrams of interested employees, both
local and Lagauchetiere. We are already looking forward to viewing
the 30% expanded, epoch-making layout, planned for the 1970-71 holi­
day season.
It is rumored that Stoney Creek Bridge and Mountain Creek Tr­
estle, some fifty miles west of the Spiral Tunnels along CP RAILS
mountainous main line,will appear and that the beautiful,tradition­
al Christmas tree,which annually stupefies hundredS of bright-eyed,
innocent -faced little children (all stoned on pot) will be replaced
by a diorama showing Walter Moberly,C.E. discovering Rogers Pass.
Dont ask me why.
ELECTIONS AND
APPOINTMENTS
FOR 1970
THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEEIING OF
the regular members ras
held on January 28,1970.A
short resume of the elec­
tion of Directors and the
appointment of honorary
officers follows.
At the Annual General Meeting,about 35 regular members and
an equal number of associate members and friends heard reports and
asked questions pertaining to the various activities of the Assoc­
iation during 1969. Votes of thanks Jere officially recorded by
the Directors and Members to McGill University and Martineau,Walk­
er and Associates for the use of meeting rooms. The firm of Steven­
son,Blakely,Blunt & Company -rere appOinted auditors to the Assoc­
iation.
The Nominating Committee presented the follm,;ing regular members
as cand idate s for elect ion as Directors for the year 1970:
Angus F.F. Latour Denis Viau Charles
Beatty J .A. Murphy Peter Halbridge A.S.
Cheasley C .S. Nicholls R.V.V • Hebb R.1.
Doyle John Shergold Peter Horthen S.S.
The Secretary acknowledged rece ipt of the follovring nominat ions of
regular n~mbers as candidates for election as Directors for 1970:
Heard C .(11 .K. Plant T .0 • Seton L.A.
Jordan E.A.
The follmling regular members Irere elected Directors of the Asso-
ciation for 1970, in ,the ensuing election:
ANGUS F.F. HEARD C.vl.K. VIAU Charles
BEATTY J.A. MURPHY Peter HALBRIDGE A.S.
CHEASLEY C.S. NICHOLLS R.V.V. HEBB R.1.
DOYLE John SHERGOLD Peter WORTHEN S.S.
The members present at the meeting approved the revisions of By-Law
Number
3,lhich had been previously circulated and ratified the re­
commendation of the Director,Membership Services & Branches that
the annual dues remain unchanged for 1970. The members also appro­
ved the remuneration of employees and the acts of the Directors in
1969.
The first meeting of the 1970 Board of Directors was held on
CANADIAN
70
R A I L
February 2,1970, at which the fo llm1 ing Off icers were elected:
president:
Vice -Pres ident :
Dr. Robert V.V.Nicholls
~!. CharlesViau
Vice -Pres ident : S.S .11orthen
Treasurer: A.S .Walbridge
Secretary: F.F.Angus
The following Honorary Officers of the Association ,ere appointed:
~~. Donald F. Angus
l>1. Lucien lAllier
~. N.J.MacMillan Q.C.
l>1r. N.R .Crump
Mr.
R.C.Day
H. Roger Viau
Honorary President
Honorary Vice-President
Honorary Vice-President
Honorary Vice-President
Honorary Vice-President
Honorary Vice-President
The Board of Directors ratified the election of the following mem­
bers as COmmissioners for the Canadian Railway Museum(Musee Ferro­
viaire Canadien,Delson/St-Constant,Que. :
Angus F
.F. Mosher K.D.
Cheasley C.S. Shergold Peter
DeJean C. Halbridge A.S.
Doyle John Vlebb R .>I •
The following areas of responsibility were aSSigned by the Board:
Acquisitions & Archives
Branches
By-Lal>ls,Revision of
CANADIAN RAIL Editor
Publisher
Distribution
Chairman of Board Meetings
Correspondance,general
Excursions
Fund RaiSing
Meetings,Regular &
SpeCial Events
Membership & Membership Services
Canadian Railway Museum
Publications (other than
CANADIAN RAIL)
PubliC Relations
Dr. R.V.V.Nicholls
C.W.Kenneth Heard
C.W.Kenneth Heard
S.S .Horthen
M.P.Murphy
F.F.Angus & J.A.Beatty
Dr. Nicholls or C.S.Cheasley
F.F.Angus
John Doyle & F.F.Angus
Dr. Nicholls & Messrs.C.S.
Cheasley & A.S.VJalbridge
Peter Shergold &
M .P .t-lurphy
J.A.Beatty
R.W.vlebb
J
.A .Beatty &
M.P.Murphy
John Doyle
Members wishing to participate in any of the above activities are
urged to contact the director (s) concerned at the regular monthly
meetings of the Association,at the Canadian Railday l-1useum or by
writing to the Director at the Associations address.
The Board of Directors of the Association elected Dr. David M.Baird
Director of the Museum of Science and Technology,National Museums
of Canada,Ottawa, Canada, to honorary membership in the Assoc iat ion,
for the year 1970.
Wft~ ,. e .ftllJ III .Aw.tl) ~
~®~~ ~@@®~~~~&I:JJj)~J @
I!{NAN~!AL RI!POal
l ro~ !~~~
,I A.Stephen Walbridge •
..
~
ONEY CERTAINLY IS N!ONEY,Al.lD
most peop1.e want to know
how it is received and sp­
ent. A detailed financial
report was made to the vo­
ting members at the Annual
Meeting in January,1970,
and he re is a synops is of
that report.
Your Associations Financial Statements for 1969,audit­
ed by the Montreal firm of stevenson,Blakely,Blunt & Company, Char­
tered Accountants,were presented at the Annual Meeting on January
28,1970.
Association General Funds now total $ 1,300,the amount
being the largest in the Associations history. This is the equiv­
alent of $ 0.93 from everyone. of our members and provides our As­
sociation with a reserve in case of emergencies. He have not hi­
therto had such a reserve.
In recent years, the Board of Directors has allocated an
amount of $ 4.50 from each member to the production of CANADIAN
RAIL. It is interesting to note than in 10 years of ope rat ion, this
account has been overspent by $ 17.00 in transactions totalling a­
bout $ 60,000. Thus,it can be seen that every member has received
full value for their money, Hithout taking into acocount the thou­
sands of hours of time cheerfully donated by the volunteers: cor­
respondants, authors, photographers, ed itor, publisher, packing and
d
istr ib ut ion per sonne 1.
The sale of our other publications has realized a cash
reserve of some $ 1,430,presently available to underwrite the
cost of future Association publications and to assist in stocking
the book store which,it is hoped,vlill be operated at the Canadian
Railway Museum on Sundays during the coming season.
The Trip Committee operated five trips in 1969, and br­
ought nearly $ 3,200 to the Treasury. Of this, $1,850 was allo­
cated to the Canadian Railway Museum for capital projects.A total
of $ 3,740 remains in the bank to underwrite trips in 1970. The
CANADIAN
72
R A I L
Association was, until 1969,the sole operator of steam-hauled ex­
cursions in eastern Canada. Iron Horse Tours of Montreal have now
entered this field,with trips in September, 1969 and February, 1970
(proposed). The Assoc iat ion t s financ ial statement may not there­
fore reflect revenues of the same magnitude in 1970. It thus fol­
lows that allocations of Association funds from this source to
the Canadian Railway Museum for capital projects may decline in
the future.
THE CANADIAN RAIilIAY MUSEUM hosted nearly 13,000 vis­
itors during the 1969 season and showed a surplus of $ 260. This
favourable position was largely due to donations from other sour­
ces. Attendance should be increased in the future,to keep the op­
erating position at a break-even point.
Capital Projects at the Canadian Railway Museum requir­
ed $ 71,600 during 1969. The value obtained for this expenditure is
described else1here in this issue. Since the placement of consider­
able amounts of money in such projects at the Museum is the prime
purpose, the magnitude of these amounts should be regarded with sa­
tisfaction.
A contract for the construction of a workiog replica of
the 1847 locomotive John Molson has been signed and building ~Iill
commence shortly.
Charitable donations during 1969 totalled $ 41,Boo.This
includes approximately $ 1,200 for the DOORS for Building No.2. We
thank our many kind benefactors.
The members should al1ays keep in mind that the affairs
of the Association are conducted by volunteers. In fact, the By-laws
specifically prohibit the remuneration of any officer or member of
the Association. To assure the members that this requirement is
strictly obeyed,Messrs. stevenson,Blakely,Blunt & Company have be­
en engaged and their report assures the members that all of the
monies received by the Treasurer have been used for AssOCiation
activities and objectives,or remain in the Associationts bank ac­
count (earning interest).
AssOCiation regular members, who may be particularly in­
terested in the detailed, audited statements of financial transac­
tions of the AssOCiation are welcome to write for a copy to the
Treasurer at the Associationts address.
.What
66 CANADIAN
RAIL??
?
The Editor and The Publisher.
In the absence of the Publisher, the Editor reported for
both of these activities at the Annual Meeting. Special mention
was made of the correspondents from Halifax to Vancouver and the
names of all of the contributors during 1969 [ere noted. Of par-
ticular interest was the distribution, by subject,of articles dur­
ing 1969,which alternately covered the three main types of railway
activity: steam,electric and diesel. For future issues,the Editor
recommended that the following principles should be adopted:
1. Maintenance of this equal distribution between the three
main types of art icle; .
2. Preparation of at least hlo issues in 1970 Nhich would be
devoted to a single subject,with articles giving differ­
ent points of view on the same subject;
3. Innovations,whenever possible,which Ilould serve to vary
the content of the magazine,thus generating interest and
entertaining the readers;
4. Consideration of the publication of tflelve (12) issues per
year,even though the supply of copy might require the pub­
lication of an issue devoted solely to pictures;
5. Provision by the Associations Board of Directors of a sum
of money for the production of CANADIAN RAIL which would
be independent of the number of members or, alternately, a
concerted drive to obtain more members, thereby increasing
the amount of money available for the production of
CANADIAN RAIL.
From a finanCial point of vie, … , the Editor pOinted out
th::j.t the Board of Directors had allocated $ 7, 02L~ to CANADIAN RA.IL
and with this amount, 15, 625 copies of the magazine had been mailed
to the members, resulting in a surplus of $ 153.47 at the year-end.
The Treasurers figure of a deficit of $ L~67 reflected the fact
that there were stocks of paper to print the magazine and envelop­
es to mail it out,at the year-end.
In his report,Mr. Murphy,the production Nanager, noted
that 1969 had seen the use of ,;0 or more colours on the cover and
the evolution of a ne, … , cleaner style of cover, toards the end of
the year. The numoer of pages of text, pl10tographs, maps and sketches
had all increased over 1967 and 68,and further increases were an­
ticipated -or at least recommended, in 1970, Hr. 1·lurphy underlined
the fact that CANADIAN RAIL had appeared on time throughout the
year,which required a good deal of work and s·ollle hurried arrange­
ments with the printer. He recommended that this record for prompt
preparation and delivery to the members be considered of paramount
importance in 1970.
o
CA NADIAN
74
R A I L
Both the Editor and Publisher reminded the members that
the success of CANADIAN RAIL was largely dependent on them,since
without their contributions, they would be doomed to a diet of prose
from the Editor,-a prospect to be viewed with apprehensionl
Contributors to CANADIAN RAIL during 1969 were acknowle­
dged by a by-line. Not so correspondents, whose name are given here­
inbelow,with appreciation:
Phillip Fine E.H.Heath W.R.Linley Dale K.G.Younger Clayton Jones D.E.Cummings Eric Johnson
R .M.Binns John Hoffmeister Jos. Langevin Roger Boisvert
CD
Please turn to the next
page for photo captions.

THE 1969
REPORT OF
THE
CANADIAN RAILWAY
MUSEUM
Editors
Dear Museum Guides:
AN EYE TO THE FUTURE.
Note: There could be no more
f
itt ing an introduct ion to
this report than the letter
which follows. It was received
by the Museum Commission near
the end of the 1969 season.
216 Victoria Drive,
Baie d Urfe,Que.
Thank you very much for taking our group around the Train Museum.
The
part I liked best was going into the caboose. I thought it was
neat how there were seats up near the roof. I wonder what they are
for.
I also liked the old engine we were allowed to go into. Id like
to know how the engineer memorizes all the different knobs.
I thought that the trains inside the building were very interesting
and I liked the sleeping cars.
Thanks aga in.
Yours truly,
Fiona Done.
steam engines •••••• huge black monsters shuddering under the
loads of coal and compressed steam •••••• tons of metal,shaking the
earth as wheels churn over the gleaming track, bearing witness to
mans genius for harnessing power ••••• lumbering masses of iron and
steel that blast the air,as they spit black smoke to the heavens ••
• • •
THE FAST EXPRESS at the Canadian Railway Museum/Musee Ferroviaire Can­
adien,Delson/St-Constant,que. Picture 1 shows the LIGHTNING EXPRESS spe­
eding down the main line away from Barrington Station. Picture 2 illus­
trates the PACIFIC SPECIAL at full speed passing building NO.1,while the
third illustration shows the NINETEENTH CENTURY LIMITED slowing near the
end of her run,at her western terminus. Photos by Museum Commission.
THE SECOND SERIES starts (no.4) with Barrington Station,which in 1969 re­
presented a great attraction to visitors. Picture 5 shows the narrow­
gauge electric mine locomotive,presented to the Museum by Hollinger Gold
Mines. The last picture shows Building No.2 with the roof and sides in
place and the-connection to the crossover switch installed.
CA NAD I AN
77
R A I L
, •• inunense driving shafts that grind in rhythmic strokes as the
iron horse plods along the rails ••••• wailing whistles that echo
through silent sountrysides where people sleep in their beds .•••••
these are all recorded as the railroad sounds of a vanished era.
The Canad ian Railway Museum!Musee Ferrov iaire Canad ien
become recognized as a centre for the preservation of these
roading masters. Many of the aspects of the glorious years
railroad history are presented here,-not only in the aspect
steam,but in that of electric and diesel-electric,as well.
has
rail­
of
of
The process of its development is still not complete.ldeally,
it never will be,for when this happens,the history of railways,our
Nations unifying force,will decline into stagnation. At the MuS­
eum, th
ere will always be details for add ition, exhibits to complete;
in general, the creat ion of a place with a total railroad ing atmos­
phere,a place where visitors can actually participate in the dis­
plays and learn about every aspect of the railroad romance,-its
majesty and its grace.
Creating an annual report only puts a division point in these
proceedings. The 1>1ork is not limited in scope; each project leads
directly into another of equal importance. During the summer mon-
ths,the emphasis 1>1aS on track work and because of teamwork and
persistence,the volunteers are nO-1 ready to proceed with laying
of the turntable foundations. Building No.2 tlas completed,sans
the doors, but 40 more pieces of equipment are nO protected from
the elements. Restorat ion has been the winters higtl-light, with
the concentration on Barrington Station and the reconstruction of
its interior. It will be used for the point of origination for the
scheduled Sunday operation in 1970,-a caboose ride from Barrington
to the end of track at the west end of the yard. The vans to be
used are CPR no. 435288 and NJR no. 34. Restoration of the latter
in another of this winters projects and is expected to be comple­
ted about ilarch 1. Canadian Nationals locomotives nos. 4100 and
5702 are cleaned and ready for the final painting; their cabs have
been restored to a natural state. They will complete the overall
display in Building No.1.
The enthusiasts interest seldom falters,for there are always
new things to do;new equipment and constant improvements; it is
the job of the Museum Commission to order all of these activities,
to insure that they ill never pass into limbo and that they will
all occupy their proper place in Canadian railway history.
We heartily thank all those people …. Iho have helped the Can-
ad ian Raillay ivluseum/Musee Ferroviaire Canadien in 1969. We ernest­
ly solicit their support in 1970,in any area,-for there are many
projects Ihere help ,ould be most 1.,elcome. Readers of CANADIAN
RAIL ,Iho would like to know more about this project of the Can-
adian Railroad Historical ASSOCiation are encouraged to write to
the Chairman of the Public Relations Committee at the Associations
address, given on the back page of CANADIAN RAIL.
TRIP COMMITTEE
REPORT 1969
Report of Mr. Denis Latour.
Ed itor s note: The follOlling report was
presented at the Annual Meeting of the
Association on January 28,1970, by Mr.
Denis Latour,Director of the Associa­
tion and Chairman of the Committee for
Excursions,Meetings and Special Activi­
ties,1969. It is produced in its entir­
ety,except for some short passages that
have been removed for reasons of space.
Dear Fellow-Members:
Before giving you a summary of our activities for the past
year, I would like to say a few words on the portfolio that I was
responsible for until this evening. At the first meeting of the
Board (of Directors) in February 1969,Mr. Walter Bedbrook and I
were
appointed as CO-CHAIRMEN of a Committee that would be respon­
sible for CRHA EXCURSIONS,MEEIINGS AND SPEX::IAL ACTIVTIIES. No of­
ficial committee was ever formed and it was preferred to do thir.gs
on a more personal basis, calling on help as required. This avoided
a lot of red tape, lengthy meetings,etc ••••• Early in May, Mr. Bed­
brook asked to be relieved of his duties as his work would requi­
re him to be out of town for some months and I assumed full re­
sponsibility. My first move was to appoint trip coordinators for
the coming steam excursion. The lork of these persons was to look
after every aspects of the excursion (publicity, tickets, safety ,
liaison with the railway,etc ••• ),all under the supervision of the
Director. The system proved very efficient and it l1aS dec ided to
maintain it for other excur,sions in 1969. This pattern also gave
a chance to the Director to carryon other projects (meetings,etc •
•• ) at the same time.
MEETINGS:
1fe had 8 regular meetings, with entertainment (mostly
slide and film presentations) being provided by members; this year
marking the lOth. anniversary of the disappearance of streetcars
in Montreal, it was found appropriate to devote some meetings to
our traction .enthusiasts and show them souvenirs of that era in
the City. Even MTC trolley coaches and buses made their appearance
at the November n~eting. Steam fans had the opportunity to see
….
THE ASSOCIATIONS CP RAIL RDC DAYLINER trip to Labelle,QuB., which took
place on March 2,1969. The Special stopped briefly at the station at
Ste-Agathe,QuB.,for the benefit of the photographers. Photo by F.F.Angus.

April 20,1969 saw the appearance of the Associations HABITANT SPECIAL,
pictured here in the station at Huntingdon,quB. On the way west to Hun­
tingdon, CN 3900 and train paused at a bridge over a river for the bene­
fit of the photographers. Photos courtesy F.F.Angus.
I .
CANADIAN 81 R A I L
films from Fred Pardoes fine collection and scenes of European
railroading Iere shown in December. Attendance has been satisfac­
tory through the year, however, it ~ould have been very pleasant to
see this place full every month. The May meeting gathered 108 per­
sonsl Before closing on this aspect, I would like to thank Messrs.
Roland Dauphinais,F. Pardoe,M.P.Murphy and F.F.Angus for their
contribution to these meetings.
BANQUET :
ilith the month of March, we had our Annual Banquet, which
also replaced our monthly meeting. The banquet took place, for the
2nd. year,at the Black Watch Armory and the guest speaker was Mr.
~murice Archer,Vice-President,CN Research & Development. As usual,
a very successful eveningl
SUMMER GATHERING:
I took the liberty of organiz ing our first sununer ga­
ther ing at the !Jluseum and I ,.,ras very pleased with the results. 128
persons (including staff) participated and I have not heard anyone
yet who has said that he didnt enjoy himself. Thanks to the Museum
people for their cooperation that eveningl That gathering took
place on July 9th.
EXCURSIONS:
Five (5) excurs ions were operated, as follo~lS:
a) March 2nd. CP RAIL
b) April 20th. CN
c) May 31st. CN
d) October 11th. CN
e) November 16th.
MONTREAL-LABELLE
using 2 RDC units, our Snow
EXcursion.
MONTREAL-HUNTINGDON
with diesel locomotive 3900,
our Habitant Local. Thanks
to Claude Gareau for his help
on this tripl
MONTREAL-GRAND • HERE
with good old 6218 ••••• with
over 800 persons aboard!
MONTREAL-QUEBEC C rry
with 6218 again. For many,
this trip las referred to as
animpoSSibleone; well,with
continuous effort from the
promoters and your support,
dear members and friends, •••
we ran it and not at a lossl
MrC COMMmDRATIVE TRIP.
to celebrate the 50th.anni­
versary of introduction of

CANADIAN
84
bus serv ice in ~,jontreal. It
was our first trip aboard an
MIC vehic-le since 1959; 34
members and
friends marked
this event and showed the MTC
their appreciation for what
they have done for the Asso­
ciation! The trip was made
aboard GM Coach 41-449, at
the time, the youngest member
of the large MTC fleetl
R A I L
NOTE: I have not mentioned the special 2-unit RDC train operated
between MONTREAL and DELSON,on the evening of July 9th., as
this TaS not an excursion. These cars ~Iere used as a mean
of transportation and fare Has included :in the admission
fees for that event. (I dont have to tell anyone that ac­
cess to our l4useum is very limited ..•..•• unless you come
by carl)
Operating five (5) trips was a major undertaking and we
managed to make a success of each of them,not loosing any money, ..
••• on the contrary,Le. ti1e GRANDMlRE trip brought a net surplus
in the vic:inity of $ 2500. Even our MTC BUS trip brought a surplus •
.•.. $ 6.43. For both steam excursions, I was fortunate to have Mr.
R.G.Cox and Miss H. Haig,as trip coordinators and the Association
is indebted to them for their contribution to these excursions.The
~,,…–..-supe-r-.tripll to Quebec City would have been impossible Ilithout
the ir cont inuous effort; thanks Bob and Heather! Thanks are also
extended here to Fred Angus for his help on all trips and to Mr. J.
A.Beatty (both in his capacities of Director of the Association and
Officer of CP RAIL),to Canadian National Railways, ••••• not forget­
ting my good friend Walter Bedbrook.
As far as finances are concerned, the Committee is in
very good standing. During the year, funds from excursion revenues
lere transferred to the Museum for external restoration of CN
steam locomotives 4190 and 5702 (sand-blasting, priming and one (1)
coat of paint),for the purchase of a paint sprayer and paint sup­
plies. Following the GRANDMERE trip and its financial success, a
suggestion was made to the Board (of which some Directors are also
Museum Officials),with an offer of $ 2500.00 for the same restor­
ation Iork on the remaining units of the CN steam loco/llOtive col­
lection. However,for some unknown reasons, this offer laS declined.
I just hope that money earned at great effort by this Committee
will be put to good use some day and not spent at random!
•••
Better than 4 on the floor are four on the rail-four axles,that is,
with eight wheels,all packing a large wallop (J. Langevins photo). A
perfect day for the Associations Quebec Trip on October 11,1969 and a
perfect subject to photograph. The run-past was scheduled for the deck
plate girder bridge at Victoriaville,Qup..(F. Angus photo),after which
6218 required another tenderfull of coal (J. Langevin photo).

, I
CANADIAN
87
R A I L
All the Committees activities,this year,1ere conducted
in both official languages and I Iouldnt like to end this report
Iithout saying a few lOrds in French 1 Le Comite des Excurs ions a
eu une annee tres chargee en fait d1activites de toutes sortesjnous
avons eu 8 reunions mensuelles,l banquet,une rencontre d1ete au
Musee (notre premiere),et 5 ex~ursions. Je desire vous remercier
tres sincerement poun_l1appui que vous m1avez donne et jespere que
toutes ces activit&s:ont su vous plaire.
To concl~de,I would like to say that 1969 has been a
very busy year,a successful one and a very colourful one too(dont
worry, I ,.,ron t elaborate on the many d 1ff icult ies and frustrat ions
I had to put up withl). I have devoted a lot of time to all these
activities in order to insure their success and 1ith your support,
Ie were able to partake in a variety of most interesting act ivi­
ties. You enjoyed them, ••.••• I did 1 Tile could have bad more ….• we
could have had less, too!
Thanking you again for your support and consideration,I
wish the best of luck to my successor and I respectfully submit th­
is report for your approval.
Yours truly,
(signed) DeniS Latour
(CRHA No. l8L~)
Director of Excursions,
Jvleetings and Special
Activities,for the year
1969.
Hontreal, P.Q.
January 28th.,1970.
Ed itor I s note: Hith reference to the offer Ihich was made by the
Director of Excursions,~1eetings and Special Activi­
ties,of $ 2500 for the same restoration Iork on the
remaining units of the CN steam locomotive collect­
ion,the official minutes of the Associations Board
of Directors sho, that a recommendation to this ef­
fect las made, but the Board of Directors did not
act on it and it is therefore still under consider­
ation.
An innovation in the type of excursions sponsored by the Association was
the trip of November 16,1969,which utilized Montreal Transportation Com­
missions GM bus no. 41-449,pictur8d here at Saint-Denis Garage. This
excursion was held to mark the 50th. Anniversary of the introduction of
bus service in Montreal. Photo courtesy F.F.Angus.
Text and Photographs
by
Don Scafe
-r he Canad ian Railroad Historical Assoc­
iations Rocky Mountain Branch and
the Alberta Pioneer Railway Associa­
tion of Edmonton,Alta.,have together
succeeded in keeping real steam rail­
roading alive in their area during
the past two years. During 1969,for­
mer Northern Alberta Railways 2-8-0
steam 10 CODlot.i ve no. 73 operated on
8 holiday weekends. The citizens of
Edmonton and the vicinity, -large and
small,have ridden behind no. 73,over
300 yards of track, built and main­
tained by the A.P.R .A.,in a former
Canadian National Railways combine,
built in 19l5,or in ftn ex-CN caboose
of about the same era.
Many visitors to the project came to look,to see and to savor
the nO1-rare odour of coal smoke from a steam engine. In more than
a few instances,the A.P.R.A. and no. 73 provided the visitors fir­
st ride on a train and there were actually some adult visitors in­
cluded in this category. Thirty children from a local hospital sat
bolt-upright and wide-eyed during their ride behind no. 73. Many
stories were told by visiting railroad pensioners about their ex­
periences when they were on the main line.
The Alberta Pioneer Railway Association was formed in the sp­
ring of 1968 for three princ ipal reasons. These Iere, to fac ilitate
the raising of money, to acquire equipment and to create an organ­
ization separate from the Canadian Railroad Historical Association
which could assume the total responsibility for the operation of
the steam locomotive and train. The A.P.R.A. is a non-profit or­
ganization,registered with the Government of Alberta and the Tax­
ation Division of the Federal Government at ottawa •
. . ..
The trick in getting CRHA/APRAs no. 73 out of the shed is to use a lit­
tle compressed air! Compressed air helps to move the engine out of the
shed and then aspirates the oil into the firebox for lighting up prior
to raising the necessary head of steam.

/1
CANADIAN
91
R A I L
For the purpose of maintaining supervision of this equipment
trust organization and liaison HUh the Rocky Mountain Branch, the
President,Vice-President and Secretary-Treasurer of the C.R.H.A.s
Rocky Mountain Branch hold the same offices in the A.P.R.A. organ­
ization. Most members of A.P.R.A. are also members of C.R.H.A.
The operation of eX-N.A.R.no. 73 is the A.P.R.A.s most pub­
licized summertime activity,but the acquisition and preservation of
other railroad equipment continues throughout the year. The present
equipment,acquired and maintained by the A.P.R.A.,includes:
No. 73
6947
8029
72782
78185
409748
68301
2-8-0
steam
engine
0-8-0
steam
engine
Baggage
car
eX-N.A.R •
ex-C.P.R •
ex-Manitoba &
Saskatchewan
Coal Company
ex-CN 8029
ex-lCR 736 eX-lCR
coach
Baggage-ex-Can.Northern
smoker Rail~lay
Caboose ex-CNR
Outfit ex-CPR
car
Outf it, ex-CNR
car
….
Built by Canad ian Lo­
comotive Company, King­
ston,Ont.,in 1927.
Built by Montreal Locomo­
tive Works,Montreal,Sept.
1908. CPR class V-4-a.
Presently at Bienfait,Sask.
Formerly part of CNs fam­
ous MUSEUM TRAm. Built
1877 for Intercolonial Ry.
as a coach;rebuilt by lCR
in 1890 to baggage car no.
736. Renumbered in 1920 to
CN 8029.
Built 1915 as Canadian Nor­
thern RailHay second-class
smoker no. 6755. converted
to baggage-smoker in 1940
by CN,no.72782. Later,con­
verted to work car 7379.
~ APRAs no. 73 provides steam to warm up the bunker-C oil in the tank-car
as well as to operate the pump for transfer of the oil to the tender.The
Decas ion was the preparat ion for operat ion on the Thanksgiving week-end,
1969.
Prior to operation,erew members Wayne Shserer,Jim Coutts and Don Seafe
check their watches. Wayne and Jim have obtained their uniforms from for­
mer railway employees. Don is wearing vintage-1890 attire,worn by many
Edmontonians during the annual Klondike Days celebrations.
Picture 3 shows the CN Outfit Car being painted to prevent weathering. The
car is interesting in that it has arch-bar trucks.
Picture 4 shows CRHA/APRA members working at Bienfait,Sask.,on ex-CPR lo­
comotive 0-6-0 6947,in preparation for her movement to Edmonton.
CANADIAN
92
FROCOR Tank car ex-FROCOR
509893 Box car ex-CNR
512719
Box
car ex-CNR
46230 Refrigerator
car. ex-CNR
172755 stock car ex-CNR
500599 Flat car ex-CNR
R A I L
Built October,1914.
Built April,1930.
Built ~..ay, 1931.
Built August,1929.
Formerly CN Box Car
500599.Modified by A.P.
R.A.
Also various track motor cars,hand-cars,velocipedes and express wa­
gons.
The Alberta Pioneer Railway Association has been informed this
year that Engine no. 73 must be moved from her present storage bu­
ilding during the spring of 1970 and that weekend operations must
cease at the present site. To help maintain the treasury in a sol­
vent condition,the A.P.R.A. is presently selling shares in de­
nominations of $ 1, $ 5, $ 10, $ 50, and $ 100. If you can read
the fine print, you will find that every share certificate is pr_
iceless as a part of the A.P.R.A .,helping them to build an oper­
ating steam raihray and museum,to restore,preserve and operate
raihlay equipment that helped to build the West. This is unques­
tionably a very commendable project and interested persons, par­
ticularly C.R.H.A.members outside the Edmonton area,may participa­
te by subscribing through the author of this report at the RoCky
Mountain Branchs postal address (see the back cover of CANADIAN
RAIL). Income tax receipts will be made available for donations.
The Rocky Mountain Branch officers for 1970 are:
President Mr. Wayne Shearer
Vice-Pres iden,t Mr. Jim Myers
Secretary-Treasurer Mr. Don Scafe
N~ 2136
C.pit..1 Sfo.&it Ualimiled
!?Au ~ !JAai CoUIADUH RATt:ROAD HISTORICAl ASSOCJATIOH
U Ik __ Alberte Pioneer Ra.ilw~y As~iation
foU, f-I fo. • .J ………. , _ …
~~~~BtM~~
~~.~ll;~·J;l~iiroJWfAt~KJMlfh~
s <> l.Y.I: ~ wr EI I ~ <;.
S<>:lY.I: ~ wr EI I ~ <;.
wr<> X><>
The Report of the ottawa Branch.
S oR .Ell iot •
<> TTAHA was a busy spot during 1969,
with happenings II in excursions,
restoration,operation and, for
want of a better term, what can
only be described as Branch ac­
tivities •
The
Branch ran two excursions; one in the spring on the Thurso
and Nation Valley Railway for about 75 members and friends and the
other in the autumn on the Maniwaki Subdivision of CP RAIL in RDC
DAYLINERS for the Fall Foliagell,catering to a group of about 150.
Small, perhaps, by 6218 standards, the T. & N.V.R. run ~I8S at capa­
city and in fact was sold out a month before the trip itself • The
Maniwaki
tour, though not sold out, was probably at the maximum that
could have been expected for the ottawa area,considering the fact
that the participants paid $ 10.00 for a journey which could other­
wise have been accomplished (bus) for $ 6.10. Without doubt, both
excursions were a success from the members f point-of-view and .ev­
eryone enjoyed the runs and the particular attractions offered by
each. The Branch made a little money on each activity,which, after
all, was the object of these exerc ises II •
Restoration has taken a good deal of time and effort during
the year past and, in many respects, seems to have been our major
endeavour, insofar as the amount of executive guidance and adminis­
trat ion was concerned. This year, we completed tile replacement of
the roofing and siding of the boom car, CVR 4313, leaving only the
replacement of a roof walk and gutters, painting of the rear door
and marks and some minor maintenance. The tender got a new front
coupler deadwood, some new planking,a coal box cover, scraping and
some
painting. The painting remains to be completed, the water pump
needs to be overhauled and installed. To complete the job, there is
a little more Woodorking and some minor maintenance to be done.
CVR 4251,the opera~ing crane car, got a new set of electrical
wiring,which allo,..,s unplugging of the lights ,thereby frustrating
the rock-throwing rascals in the area. A new steam-cleaning deliv­
ery pipe was installed, together ith a coal bunker side-sheet and
a water tank drain pipe and the repainting that it needs was begun.
This year,we are replacing her grates, repairing a split grate ring,
pouring a new builders plate (she only has one now) and making so­
me minor steamfitting repairs and other maintenance. To ease the
paint-scraperfs task,we hope to get the use of some air-driven ch­
ipping equipment.
CANADIAN
94
R A I L
Our 1907 spreader,CP 402S1S,got some paint, her air system was
checked and she is sched uled for a complete repaint job and minor
repairs in 1970.
Our 1908 wooden colonist/boarding car,CP 411205,l1as been pre­
pared for work and surveyed. A more active repair programme will
be taking place in 1970.
The minor equipment,-velocipede and hi-railer,signal and sig­
nal equipment,was ignored, partly because some of it had been wor­
ked on in 1968,but mainly because it had been assigned a lower pr­
iority. There is nothing major that need to be done on this minor
gear, although assembly and mounting of the signal >lil1 present some
problems •
Our biggest problem,as usual, is financial. vie have to buy our
mater ial as >le go along and occas ionally we are restr icted when we
dont have what we need, because we cant afford it. In addition to
our own work,we also aSSisted the National Museum of Science and
Technology and crews have been out removing rust on some of the
equipment in the Museum displays. This is a continuing task t/hich
we undertake as payment for the storage of our equipment on MuS­
eum
trackage. All equipment and materials for this sort of activi­
ty comes from the Museum.
Operation in 1969 consisted of some five runs of CV 4251, the
crane and six runs of the Museums 0-6-0 switcher, formerly STELCO
No. 40,ex-Toronto,Hamilton & Buffalo No. 42. We run the crane for
our own purposes,e.g.,live steam for cleaning,air for the spreader,
some switching and as a general attraction and interest. Though it
takes some considerable time to prepare her for operation, she can
raise enough steam to run in about an hour and a half and when she
is forced, she can shift most of the equipment in the little yard,
including CN 9400,the ALCO diesel-electric and the London & Port
Stanley No. l,not to mention three or four assorted cars, all at
oncel On one occasion, she was used to shift an oil derrick pump wh­
icij the Museum wanted to move off their parking lot (we had put it
there for them originally). This required a little cable and boom
work. No. 40 is fired up for l4useum purposes and is used to run
minor excursions on the l4useum spurs. C~.H.A.Ottawa Branch person­
nel assist in these minor runs, acting as safety guards and conduct­
ors,as well as engine and train crew. Ottawa Branch members fired
her up in August,when CN 9400 was formally presented to the Museum,
an
event which drew more publicity for No. 40 than it did for the
diesel.
•••
EX-STELCO NO. 40 under steam at the Museum of Science and TeChnology at
Ottaw~ on September 9,1969. At the controls,-it looks like Mr. Duncan
duFresne, Vice-President of the Ottawa Branch. Photo courtesy J. Langevin.
eN no. 9400 and van,-part of the collection of the Museum of Science and
Technology at Ottawa,Canada. Photo courtesy J. Langevin.

CANADIAN
96
R A I L
Miscellaneous Branch activities have included our monthly me­
etings,with speakers not only from within the Branch membership,
but also from interested non-members. We do a good deal of enter­
tainment presentations,with slide-shows and reports of trips and
visits from individual members,as appropriate. VIe have established
an archival section which is now in the process of cataloguing bo­
oks and photographs,held by the Branch members. In addition, we
have initiated a project vhich, if it develops, will gain us an op­
portunity to use material in the National Archives.
Another difficult problem has been in the area of publicity
for the Branch and a Branch publication. vIe need both badly and we
just have not had the fac ilities availabl.e within the Branch it­
self,during 1969,to obtain the optimum results.
Looking back on 1969 and to misquote somevlhat the general
confess ion, vie have left undone a number of things which we ought
to have done and Ie have done some things which we ought not t9
have done. But we have done those things which we wanted to do and
the Branch at this point is very healthy. vIe are looking forward
in 1970 to enlarging our membership,to making the ottawa Branch be­
tter-known,to improving the condition of our material and perhaps,
if circumstances permit, to find ing a few more items to add to our
displays.
The officers of the Ottawa
President
Vice-President
Treasurer
Secretary
Branc h, C .R .H .A., for
Maj. S.R .Elliot
Mr. Duncan Dufresne
Mr. T. Emo
Mr. H. Iveson
……
. I .
J
:..
1970,are:
$ 1,000
$ 2,000
$ 3,000
$ 4,000
$ 5,000
~ 6,000
Thanks to our kind
benefactors, only two­
thirds as much snow
got in during that
((;~~t ,,,w,to,m
~
,
!!J
The Officers and Directors of the Association and the Commissioners
of the Canadian Railway Museum gratefully acknowledge donations fr­
om the following persons to the IlroORS Fund, to provide doors for
Building No. 2 at the Museum:
ALLEN E.C. DENNIS D.V. l>1ORRIS N.S.
ALLIN Harren DUBUC D. l-DRRISSEITE Ml.A.
BARREITE Thos. FEITERLY M.C. MYERS John
BAILEY VI.E. GALOVICH Ii{ .G. NORRY H.T.
BATES Gordon GUY R.L. OLVER A.S.
BERNIER Lucien HALL Peter RICHARDSON E.R.
BLEVINS Harry HO IDDEL ENG. SOC IElY ROBINSON R.O.
BONNELL T.R • INGALLS vI .0 • ROHN Harren
BOURASSA Yves JACOBSEN R.C. SANGER D.F.
BROOKS H.J. KING S.V. TAYLOR Ian
BUDDLES G. LE:r.ICH J .E. THORNlON Grier
CAMPBELL J.Murray WfELL Donald TURNBULL K.VI •
CODERE John F. LUOOVICI H. WALKINarON D.H.
COLEY V .H. l-IacASKILL J. HAY Jas.R.
COULOON J.F. 14cKEE R.B. WILDE E.A.
DAVIS J.R. MITCHELL J.H. YOUNGER Murray
DESJARDINS J-P HEATH E.H. YALE ENTERPRISES
..

..
… Mr. J. LANGEVIN of Ottawa sends us this extraordinary 25 times enlar­
gement of CN 6218,ex-STELCO No. 40,with the Ottawa Branchs crane car
in the background. The occasion was the visit of No. 6218 to the Museum
of Science and Technology at Ottawa on September 20,1969.

OBSERVATIONS
VVITH F.A.KEMP
• • • • •
A LOST SHEEP AT ST-LUC yARD •••••••••••••••
Ilid-January saw an unanticipated visitor to CP RAILs St-Luc
Yard,Montreal,when ALCO Schenectady century C-636 demonstrator,no.
636-3 appeared. This unit was one of the last three produced by
the Schenectady builder before the shop doors swung closed. The
other two,636-l & 636-2,after demonstrating on many U.S.railroads,
were sold to Morrison-Knudson,the giant-size contracting company,
for use in the construct ion of a mammoth power dam near vancouver,
vlashington.
Morrison-Knudson have now leased these units to the Spokane ,
Portland & Seattle Raihray, which already has ten C-636 s .The last
demo unit, 636-3, ~as latterly leased by PENN-CENTRAL and when it
was returned to ALCO Schenectady recently, power-hungry CP RAIL
alerted by friends at MI1Il-worthington,Montreal,contacted the suc­
cessor to ALCO Schenectady and leased the unit directly, for an
indefinite period.
ALCO Schenectady Century C-636s,for some reason not very pop­
ular in the United States, ,rere actually purchased by PENN-CENTRAL –
(15), Illinois Central (6) and Spokane, Portland & Seattle (10). S.
P.& S.s lease of the duo from Morrison-Knudson is a natural. Not
so
CP RAILs lease of 636-3.
SlEAM Dr NEH HAMPSHmE S CRAVJFORD NOTCH ? ••••••
A narrow defile in the Vlhite Mountains of New Hampshire,Craw­
ford Notch is a favourite route for Montrealers on their way to
New England seashore summer vacations. So it has been since the
Portland & ogdensburg Railroad ~aS opened in 1875. As late as 1949
through coaches were run between Portland and Montreal,but now
most of the NotCh travellers traverse it on the highway.The rail
line is still there and is still one of the most scenic !ir.es in
the East,but it car.ries only freight trains and an occasional ex­
cursion for rail enthusiasts. The popularity of these excursions
may well have prompted the plan to operate steam-powered passenger
trains between the old Maine Central Railroad division point of
Bartlett,N .H.,vrhere most of the facilities are still available and
Crawford Notch station at the crest of the long 2% grade. Trains
would run a short distance farther to Fabyans,vlhere the locomotive
could be turned on a reconstructed lIyll.
The
Crawford Notch Steam Railroad Company has been organized
by Messrs. Edward Clark of Clarks Trad ing Post and White Mountain
Central Railroad (North Woodstock,N.H.),George McAvoy, Manager of
the Crawford House (onlY a short distance from Crawford Notch sta-
•••
On the Associations excursion of May,1959, CN 5218 posed alongside CNs
2022 and sisters. Photo courtesy Jim Shaughnessy.
CANADIAN 100 R A I L
tion),Douglas Philbrook,Manager-of the Mount 1tlashington Sununit Ro­
ad (Pinkham NotCh,N.H.),Arnbassador Robert C. Hill (Littleton,N.H.)
and James T. McFate of the Hanover Inn (Hanover,N.H.). The Com­
pany has been granted permission by the Public Utilities Commis-
sion of the state of New Hampshire to operate a train over the
Maine Central Railroad betlleen Milepost 70 (Bartlett) and Mile-
post 90 (Fabyans).
The train will consist of equipment leased from the Steamtown
Foundations museum and will probably include 4-6-2 locomotive No.
127
(formerly Canadian Pacific No. 1271) (class G5d) or one of sev­
eral other G5s at Steamtown,hauling coaches from the Central Ra­
ilroad of New Jersey. It is anticipated that development costs may
be of the order of $ 350,000 and that 75,000 passengers will be
carried in the summer season. Tickets will be sold at both ends of
the line. Trains will operate in the daytime only,so as not to in­
terfere with MECs freights,which run at night. The line between
Bartlett and Crawford Notch and onward to Fabyans is sometimes ad­
jacent to the highway, but the section between Notchland and Craw­
ford Notch,while visible from the highway at considerable distance
is only accessible (for photography) to strong climbersl
COAL TRAFFIC POTENTIAL-CAN IT REVIVE THE OLD GN LINE ••••••
Follolling the completion of the Great Northern Railway (U.S.
A.) from st. Paul,Minn. to Seattle, Washington, in 1892, a large
number of branch lines ofere constructed northward to the 49th.par­
allel and several entered Canada, in an unsuccessful attempt to di­
vert traffic from the Canadian Pacific Railway. This bitter and
unrelenting rivalry was the avowed policy of James J. Hill, who
was one of the original promoters of the Canadian Pacific, but re­
signed when the decision was made to build the C.P.R. entirely on
Canadian soil. At this pOint,Hill began to expand his St. Paul,
Minneapolis & Manitoba Railway and it eventually became the Great
Northern.
One of the branches of Jim Hills picket-fence extended fr­
om Rexford,Montana to Fernie,B.C.,in the Crowsnest coal region.
Between Fernie and Elko,B.C.,it ran parallel to Canadian pacifics
Crowsnest Pass line. This branch was abandoned in the early 1930s
when many of the mines closed. When the Japanese coal market be­
came a reality in the late 1950s,Crowsnest Industries Limited ob­
tained a charter for an industrial railway under the name of the
Kootenay and Elk Railway Company,with the intention of rebuilding
this abandoned branch-line. It was not built, but negotiations be­
tween Kaiser Resources Limited and CP RAIL resulted in the estab­
lishment of a shipping rate to the Roberts Bank,B.C. superport of
$ 3.50 a ton for coal and the subsequent development of the coal
unit-train, units of which are nOof being built.
The problem now arising,according to Mr. William Prentice,
President of Crowsnest Industries, is that coal contracts either com­
mitted or projected, total alroost 20 million tons per year,while the
existing CP RAIL line will be able to handle only 12 million tons.
Therefore,Crowsnest Industries has filed an application with the
CANADIAN
101
R A I L
Canadian Transport Commission to build a line from a point north
of Natal,B.C.(see CANADIAN RAIL No. 218) to the International Boun­
dary near Rooseville West,whence it is only nine miles to the G.N.
main
line. Coal unit-trains would go westward on the G.N. to Eve­
rett,vlashington,then north~ard through White Rock to Roberts Bank.
CP RAIL has meantime initiated a study on the feasability of
a solids pipeline to carry some of the coal and will undoubtedly
oppose the Crowsnest Industries application. Meanwhile,4700s bur­
ble out of MLW-Worthingtons plant in Montreal and long strings of
bright red hoppers roll westward from Trenton,N.S.,soon to begin
their task of transporting Crowsnest coal to Japans steel mills.
FROVISION FOR THE PROTECTION OF FREIGHT SERVICE ••••••
Canadian National recently called for tenders for the constr­
uction of a wharf to be built on the west shore of the Straits
of Canso. It now appears that Mulgrave,N.S.,will be the site of
the new ~harf ,which in reality will be a new docking facility
for CNs North Sydney-Port aux Basques,Nfld. rail-automobile ser­
vices,when the main ferry dock at North Sydney,N.S.,is unusable,
due to ice or weather conditions. In other words, it is an alter­
nate facility which will hopefully assure a constant flow of rail
freight traffic to and from Newfoundland.
The apron portion of the new wharf will be raised and low­
ered by means of water-ballast tanks, to compensate for changing
water levels due to winds and tides. At Cape Tormentine and Borden
on Northumberland Straits,the dock aprons are adjusted by means of
hydraulic lift cylinders, powered by steam.
The choice of Mulgrave,N.S. for this new facility is an in­
teresting one, because this town was once the site of extensive do­
cking and servicing facilities for CNs trans-straits rail-ferries
before the Canso Causeway was constructed in 1955. All rail traf­
fic,to and from Cape Breton Island (North Sydney, Sydney and Glace
Bay) was loaded aboard train-ferries for the short but sometimes
hazardous journey to Point Tupper,Cape Breton Island.
COUNTESS OF DUFFERIN TO GO TO MUSEUM (AT LAST)? ……… . One
of the projects proposed for the Centennial Celebrations
in Manitoba in 1970 is a Museum of Transportation and one of the
princ ipal exhibits is to be the famous locomotive Countess of Duf­
ferin which has been displayed out-of-doors in front of CP RAILs
station in vlinnipeg since 1943 and in the former Sir William Whyte
Park from 1910 to 1943. The City Engineer of Winnipeg,W.D.Hurst ,
has reported that repairs to the tender underframe,cab,smokestack
and headlight are necessary and that the engine must be repainted
for a total cost of $ 11,000. The moving ~xpense to and from the
Citys shops will be $ 4,000 for a total total of $ 15,000. If the
repairs were to be made by CP RAIL, the bill would be % 5,000 hi­
gher. The question of who will pay for the repairs,-the City, the
prov ince or others, remains unans~ered.
The Countess of Dufferin,unquestionably WinnipegS first
steam locomotive,was brought by barge to the City in 1877 by the
CANADIAN
102
R A I L
contractor, Joseph Whitehead,who had been awarded a contract by the
Canadian government to build a line called the pembina Branch,from
St. Boniface to the United States boundary, near Emerson,Man.,where
it connected lith the St. Paul,Minneapolis & Manitoba Railroad.
This railway thus provided an all-rail route from eastern Can­
ada,throUgh the United States. Whiteh~ad lettered his equipment
Canadian Pacific R.R. and the Countess was his NQ. 1. He com­
pleted the Pembina Branch in December, 1877 and thereafter undertook
other contracts from st. Boniface to Selkirk,Man. and from Selkirk
to Keewatin,Ont.,where the Countess was kept busy until the Can­
ad ian Pac if ic Ra ilway Company was formed in 1881 and too k over the
government-built portions of the line and most of the contra~torls
locomotives,-but only after considerable negotiation.
The Countess was not therefore taken into C.P.R. stock until
1882,when she became No. 151,the only number she ever carried on
the Canadian Pacific. In 1897,she was sold to the Columbia River
Lumber Company of Golden,B.C. Brought back to Winnipeg in 1910,she
was placed on display in the park across from the C.P.R. station,
remaining there, adorned with flower-boxes, twining vines and shrub­
bery until,in the Iorld War II year of 1943,she was skidded across
the street on well-greased temporary rails (to avoid turning her
wheels, coupling rods and valves and pistons) to her present loca­
tion. Movement to another site will require a low-bed semi-trailer
of suitable dimenSions.
COUNTESS OF DUFFERIN Built by Baldwin 1871 cln 2660 cylinders
15x2L~ drivers 57 4-4-0 type Northern Pacific Railroad No. 56 ,
(1872-1877) Joseph Whitehead No.1 (1877-1882) (lettered C.P.R.),C.
P.R. No. 151 (1882-1897),Columbia River Lumber Co. No. 151 (1897 –
1910),City of ilinnipeg Countess of Dufferin (lettered C.P.R.No.l)
1910 to date.
srRANGERS IN OUR MIDsr ••••••••••••••
January,traditionally the coldest month of the Canadian Win­
ter,this year brought a prolonged cold spell to eastern Canada, lea­
ving Montreal with a mean (average) temperature of 3.5
0
F., lowest
since 1888. Cold weather makes railway cars harder to move, requir­
ing more power for long trains. Despite recent deliveries of new
M-630 and M-636-type units,CP RAIL has needed extra help and leased
34 units from U.S .lines. These included a group of elderly covered
wagons from a road no longer in existance, the Chicago Great Wes­
tern, which merged with Chicago & North western in 1969. As well,
there were more modern units, such as DL-600s,c-636s and even three
Gene ral Electr ic U-Boats (U23Cs) .All units are ass igned to st -Luc
Montreal,but newer ones are usually run out of Calgary. B. & M.rm.
units are generally kept on trains to the U.S. via Ne~·lport,VT.,wh­
ile caw power works to Toronto and vJindsor and B. & L.E. units go
both ways,as required.
Boston & Maine RR.
(Blue, black &
white)
ALCO RS-3
GM-EMD F7A
GM-EMD F7B
1508.1512,1517,1518;
4266A;
4266B.
CANADIAN
103
Chicago Great western Railwa,y (C. & N .<1.)
(Badly faded tuscan GM-EMD F3A 110A;
R A r L
red Cyuk pink), F3B 103B, 105B, 109B;
gold lettering.) F5A 115C,1l5A;
Bessemer & Lake
(Orange, black &
~lhite ) F5B
~_OlD, 112D, 114B;
FP7A 116c.
Erie RR.
GM-EMD F7A
F7B
ALOO DL-600B
719A;
712B;
881-886 inc1.
Illinois Central RR.
(Orange & white) ALCO C-636 1100-1105 incl.
(Note: Truck design and suspension
different from C-636M units.)
Lake Superior & Ishpeming RR.
(Dark tuscan red,yellm~
lettering.) GE U23C 2300,2301,2302.
(Note: This Michigan ore-carrying road
continues to number units accor­
ding to their horsepower.)
Presicion Engineering Inc.,Mt. Vernon,IL.,U.S.A.
{Solid black, ALCO DL-640 900,901 (ex-C. & N.H. 900,901)
white numerals.) or RS-27
ALSO RANS ••••••••••••••••••
••••
CP RAIL is not the only Canadian raih;ay leaSing motive POH­
er during the winter. Canadian National has leased the follm1ing
units from the Duluth,Messabi & Iron Range Railway (again) and has
assigned them to st. Lawrence Region,Montreal and Prairie Region,
Symington Yard:
(Montreal) 1750 hp. SD-9
1800 hp. SD-18
(Symington) 1800 hp. SD-18
AND THEN THERE WAS ONE ••••••••••••••
111,112,117,119,120,121,123;
182,188,189,190,193;
176,177,178,179.
Canadian Pacifics Empress ships !ere first introduced in
trans-Pacific service (Vancouver-Yokahama-Hong Kong) early in 1891,
utilizing a design concept of medium size and moderate speed.These
ships were very popular and were brought to trans-Atlantic services
in 1906. Follmling World far II,only one of the pre-IJar Empresses
was available,so two smaller Duchesses were promoted to Empress
status until they were replaced by new vessels in 1956,1957 and
1961. The second of these,the Empress of England , has recently be­
en sold to Sha~,Savill and Company,for continuing operation and
will end her service under CP SHIPS house-flag April 5,1970,on her
return to Southampton,England,after an Easter Cruise. Three other
cruises and 13 trans-Atlantic crossings were cancelled. The Em­
press of Canada,last of the line,1ill maintain the service.
• • •
otis Dump Car, Built by Dominion June 1~10
FROM THE ASSOCIATION S ARCHIVES
CANADIAN RAIL
published by the
Assooiate Membership inoluding 11 lssues of
Canadian Rail B.OO annually.
EDITOR S.VVorthen PRODUCTION P.Murphy
EDITORIAL ASSOCIATE F.A Kemp
DISTRIBUTION J.A.Eeatty & F.F.Angus
VISIT THE
Canatlian Hailway ~luscwu l7 MI~ee Ferro,jaire Canadien
k
VISITEZ LE
OPEN MAY SEPT. • • OUVERT MAl -SEPT.
DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP AND BRANCHES
Mrg J.A.Beatty. 4982 Queen Mary Road, Montreal 248, Quebec, Canada.
ASSOC IA TION BRANCHES
OTTAWA Nr.M.Iveson • secty., p,a.Box 352, Term1nal AU Ottawa Onto
ROCKY MOUNTAIN tlr. Donald W.Scafe 12407 lansdowne Drive, Apt. 101, Edmonton Altao
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES
OTTAWA VALLEY
Sf,SKATCHEliAN
PAClfJlC COAST
FAR F;.ST
BRInSU ISLES
MANITOBA
ALBERTA
K.F.Chlvers, Apt. J,67 Somerset St. :., ottawa, Ontario.
J .S.Nlcholoson, 2)06 Arnold SL., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
P
eter Cox, 609 Cottonwood Ave., Coqultlom, British Columblo..
W.D.~~cKeown, 6-7, 4-chomc., Yacote-cho,SUl It City. 050ka, Japan.
J.H,Sfm(.iI~rs, 67 Willow Way, Aopth111. Beds •• England..
K.G,Youn ,er, 267 Vernon Road, WinnipE:.g, Y.anltobD..
Mr. Donald. I,Scafe,12407 Lansdowne Dr1ve, Apt. lOl,Edmonton Alto.
CopyrIght 1970 Pr1nted in Canoda on Canad1en po.per.

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