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Canadian Rail 136 1962

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Canadian Rail 136 1962

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ilL·
a:n..adian..
) ffimfLn
NUMBER 136
Issued 11 times yearly by
Canadian Railroad Historical Association.
SEPTEMBER 1962
RUSH HOUR at Bonaventure Station, fifty-five years
ago. Fashions of Montreal Street Railway passen­
gers date this· interesting photograph taken of
car 824 loading at the Grand Trunk Railway station
in Montreal on August 26th, 1907.
-Photo Montreal Street Railway

Montreal Street Railways
790 class Cars.
by R. M. Binns
Among the ITlany notices and special instructions posted on Montreal Street
Railway bulletin boards for the guidance of car crews, there was one that app­
eared regularly each year during the summer:-
We wish to remind conductors that it is their duty to see that all
windows are closed every tiITle car is pulled into yards. On cars that
have the wi~c;!~~~~~~::..,,-(!Jor the Summer ITlonths, the ~!;:rt<:..0.2_D!..ust
!?~..?~Ee ortant duty, with the result that serious damage might be done to the
seats of cars left outside, should it happen to rain.
The reference is to the so-called semi-convertible cars, of which the 790
class was the first example.
Around the beginning of the century a great deal of ingenuity and money was
being put forth by United States car builders in attempts to create an all-pur­
pose car. The objective was a streetcar that would suit the various require­
ments of ITlost street railway companies, both as to Summer and Winter use, and
with a seating plan that afforded the greatest standing space during rush hours,
yet provided cOITlfortable seats for passengers riding long distances. None of
these atteITlpts proved very successful, except perhaps Brills Convertible car,
which received rather wide acceptance for a tiITle.
The Brill design featured transverse seats throughout, with an aisle down
the centre. The window sash and side panel between each post could be raised
into pockets in the roof, thus the car could be transformed quickly into a fully
open car. The design was patented by Mr. John A. Brill in 1899, and he promot­
ed it vigorously.
Late in 1903, Montreal Street Railway, ever on the alert to adopt new ideas,
decided to build its own version of the ideal car, one suitable for Montreals
Winters, but which could be adapted to offer some of the attractions of open car
riding during the short but warm Summer season. A flexible seating plan was
also highly desirable. Plans were prepared by M.S.R. engineers, and submitted
to the Board of Directors on January 25th, 1904. There was nothing fundament­
ally new or radical in the Montreal design, except perhaps the seats, the origin
of which is obscure. The cars were to be fitted with individual cane chairs
similar to those on the 1032 class Park & Island Ry. cars built in 1902. These
chairs, ingeniously ITlounted in pairs, could be swivelled around to produce any
combination of transverse and side seating to suit passenger traffic requirements
during the various periods of the day. The car body -28 feet long -had ten
large single window sashes on each side which could be removed entirely for
SumITler operations. The Board of Directors, at its January 25th meeting, app­
roved the building of fifty of these semi-convertible cars, as they were called
and appropriated $250,000 for the purpose. The question of purchasing a sample
convertible car froITl the Stephenson Co. and the Brill Co. was considered. It
was decided to leave this ITlatter in the hands of the Managing Director.
131

133
Late in May 1904, the first car, No. 790, was turned out of Hochelaga Shops
and inspected by the Directors. Apparently satisfied, production continued and
by November of that year, twenty cars (Nos.790-828 even) were in service.
The significance of the 790 class does not lie so much in their convertible
feature, but rather in the marked change in style introduced, and in this respect
they represented a most important step in the evolution of Montreal streetcars.
The cars were of wood construction, with steel reinforcing in the underframe,
and inside truss rods. Overall length was 40 feet, 3~ inches. To accomodate
transverse seating -an innovation on M.S.R. cars -the body was some eight
inches wider than previous cars. and more rectangular in cross section. Oddly
enough. the sides were not flat -the traditional inner-curving lower panel being
retained, but curved to a very slight degree. Vestibules became more a part of
the car body than formerly, and were a generous 5 feet 4 inches long at each
end. The front vestibule contained the air compressor and governor, while the
rear platform had a brass rail intended to keep rear platform standees from
obstructing the single bulkhead door. [t is easy to see how this arrangement
would lead. almost inevitably, to the pay-as-you-enter concept about a year
later. The chair seating experiment was apparently short-lived. It is not known
whether any of the cars other than No. 790 were so equipped. In any event, very
soon, the front part of the car was fitted with five fixed transverse double seats
on each side. and the remainder of the car with longitudinal seats, all spring­
upholstered in woven rattan. Thus, we see emerging, a car design which, in
general appearance and seating arrangement, was to continue for many years
with only minor variations.
Number 790 had scarcely been put in service on St. Catherine Street when
the Board of Directors, on June 9th, 1904, appropriated $100,000 fo~ another pr0-
ject, transforming fifty of the Companys single-truck open cars into convertible
cars. This involved building sides with windows, which could be attached to the
right sides of these little half-open cars, permanently closed fronts, and other
alterations, so they could be used in Winter. Reading the minutes of this meeting,
we find:-
It was also decided that in view of this work being required at
once, and that in consequence the building of the fifty double-truck
semi-convertible cars would be delayed, the Managing Director be
authorized to purchase five cars of the semi-convertible type from
either the Stephenson Co. or the Brill Co.
In August, a car arrived from the LG. Brill Co., Philadelphia. It was the
well-known Brill Convertible, but being a single-ender, it was convertible on
one side only. It was numbered 701 and therefore classed as an open car.
Whether this was the sample car authorized at the January meeting, or one of
the five authorized on June 9th is not clear. In any event, it formed part of the
fifty in the original appropriation, and was afterwards included in the 790 class.
but always retained its open car number. Apparently not impressed with this
design, the Company altered No. 701 late in 1904, by permanently fixing the side
panels in place, thereby making a closed car with removable windows like the
others.

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7-4-
GENERAL
DIMENSIONS
AND
LAYOUT
OF
790
CLASS
CARS
AFTER
ALTERATIONS.
IN
1906-7,
FOR
P.A.Y.E.
OPERATION.
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Page 136 Canadian Rail
The Brill order included two other cars built more nearly to the Montreal
design, but having more rounded ends and arched windows favoured by Brill at
that time. These cars, Nos. 840, 842 did not go into service until April 1905.
Two cars were purchased from the John Stephenson Co. of New York. These
followed the Montreal design more closely, but had a more rounded front vest­
ibule and a metal sheathed dash. They went into service in July 1905 and were
numbered 864, 866.
Getting back to the summer of 1904, we find in the minutes of a subsequent
meeting held on July 9th, the following;-
Owing to the Company being unable to construct the full fifty cars
in its own shops, appropriation for which was granted in January last,
the Board authorized the purchase of ten semi-convertible cars from
the Niles Car and Mfg. Co., five from Rhodes-Curry Co. Ltd., and
five from Ahearn and Soper.
Thus it came about that of the fifty cars in this class, twenty-five were built by
M.S.R. and twenty-five purchased from other builders.
The Niles cars (Nos. 844-862 even) arrived first and were put in service in
January and February 1905, about the same time that the Company completed its
allotment by turning out an additional group of five, Nos. 830 to 838. This latter
group, as well as those from the other builders, differed from the original design
in that the windows were composed of a fixed upper sash and a movable lower
sash which could be raised or dropped completely out of sight into a pocket by
means of a hinged window sill. This arrangement took care of between season
requirements and eliminated the expense of removing and storing windows in the
car barns. This chore was soon to return, however, with the adoption of double
windows in Winter, a few years later.
Aside from the quite noticeably different appearance of the Brill and Steph­
enson cars, there were slight structural differences between the other groups,
notably in the treatment of the letterboard. The group built by Ottawa -Nos. 878
to 886, -did not go into service until August 1905, and the group from Rhodes­
Curry not until the late Fall of 1905. It is strange that these last ten cars, com­
ing well after the 900 class Pay-As-You-Enter cars were in production, were
not delivered with long rear platforms for P.A. Y.E. operation, particularly as
No. 828 had been withdrawn in June 1905, and so altered, reclassified and re­
numbered 950.
In 1906, sixteen of the 790 class (numbers unknown) were altered for P.A. Y.E.
opera tion and rear platforms extended to a bout 7 feet. In 1907, twenty-eight
were similarly altered. The Brill and Stephenson cars (701, 840, 842, 864, 866)
were not converted. Nos. 864, 866 were assigned to Park and Island lines in
1909 and Nos. 840. 842 to the Terminal Railway about the same time. The P.A.
Y.E. system was not then in effect on suburban lines. While these four were
operated on city lines in later years, as PA. Y.E. cars, the rear platforms were
never lengthened. No. 701 also retained its original platform.
When built, the 790 class cars were equipped with WH 68 or GE 67 motors,
Blackwell Cl. 50 trucks, K6 control, and Christensen air brakes. Total weights
ranged between 40,120 and 40,600 Ibs. No. 701 had WH 68 motors, Brill 27 G
trucks, K6 control and hand brakes only. Total weight was 33,270 lbs. Air
brakes were installed on No. 701, probably late in 1904.
Text oontinues on Page 144, photos oontinue overleaf.

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M.S.R.

790
CLASS
CARS
SEM

CONVERTIBLE
TYPE
SEQUENCE
IN
WHICH CARS WERE PUT INTO
SERVICE
I
904-
1905
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
OCT
NOV
DEC
JAN
FEB
MAR
APR
MAY
JUN
JUL
AUG
SEP
190 192
194
800
808 826
830 832
838
840 864
878
196
802
810
828
834-
842
866 880
198
804
812
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836
@
®
882
806
814
®
884
816
886
818
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820
844
846
822
848
852
824-
850
858
~
854
862
856 860
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101
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888
890
*
BUILDERS
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First
car
of
First
N?
828
altered
rOT
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monlreal
Sln:E1
Ra
ilway
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style
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SllDsefuen!
order.
P.A.YE
PA.YE.
operat
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on.
car
re
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and
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The
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Philadelphia·
(convertible)

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nilts
Car
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mfg.
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St£phwson
&-
Co.

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York
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Car
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mfg.
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RhodEs-Curry
Co.
Ltd. –
Amherst
n.s.

OCT
NOV
812
868
876
810
T
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DEC 814
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Page 142 Canadian Rail
Photo Captions.
PHOTOGRAPH CAPTIONS
Page 130 -Notre Dame Street, in May 1904, was a typical
muddy morass over which only railed vehicles could
glide in comparative comfort. Here is car 790,
the first of its series, in the MSRs light chrome
yellow, silver and black livery. (I11SR)
Page 132 -The interior of No. 790 showing the curious pivot­
ed and paired seats vhich could be locked in diff­
erent positions. Used also on the Park and
Island Railway cars]. this arrangement enjoyed only
restricted use. (MSR)
Page 134 -Car 830 during the regime of the Montreal Tramways Company,
in an official broadside photograph taken
at Youville Shops in 1918. (II1TC)
Page 137 -No. 854 was one of the Niles-built cars, pictured
here in 1912 at the St. Denis carhouse. (r4TC)
Page 138 (top) -Only one Brill semi-convertible was ever
purchased for Montreal, and it was car 701. Blind
side arrangement shoffi here, as built, was adapted
for the door side shortly after the car Has deliv­
ered, as the removable panels proved unsatisfact­
ory in the Iilontreal wint er. (OSAL)
Page 138 (bottom) -The interior of No. 701 as built, showing
transverse seats which were first to be applied to
an MSR closed car. (OSAL)
Page 140 (top) -No. 852, one of the Niles-built cars, is
shown in this 1913 photo, about to leave Tetrault­
ville Junction for a trip up Des Ormeaux. (filTC)
Page 140 (bottom) -Stephenson-built No. 866 ran on the Car­
tierville line when this picture was taken on Queen
l1ary Road just west of Snowdon Junction,well
over half a century ago. (JJL)
Page 141 (top) -Official broadside of car No. 814, showing windows
completely removed for summer service, in
1913. (MTCj
Page 141 (middle) -Official broadside of car No. 878 with
lower sashes dropped into pockets; 1913. (MTC)
Page 141 (bottom) -No. 842 in rush hour service on the Bout de
lIle line in the summer of 1917. (MTC)
PHOTO CREDITS: MTC -r.lontreal Tramways Company.
MSR -Montreal Street Railway Company.
OSAL -Collection of O.S.A. Lavallee.
JJL -Collection of J.J. Lunny.
mnm Contracts for which tenders
– – I Contracts awarded but no construction as yet.
_ Contracts under construction.
The Montreal City Administ­
ration authorized the calling of
tenders for the first section of
the east-west (Line No.1) of
the Montreal rapid transit sys­
tem on Wednesday, August 22nd. The
new contract, l-A-l, will
cover a 4,090-foot stretch under
St. Luke Street, from Atwater
Avenue to a point east of Houn­
tain Street; this contract will
also include Guy station, to
extend from Guy to St. Matthew
streets. The work involves rock
tunnelling for 2,564 feet, earth
bore for 990 feet and station
excavation for 536 feet. Tenders
will be received up to September
21st, and they will be opened at
noon on September 25th. The us­
ual 700 days has been allowed
for completion of the contract.
The calling of tenders for
the east-west route now brings
to three the number of contracts
under way, the others being on
the north-south Line No.2
starting at Cremazie and extend­
ing south to Rosemont Boulevard,
under Berri and de St. Vallier
streets. The east-west Line No.
1, of ,/hich the new contract
forms the westernmost part, will
eventually be 21,270 feet long,
and include ten stations includ­
ing the termini at Atwater and
Frontenac streets; it will
extend under St. Luke, Burnside,
Ontario and der~nti~ny streets,
and will intersect the north­
south line just to the northeast
of the intersection of St. Cath­
erine and St. Denis streets.
The north-s.outh line is to
extend from Cremazie to the IJjTC
Craig Terminus, and will be
30,200 feet long with eleven
stations. Both lines will be
operated with rubber-tired roll­
ing stock, as presently in use
on the rapid transit system in
Paris. A third route, using
conventional railway equipment,
and utilizing the present CNR
).jount Royal Tunnel, is under
study.
Work has already started on
the first contract (2-A-l) at
Berri Street just south of Jarry
and commencement of the second
contract (2-A-2) will be under­
taken in September ,lith complet­
ion of an access pit from a point
north of Beaubien street, between
deChateaubriand Avenue and de
St. Vallier street.
Mr. Lucien Saulnier, the
Chairman of the city executive
committee, says that planning
has now reached the stage where
design of the subway cars and
equipment are under study. He
indicated that the administrat­
ion (which is building the lines
itself without consultation with
the IvTontreal Transportation Com­
mission) may be in a position to
call tenders for the rolling
stock early in 1963.
$132,090,000 is the expect­
ed cost of the completed project.
143
Th 50·year·old steam locomotive, which over the years
was owned by three raIl lines yet never had its number
Starr Photo h> DavId Bt!r
changed, arrived in Montreal by ship on its way to the
Canadian Rail Transportation Museum at Delson, Que.
Pioneer Engine to Retire

Mothballs In
. verted to oil in it;; last years ofand Leonard A. Seton, QC,;lslands and Knob Lake, By HAROLD POITRAS
I The ancient coal burner, con· Robert V. V. Nicholls, president, ,the railway line between Seven
Flfty·year·old IO·wheeler No. operation, waS transported from I director and general counsel, hy; The other locomotive has .:50
1112, which helped blaze a Iall· Seven Islands aboard the M/V1JOhn Lillie, general managertbeen retired (rom service nn
road throu<1h a wilderness in lnland. owned and operaled by and Paul OUlmel, QC. secretary, is now on display III front of
Quebecs n~rth shore area is H,e QNS &. LRC. It took the QNS & LRC. . . the raJlway station at Sev,-n . . .. .: ShiP,
under the command of The locomotive was bUill hy;Jslands.
bemg plac~d III mothballs. Capt L. E Pain, a seaman of the Montreal Locomotive Worksl The locomolives, including
It has been donated by the 44 years experience, 44 hours in 1912 for the Canadia No. 1112, which never had its
Quebec,
North Shore &. Labr.· to bring the 71·ton locomotive Northern Railway and later he,! number changed although it was
dor llailway Company 10 the and its 18·ton tender from came the propelt) of the CNR, connected with three raiI-vays,
Canadian Railroad Historical Seven Islands to Montreal. It was subsequenLly purchased were assisled III the fall line
Associalion for ultimate display I On its arrival here today, itiby the QNS & LRC in 1952, was constluction by three diesels,
in the Canadian Rail Trans: was formally presented to .l.he:converl.ed to .an ollburner and These have now heen replaced
porlalion Museum at Delson, Canadian Railroad Hlstorlcallwas used With another 10(;0· by a fleet of 80 diesels owned
_ne_a_r !~~_~·~~l: ___ . ____ . __ ~A_s_s_oc_i_at_lO_n_, _f_ep_r_es_e_n_te_d_h_y_O_r,_m_otive_ III the construction of by_tl_le_c_o_m_p_a_n_y_, ____ _
Continued from Page 136
The 790 class cars had a relatively short life compared to some of the other
types. None quite attained twenty-five years of service, Nos. 842. 844. 848
were scrapped in 1925. No. 701 in 1926. No. 796 in 1927. and the remainder in
1928. One of the bodies survived for a few years as a waiting room at the cor­
ner of Park Avenue and Beaubien Street. Appropriately, this was No. 886, the
last of the series.
Before closing, we should not forget that these interesting cars had the dis­
tinction of bringing to Montrealers, for the first time, a new popular feature of
streetcar travel that continued to the very end, a cross seat next to the window.
Who can deny the attraction of that spot? If you were lucky enough to secure one
of these prized positions, you had virtually a private compartment. and at no ex­
tra fare, where you could adjust the window and curtain to your own liking. You
were not confronted by a row of staring faces, nobody could step on your toes,
and the neve r -ending pageant of the citys streets rolled by at your elbow.
144
Canadian Rai 1 page 145
R epresenfa five
from Labrador
An interesting event took place at Shed 62, Montreal Wharf, on
Friday, August 17th, when a heavy-duty dockside crane swung ashore
Quebec North Shore & Labrador Railw9.Y 4-6-0 No. 1112, latest unit
to be delivered to the Associations museum at Delson. )1)0.1112, a
gift of one of Canadas newest railways, had just completed a 44
hour sea trip from Sept-Iles, Que., on board the M.V. Inland».
Resplendent in a new black, white, me.roon and gold paint job,
No. 1112, a former Canadian National engine of class G-16-a, gave
onlookers some notion of what a CN engine would look like in a Can­
adian Pacific paint scheme, and the effect was agreeable, to say
the least. The Railway had spared no effort to rrake the locomotive
most presentable for the i,[usewn, even to cleaning and painting of
the cab interior, with gleaming boilerhead and fittings, newly up­
holstered seatboxes and new white canvas curtains.
Once swung ashore and coupled to its tender, No. 1112 command­ed
the attention of passersby on the villarf until Saturday morning,
when the National Harbours Board r8moved it and turned it over to
the Canadian Pacific Railway, for removal to Delson via St. Luc
Yard. The engine was loaded as declc cargo on the compara ti vely
small vessel, with the tender placed in the hold immediately below:
tender oil and water tanks were loaded vdth water as ballast, but
even with this additional stability, Captain Pain of the »Inland ,
who acted as host at lunch to Dr. Nicholls, and Messrs. L.A. Seton,
D. F. Angus, and W.Pharoah, said that the vessel experienced con­
siderable rolling with its top-heavy cargo when off the mouth of the
Saguenay.
While still on board, there was a short ceremony when Mr. Paul
Ouimet, ~.C., and Mr. Little of the QNS&L officially turned the en­
gine over to our Association. In addition to making a gift of No.
1112, the Iron Ore Company of Canada also transported the engine
to Montreal without charge to our Association. Acquisition of the
engine had originally been negotiated with the ore company and its
subsidiary railway by our Legal Counsel, 1u-.Leonard Seton, ~.C.
The arrival was given good publicity in Ilontreal papers, while
the members recalled that it was just short of ten years since No. 1112
had been converted into an oil-burner and sold to th~ iron ore
railway, which was then (September 1952) under construction. On
the CNR, the locomotive had last worked at Campbellton, N. B., and
was withdrawn from service and placed in storage at Mont Joli on
March 27th, 1952. Formerly, it had seen service on Prince Edward
Island. No. 1112 was originally built for Canadian Northern Rail­
way by the Montreal Locomotive Works in 1912. It retained its same number
under Canadian National regime after 1918, and again after
sale to the QNS&L. On the iron ore railway, it was used in work
train and mixed train service, and as a boiler for thawing culverts
and ore piles. In this service, it was accompanied by ex-Ontario
Northland Railway 4-6-2 No. 702, which has also been honourably re­
tired and is on display at Sept-Iles,1ue.
Page 146 Canadian Rail
Notes and News
Edited by W.A.Pharoah
Q The Montreal city administration recently awarded the seoond con­
tract for construction on north-south line No.2 of the prOjected
Montreal Subway. The successful bidder was Spino Construction
Company whose bid of $1,786,920 was the lowest of seven opened on
July 3 by the city executive committee. This contract covers
construction of the double-track, single tunnel structure from a
point north of Jean Talon Street (adjoining the first contract,
awarded in May) and extends south under the axis of Berri and de
St. Vallier streets to a point south of Rosemount Blvd. The
stretch includes the three stations at Jean Talon, Beaubien and
Rosemount. A total appropriation of $2,190,000 was voted for the
project, the $403,080 balance covering engineering fees, super­
vision costs and other charges.
Q Two electric locomotives of the Lake Erie & Northern Railway, the
Canadian Pacific subsidiary which was dieselized in the autumn of
1961, have been sold to the Cornwall Street Railway, Light & Power Company,
at Cornwall, Ontario. The locomotives, Nos. 333 and 335,
have been delivered to their new purchasers and are currently
being converted from 1500 volts DC to 550 volts.
Q Greater Winnipeg Water District recently obtained several open­
platform wooden passenger cars from an unknown (to us) source; a
recent visit by one of our members disclosed that the railway is
painting this equipment yellow.
Q Canadian Pacific Railway has applied to the Board of Transport
Commissioners to abandon the St. Lin Subdivision, Laurentian Div­
iSion, extending from St. Lin Junction (with the Ste. Agathe Sub­
division) to St. Lin, 15.1 miles. This railway was built by the
former Laurentian Railway Company, and was opened for service in
1877; it was the locale of CRHAs November 1960 re-enactment of
the CPR last spike ceremony. The hearing will be held at Ste.
Therese, Que., on September 25.
Q Canadian Pacific Railway has also applied for permission to dis­
continue passenger service between Ottawa and Maniwaki, Que., and
between McKerrow and Little Current, Onto
Q Pacific Great Eastern Railway recently scrapped its last remaining
steam locomotive, 2-8-2 No. 160, which had been held at Squamish
presumably pending preservation. Also in an obvious bid to divest
itself of additional units of its older, though picturesque, rolling
stock, mountain observation car No. 14, a cut-down wooden inter­
urban car, was recently sold to an Oregon historical group for $350.
Q Canadian Pacific Railway is applying CTC installations to its
Adirondack Subdivision, between Montreal and Brookport, Que. As
a corollary of this application, double track between Delson and
Brookport 1s being reduced to single line and this work is pres­
ently under way.
Canadian Rail
Page 147
Q Comox Logging and Ra11way Company on Vancouver Island, 1s st111
using 2-8-2 type steam 10comot1ves 11 and 16 in regular service on
logging trains, replac1ng an 1mported diesel 10comot1ve wh1ch 1s
out of service. The Company 1s said to be seek1ng an add1t10nal
diesel unit to supplement the ex1st1ng one. The locomotives handle
log trains over a twenty-m11e line-haul operat10n from Nana1mo
Lakes to Ladysm1th, B.C. MacMillan & Bloedel L1m1ted also operate
trains over the same line, using a rare-for-Canada 2-6-2 type
engine.
Q In connection with our recent report on applicat10n to abandon a
portion of the Canadian Pacif1Cs M1nto Subdivision in New Bruns­
wick, we are now informed that the drawbridge at mile 69.5 has been
out of service since April 2 when it was reported to have moved
twelve inches out of alignment, probably due to high water flowing
under the span.
Q The Federal Governments auster1ty program will not affect con­
struction of the ~86 million Great Slave Lake Ra11way, CN Presid­
ent Donald Gordon said recently. Mr. Gordon said he knows of no
factor which would slow construction of the 377-mile railway link-
1ng Peace River w1th the vast lead-zinc deposits at Pine Point on
the lakes south shore.
Q Canad1an automakers are sounding the death knell for long-distance
highway car transports hauling more than 300 miles as they switch
back to rail sh1pment of passenger cars. The move will affect to
some degree all of the 1,600 car transports operating in and out
of Ontario. Two companies Ford Motor Co. of Canada Ltd. and
Chrysler Corp. of Canada Ltd. have signed agreements with CN
and the CPR covering the almost-exclusive shipment of automobiles
to major distribution points in the Maritimes and Western Canada.
General Motors of Canada Ltd., builder of about 57 per cent of the
cars made in Canada, will start to serve the West and the Maritimes
with cars shipped by rail in mid-October. Agreements, with rate
reduct10ns ranging from 30 to 36 per cent, call for shipment of
automobiles in the new tri-level automobile car loaders, which
range from 85 to 89 feet long and carry 12 conventional or 15
compact sized cars. National Steel Car Corp. is building
$5,750,000 worth of the tri-level cars: 150 for CN, 100 for CPo
Q CN is seeking to abandon a 30-mile branch line between Moncton
and Buctouche that loses money at the rate of almost $75,000 a
year. CN already serves the area by motor truck and this service
would be expanded. CN has also applied to abandon its Sunnybrae
spur from Ferrona Junction, NS, to end of steel. Alternative
service is provided by CN trucks from the railhead at Stellarton.
Q The Soviet Union has begun construction of a modernized electric
belt railroad around Moscow to ease the capitals heavy traffic.
Bypass routes about 50 miles from the centre of the city are de­
signed to divert transit freight that has been clogging yards and
freight depots in the complex Moscow railroad system.
Q A private group headed by a 21-year 011 has o~fered to run the
Rutland Railroad. The group is willing to invest $2.5 million
in the line if the State of Vermont underwrites a loan to make up
the rest of the #5.5 million estimated necessary to revitalize
the road. Key elements in the plan would be institution ~ piggy­
back for hauling milk, restoration of passenger serv1ce (!) and
establishment of 1ntegrated service with connecting railroads.
The Rutland has been closed by a strike since September 15, 1961.
r
Q In the May 1952 issue of the News Report it was announced that,
The name Tavernor has been chosen by Newfoundlanders for the
new CNR ferry operating between the tenth province and the main­
land. The choice of name was never acted upon, however, and the
shl~ became the William Carson. Now Taverner (spelled with an
e) is to be the name of the new ship for the Newfoundland ser­
Vices, recently launched at Collingwood, Ohtario. The name com­
memorates Captain Taverner who was in charge of the Sydney -Port
aux Basques ferry Caribou, sunk near the Newfoundland port by enemy
action early in World War II.
Q It is reported that Canada and Dominion Sugar Companys 0-6-0
switcher (formerly CN 7470) will shortly be disposed of because
of the closing of the sugar companys Wallaceburg, Ontario, plant.
The locomotive, which now carries a C. & O.-type headlight numbered
303, has been stored serviceable outside the plant since its ac­
quisition from the National System in 1959. (DMQ)
Q Mr. Eric Wynne, Vice-President of ONs Great Lakes Region, has
announced that Kapuskasings request for fast train service from
Toronto to Hearst and return has been granted. The new schedule
will be inaugurated on October 28, in conjunction with the return
to eastern standard time. The new train, with the very latest
of eqUipment, will leave Toronto at 7:00 pm daily except Sunday
and will arrive in Kapuskasing the following morning at 10:30.
No longer will Kapuskasing travellers be forced to transfer at
Porquis or Cochrane, or ride buses to and from Kapuskasing to make
connections.
Q Agreement has been reached in the contract dispute between Canadas
railways and their 100,000 non-operating employees. The agreement
is based on the UNANIMOUS recommendations drawn up by a three-man
conciliation board and marks the first time in the history of the
non-ops that a board has been able to reach a unanimous decision.
More information regarding locomotives Which were not
built in North America, but which are in use on Canadian
rail lines:
Vancouver Vlharves Limited,
North Vancouver, B.C.
Pilkington Glass Co.,
Scarborough, Onto
Winnlpeg Hydro Railway,
Manitoba.
Two diesels, numbered 1(21)
and 2(22) built by Hudswell
Clarke, England. One shown
in photograph on page 117.
Operates an even larger Br­
itish-built diesel-electric.
Steam locomotive No.3,built
by Dubs & Co.of Glasgow, in
1582.
Also some additional information on James Bay Railway
101 and Canadian Northern 164 & 165, provided by Messrs.R.
Corley and H.Goldsmith:
These locomotives were originally part of an order
for 7 locomotives built by Brooks(1259-1265) for the Buffalo,
Rochester and Pittsburgh RR(Nos.37 to 43) in 1887. Known
as class D, they had 19×24 cylinders and 56 driving wheels.
All were sold in 1905-06, n~~bers 39 and 42 going to the
Texas Central as lll(second) and 112, numbers 37, 40 and 41
to the Canadian lines. The disposition of numbers 38 & 43
has not been ascertained.
148
Canadian Rail
Page 149
Boxcar Lett e rs.
ItBoxcar let11ers
lt
, a phrase often used to describe the ultimate
in typographical visibility, is taking on added meaning at the
Sorel Works of Marine Industries, Ltd. First units o~ an order of
100 roller-bearing 70-ton covered hopper cars for Canadian Pacific
have been completed and will be the first to carry the words ItCanadian
Pacific ih letters larger than ever before applied on
C. P. rolling stock. In fact, the .,ords ItCanadian Pacific
ll
stretch
over a width of seventeen and a half feet in letters eleven and a
half inches high.
Similar applications of the enlarged script are being made to
a total of 800 additional units of freight train equipment on order
with various Canadian suppliers and in various stages of complet­
ion. These include 600 50-ton, 40-foot boxcars and 100 roller­
bearing 70-ton gondola cars on order with National Steel Car Cor­
poration at Hamilton, Ont., and 100 50-foot boxcars being built at
the Dosco Trenton lorks in Nova Scotia. Dosco has almost completed
an order for 200 70-ton flatcars but flatcars do not provide suf­
ficient space on their sills for application of the large insignia.
As existing cars are shopped for general repairs and when they
will receive a new coat of paint, an application of the large size
Canadian Pacific insignia will be made according to the master plan
adopted by the railway to give their rolling stock the new look.
ABOVE:
QNS&L
4-6-0
No.
1112
being
swung
ashore
at
Shed
62,
Montreal
Wharf,
from
the
M.
V.
Inland
on
August
1
7th.
BELOW:
No.
1112
on
board
the
vessel,
wh­
ich
carried
it
from
Sept-Iles,
Que.
See
story
Representative
from
Labrador
elsewhere
in
this
issue.
~~
.

–~
rt::i;~~
o~~~~:;!,r
Progress
Report
ABOVE:
Maritime
Coal,
Railway
&
Power
Co.
No.5
when
restor­
ation
and
repainting
was
begun
in
July,
in
the
yard
of
Canada
Creo­
soting
Co.,
at
Delson.
It
is
flank­
ed
by
two
interurbans,
QRL&PCo.
No.
401
at
left,
and
L&PSRy.
No.
14
at
right.
ABOVE:
First
train
into
the
mus­
eum
siding
was
CPR
Work
Extra
8444,
on
July
1.0,
bringing
ballast
for
our
newly-laid
siding.
BELOW:
Newest
addition
to
our
roster
is
UTLX
11204,
whose
st­
ory
appears
on
the
opposite
page.
Photos
of
No.1112
by
Bill
Pharoah.
All
other
photos
by
Peter
Murphy.
has our
Num ber.
Newest Addition
Highest Road
Early in July, the first railway freight car to be acquired by
the Association for preservation at the Museum, was delivered at
Delson and pl.aced in the yard of the Canada Creosoting Company. The
unit is a tank car, UTLX 11204, and is a gift of Pro cor Limited
of Toronto, who operate an extensive fleet of liquid-carrying cars.
UTLX 11204 was built by Canadian Car & Foundry Co. Limited of
Montreal in July, 1916, and is an AAR type II tank car, having a
shell capacity of 5,)88 Imperial gallons and a dome capaclty of 175
eallons. It is built with a single centre sill, mounted on 40-ton
capacity trucks. As the photograph shows, the catwalks are mounted on
the side of the tank, which also serves as a mount for the brake
wheel. The car was completely cleaned, reconditioned and repainted
at Montreal East refinery shop, and neatly lettered –at the re­
quest of the Association –with the name of the donor company.
Mr.
Ronald ~lelvin, Manar;ing Director of Procor Limited, who
arranged the gift, advises us that the car has been used to trans­
port such light petroleum products as stove oil, furnace oil, die­
sel oil, gasoline and kerosene. While precise mileage records are
not available, Mr. Melvin has given us an educated euess that the
car has travelled between 425,000 and 450,000 miles since it was
built. Its actual mileage may not be far short of half a million
miles; the estimate is based on empty miles equalling loaded miles
whereas Itr. rljel vin tells us that such cars normally e.)Cperience more
mileage empty, than loaded.
SERVICE RECORD
1869 -1937
Born before the route was mapped
For main line since completed.
Born when construction boss was king,
And distance undefeated.
Born to start them rolling.
Help the crew with their unloadin~,
None too young to lend a hand.
Sell the service, bag or carload,
Weigh the gross, deduct the tare.
Warm the chicks and feed the cattle,
Handle everythin~ with care.
Care to keep them rolling.
Leave your desk to turn the switch
When 104 comes down the wye.
Help the travellers,-new arrivals
Opening up a great new land.
Brakemans chore,and you both know it,
But you smile and wave him by.
Help to keep them rolling.
Enter service, still a youngster,
Piling cordwood by the track;
Through bright day and into darkness
Lit by engines flaring stack.
Fuel to keep them rolling.
Lonely outpost, lonely stranger,
For a month or for a day,
Take your turn relieving others
At the stops along the way.
Learn to keep them rolling.
Move on up the service roster,
Till you earn the right to say
ThereS a station that is vacant
In a village where Ill stay.
Stay to keep them rolling.
151
Wave to keep them rolling.
Speeding flyer, gaily whistling,
Riding high around the turn,
Take a light and flag the crossing,
Act the safety all must learn.
Safe to keep them rolling.
Time brings changes never-endin~,
And your turn to step aside.
Time for pension and relaxing;
Must not show the hurt inside.
Others keep them rolling.
Out beyond the winking signals,
Where the powerful diesels run,
Restless spirit gently whispers,
Now you keep them rolling son;
Always keep them rolling.
-J.W.Dickson
Last Gasp Doug Wright, Editorial Cartoonist, Montreal Star
=——-~———-~~
1 think its going to break Gerards heart when he finds out hl~ hrakr.~ clonl work quil thp Illr.
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTOlUCAL ASSOCIATION
E,la6{i,{J 1932 • :13ox 22 Sialio/l 13 JAo/lI,1 2 . Q,fj • 8/1corporal,J 1941
CANADIAN RAIL:
Published eleven times annually by the Publications
Committee, Canadian Railroad Historical Association.
U.SO ,nlllily
————————-
CHAIRMAN, PUBLICATIONS
COMMITTE:E: David R. Henderson
EDITOR:
ASSISTANT EDITOR:
DISTRIBUTION:
COMMITTEE:
Anthony Clegg
William Pharoah
John W. Saunders
Robert Half yard
Omer S.A. Lavallee
Frederick F. Angus
Peter Murphy
PACIFIC COAST REPRESENTATIVE:
Peter Cox, 2936 West 28th Avenue,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN REPRESENTA TIVE:
William T. Sharp, Apartment 11,
11544 St. Albert Trail, Edmonton, Alta.
SUBSCRIBERS!
BEFORE YOU II-lOVE-WRlTE!
At least 5 week~ before )OU
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