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Canadian Rail 201 1968

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Canadian Rail 201 1968

ITO. 201
19&8

By. S.S,Worthen
~OT QUITE ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO,in the age
of the elegant eighties,railway constr­
uction was still burgeoning. Nowhere was
this more the case than in the New
England portion of the United States,in
which region the Vermont Central Rail­
road was still taking on all comers, in
an epic competition for the traffic be­
tween the Atlantic seaboard and the Gr­
eat Lakes. Naturally,this extremely ag­
gressive competition prevailed whenever
and wherever a competing line crossed
the CVls right-of-way.


ONE OF THE MORE IMPORTANT of these competitive lo­
cations was the town of Swanton,in the State of Vermont,only
a few miles south of the international boundary. Swanton had
first achieved local importance with the construction of the
Vermont and Canada Railroad,in 1850-51. This line was the n~
tural extension of the Vermont Central,north of its original
terminus at Essex Junction and Burlington,on Lake Champlain.
Now,in l88l,Swanton was served by a second railroad,-the new
line from Fonda Junction to St. Johns,Que.,through Highgate~
St. Armand and Stanbridge. The third main line to hit town,
was the St. Johnsbury and Lake Champlain Railroad,which had
stru~gled over the Green Mountains from St. Johnsbury. The
St. J. & L.C. was pushed and prodded by the wealthy citizens
of St. Johnsbury,who were anxious to participate in the ap­
parently limitless profits associated with running a rail­
road.
ADMITTEDLY, THE VERMONT CENTRAL had a strangle-hold
on the lionls share of the traffic from Boston to the Great
Lakes. Granted,the Grand Trunk Railway effectively monopo­
lized the traffic from Portland,Maine,to Montreal and The
West. Moreover,the Vermont Central had gathered to its capa­
cious bosom such potential competitors as the Rutland Rail­
road and the Ogdensburg and Lake Champlain. Thus the Cen­
tral,-as it was known locally,was able to offer through and
rapid servioe from tidewater to the St. Lawrence River & the
lower Great Lakes,at Ogdensburg. At this point,freight was
CANADIAN 168 R A I L
loaded on b6ard one of the Companys steamboats, which plied
as far as Duluth,Minnesota.
IN THE FACE OF THIS APPARENT iron-clad monopoly, a
group of Portland business men and other interested local
parties incorporated a new railway,to run from Portland eas­
terly through Maine and New Hampshire,over the Green Moun­
tains of Vermont to the shores of Lake Champlain,where, it
was intended to achieve some kind of a connection with the
rail or river highway to the West. When it was bUilt,the new
line ran northwest from Portland up the valley of the Saco
River and penetrated thEl barrier of the White Mountains in
New Hampshire,through fabled Crawford Notch. Having descen­
ded to the valley of the Connecticut River,the Portland and
Ogdensburg Railroad made an end-on junction,at Lunenburg,Vt.
with the St. Johnsbury & Lake Champlain Railroad,-incorpor­
ated in the State of Vermont.
THE ST.JOHNSBURY AND LAKE CHAMPLAIN has often been
described as the crookedest railroad in North America. It
has also been otherwise described,-but not in such genteel
language. As the connection of the Portland and Ogdensburg,a
more unique railroad could hardly be imagined. Winding its
way up,over and down through the Green Mountains,eventually
it terminated at a place named Maquam on the eastern shore
of Lake Champlain. While this location was some several more
miles west of Swanton and the Vermont Central,to all intents
and purposes it was still nowhere. Nothing daunted,a pier
was here constructed,so that side-wheel steamboats could un­
load and load freight for and from Plattsburg,N.Y., on the
west shore,and for other towns on Lake Champlain and the
Richelieu River in Quebec.
TO REACH THE PORT OF MAQUAM,the st.J. & L.C. had
to pass through the town of Swanton,crossing the Missisquoi
River by a long covered bridge.In the process of passing th­
rough Swanton,from east to west,two crossings at grade were
made with the Central. At that time, the Central boasted
two stations in Swanton. The west or original station was
Called Swanton Junction,while the more recent east sta­
tion,on the line of the Vermont and Canada Railroad,
from Fonda Junction to st. Johns,Que.,was called East Swan­
ton. This awkward requirement for two grade crossings was
the prime cause for a good deal of bickering and quarreling
for a number of years.
PERMISSION TO INSTALL THESE crossings at grade at
various locations was usually granted grudgingly, and the
Centrals case at Swanton was no exception. Intrusions on
its right-of-way were never welcome ,even under the best of
cireumstances,and here the request came from a real compet­
itor.Although the appropriate materials were necessarily a
responsibility of the st. J. & L.C.,-the petitioner, the
Central did nothing whatever to assist. After all, the
Vermont Central had preceded the St. J. into Swanton by
a good margin of years,and it was logical that the latter
should pay the billJ Being not too affluent at this period
of its history,the st. J. was forced to do things a little
on the cheap. When constructed, the two grade crossings ob­
viously left much to be desired from the point of view of
PHOTO ABOVE: The Year of Grace, 18 and 95, 1s the yea.T when this
Cana.d.a Atla.ntic Railway train, drawn by engine 413 of the Grand
Trunk Railway, eased to a stop at the station at Alexandria, Onto
The engineer on this trip was Mr. Wrn. Atkins and the ccnductor
was Mr. WID. G. Cole, sr., father of Mr. William G.Cole, jr., late
member of the association. Photo C.R.H.A. (W.G.Cole collection)
PHOTO PAGE 166: About 1895-96, A Canada Atlantic Railway traj,n,
headed by engine 32 of the st. Lavlrence & Adirondack Re.1hllY.
st8~ds at the station Dlatform at Coteau Junction, with the east­
bound afternoon train.-Photo C.R.H.A. (W.G.Cole Collection)
good railway construction,and this regrettable situation
was soon to have an even more regrettable result.
THE SIGNALS,DERAIL SWITCHES and guard rails for
such crossings were rather primitive,to say the least. Those
provided at Swanton Junction by the St.J.& L.C. were cer­
tainly no exception. Some hundreds of feet from the actual
crossing,-on each railroad and in both directions, painted
signboards were erected.Sometimes,these signboards were red
with white bullseyes and the word STOP in large letters.On
other occasions, the colour scheme was reversed. Trains on
either railway (and in both direcUons) were supposed to st­
op at these signs,whistle and then proceed slowly across the
crossing,having first made absolutely certain that no trains
were approaching on the other line.
A FURTHER IMPROVEMENT on this somewhat risky pr­
actice was the installation of derail or disconnecting sw­
itches on one railway,-usually that of the petitioner, who
sought permission to effect the crossing,-and therefore was
obliged to install the derails. These derails were not ac­
tually required by law and so the provision of these safety
devices was generally overlooked. The derail switches were
usually placed near the STOP boards and the routine pro­
cedure was, that when the train stopped at the board, the head
end brakeman dropped off and closed the derail,which was op­
en in its normal position. This assured the derailment of
trains or cars approaching the crossing out of control. After
closing the first switch, the head-end brakeman would then
walk across the crossing,and close the derail on the other
side. Making sure that there was no train approaching on the
Photo: A genuine
crossing-frog!
Barrington Station
now at the Canadian
Rallway Museum-in
its original set­
ting, at the cross­
ing of the main
line of the Canada
Atlantic Railway
with the Caughna­
waga Division of
the Grand Irunk.
Barrington, being
a Canada Atlantic
station, has its meln ple.tform alongside the CAR maln. lhe Gnmd
Trunk crosses the picture from right to left.
Photo C.R.H.A. (~.G.COLE Collection)
<;
other line the engineer brought the train slowly across the
orossing. The conductor or rear-end brake~an opened the de­
rail switches behind the train,and after the second switch
was opened,the train proceeded.
WITHOUT DOUBT,THIS WAS a very correct and safe pro­
cedure.Nevertheless,precious minutes were lost in starting,
stopping and picking up various brakemen and conductors. If
the crossing happened to. be on a grade ,or on the approach to
a grude,some difficulty could be caused by having to stop,As
luck would have it,there was a grade from Swanton Junction
to Maquam,for westbound trains on the st. J. All of these
conditions favoured skimping on the safety rules by the St.J
crews. In fact, the st. J. had thus {or perhaps therefore)not
seen fit to install these disconnecting switches at the
crossing with the Central at Swanton Junction,as of March,
1881.
WE MAY NOW PROCEED TO THE EVENT which highlighted
this omission. It is suitably recorded in the weekly news­
paper,-the Swanton COURIER, under date of March 12,1881:
Thursday morning,quite a serious accident occurred
at the crossing of the Central Vermont and the St.J.
& L.C. Railroad,on the west side.
These crossings are known as lgJ.ow-nothings and it
is the first accident,we believe,that has taken pl­
ace since the iron from the two roads crossed. Just
who is to blame for the accident is not for us to
judge and we will only give the particulars as we
heard them,though we have not been able to interview
the conductors of the two trains.
The morning freight of the St. J. & L.C.was being
made up. While the engine was doing some switching,
Conductor Burt undertook to let four cars,-two flats
and one box,loaded with coal and iron,out of the cut
west of the Central
l
line,where they had been left
overnight. This is a common practice,we understand,
as it saves time. I~ese cars,standing in the cut wi­
thout an engine,cannot be seen by an approaching
train,coming from the south (St. Albans) on the Cen­
tral line.
CANADIAN
171
R A I L
While Conductor Burt was letting the cars out of the
cut,down the grade ,he ,having hold of the brakes on
the rear car,-the morning express from the south
came uP,stopped and whistled as required by law and
then started. Just as the express neared the cros­
sing frog,the freight rolled down in front of them,
and was struck with terrific force,demolishing the
two flat cars and scattering the coal and iron in
every direction.
The Central engine PACIFIC,Mr. Driscoll the driver,
cut the car in two, tore up the track and went into
the sand,where it fetched up at an angle of about 45
degrees. The passengers in the coaches were well sh­
aken up and strangely enough,no one was injured. The
engine was smashed up badly and will have to go to
the shops for general repairs.
IT MIGHT HAVE BEEN ASSUMED by the COURIERs readers
in spite of some inconsistencies in reporting,that the inci­
dent was shortly amicably settled by the parties concerned ,
had it not been for a succeeding newspaper item which appear­
ed in the COURIER of May 24,1881,-some eight weeks later:
The taking up of the frog at the west crossing Tuesday
by the Central folks and the replacing of the same Wednesday
forenoon by the St. J. & L.C. management was
an exceedingly quiet affair compared with the blood-cur­
dling reports in the Boston JOURNAL and the st.Johnsbu~
CALEDONIAN.
THE DIPLOMACY OF THE EDITOR of the Swanton COURIER
was admirable,but this does not seem to have mitigated the
little skirmish,reported above. Obviously,it was abundantly
apparent to the readers that things were not quite as lovey­
dovey as the newspaper reports had suggested. Indeed, more
of the same was t.o follow. The COURIER of SaturdaY,May 21 ,
1881,had this to say:
Some papers,notably the St. Johnsbury CALEDONIAN and
the Lyndon UNION make misstatements in regard to the
crossing-frog affair.The latter paper,in particular,
in a vulgar article under the head of st. Johnsbury,
says that Superintendent Hobart (of the Central)got
bilious and ordered the frog jerked uP. Now this writer
if he knows anything,knows that Mr. Hobart is one of
the most efficient railroad men in the country,always
a gentleman,fair and manly in his business transactions
and courteous to all comers and a man above everything
mean and underhanded. The CALEDONIAN has been general­
ly read here,we believe,as extra copies containing the
article,marked in blue,have been circulated.
The facts are that the Central folks requested the
St. J. & L.C. management to put in a disconnecting
switch at this crossing,-an inexpensive arrangement
that insures safety,Vlhere one line crosses another on
a down-grade. It is something that the Centralfolks
have in use at several points on their line.
By mutual agreement, Superintendent Hobart and Colonel
Jewett were to meet here at a certain time to arrange
about the frog and for the engine,damaged several we-
THE FORMER VERMONT CENTRAL station at East Swanton, Vermont,
where the Fonda Junction-St. Johns,Que. line crossed the
st. Johnsbury & Lake Champlain Railroad,at grade. The train
approaching is the Swanton-St. Johnsbury Accommodationof
the st. J. & L.C.Plainly visible against the station tower
is the STOP board,swung across the CVRR tracks,casting
its shadow across the station front,and tastefully sur­
mounted by a standard swltchstand lantern. Close examina­
tion of the picture shows the absence of the disconnect­
ing switch. Photo courtesy Swanton COURIER.
eks ago at this crossing. The former was present at
the appointed time and after waiting nearly an hour
for the latter,who was at the Lake (Champlain), was
obliged to leave on account of another engagement.
Since then,Mr. Hobart has written several letters to
the St.J. & L.C.management,in relation to the matter,
but could get no response. By removing the dangerous
frog,Mr. Hobart doubtlessly only obeyed instructions
from his road. Judge Ross of st. Johnsbury granted
the injunction which allowed the old arrangement to
go back.
AND SO, THE EPISODE OF ~HE CROSSING FROG stood ad­
journed. It was not the first nor the last of these little
skirmishes,by any means. These incidents characterized an
era of fierce competition for interstate and international
traffic.SubsequentlY,when the Vermont Central empire col­
lapsed in the late l890s,and the Grand Trunk Railway Com­
pany of Canada emerged as the owner of most of the inter­
national railroads in this area,most of the traffic from
the Ocean to the Lakes travelled over its lines. Otherwise,
freight traffic agreements effectively prevented anyone
railroad f~om securing the lions share. But the old-time
spirit of competition died very slowly and the honest com­
pany loyalties therein demonstrated are still as true,hon­
orable and lively as they were then,-nearly a hundred years
ago 1
llOI[ OUB BIIBIRS
THE GREAT GLACIER STATION MYSTERY.
Our readers may remember the discussion in
these pages regarding the picture of the Royal Couple
during their tour in 1901,taken at Glacier,B.C. D.Wayne
Brow,our member from Edmonton,Alta.,has been to Glacier,
to inspect the locale,and writes as fOllows:
I am quite sure that the pi.cture was taken at (old)
Glacier,B.C. The train is heading west,having just
decended the grade from Rodgers Pass,and has made a
loop of 180 degrees,crossing Asulkan Brook,just out
of the picture to the left. Above the last coach we
can just distinguish the roof of the Glacier House
(hotel).If the mountains in the background were sh­
arper,it would be possible to see a portion of the
Great Glacier. Today,it has receded far up the side
of the mountain and the great scars of its passage
are quite clear on the flank of Mount Sir Donald.
The fountain which once adorned the hotel grounds
is reduced today to a crumbling circle of stones,
faintly reminiscent of a turntable pit. Farther
back in the trees,the foundations and parts of the
walls of the old hotel can be traced and,if one
looks hard enough, the boiler room foundations,com­
plete with boiler (whats left of it) may be un­
covered.For a view of the area,may I suggest that
readers refer to the August,1961 issue of the
Associations NEWS REPORT.I hope that this infor­
mation will be of assistance to you.
n
We appreciate Mr. Brows assistance,and hereby declare
that the Great Glacier Mystery officially solved 1
ADD ••• TO WHERE TO FIND EM •
:I:-I EREWITH,AND THROUGH THE KIND
cooperation of the readers
noted,are sundry additions
to the original list which
appeared in the April and
May,1968,issues of CANADIAN
RAIL.
·:c Glace Bay
N.S.
Cape Breton Island
Miners Museum Old
Sydney Colleries
No. 17 2-6-0
Blt.Schnectady 1903
(#27301)
o Trenton Mr. R.C.Tibbetts
Ex Broughton(4 Star)
Mines No. 17
No.7260 0-6-0
Blt.C.L.C. 1906 (#697)
Ex Drummond Colleries
Ex CNR 7260
CANADIAN
174
R A I L
Ex CNR 7075
Ex CGR 809
Ex TCR 100
No. 42 2-6-0
Blt.Schnectady 1900
(#5103)
Ex Acadia Coal no.12
Ex S. & L. /142
EJC S. & L. #17
(81 t. as 2-6-4T.Flebuil t
as 2-6-0 by S.& ~ )
No.? 2-6-2
BIt. Baldwin 1911
(#36768)
Ex Drummond Colleries
Ex. Jacksonville Termin~ls
said to be #4 q.
(Rebuilt from 0-6-0 by Drummond
Colleries Ltd.)
(These additions from Mr. Conrad Steeves,Hillsboro,N.B.)
;c Smooth Rock
1 Falls,Ont.
No. 100 2-6-0
Ex Mattagami Ry.
(This one from Mr. Ron Morel,Kapuskasing,Ont.)
;c Atikokan,Ont.Town Park
Onto ~own of Atikokan
No.? Shay (geared)
Ex Shelvin-Clarke
Lumber Co.J~td.
(This gem from K. Gordon Younger,our Manitoba Bepresentative)
(Score one for the Bditor.)
.;;. Port Alfred
Que.
Musee de Msgr.Dufour
Port Alfred,Que.
No. 15 0-4-2ST
Bl t. IviLW 1923 Aug..
C¥64?lO)
Ex Roberval & Saguenay
And change •••••••
North Battleford Western Development
Museum
No.6166 0-6-0
Ex Mani taba &
Saskatchewan
Coal Co.
Sask.
(Tnis change from
And NOTE •••••••••
.;:. CN
Belleville,Ont.
North Hattleford.
(see photo)
Mr. Cecil Barrett,Saskatoon,Sask.)
CNR Yards –
in transit
No.8447 0-9-0
Ex CN 8447
(Mr. Frank Dubery observed this engine in transit from eNs
Pointe-St-Charles Shops,Montreal to London,Ont.,-for sc­
rapping,so the roundhouse crew at Belleville says. .lr.Du­
bery notes,So will perish the last example of CNs 0-5-0
switchers.)
MANITOBA & SASKATCHEWAN COAL COMPANYS no. 6166 caught
by photographer Cecil Barrett in CNs Chappell Yard, at
Saskatoon,Sask.,in April,1967.en route to Western De­
velopment Musewn at North Battleford,Sask.
Winnipeg readers Younger,Downing and Harris all point out
that Winnipeg Hydro 4-4-0 no. 3 was NOT Greater Winnipeg
Water District NO.3. G.W.W.D. engines 3, 5 and 7 were
all little moguls (2-6-0s) ,built new for the road by
Montreal Locomotive Works,Montreal.
DOES ANYBODY ANYWHERE have any information on this doll ? The
caption says Vancouver,B.C.: Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Glidden of
Boston,Mass.,arriving in Vancouver,after driving in a car equip­
ped with railroad wheels,over tracks of the $00 Line and the Can­
adian Pacific Railway for 1,803 miles. Aint she a gasser?
THE
SPRING & SUMMER
TIMETABLES
IN 1968
-by F. A. Kemp –
IN
THIS YEAR, CANADIAN NATIONALS lines east of Montreal
were most subJected to changes in passenger train arrangements.
Through trains numbered 122-123 resumed service between Montreal and
Campbellton, N. B., reolacing the former Railiner service, which
connected with Rapido trains 22 & 23 at. Charny, Que. The se latter
trains have now become Railiners between Charny and Quebec, con­
necting with nos. 122 & 123 except Saturday and Sunday. It would ap­
pear that equipment from Richmond -Quebec trains 628-629 is used for
this short run. Through II Rapido service has reverted to twice daily
on this line.
MORE JUGGLING HAS BEEN GOING ON with the Montreal-­
Maritimes trains although most of the changes will apply only from
June 21 to September 9. The 11 Ocean , -trains 14 & 15, continues to
operate via Edmunston, with through equipment to Sydney, N.S., except
during the summer months. The Chaleur, trains 16 & 17, will con­
tinue to divide at Matapedia, into Moncton and Gaspe sections except
that during the summer, it will be strictly a Montreal -Gaspe train,
with two Campbellton sleepers.The Cabot , trains 18 & 19, will run
between Montreal and Sydney, N. S., via Campbellton, from June 21 to
September 9 only. Last year, this train operated via Edmunston, N. B.
NO MENTION WAS I1ADE IN THIS SUMMERS timetables of the
Montreal -Portland, Maine, service, and the Montreal -Sherbrooke -­
Coaticook service over this line has been drastically curtailed. The
Sherbrooke -Coati cook train is shown as operating on Fridays only!
Otherwise, passengers are transported by taxi service, connecting at
Sherbrooke with trains 621-622, except Sunday. It is noted th~t these
are the only regular services, but trains 620-623 run Friday and Sat­
urday, 624-625 on Sunday only and 626-631 on Friday only.
THE MONTREAL -CTTA1tIA SERVICE will have an additional
train, according to the new timetables, numbered 32 and 37, from June
14 to Seotember 13. No. 37 will follow CN no. 1 and take the heavy
Ottawa traffic of the latter during the peak summer period, while no.
32 will provide an additional service to Man and His World from
intermediate points on the Montreal -Ottawa line.
FROM THE MAINLAND TO NEWFOUNDLAND, an additional ferry
service has been shown, between North Sydney,N.S., and Argentia,Nfld.
( on the south coast of the Avalon Peninsula) beginning on June 17.
This ferry will operate three times weekly and requires 17 hours for
CANADIAN
177
R A I L
the 21St:;-mile trip. Trains 101-102, the Caribou will continue to
operate and will run daily July 1 to September 4. Other Newfoundland
services remained virtually unchanged.
ON THE MONTREAL -TORONTO SPEEDl.JAY, Rapido trains
64 & 65 have appeared with Executive Club Cars for the busy busi­
ness man and Bistro Cars for the effete. The Montreal -Windsor,
Onto through sleeping car will disappear after May 20.This car ran in
trains 59-11~9 and 14e-58, offering service through Toronto, wi th­
out charge.It was the last CN sleeper in the Windsor -Detroit areas.
All of the Toronto -Samia and Toronto -Windsor trains have lost
their names, -Huron, Tecumseh, Erie and st. Clair, but the
Detroit -Chicago afternoon express has assumed the name Mohawk .
Brampton and Windsor trains 219-220 have been eliminated from the
timetables.
CAPREOL-FOLEYET PASSENGBR TRAINS nos. 194-195 run Sat­
urday and Sunday, while mixed trains 266 -267 also operate twice
weekly. The Panorama, no. 106, will also stop at some of the sta­
tions on this part of CNs line, on certain days of the week.
THE CN TRANSCONTH,lENTAL SEHVICES have been slowed down
again. The Super Continental , -no. 1, is given 1 hour and 35 mi­
nutes additional for the Montreal -Vancouver Journey, while no. 2
eastward takes 10 minutes longer. Trains 3 and 4 will run separately
between Toronto and Vancouver from June 14 to September 13. The Sce­
neramic lounge cars will run on trains 1 ,2,3 and 4 between Edmonton
and Vancouver. The Panorama continues to be divided at Winnipet> and
the lay-over there between nos. 105 and 5 and between 106 and b has
been extended. Montreal -Winnipeg times have been lengthened, while
Winnipeg -Vancouver timings have been reduced. No.6 now has a 16.30
departure from Vancouver, instead of 23.00, so that it leads the pro­
cession to Winnipeg. Nos. 2 and 4 follow at 2-hour intervals, but all
arrive at Winnipeg within 3 hours ,which may have resulted in schedule
ad.iustments for all of them. We stbound timings for all of these trains
are more spread out,but this has been achieved mainly by slowing down
no. 1.
THE JASPER -PRINCE RUPERT SERVICE has been changed to
a through tri-weekly operation,with daily trains from June 17 to Sep­
tember 15. There was formerly six-day -a-week service between Jasper
and Prince George. Many flag-stops have been eliminated, but little
improvement in schedules has resulted.
AN INCREASING NUMBER OF BUS CONNECTIONS are shown in
CN summer timetables for Western Canada,especially those of Coachways
which extend all the way from Edmonton to McMurray, Hay River,Yellow­
knife, Dawson Creek, Whitehorse, Fairbanks, Anchorage, Prince George
and Prince Rupert. Some of the routes shown are parallel to CN or
Northern Alberta Railways passenger services, but rail tickets are
honoured.
RED, WHITE AND BLUE FARES are not as economical this
summer as they were, due to increases. A rise in space charges for
sleeping car accommocation is also apparent, although club car (parlor
car) supplements have not been revised upwards. Lower space charges
are to apply after September 30th.
CA NAD IAN
178
R A I L
DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME has made its first appearance in
Canadian Pacific public timetables, since its compulsory use during
World War II. Train times are shown in local time, which means that
while such times are day-light in eastern Canada, they will remain
standard in Saskatchewan and Alberta,but not in B.C. The difference
is not explained in the public folders, so that train no. 1 leaves
Virden, Man. at 3.18 and Moosomin, Sask. at 3.05 a.m., although these
two towns are 39 miles apart!Obviously,the time at Moosomin is stan­
dard and would otherwise read 4.05. Station clocks also show local
(daylight) time, except those used for comparison of watches by op­
erating employees.
VERY FEW CHANGES HAVE BEEN MADE in CP passenger servi­
ce s, since the aboli ti on of the EXPO Limi te d on Octobe r 28, 1967.
Another ten minutes has been chopped from the schedules of Montreal –
Quebec City trains Frontenac ,nos. 152-153 and Viger 154-155,.
Montreal-Vaudreuil locals 295-298 and Ottawa -Montreal Sunday train
136 will bring viSitors to Man and His World again this year, while
trains 417-418 are again running six times per week from Sudbury to
White Rlver, Ont. All of these trains are designated as seasonal
services. Late evening commuters this year will have five additional
minutes to catch the last train to Rigaud, as it departs from Wind­
sor Station at 10.50 p.m., instead of 10.45 p.m.
THE CANADIAN IS STILL SHOWN as stopping at Port Art­
hur, despite the projected closure of the railway station there. Port
Arthur is convenient to Hotels and public Transportation, while Fort
William is not,being some distance from the city centre. The stations
are about four and a half miles apart.
ONTARIO NORTH LAND.
TOURIST BUSINESS IS AGAIN TO THE FORE on Ontarios de­
velopment railroad. Trains will run six days a week between Cochrane
and Moosonee, from June 29 to September 4. ONR is using this Polar
Bear 1.1 service as a promotional gimmick. Passenger trains will make
return trips on Sunday and Wednesdays,(trains 219-220) while mixed,
trains 221-222 travel on four other days each week. Other trains con­
tinue as before. Not listed in the timetable is ONRs Centennial Train
which is expected to operate at least twice during the summer with
chartered excursions.
ALGOMA CENTRAL.
THIS
COMPANY WILL AGAIN OPERATE daily except Sunday
passenger service, beginning June 2, and continuing its tri-weekly
( both ways on Saturday) service until that date.
PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN.
BRITISH COLUMBIAS PEOPLES RAILWAY is still operating
CANADIAN
179
R A I L
daily service between North Vancouver and Lillooet, but there is only
tri-weekly service described north from Lillooet to Prince George.The
tourist traffic to central British Columbia should have warranted
some extra services.
CANADIAN NArIONAL MIXED TRAINS.
THE FOLLOltJING MIXED TRAIN SERVICES have ( alas ) been
discontinued:
Nos. 256-257 Noranda-Rouyn-Taschereau,Que. (tri-weekly)
Nos. 20;8-259 Senneterre-Miquelon, Que. (tri-weekly)
Nos. 262-263 Miquelon-Chibougamu, Que. (tri-weekly)
On April lO,1968,Mr. Raymond Baumier (centre) of the Delaware
and Hudson -Napierville Junction Railway presented N.J.Ry.
caboose no. 34 to Dr. R.V.V.Nicholls (right) ,Association Pre­
sident. Mr. George McDevitt,Vice-President,Brotherhood of
Railroad Trainmen,Ottawa,(left) assisted in the ceremony. The
caboose will be on display at the Canadian Railway Museum at
Delson/st-Constantsthis swruner.
Photo courtesy R.V.V.Nicholls
. . ·1· ;?

~ . I .
CANADIAN l,ATIONAL RAILtIAYS
IN . .
Deliveries: up to )0 April 1968.
2020 ••••• 01 March 1968.
2021 ••.•• 08 March 1968.
2022 ••••• 1) March 1968.
202) ••••• 20 March 1968.
2024 ••••• 21 March 1968.
2025 ••••• 27 March 1968.
2026 ••••• 29 March 1968.
–..
2027 ••••• 0) April 1968.
2028 ••••• 09 April 1968.
2029 ••••• 10 April 1968.
20)0 ••••• 20 April 1968.
20)1 ••••• 2) April 1968.
20)2 ••••• 26 April 1968.
20)) ••••• )0 April 1968.
5040 to 5041 ••••• 16 April 1968.
5042 to 5043 ••••• 20 April 1968.
5044 to 5045 ••••• )0 April 1968.
Numbers 2020 to 202) are assigned to the St. Lawrence Region,
numbers 20)4 to 20)) to the Atlantic Region, and numbers 5040 to
5045 to the Great Lakes Region.
Retirements: up to )0 April 1968.
80M) ;Rlf13ER SERIAL BUILDER BUILT RETIRED
)011 79186 MLW 16/10/5) 15/04/68
)018 8101) f1LW 25/08/54 15/04/68
)021 81016 ~lLW )0/08/54 01/0)/68
)085 81592 MLW 19/12/56 07/0)/68
)088 81595
MLW 14/01/57 01/0)/68
,—-, .
)090 81597 MLW 22/01/57 22/04/68
)092 81599
MLI.,r 29/01/57 12/0)/68
)80) 81208 MLIV 26/09/55 01/04/68
)810 81215 MLW )1/10/55 12/0)/68
)821 81565 MLW 26/10/56 01/0)/68
9062 a A-))2 GMD 16/01/52 18/04/68
9122 a A-)97 GMD 20/11/52 18/04/68
9402 77297 MLW 25/05/50 12/0)/68
9404 77299 MLI 29/05/50 01/0)/68
9407 77)02 MLW 06/06/50 01/0)/68
9408 77)2) MLW 20/02/.51 01/0)/68
9414 77627 IIL~ 19/0)/.51 01/04/68
94)1 7772)
MLW 06/02/52
I
01/04/68
9440 79145
MLW 04/02/5) 01/04/68
9444 79147 MLW 27/02/5) 01/04/68
9456 7915) MLW 05/06/5) 15/04/68
a) Retired due to an accident. See C.R. #195 for details.
CANADIAN
181
R A I L
Leaslngs: up to 30 Apr11 1968.
The follow1ng 1s a summary of un1ts leased by CN to other oompan1es
from January to Apr11 1968.
UNIT FROM TO DATE RELEASED
1256 Mounta1n Reg10n Great Slave Lake 05/67
1271
n

n n
08/02/68
1275

01/68
1277

n

05/67
1280

05/67
1282

05/67 10/02/68
1283

05/67
1303 St. Lawrenoe Reg10n Spruoe Falls Power 02/68
1368 Mounta1n Reg10n Pac1f1c Great Eastern 25/01/68
1369

Alberta Resources Rwy. 11/67
1370 •

21/03/68 28/04/68
1371
It

It n

21/0
4
/68
1372
n n It n It
28/0 /68
1373

It It n

10/02/68 11/03/68
1373

Northern Alberta RWys. 24/03/68 14/04/68
1376 •
n
Alberta Resources Rwy. 11/03/68
1381
n n

It
10/67 10/02/68
4206

24/04/68
4213
n n
Northern Alberta Rwys. 16/02/68 29/02/68
4227

Alberta Resources Rwy. 05/03/68
42
4
8
It

It

10/01/68 21/02/68
43 1

Great Slave Lake 09/67
434
4


n

10/67
434
n

n

08/67 4345
n

06/67
4348

n
05/67
4352

10/67
4353
n

06/67
4802

Alberta Resources Rwy. 24/04/68
4803

24/02/68 05/03/68
4803

u

07/0~/68 11/03/68
4805
H

Northern Alberta Rwys. 01/0 /68
4809

11/67 10/01/68
4811

Alberta Resources Rwy. 01/68 21/02/68
4811

21/03/68
4812

01/04/68 24/04/68
4816

12/67
4817

12/67 21/03/68
4818

21/02/68 07/0
4
/68
4818

11/03/68 24/0 /68
4821

21/02/68 24/02/68
8021 St. Lawrence Reg10n Shaw1n1gan Term1nal 05/67 84
55 Great Lakes Reg10n Can. Dom. Sugar, London 10/67 01/01/68
8468

n

Intl. Harv., Ham1lton 10/67 31/03/68
8514

n

Intl. N1ckel, Sudbury 12/67 31/03/68
In add1t1on, the Minto Coal Company has had one 1600 ser1es un1t
lease~ from CN s1nce June 1967. Un1ts 1655, 1645, and 1653 have been
1nvolved at various t1mes, the latter be1ng the one leased at the end
of Apr1l 1968.
CANADIAN 182 R A I L
Transfers p to )0 April 1968 . u
ROAD NUMBERS TRANSFERRED FROM TRANSFERRED TO DATE
10)7 to 10)8 St. Lawrence Rgn. Atlantic Region )1/0)/68
1217 to 1218 St. Lawrence Rgn. Great Lakes Rgn.
01/0~/68
1)27 Great Lakes Rgn. Atlantic Region 11/0 /68
1711 St. Lawrence Rgn. Atlantic Region )1/0)/68
)609 to )612 C.V. St. Albans DW&P Virginia 25/0)/68
)850 St. Lawrence Rgn. Great Lakes Rgn. 26/04/68
)869 to )878 St. LawrenCe Rgn. Atlantic Hegion
01/0~/68
)884 St. Lawrence Rgn. Great Lakes Rgn. 0)/0 /68
4902 GTW .Battle Creek CV St. Albans 25/0)/68
4925 GTW Battle Creek CV St. Albans 25/0)/68
7910 Mountain Rgn. GTW Battle Creek 15/04/68
791~
Prairie Region GTW Battle Creek 15/04/68
804 Atlantic Region St. Lawrence Rgn. )1/0)/68
8060 Atlantic Region St. Lawrence Rgn. )1/0)/68
8184 to 8188 St. Lawrence Rgn. Great Lakes Rgn. 01/0)/68
8456 St. Lawrence Rgn. Great Lakes Rgn.
01/0~/68
8612 Atlantic Region Great Lakes Rgn. 11/0 /68
8617 St. Lawrence Rgn. Great Lakes Rgn. 21/04/68 9001
~Iountain Rgn. GTW Battle Creek 15/04/68
9004 ~lountain Rgn. GTW Battle Creek 15/04/68
..—
B-1 Atlantic Region Prairie Region 11/04/68
D106 Atlantic Region Great Lakes Rgn. 29/04/68
D206 Great Lakes Rgn. Mountain Rgn. 29/04/68
D)02 Atlantic Region Great Lakes Rgn. 29/04/68
D401 St. Lawrence Rgn. Great Lakes Rgn. 29/04/68
D452 Atlantic Region Prairie Region 29/04/68
CNR 3856 partially repainted and renumbered before seeing
service in southwestern Ontario. NeVI number on the cab side
is different from number in the front number board. This
new service is adve:::-tised as TEMPO TRAIN :,hile railway
employees like the more descripttve term SWOT (for sou­
thwestern Ontario Train). Unit photographed at Point St.
Charles,Montreal,on 09 May 1968 by Clayton F. Jones.
•••
CD :i: .t •
• t •
• t •
• t •
. : .
• t • • t • • t •
. : .
• t •
• t •
• t •
. : .
• t •
• t •
• t •
. : .
………………………………………………………………
……. J: …………… ! …………………………………………………… .
~ ••••••••••••••••••
~ •• ~T~ •••••••••••••••
, .:.,
, 3 :1: . . f4
Miscellaneous items:
V Y ~.
·t·
·t·
••• •••
• t • • t •
• t •
• t •
• t •
• t •
. : .
• t •
. : .
• t • • t •
• t.
~
D.R.McQueen of London,Ont.,wr:ftes as follows: All CLC
units mentioned previously are now in the ReclamatIon Yard
being scrapped in an aSS8mbly-line sty1e ,-plecemlel. The
whole line goes through the dismantling section to have
one or two pieces removed,and then goes back to the stor­
age line untiJ that phase of the reclamation is completed.
1 few locomotives,however,are scrappen outright. Nothing
is left of 9305 and little remains of accident -stricken
2213. Parts of 3221 are spread throughout the reclamation
area. Add:l.t:lonul arrivals are 9322 -still in the freight
yard and 2201 in the Reclamation Yard. Photos by Mr. D. R. McQueen
should be vi.ewed left to right for proper sequence.
CPR TRAINMASTRR units 8906,8911,8913,8914,8915 amd 8919
have been purchased by The Streigle Supply and Equipment
Corporation of Baltimore,Md. An addltional 8 primfl -mover
generator sets we purchased,being taken f~om units 8902,
8907,8908,8910,8912,8916,8918 and 8920.
CPRs C-630s which start delivery in the second week
of JulY,will be numbered 4500 to 4.507. The traction motors
1 )
CANADIAN
184
R A I L
for these units are trade-ins,but not from any
unit. Our reporter is Mr. Roger Boisvert.
specific
RDC 9194,-CPs experimental unit was reported to be up
for conversion to a standard RDC. The conversion has been
temporarily delayed. and the unit is stored at Angus Shops
Montreal.
Mr. Clayton Jones of Edmonton,Alta.,reports that the CP
units leased to the Northern Alberta Railway were returned
by the end of April,1968.
Last-minute additions to CN motive power transfer show
nos. 2034 to 2038 delivered to the Atlantic Region, and
nos. 5046 to 5051 to the Great Lakes .Region. The dates are
as follows:
2034 •••••• 02 May 1968 2038 ••••••• 30 May 1968
2035 •••••• 09 May 1968 5046-5047 •• 08 May 1968
2036 •••••• 14 May 1968 5048-50
Ll
9 •• 17 May 1968
2037 •••••• 24 May 1968 5050-5051. .31 May 1968
The CN has retired 6 units,as follows:
ROAD NUMBER SERIAL BUILDER BUILT RETIRED

.-~
3813 81479 MLW
1955 27/05/68
6701 2851 CLC 22/12/54 27/05/68
6705 2855 CLC 10/02/55 27/05/68
6801 2857 CLC 22/12/54 27/05/68
6804 2860 CLC 28/01/;5 27/05/68
9416 77628 MLW 02/04/51 27/05/68
FAIRBANKS MORSE (CANADA)LTD.,Kingston,Ont.,constructed
three groups of locomotives in 191)7:
Contract c-670. Cal-2) Contract c-671. Cal-3) Contract c-672. Assoc-
cuttA. Port Commlss1on-cutta Port Commlss1on-lated Cement Companies,
ers, Ind1a. 76 ton ers, India. 124 ton India. 47 ton 0-6-0
0-4-4-0 dlesel-hydrallc. 0-6-6-0 dlesel-hydrallc. dlesel-hydrallc. 66 Inch
66 1nch gauge. 66 Inch gau~e. gauge.
Ser1al #3048 .••• 04/12/67 Serial #3055 ••.• 21/07/67 Serial #3061 ••.. 26/03/68
Serial #3049 •••• 04/12/67 Serial #3056 •.•• 21/07/67 Serial #3062 •••• 26/03/68
Serial #3050 •.•• 04/12/67 Ser1al #3057 •••• 21/08/67 Serial #306a .••• 29/03/68
Serial #3051 ..•• 04/12/67 Ser1al #3058 •••• 21/08/67 Serial #306 .••. 29/03/68
Serial #3052 •••• 19/02/68 Serial #)059 •••• 27/09/67
Serial #3052 •.•• 19/02/68 Serial #)060 •••• 30/09/67
Serial #305 •.•.••. 04/68
The five SD40s,numbers 200 to 205,on order from the
Q.N.S.& L. will not be delivered from GMD until the start of
navigation in the spring of 1969.
Eight GP9s,nos. 4504 to 4512 (omitting 4506) have be­
en leased from CN for summer use,effective 15 May 1968.
CP 4000,all shined up,rumbles dOlm the hill to South .Junction
with Train 214 to Newport,Vermont,on 11 August 1951.
Photo C.R.H.A.,E.A.Toohey Collection.
CORRECTIONS:
Canadian
Rail
195
194
188
179
175
175
196
~
Comoan-x.
Serial CNR
Serial CNR
Date built CNR
Date retlred CNR
Date renumbered CNR
Date renumbered CNR
Unit
9314
3012
3035
9403
7802
1501
Printed Correct
2649 2700
79189 79187
14/08/54 14/10/.5~
15/02/66 15/03/66
1954 04/55
1956 16/06/57
Train direction CNR Tr.no.3 To Montreal
To Vancouver
LEA~S FROM THE TREES IN AUTUMN,
passenger train services in the
United States continue to tumble
into the limbo of his tory. Ni th
regret,the following termination
of services is recorded:
KANSAS CITY
SOUTHERN
York,Ala. to New Orleans,La. Trains
15-9 & 10-16
10 May 1968
However,SOUTHERN BELLE,Trains 1 & 2
will continue to operate for six (6)
months.
CANADIAN
ATCHISON,TOPEKA
AND SANTA FE RY.
13 May 1968.
136 R A I L
Chicago,Ill. to Los Angeles,Calif.
Trains
19 & 20
SEABOARD COAST Columbia,S.C. to Miami,Fla. Trains
LINE RAILWAY
30 May 1968
41 & 42
However, the PALMLAND, Trains 141-9 and 10-
118 will continue to operate between New
York and Columbia,S.C.
Nevertheless,this encouraging information from the Sou­
thern Railway System,dated 3 June 1968,as follows:
It is anticipated that effective Sunday,June 16,
the departure of the BRIMINGHAM SPECIAL,Train 17,
will be advanced one hour and ten minutes,to de­
part from Washington,D.C. at 3.10 p.m.,and effect
a 1 hr. 10 minute earlier arrival at all inter­
mediate stations and Birmingham,Ala.
This schedule will shorten the overall running
time from stations north of Washington by reduc­
ing the layover from PENNCENTRAL Train 121, and
Train 17s diner will operate through to Roanoke
Va.
OUR PROUD BEAUTY as she once was 1 British Railways no.60010
A-4 Pacific ,now displayed at the Canadian Railway Museum ,
hauled The Capitals Limited on its inaugural non-stop run
from London (Kings Cross) to Edinburgh (Waverley) on May 23
1949.The bell,presented by the Canadian Pacific Railway for
installation on the Dominion of Canada is plainly visible.
It was removed When a double blast-pipe was installed,making
the chimney oval-shaped and longer.
EY F.A. KEMP
RAPID TRANS 11 FOR gDNONTON? Indeed, Edmonton rilay
~ell be Canadas next city to get a RT system, if a study in
progress should justify it. The proposal forms part of the con­
tinuing re-development of Canadian Nationals station area. A
42-storey tower would incorporate a transportation centre,
linked to other downtown buildings by underground walkways be­
neath lOOA Street, and to seven oth8r stations by a high-speed
transit line using railway rights-of-way. The plan would be somewhat
facilitated by the fact that former Canadian Northern
and Grand Trunk Pacific railway lines were often built side by
side, leaving plenty of extra space. The CPR High Level Bridge
to South Edmonton, still has the extra right-of-vIaY space at
each side, which was formerly used by street cars. It is con­
sidered that such a system would be much less expensive than a
similar gross expansion of arterial highways.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS are making what
might be called a gargantuan effort to merchandise an
old,reliable product. Described as a new element of lu­
xury and somewhat more precisely as cars featuring ex­
clusive private rooms with special meals prepared by a
particular ahef assigned to each unit,together with con­
ference facilities,portable typewriters,wines,beverages
and cigars,this exotic equipment turns out to be the
former bedroom-longue cars BURRARD and BEDFORD. Attached
to regular RAPIDO trains daily except Saturday after Ap­
ril 28,1968,they provide travellers with executive ser­
vice offering business people the chance to work while
they travel or to relax in an atmosphere of prestige
and sophistication. All this in two deluxe seven-bed­
room lounge cars completely redecorated with smart,new
interiors with the observation lounge converting in a
jiffy from a living room arrangement to an elegant din­
ing room or conference room. The only adjectives omit­
ted in the press release were lucullan and sybaritic.
:c -:c ::::ac :e: :::::2C ::c ::xc
COVER
STRAIGHT OUT OF THE FABULOUS FIFTIES-New York Central Railroads
4-6-2 No. 4577 shuffles across Westminster Avenue crossing, in
Montreals west end,with a summer afternoons commuter train to
Valleyfield. Photo E.A.Toohey Collection.
Jltly eM wouldnl slart.
SOTER HOMES AND GARDENS, MAY, 1967
CANADIAN RAIL
published rn.ont.hly except. July & August. corn.bined )
by t.he
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION ~~~~~, ~2 qU~:on B
Associat.e Mern.bership including 11 issues of
Canadian Rail e.oo annually.
l<-:;DITOR S. ViTorthen PRODUCTION P.Murphy
DISTRIBU TI ON J.A.Beat.t.y & F.F.Angus
DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP AND BRANCHES
~lr. J.A.Beatty, 4982 Queen Nary Road, Nontreal 29. Quebec, Canada.
ASSOCIATION BRANCHES
OTTAWA NaJ. S.H.Elliot, Secty., P.D.Box )52, Terminal IIAII ottawa Onto
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES
OTTAIt,A VALLEY K.F.Chlvers. Apt. ). 67 Somerset st. W •• ottawa, Ontarlo.
SASKATCHEWAN J .S.Nicholson. 2)06 Arnold St., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.
PACIFIC COAST Peter Cox, 29)6 West 28th Ave., Vancouver. Br1tish Columb1a
FAR eAST W.D.l>icKeown, Oaska (Tosaborl) Yl BRITISH ISLES J.H.Sanders, 67 Willow way, Ampthill, Beds. J:ngland.
~IANlTOBA K.G.Younger 267 Vernon Road, Winnipeg, Irisnltoba.
A Lp.SRrA V~H.Cf)]p.y. 11143 – 72nd AveH ;;dmo:,ton. Alherta
Copyright 1968
Pr1nted in Canada
on Canad1an paper

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