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Canadian Rail 184 1967

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Canadian Rail 184 1967

January
1967
Number 184
Three Rivers Traction one-man Pay As You Enter car
The Three Rivers
Traction Company
~he city of Three Rivers, or, Trois Rivieres, is situated
on the North side of the St. Lawrence River, at the mouth of the
St. 1-1aurice, a 11 ttle more than midway between Montreal and Quebec
City. Although a fort was built on this site as early as 1634, the
growth of Three Rivers was slow until after 1850, when the impor­
tance of the paper industry caused rapid increase in the size of
the community, which was incorporated as a city in 1857.
Further growth occurred in the early 20th century, due
largely to the newly-harnessed hydroelectriC power at Shawinigan
Falls, 21 miles to the north. Despite a disastrous fire in 1908,
by the year 1910 the City of Three Rivers and the neighbouring City
of Cap de 1a I-lade1eine across the St. Maurice river had grown to
such an extent that a street railway became a necessity.
The first definite proposals to build a street railway
were made in 1911, when preliminary plans were drawn up for a system
or tramways, to be followed later by radiating electric railways to
other towns. A bylaw was passed permitting the construction of 5.5
miles of City lines, and a charter was sough~ from the Quebec Leg­
islature. In the spring of 1912, a company was incorporated under
the name of the Three Rivers Tramway Co., and plans were approved
for operation of electric traction vehicles on the principal
streets, and to I1e St. Christophe in the St. Maurice River.
Despi te hopes for an early start on construction, the next
three years were spent in making plans, in reorganization. and in
raising capital. During the summer of 1913 plans were announced for
a 7-mile line, but further difficulties caused the complete reorgan­
ization of the company. Reincorporated late in 1913, the organiza­
tion became known as the Three Rivers Traction Company, a subsidiary
of the Shawinigan Water and Power Co. A 20-year franchise was
sought from the city, and, after over a years conSideration, this
was granted early in 1915. The company, having raised ~600,000.00
in capital, was now free to start construction as soon as weather
permitted. By this time the project included not only lines in
Three Rivers and Cap de 1a Madeleine, but also an 80-mi1e high speed
interurban nd1way extending west to Berthier, and east to Portneuf.
Ground was finally broken for the first track in May.
1915, and crews of the Shawinigan Water and Power Co. were soon
busily at work laying 60 lb. rail, and erecting overhead wire. Six
single-truck semi-convertible one man closed cars, and a snow
sweeper were ordered from Ottawa Car Co. The passenger cars had a body
length of 21 feet, with a 62 front vestibule, and a 4 rear
vestibule, for a total length, over bumpers, of 322. i1dth was
86, and wheel-base was in unusually long 12 feet, due to the use
of the Radiax design of trucks, in which the axles are not parallel
when the car is on a curve. These cars were equipped with two
Westinghouse 101-B-2 motors each.

CANADIAN 5 R A I L
By October, 3.5 miles of track had been built, and hopes
were held for starting operation before the end of the year. As it
turned out these hopes were realized, and the f1rst 3.9 miles were opened on December
11, 1915, in a ceremony at which Mayor J. A.
Tessier officiated. The main belt line of 2.9 miles began at the
corner of St. Maurice and Ste. Cecile Streets, ran South East to
Notre Dame St., along Notre Dame to St. Antoine, South on St.
Antoine~ back along Du Fleuve St., North on Du Plator (forming a
small loop), thence along Des Forges St., West on Champlain, North
on St. George to Ste. Marie, then East along Ste Marie, Champfleur,
and St. Maurice Sts. to the start1ng point. In addit10n, a one mile
extension ran from St. Maurice and Ste. Cecile to the St. Maurice
River, crossed to Ile St. Christophe, thence South to the Wayagamac
Pulp and Paper plant. It was proposed to build a line to Cap de la
Madeleine from where the latter line turned South on Ile St.
Christophe. After much debate, the property owners of Cap de la
Madeleine decided by a majority of 49 votes, on January 29, 1916,
to grant a 20-year franchise to the company for this route.
Work began on the Cap de la Madeleine extension, using 75
lb. rail, in the summer of 1916. In antiCipation of increased serv­
ice, the company ordered three more one-man closed cars from Ottawa
Car Co. Two of these were Similar to the s1x already in service,
while one was double ended for use on the Wayagamac route which would be a
0.36 miles branch when the main line was extended to Cap
de la Madeleine. At the same time, the steel and brick 7-car car­
barn was nearly doubled in size by extensions. The Cap de la Made­
leine route was opened on November 21, 1916, and, at this time,
three more cars were delivered, of the same design as before. A
further addition to the rolling stock was made in December, 1916 when a
double truck combination snow plough and freight car was
built by Ottawa Car Co. This un1t, 38 feet long overall, weighed
46,000 lbs. and was made especially strong to allow its use in
shunting service as well. It was double ended, and had four West­
inghouse 101-B-2 motors. This unit was ass1gned number 2, and
became a sort of all purpose work vehicle.
By the end of 1916, then, the company was operating 12
passenger cars, 1 sweeper, and the combination plough and fre1ght
motor, over 7.1 m11es of track, comprising 3 routes: the Belt Line,
the Cap de la Madeleine route, and the Wayagamac branch. The in­
crease in patronage in 1917 is graphically illustrated by the fact
that 328,199 car miles were operated, and 1,150,035 passengers were
carr1ed that year, compared to 130,303 and 411,856 in 1916, the
first full year of operation.
No further extensions of track were made until 1923, and,
needless to say, the 80-mile interurban was never built. Increased
traffic, reach1ng 3,210,000 passengers in 1920, compelled the con­
struction of 2 additional cars in 1919, and 4 more in 1920. These were
Similar to the previous units, and brought the total of pas­
senger cars to 18. A new 9-car carbarn was built by 8hawinigan
Engineering at this time.
Opposite: Interior view, Three Rivers Traction Co. car
Page 6: Former Three Rivers streetcar used as summer house
near Three Rivers. –R.V.V. Nicholls

570 AVRIC£
.sI;LawfrC~
PGlI_r M/lls r
~~~-( V
,y ~
–1~
Sr. Lawrence
c. P.R.
IC /ver
SkeTch Mop of
THE
TJ..IR££ RIVERS
TRACTION CO.
SCAL£.:
I,nile
..
CANADIAN 8
R A I L
Above: Double-truck Combination snow plough and freight car
Opposite: Six single-truck one-man closed cars
Below: Three more cars were delivered of the same design
as before . Car No. 16: Ottawa Car ~1anufacturing Co.
In 1923, a two-m11e s1ngle track was built, at a cost of
$78,000.00 from the corner of Des Forges and Notre Dame Sts. West
v1a St. George and St. Ph1l1ppe Sts. to the St. Lawrence Paper
Companys new m111s. Th1s brought total m11e~ge to 9.1, wh1ch was
the most ever operated by the company. Shortly thereafter, however,
patronage dec11ned, and the number of passengers carr1ed did not
reach the 1920 level aga1n for seven years. Another sweeper was
rece1ved from Ottawa Car Co. 1n 1924, and 1927 saw the f1nal add1-
t10n to the streetcar fleet of the Three R1vers Tract10n Co. Th1s
last order was for 4 one-man cars, probably B1rney safety cars pur­
chased second hand. Total equ1pment was now 22 passenger cars, 2
sweepers, and 1 spec1al car (the 1916 comb1nat10n work car), all of
wh1ch, together w1th the 9.1 m1les of track, remained 1ntact unt11
the early 1930s.
During the 1920s some track was renewed and general 1m­
provements were made, but the handwr1t1ng was on the carbarn wall
1n the shape of the 1ncreas1ngly popular autobus. B7 1931 the De­
press10n was on, the company ra1sed 1ts fare from 5~ cash and con­
s1dered d1sc~nt1nuance of streetcar 11nes. A bus 11ne had been
started 1n July, 1930, us1ng 4 Wh1te 2l-passenger buses, and 2
others rented as spares. On December 3, 1931, the streetcar tracks
on Notre Dame St. East of Des Forges, and on Ste. Cec11e between
Notre Dame and St. Maur1ce Sts. were abandoned. Th1s marked the
end of the belt l1ne, although North and West port1ons cont1nued 1n
use, and, w1th other 11nes, compr1sed 7.65 m11es of track.
In th1s reduced form, the electr1c ra11way system cont1n­
ued for nearly two years more. However, 1t was fully rea11zed that
the tendancy was to bus operat10n 1n smaller c1ties. In 1933 the
Quebec Pub11c Serv1ce Comm1ss10n granted perm1ss10n to Three R1vers
Tract10n Co. to d1scont1nue all electr1c operat10n. The counc1ls
of Three Rivers and Cap de la Madele1ne supported the move, and no
object10ns were f1led. Accord1ngly the last run of a streetcar on
the Three R1vers system was made on September 12, 1933, and most of
the tracks were soon removed. In the last full year of operat1on,
1932, only 1,285,717 passengers had been carr1ed, scarcely one-th1rd
of the peak year 1928.
Today, more than ~y years have passed s1nce the dem1se
of th1s small electric ra11way system. Few traces rema1n to show
that streetcars once ran by the mouth of the St. Maur1ce. Yet, at
least one body of a passenger car has surv1ved as a house, and th1s
1s, perhaps, the last tang1ble rem1nder of the all too short-11ved
tramway l1ne of the Three R1vers Tract10n Company. *
Three Rivers Traction Co. sweeper and tower car Yo. 1.
Passenger Car No. 14, Three Rivers Traction Co.
MUBlll.JS ~ tk METBO
f:arlY in January, Montreal Mayor Jean Drapeau unveiled models
for murals which will adorn two of the Citys Metro stations with-
1n the next few months. One of these was a facim1le of the pro­
Jected sta1ned glass mural for the Place des Arts station, which
w1ll dep1ct the history of mus1c 1n Montreal from the day in 1535
when Jacques Cart1er named Mount Royal to the accompaniment of
trumpets to the t1me of Claude Champagne. The work of art will
be oreated by Frederio Baok, and has been donated to the C1ty by
Ste1nbergs L1m1ted, the well-known eastern Canad1an supermarket
ohain. The second work w1ll be by oeram1st Jean Cart1er, and 1s
being sponsored by the Soo1ete des Art1sans, a l1fe-1nsuranoe. or­
gan1zat1on. Th1s is to oonsist. of three panels of enamel on steel
1llustrat1ng h1ghlights from the l1fe of Lou1s Joseph Pap1neau and
the 1837 rebel110n in Lower Canada, in wh10h Pap1neau played a
leading role. As m1ght be expected, these murals will be exh1b­
ited at the Papineau Station.
The Mayor indicated that negot1ations are under way at the
present time for murals at four other stat1ons. He said he hoped
that eventually all Metro stations would be adorned by works of
art —creat1ng the worlds f1rst underground museum. He sa1d
the ma1n benef1ciaries of the Metro murals would be the general
pub11c of the City, beoause oultural oontributions are 1mportant
to a C1tys l1fe.
In an ear11er newspaper report, 1t was ~oated that pians were
afoot to embellish all the Metro stat10ns w1th murals and other
decorat1ons that w1ll oarry out des1gnated themes. Both the C1ty
and the Montreal Transportat1on Comm1ss1on have approved the 1dea,
aooord1ng to Robert LaPalme, art d1rector for the projeot, and ten
sponsors have already agreed t.o underwrite the cost. The1r con­
tribut10ns w1ll be aoknowledged by bronze plaques.
Beoause 1ts name oommemorates a great journa11st, the farthest
north station on L1ne 2, Henr1 Bourassa w1ll honour the newspapers
of the C1ty, wh1le at V1ctor1a, adjacent to the new Stock Exchange
Build1ng, Montreals commerc1al history w1ll be portrayed by cera­
m1st Jord1 Bonet and a suspended bronze by sculptor Yves Trudeau
w1ll 1ncorporate exchange and ourrency from the beads used 1n the
early Ind1an era to the modern coinage of today.
The nat10nal soc1et1es,(St.Jean Bapt1ste, St.George, St.Andrew,
and St. Patr1ck) 1s to be the theme at Sherbrooke Station. The
soc1et1e~ will be represented by four pa1nt1ngs by artist Phi11p
Surrey. A large-s1ze mural, some 30 feet by 40 feet, at the St.
Laurent Stat10n w1ll show the markets of the C1ty, wh1le James
McG1ll, the founder of McG1ll Un1vers1ty and Peter McG1ll, the
second Mayor of Montreal, w1ll be honoured 1n glass at the stat10n
which bears the1r name.
A
rule has been set down that no l1v1ng person w1ll be ~~mmem­
orated by this programme. Otherw1se, there 1s no doubt that the
most 1mportant stat10n should honour the present incumbent of the
mayora11ty. Doubtless at some date in the future such a commem­
orat1ve statue or paint1ng w1ll be installed, but for the present
Mayor Jean Drapeaus Metro memor1al must remain the blue and wh1te
rap1d trans1t cars that greet M.T.C. travellers 1n each and every
Stat10n on the System ••
POWIH
……… 10 •• 00 0 o …. # …………. —~=–=.:..–==-.:….::=-.;==
Power is a column devoted to news of motive power operating
on Canadian railways and subsidiaries thereof plus export models of
Canadian builders, up until the time that the locomotive is dis­
mantled. Information is basically supplied by four sources­
Canadian National Railways, Canadian Pacific Railway, Montreal
Locomotive lorks, and Ray Corley. Eowever, all persons are invited
to send news that is thought to be of interest. Credit will be
given if the item is published and if one of the above sources has
not already supplied it. Interesting and topical photographs would
also be considered for publication.
As well as current information, it is hoped that this year
will see the publication of rosters, summaries, and technical ar­
ticles as well. This month, for the benefit of new members, rather
than merely noting the changes in rentals and steam disposition,
they will be published in full.
Please note that although the date is published in full when­
ever space permits, when the abbreviated form is used, the order of
the numbers will be day/month/year. i.e. 1/2/66 means February 1,
1966, not January 2, 1966.
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Purchases: up to January 20, 1967.
ROAD NU~1BER
3222
3223
DATE DELIVERED
January 13, 1967
January 17, 1967
Retirements: up to January 20, 1967.
ROAD BUILDER IS BUILDER
NUNBER NU~1BER
2200 2862 CLC
2205 2867 CLC
2212 2874 CLC
3037 81032 ~lLW
9300 2648 CLC
9306 2696 CLC
9316 2701 CLC
9338 2712 CLC
9450 79150
MLW
BUILDER I S NUIlBER
M-3477-01
M-3477-02
DATE BUILl
March 22, 1955
April 7, 1955
~lay 13, 1955
October 21, 1954
January 2, 1952
December 2, 1952
December 18, 1952
February 23, 1953
March 31, 1953
NOTES
£
£
£ -units so marked were traded-in to MLH as credit on their pres­
ent CN ord er .
CANADIAN 13
R A I L
Rebuilds: up to January 20, 1967.
Six 3800s are to be converted for use on the new consists to
be used in Southern Ontario to complement the Montreal -Toronto
Turbos. They will be equipped, like the GO units, with an elec­
tric generator for heating the cars, and will thus be reclassified
to NRE-,sub class yet undetermined. The units will be renum­
bered to one of the hundreds of the 6000 series passenger alloca­
tion. Locomotives are shown below.
ROAD NUMBER BUILDERS NUMBER DAlE BUILT
3850 83230 January 25, 1960 3853 83233
January 29, 1960
3856
83236
February 10, 1960 3860 83240
February 19, 1960
3884
83264
11ay 30, 1960
3887 83267 June 8, 1960
Rentals: up to January 20, 1967.
The following units from the Duluth, Missabi, and Iron Range
Railway are presently on leB.f!e to the CNR:
ROAD BUILDERS BUILT RAILWAY BUILDERS BUILDER
NUMBER NUJIIBER CLASS CLASS
127 23115 March, 1957 RS-2 SD-9R EMD
131 23911 February, 1958 HS-3 SD-9R EMD
132 23912 February, 1958 RS-3 SD-9R EMD
133 23913 February, 1958 RS-3 SD-9R EilD
139 23919 February, 1958 RS-3 SD-9R EMD
144 23924 March, 1958 RS-3 SD-9R EMD
145 23925 March, 1958 RS-3 SD-9R END
149 23929 ~1archl 1958 RS-3 SD-9R END
154 23934 !·1arch, 1958 RS-3 SD-9R EMD
161 25261 April, 1959
Rs-4 5D-9 EMD
163 25263 April, 1959 Rs-4 SD-9 EMD
169 25269 Nay, 1959 Rs-4 SD-9 El!D
c
171 25271 April, 1959 R3-4 SD-9 END
Miseellaneous: up to January 20, 1967.
The steam locomotives shown below still remain on the CNR.
ROAD CLASS BUILDER DATE BUILDERS STORAGE NOTES
NUMBER BUILT NUMBER LOCATION
2534 N-4-a MLW 9/06 40587 a
5114
J-4-d MUI 8/19 61480 Transcona
5700 K-5-a MLW 10/30 68540 Joffre
6077 U-l-f MLW 12/44 72774 Winnipeg b
6167 U-2-e
}1LW 3/40 69262 Toronto
6218 U-2-g NLvl 16/9/42 69716 Toronto c
CANADIAN
ROAD CLASS BUILDER
NUIlBE!1
6400 u-4-a I~LW
8
L
,47 Lima
40
Hone
Portland
247 None GT
713 E-7-a Gl
a) held for Belleville. b)
held for Capreol.
c) in service.
d) part of eN 1·1u seum Tra in.
CANADIAN
Purchases: up to J8nuary 19,
14
DATE BUILDERS
BUILT NUMBER
6/36 68715 1923 6620
11/72 233
9/94 1270
1900
PACIFIC
RAILWAY
1967.
R A I L
STORAGE
LOCATION
Joffre
Johnsons Yard
Joffre
Joffre
Joffre
NOTES
d
d
d
The following is the expected delivery schedule for the second
SO-40s, numbers 5532 to 5564. order of
December 1966 ••••• 1 unit ~larch 1967 ••••• 9 units
January 1967 ••.••• 7 units April 1967 ••••• 8 units
February 1967 ••••• 8 units
5532 I!as outshopped on time on December 29, 1966.
Rentals: up to December 15, 1966.
RAILWAY ROAD BUnDERS DATE BUILDERS RAILWAY BUILDER
NUMBER NID1BF.R BUILT r10DEL ~ODEL
BLE 713B 13690 ~1arch, 1951 F-7B W-4-B1 END
BLE 716A 16588 June! 1952 F-7A W-4-A2 EMD
BLE 717A 16589 June, 1952 F-7A oJ-4-A2 Elm
BLE 717B 16600 June, 1952 F-7B W-4-B2 El-1D
BLE 718A 16590 June, 1952 F-7a w-4-A2 END
B&:M 1178 79540 28/2/52 S-J DS-Jb Alco
B&M 1179 79541 31/3/52 S-J DS-3b Aloo
~-B&M 1181 79770 16/4/52 S-3 DS-3b Alco
B&M 1263 7:l376
12/6/45 S-2 Ds-4b Alco
B&M 1268 78023 9/8/50 s-4 Alco
B&M 1270 78025 11/8/50
S-L, Alco
B&M 1511. 80750 12/10/54 RS-3 Alco
B&M 1535 79602 11/1/52 RS-J Alco
B&M 1536 79603 i4/1/52 RS-J Alco
B&r1 1540 79607 16/1/52 nS-J Alco
B&II 1556 12374 Sept., 1950 GP-7
EMD
Bcdl
.1557 12375
Sept. , 1950 GP-7
Efm
B&N 1558 12376 sept.! 1950 G?-7
Elm
B&M 1559 12377
Sept ., 1950 G?-7
EI·m
B&M 1561 12379 Dec., 1950 GP-7
El1D
r
CANADIAN 15 . R A I L
RAILWAY ROAD BUILDERS
lIIUMBER NUi1BER
DATE
BUILT
BUILDERS HAlLWAY BUILDER
B&M
B&M
B&~!
B&I·j
BMl
CG-!
COW e
cml
CG~
D&H
D&H D&H
D&H D&H
D&H
DI-n
DrlI
DrH
DMI
DIU
D~lI
mn
DiU
ma
DHI
orn
Dm
[)~;I
DMI
?OE
PGE
POE
1573 1574
1575 1576
1577 150
153 155
1.56
301.5
3023
3026
3
0
3.5
30iJ,5
137
138
147 150
152
1.53
156 1
62
16.5
170
173 621
622 623 18176
18177
18178 18179
18180
5995
70.58
7060
7061
75.5.53
76.512 7651.5
78031 78239
78406
23112
23917 23918
23922 23923
23927 23930
23932 23933
23936 25262
2
.5265
25270
252
73
84832
April, 1953
April, 1953
April, 1953
April, 1953
April, 1953
Nov., 1948
June, 1949
June, 1949
June, 1949
29/12/47
17/12/iJ,8
27/12/48
5/9/.50
29/9/50
2/10/50
Feb., 19.57
Feb., 1958
Feb., 1958
March, 1958
lJarch, 1958
March, 1958
r-Jerch, 1958
f-larch, 1958
ilarch, 195e.
Lpril, 1958
April, 19.59
April, 1959
r·laj, 1959
April, 1959
11~/5/65
11~/5/65
27/5/65
Niscellaneous: up to January 24, 1967.
j-jODEL liODEL
OP-7 OP-7
GP-7
OP-7
GP-7
F-3A
F-7A
1<-7A
F-7A
5-2
5-2
5-2
3-4
5-4
5-4
5D-9R
SD-9R
5D-9R
SD-9R
SD-9R
SD-9TI
SO-9R
SD-9R
SD-9R
SD-9R
SD-9
SD-9
SD-9
SD-9
RS-18
liS-18 RS-18
D-7
D-7 D-7
D-7
RS-2
RS-3
RS-3
R5-3
RS-3
R5-3
RS-3
R5-3
RS-3
as-3
RS-4
liS-
4
RS-4
H3-4
EMD EMD
El1D
E~1D
EMD
EMD
EMD
END
EMD
Alco
Alco
Alco
Alco
Alco
Alco
EMD
H1D
EMD
S~1D
EMD
EW
EHD
END
E~iD
E~1D
!iLl
llLW
NLW
The following is D list of the remaining steam locomotives on
the CPR.
ROAD
NUl-lBER
1201 2858 3100
CLASS
0-5-8
H-1-d
K-l-a
BUILDER
CPR
MLW
CPR
DATE
BUILT
June, 1944
August, 1938
August, 1928
BUILDERS
NUrBER
None
69108
None
STORAGE
LOCATION
Angus
Angus
Weston
Unit 6905, as yet unaccounted for by this column, was scrapped
in March 1966 at Weston. Tha other three locomotives are held for
the Canadian Government Museum at Ottawa.
e -rebuilt in December, 1956 ••

Alberta Resources Railway
<:?onstruction of the second phase of the Alberta Resources Rail­
way has been agreed upon between the Canadian National Railways and
the Government of the Province of Alberta. Mr. A. O. Aalborg, the
Provincial Treasurer, made the announcement in Edmonton on January
13th last. At the present time, contractors under the direction
of the Canadian National are building the first phase of the line
from Solomon, on the C.N. main line west of Hinton, Alberta, to the
new town of Grande Cache in the Smoky River coal fields. The con­
struction of this section was reported in Canadian Rail #170, for
Oct., 1965. It is expected that this first section of about 110
miles will be completed by October. The second section of the line
of an approximate distance of another 110 miles, will be completed
by the end of 1968 from the Smoky River coal deposits, down the val­
ley of the Smoky to within a few miles of Grande Prairie.
. (see adjacent map) And
despite what you may have read in newspapers, I am confident
that it wont be long after that before it is linked up with the N.AR.
at Grande Prairie said Mr. Aalborg. He was referring to a news
story, indicating that the Northern Alberta Railways gave a cool re­
ception to plans for the link.
Progress reports to date indicate that the grade for the first
phase of the new rail line is ten percent completed for the first
sixty miles and seventy five percent completed for the next forty
miles. The 570 foot bridge over the Berland River is presently
under construction, while the bridges over the Mahon and Muskeg
Rivers will be built before the spring. This will permit the oper­
ation of the automatic track-laying machine which can lay track at
the rate of about a mile a day.
The Alberta Resources Railway will be operated by the Canadian
National System. The National will pay rent on the basis of ton­
nage carried, and has the option to purchase the line by re-imbur­
sing the Alberta Provincial Government for its expenditures on be­
half of the A. R. R. plus interest ••
1967
E~pendlure
Il7coml? –
CI1DrtfbJ,Je
N.D-c.!>«rIr,,*
As a result of the Annual General Heeting on January 18th, 1961, and
the Directors I Heeting on January 23rd, the persons shom on
the chart were elected to be directors –and I in so~e instances
officers too –of the Associatl.)n during 1961. Their principAl
areas of resflonsibility nre noted after their n8..::IC6. :i,L,Pharoah
1s not a r:1cmber of the Board of Directors I but r.ll.S kindly agreed
to serve liS ~i tor, Canadian Rail, 8S a Apeciel favour to :lr.
Anthony Clegg and Mr. Dnvid !{enderson. (DIDI)
pVI/k4:1i.,,,.,.
Sca.les
.s::r-~J~ ..
No. 6100
Makes
Its Appearance
THE COVER
The purple and white diesel units now touring the Dominion
with their interesting exhibit cars are not hauling Cana­
das first Confederation train. At the time when Canadians
united in celebrating the Diamond Jubilee of Confederation, a new
Canadian National Railways transcontinental train was pla­
ced in operation between Toronto and Vancouver, known as
THE CONFEDERATION in honour of the great national occasion.
The sleeping cars originally used on this train were named in
memory of the statesmen whose work made the union of the Pro­
vinces possible.
The National Systems then-new 6100 locomotive also bore
the name CONFEDERATION and our cover photo this month shows Eng
ineer Duncan Campbell and Fireman Robert McKay, inspecting
the engine before its departure for Baltimore, Md., where it
represented the Dominion at the Fair of the Iron Horse.
The photos on Page 18 show other views of the locomotive
during its construction at the Kingston works of the Canadian
Locomotive Company and at the time of its delivery to the CN.
(photos courtesy Can. Nat. Rys. Magazine)
eNs NEW EDMONTON HEADQUARTERS
Topped by a gigantic ~ symbol, E~ontons tallest skyscraper
houses the Na tional s Mountain Region Headquarters and incor­
porates the Citys centrally-located railway station in the
basement and ground-floor levels. Edmonton wisely retain­
ed its main station in the downtown area in spite of the less
fortunate examples of Saskatoon and Ottawa ••
by Derek Boles
* !he City of Calgary ie planning a multi-million dollar re-development programme
in its downtown area. Included in the master plan is a $140 million Rapid Tran­
sit System, operating along four corridors in an H pattern, with Seventh Avenue
S.W. being the connecting line. It is currently being debaterl whether the Tran­
sit ehould be an underground or elevated system. The latter would be $35 Mill­ion
cheaper, but its .. artietic value to the City is dubious. The plan calls for
reetr.!c t ion of automotive traffic in the dOllTld01ll1 area, access being ga ined only
vi!! the Rapid Transit System. Completion of the master plan is scheduled for
1986.
*Expo
67 s }linirail, a miniature monorail Rystem, was exhibited on November 1
to Expo officials and the pres!!. Commentl! were favourable and Minirail is
expected to be a major attraction at the Exposition.
*With the opening of the new Ottawa Union Station, running time of Montreal _ Ottawa
passenger trains has been cut five to ten minutes, at least on the C.N.
Canadian
Pacific North Shore trains, however, take longer as they approach the
station from the north-west and must make an extensive detour around Ottawa.
The new terminal is about two milee east of the former Ottawa Union Station.
*A new C.N. passenger station in Hamilton, Ontario, has been suggested by C.N.
vice-president D. V. Gonder. Probable location is near the High Level Bridge
off York Boulevard.
*Pacific Great Eastern is spending some two million dollars on new rolling stock
and motive power. Included in the ordere are 3 diesel-electric locomotives from Montreal Locomotive
Worke and eeventy-five wood-chip cars. Laet year the PGE
ehowed an operating profit of $5.5 million, but lost just over $560,000 after
deductions for depreciation and interest. However, Premier Bennett promised
a real, overall profit by the next time I bring down the budget
* Edmonton s
new C.N. Tower Building was opened last November 4th by Donald Gor­don,
then president of the C.N .R. Mr. Gordon unveiled a chrome-plated driving
wheel from a C.N. Mikado steam locomotive, which is on permanent display at the
entrance to the building. C.N.s new Edmonton Station occupies the lower floors
of the structure.
*Canadian Nationals 120 m.~.h. TurboTrain is expected to be ready for delivery
to the Railway early in April. While regnla.r sp.rvice by these trains for Expos
April 28th opening date i!! dubious, it is expected that they will be operating
well before the peak travel period in June.
*The Board of Transport Commissioners has authorized the C.N.R. to discontinue
passenger trains 87 and 88 operating between Hearst and Kapuskasing in northern
Ontario. The Railway IIill !lubstitute a bus and truck servi.ce.
*C.N.s Red, White, and Blue rail travel plan was extended to U.S. subsidiary,
Grand Trunk Western on November 1st. Extension of the plan was disclosed by
H.A. Sanders, then VP and General Manager of the G.T.W. RR. Some fares on the
line were cut by as much as 27%.
·The Canadian Pacific, according to reports from the Provincial
Capital, is making a bid to retain some of the lucrative pass­
enger trade between Q,uebec City and Montreal. V:hile up to a
year and a half ago, the CPR carried almost all rail travellers
between the two cities, of late the National has been obtaining
much of the West End traffic with its station at suburban Ste.
Foy, near the ~uebec Bridge. The Canadian Pacific is now
making extensive repairs and renovations to Ancienne Lorette
station and a massive parking lot is being prepared near-by.
Rail 1s to be improved to allow a higher speed run and one re­
port indicates that about 35 minutes will be cut from the inter
city running time within the near future •
• In the Montreal area, the suburban community of Dorval is to re­
ceive a new station to handle the growing number of C.N.passen­
gers who make use of the stop adjacent to the Montreal Inter­
national Airport. The proposed $125,000 station, to be built
on the site of the present building, is designed to improve the
passenger handling facilities and to meet the rapidly increasing
population along the Lakeshore •

Fredericton, N.B. too wants a passenger station. Theyve got
the building and according to Mayor V~.T.Walker theyve got the
potential passengers. But theyve not got the train service.
The last regular passenger train left the CP station infue N.B.
Capital a few years ago. Mayor Walker has now asked the Can­
adian Pacific to restore the direct rail service to Saint John
and Montreal, at least during the winter months •
• From
the Lakehead comes word that the Canadian National is pro­
posing to abandon its tri-weekly passenger service through the
Rainy River district between Port Arthur and Winnipeg. A num­
ber of protests have been VOiced, however, and the proposal will
no doubt go before the Board of Transport Commissioners. The
Fort Frances newspaper caims that service between the Lakehead
and Winnipeg is as important as is the Rapido and other plan­
ned high speed trains between Toronto and Montreal.
The 1400 h.p. diesels which Canada is to provide for India
will not be the first Canadian-built locomotives in that
country. In 1949 and 1950, Montreal Locor.J.otlve Works and
Canadian Locomotive Company built both broad and narrow gauge
engines for the Indian Railways. Some of the former are
shown ready for shipment from Montreal.
The tri-weekly passenger service through the Rainy River dis­
trict between Port Arthur and Winnipeg, which the CN is pro­
posing to abandon, photographed May 25th, 1945, in the days
before the paved highway. ON 5128 and train 33-19 prepare
to leave Port Arthur with coaches and buffet-sleeping-car,
(8 sec. 1 double bedroom) for the overnight run to the Mani­
toba Capital.
-One of the last unassigned steam lo.comotives in the country,
C.N.60?? has been donated to the Town of Capreol, Ontario. It
is to be delivered from its present location at the ONs Transcona
Yard to the Northern Ontario community free of charge and will
be set up in the Town Square.
-Three hundred insulated and heated boxcars are being de~ered
to the C.P.R. by National Steel Car Corporation of Hamilton, Onto Each
of the new cars is ten feet longer and can hold about 13
tons more than CPs other insulated cars. They are being painted
bright orange for customer appeal and easier identification by
yard workers.
CANADIAN —–23 R A I L
*Bill C-23l, the Transportation Bill that is intended to re­
volutionize Canadian transportation in general and railroading
in particular, passed second reading in the Canadian House of
Commons on January 26th. .Routine third reading and the ap­
proval of the Senate remain before the bill goes for Royal
assent. Main features of the bill include the establishment
of a Canadian Transportation Commission to direct all forms of
transportation under the control of the Federal Dominion Govern­
ment. These consist of Railways, Shipping, Airlines, and Inter­
provincial trucking and pipelines. The bill will make it easier
for the railways to discontinue uneconomic passenger services and
abandon branch lines, unless the Government orders them retained
in the public interest and compensates for the deficits incurred.
Subsidies starting at $110 million and dropping in eight annual
stages to zero will carry the railways through the transitional
period, during which the money-losing services are progressively
scrapped.
*Electrification of the Canadian Nationals heavy-density route
between Montreal and Toronto has been spot-lighted again –this
time by C.N. s Director of Corporate Planning, Dr.R.A.Bandeen.
In an interview reported in the Montreal Star at the end of last
year, Dr.Bandeen said Theres a man outside the Railways looking
at freight-carrying turbo cars that operate independently of one
another •••• more practical for the Near Future is an idea to el­
ectrify the route between Montreal and Toronto.
*Rates of fares on Montreals new Metro System were substantially
increased, effective Saturday, Jan. 28~h. The new adult fare
i
on subway and regular bus services is now 30¢ cash, four tickets
for $1.00, or 21 tickets in a book which sells for $,.00. The
student fares, effective between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. ,remain unaltered.
*Jurisdiction over the fares to be charged by the soon-to-be
inaugurated GO Transit at Toronto rests with the Board of Trans­
port Commissioners, the Board has decided. This means that the
Ontario Government will have to file its fare structure with the
Board and get its approval.
*Effective February 1st, the Canadian National is to intro-duce
monthly and weekly commutation flash-cards for passengers
on the Montreal-St.Hyacinthe local run, a system used with
success on the commuter lines through Mount Royal Tunnel. The
Turillel line, however, boasts some forty runs daily, the South
Shore service has but one round trip per day.
*Canadian National and Canadian Pacific Telecommunications have
asked the B.of T.C. to approve an increase in charges for telegram
messages in Canada. Basic charges, minimums, and basic distances
would be altered, and the proposed scale of rates would eliminate
the day-letter class, Which the companies feel are now trans­
mitted as quickly as full rate messages.
*Canadian Locomotive builders have been invited to tender on a
contract for the production of 30 diesel locomotives, which Canada
will provide to India. EaCh locomotive will be of 1400 horse­
power.
–Ken Taylor, Macleans Hagazine
Oh, hes fast enough …
CANADIAn RAIL: Published monthly (except July/August combined) by
the Publications Co~ittee, Canadian Railroad Historical
Association, P.O. Box 22, Station B, Montreal 2, Canada.
Subscription includes Associate 11embership: S4.00 annually.
PUBLICATIONS COl1i·:ITT:C:E:
E:::lITOR, CA.ADIAN RAIL:
ASSOCIATE EDITOR: Iill:
lS EDITOR:
~~~1BERSHIP EDITOR:
EDITORIAL S~AFF:
DISTHIBUTI01:
~BERSHIP CHAIRlft.A~T:
D.H. Henderson, Chairman
Anthony Clegg
William Pharoah
,-lilliam Pharoah
Anthony Cleee
Derek Booth
Derek Boles
James Sandilands, Ian t/ebb
John I. Saunders
J. A. Beatty
ASSOCIATION REPRESENTATIVES:
OTTAWA VALLEY: Kenneth F. Chivers, Apt. 3, 67 Somerset st. W., Ottawa, Onto PACIFIC
COAST: Peter Cox, 2936 W. 28th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.
SASKATCHEW~;: J.S. ~!icolson, 2306 Arnold St., Saskatoon, Sask.
ROCKY ~WUNTAn!: V.H. Coley, 11243 -72nd Ave., Edmonton, Alta.
FAR EAST: W.D. McKeown, 900 Senriyama (Oaza), Suita City, Osaka, Japan.
BRITISH ISLES: John H. Sanders, 67 Willow lay, Ampthill, Beds., England.
Copyright 1967
Printed in Canada on
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