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Canadian Rail 120 1961

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Canadian Rail 120 1961

crha ews Report
P,O, BOX 22, STATION B MONTREAL2,QUEBEC
NUMBER 120
:«:«(
* —————-
Pale-grey, orange-red, medium blue and black are component
colours in Canadian Nationals new visual redesign programme
for passenger trains. This scheme was put on public display for
the first time when CN assembled, a train consisting of
diesel A
and B units, a baggage car and two coaches and took it on a dem­
onstration run for officials On February 19th, 1961. After this
photograph was made near St. Hubert, Que., the equipment was
sent out in transcontinental
service for visual and physical tests.
CN says initial public reaction has been good.
Canadian National Photograph.
Page 30
At the February meeting, held in
the McConnell Engineering Building,
McGill University, Montreal, on Feb­
ruary 8th, 1961, the following persons
were accepted as Regular Members
of the Association:
Dr. E.H. Bensley
Mr. D. Angelo Gismondi
Mr. Edward Jordan
Mr. Conrad F. Harrington
Dr. James Macfarlane
Mr. A.H. Modler
Mr. E.A. McMahon
Mr. C.W. McNeil
Mr. Peter Payan
Mr. David Scott
Mr. H. Greville Smith
Mr. Garth Stevenson
Mr. E.L. Taylor
The following persons were elected to
Junior Membership in CRHA:
Mr. Jeffrey Forest
Mr. Daniel Laurendeau
Mr. Derek Loder
Mr. Keith Henderspn
Mr. John D. Taylor
[n addition, the following persons were
proposed, for the first time for elec­
tion to membership at a subsequent
meeting:
Mr. Elliott Durnford
Mr. R.F. Legget
Mr. John Sanders
Mr. Keith Smith
Mr. George Tucker
There were no proposals for Junior
Membership at the February meeting.
Owing to the inability of the sched­
uled speaker to appear, the members
were very grateful to Mr. Forster A.
Kemp for stepping into the breach at
the eleventh hour to show moving pic-
C.R.H.A. News Report
tures taken in western Canada.
At the Annual Meeting in January.
Mr. O.S.A. Lavallee asked to be re­
lieved of the chairmanship of the Ed­
itorial Committee. He pointed out
that he had held this post since Jan­
uary 1952, and that he was also chair­
man of the Rolling Stock Committee.
Both committees had increased the
scope of their activities enormously
in the past few years necessitating
separate and distinct individuals in
charge of each of these important fac­
ets of CRAH activities. The President
subsequently appointed Mr. David R.
Henderson as Chairman of a new Pub­
lications Committee, which will look
after all printing and publishing by the
Association. Mr. Lavallee will cont­
inue to be editor of the News Report,
while Mr.Anthony Clegg will be editor
of bulletins and special publications.
His place as editor of the feature Ob­
servationsin the News Report is ass­
umed by Mr. Forster Kemp.
The results of Mr. Hendersons
energetic tackling of his new duties
are apparent in the new format of the
News Report. on which favourable
comment has been received.
CRHA MUSEUM FUND
The following donations to the
CRHA Museum Fund q.re gratefully
acknowledged:
Mr. Thomas Meinl ………. $ 25.00
10.00
1,000.00
Mr. L. Lamontagne ……. .
Anonymous ………………. .
The British American Oil
Company Limited …… ..
Bank of Montreal ……… ..
The Royal Bank of Canada
TOTAL
1,000.00
1,000.00
1,000.00
$4,035.00
Previously acknowledged. nil
GRAND TOTAL … $4,035.00
C.R.H.A. News·Report
WELSHPOOL AND LLANFAIR LIGHT RAILWAY
PR£SERVATION COMPANY LIMITED
Page 31
A
Company having the above name and limited by guarantee,
was formed in January 1960 by the ilelshpool and Llanfair
Light Railway Preservation Society, bringing to three,
the number of groups engaged in the preservation of nar­
row-gauge railways in Wales, the others being those of
the Festiniog Railway and Talyllyn Railway. The Welsh­
pool & Llanfair Light Railway group are engaged in work
to revive operation on this narrow-gauge railway, which
extends from Welsh pool to Llanfair Caereinion in the
mountains of Wales. Goods traffic was begun in March,
1903, with passenger service following less than a month
later. The passenger service was discontinued in 1931,
but the railway continued to function, as an adjunct of
the Great Western Railway and later British Railways, to
carry freight until November 5, 1956, when it was closed.
The Railway possesses two 0-6-OT locomotives, The
Earl and Countess, British Railways Nos. 822 and 823,
which were built by Beyer-Peacock in 1903.
Ie are officially advised by Mr. Colin T. Duckitt,
Publicity and Public Relations Officer, Welshpool & Llan­
fair Light Railway, that it is intended to open the line
in five separate sections, thus:
Stage 1.
Stage 2.
Stage 3.
Stage 4.
Stage 5.
Llanfair to Heniarth
Heniarth to Cyfronydd. Cyfronydd
to Castle Caereinion.
Castle Caerein:!.on to Golfa.
Golfa to Raven Square, Welshpool.
The Railway solicits annual membership, which can be had for
the modest sum of £1/1/-. Those under 18 years of age can have
associate membership at 10/6d. Cheques and money orders should be
made payable to the Company, and forwarded to Mr. A. Barnes, Mem­
bership Secretary, 69 Woodvale, London, S.E.23, England.
The Earl, Beyer-Peacock & Co., Manchester, 1903.
Page 32
New CN Colours
CANADIAN NATIONALs long­
awaited new paint scheme for loco­
motives and passenger train equip­
ment has finally had a public showing.
Our cover this month shows how an
experimental train, consisting of die­
sel-electric A unit 6536, liB unit
6636, express car 9059, and coaches
5515 and 5345 looked on a test run in
the vicinity of Montreal on February
10th. At the same time, a road swit­
cher was painted with a complement­
ary paint scheme;this engine No.4566
went into service February 16th.
The paint scheme on the diesel
pas senger units starts off with a br­
ight red-orange nose, on which the
new trademark symbol, described in
last months News Report, is painted
in light grey. The sides of the unit
are painted in alternate diagonal str­
ipes of black and light-grey. The un­
derbody and roof are black. Near the
rear end of the unit, on the black, the
CN symbol appears again in orange.
C.R.H.A. News Report
in Use
The liB unit is painted in similar
manner to the A unit, with diagonal
black and light-grey stripes. The ends
are black, and the numbering light­
grey. In the picture, the stripes on
A and liB units both slope in the
same direction, however, the design
is also intended to be used with the
stripes sloping in opposite directions,
which is, of course, inevitable. The
intake grills are to be painted black,
though in our photograph they are pol­
ished stainless steel.
The passenger equipment paint
design is intended to harmonize with,
though not correspond to, the locom-
otive. The cars are painted light-
grey, with a uniform medium-blue
stripe encompassing the belt rails,
rivet lines and high windows of the
older cars. The stripe is therefore
somewhat wider than the windows on
the streamlined cars, but, as the pos­
itioning will be measured from rail
level, it will be uniform on all cars,
(contd on page 40)
MONTREAL
STREET
RY.
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MONTREAL
STREET
RAILWAY
No.
274
The
diagram
shown
this
month
represents
Montreal
Street
Railway
No.
274,
a
single-truck
closed
electric
car
which
was
built
by
the
Newburyport
(Mass.)
Car
Manufacturing
Company
in
1892.
No.274
was
the
first
piece
of
equipment
ever
to
be
preserved
by
CRHA,
hav­
ing
been
donated
to
the
As
socia
tion
early
in
1951
by
the
late
Montreal
Tramways
Company.
The
car
wa
s
one
of
a
series
of
ten
built
by
the
New
England
firm,
numbered
274
to
292,
even
numbers
onl
y.
Nos.276
and
286
were
destroyed
in
the
disastrous
Hoch-
elaga
carbarn
fire
of
1898;
bet
we
en
1909
and
1915,
nos.
278,
280
and
286
were
converted
to
work
cars,
and
later
scrapped.
Nos.
282,
28
8,
290
and
292
were
scrapped
as
passenger
cars
between
1913
and
1916.
No.274
remain­
ed
as
a
pas
senger
car
until
1912
when
it
was
rebuilt
into
a
salt
car.
It
w
as
retired
from
service
in
1950,
wren
it
was
donated
to
the
Association.
Restoration
back
into
a
passenger
car
followed
subsequently,
with
replacement
1;.9
of
seats
and
varnished
interior
being
completed
in
1956.
~
While
the
car
had
open
platforms
originally,
these
were
I~
later
enclosed
because
of
the
severit
y
of
the
winters.
W
Page 34 ___ -C:C.R.H.A. News ~.?rt
EARLY LOCOMOTIVES ON VANCOUVER ISLAND
by I. E. Barr.
This interesting paper, prepared by Mr. Barr and published in
the CRHA Bulletin more than twenty years ago, remains the
definitive work in its field. The author, a retired Esquimalt &
Nanaimo Railway dispatcher, now lives in White Rock, B.C.
Due to fortunate preservat­
ion and a certain amount of pub­
licity, the locomotive Countess
of Dufferin now on exhibition
in front of the Canadian Pacific
station in Winnipeg, has become
widely known as the first loco­
motive in western Canada; simil­
arly, the Curly, now preserved
in Vancouver, bears a plaque
stating that it was the first in
British Columbia. Actually, how­
ever, there were several earlier
locomotives on Vancouver Island
and one of them, the Pioneer,
was at work nearly fifteen years
before the Countess of Dufferin
arrived at St. Boniface on the
deck of a scow.
The
Vancouver Coal Company commenced
mining operations in
the vicinity of Nanaimo in the
early Sixties and in 1863 they
imported from England the small
standard gauge locomotive Pio­
neer. It was built at Staley­
bridge, near ~~nchester, and the
manufacturers sent out Harry
Cooper and Thomas E. Peck with
the engine to set it up and they
became the first engineer and
fireman west of Ontario. The
Pioneer was a saddle tank en­
gine, outside connected, cylin­
ders 8xlO, and driving wheels
of 36; the throttle was a slide
valve, the safety valve was sp­
ring-loaded and the pressure
carried was 115 pounds. The Pump
was operated by an eccentric on
the main axle. The weight in
running order was about 10 tons.
In 1903, it was reconditioned by
the late William H. Hall, Master
Mechanic of the New Vancouver
Coal Company, and sold to a con­
tractor for construction work
near New Westminster.
The second to arrive was
the Euclataw and it was landed
in 1866. It also was built at
Staleybridge and was similar to
the Pioneer but somewhat smal­
ler. At its arrival, a number
of Indians gathered around, say­
ing that ten of them could hold
it from moving, so the Euclataw
tribe, being the smallest on the
Island, felt proud of the loco­
motive being named after them.
It was a saddle-tank engine,
inside-connected, cylinders 6x$
drivers 30 and the water feed
pump was operated from the wrist
pin. The Euclataw was used
principally to take ballast from
the ships. It was sold in 1903
to the Joseph Dobeson Foundry at
Nanaimo and broken up several
years later.
The next to appear was the
Nanaimo in 1874. It was built
by Boiling & Low of Leeds, and
was generally similar to the
Pioneer and Euclataw. It ias
an 0-4-0 saddle-tank engine vlith
cylinders $ x 10, 36 drivers,
and weighed about ten tons. Af­
ter many years service, it was
sold to the Dobeson foundry, re­
built and then sold to John W.
Coburn who used it in his lum­
bering operations near South
Wellington. Later it was sold to
the Pacific Great Eastern Rail -way
for laying track during con­
struction and finally it was sc­
rapped about 190$,
The London, built by Man­
ning-HardIe of Leeds, came out
in 1$$4. . It was a 0-6-0 side
tank locomotive, inside connec­
ted with 10xl2 cylinders, 54
drivers and it weighed about
twenty tons. In 191$, it was
I
C.R.H.A. News Report
sold to a junk dealer in Vancou­
ver and scrapped.
In 1891, the Vancouver Coal Company
purchased its first mod­
ern locomotive from the Baldwin
Locomotive Works; it was called
the San Francisco, later No.5;
it was 0-6-0 type with 15 x 22
cylinders, 48 drivers and it
weighed about 35 tons. It gave
good service and another, No.6,
was bought in 1896; still later,
Nos.7 and 8 were purchased. With
the old locomotives, it was hard
to ship 2,000 tons of coal in 12
hours, but shortly after No.6
was put to work, 5,800 tons were
put aboard the S.S. Titania in
10~ hours which at that time was a
worlds record.
The Vancouver Coal Company
beca~e the New Vancouver Coal
Company, then the Western Fuel
Company, still later Canadian
Collieries (Dunsmuir) Limited,
controlling most of the large
mines on Vancouver Island.
When rtobert Dunsmuir opened
the Wellington Collier~he built
a five-mile line from VJellington
to Departure Bay,using fir rails
4×4 , topped with strap iron.
The gauge originally was 26
but later was widened to three
feet. It was a gravity-operated
cable railway and the loaded
I
Souther Half.
Pacific c9cea1/-
Page 35
cars in descending pulled the
empties back. In 1874, one of
the partners, ~1r. Diggle, bought
two traction engines from the
Admiralty in London which, on
arrival, were changed to loco­
motives by the application of
flanged wheels. They each had
one cylinder mounted on the top
of the boiler, a fly wheel six
feet in diameter and a chain
gear to the drivers. One of
these engines was used for shun­
ting at the mine and the other
at the Departure Bay wharf, each
one replacing six horses.
In 1878, these rebuilt tra­
ction engines were replaced by
two small 0-6-0 saddle tank eng­
ines, the Duke and Duchess,
products of the Baldwin Locomot­
ive Works. The Duke was built
in 1876 and was exhibited at the
Centennial Exhibition, where Mr.
Dunsmuir saw it and liked it so
well that he bought it and or­
dered another just like it; they
arrived at Nanaimo in 1878.
These locomotives had 10xl2 cy­
linders, 42 driving wheels and
originally were 26 gauge but
later were altered to three-foot
gauge. The Duke worked around
the mines until 1909 when it was
scrapped, but the Duchess had
a more interesting career. At
the time of the Yukon gold rush,
Captain John Irving, t-1anager of
Page 36
Canadian Pacific Navigation Com­
pany went north to build steam~
boats on the northern lakes. The
route from Skagway to Atlin City
was by the White Pass & Yukon
railway to Bennett Lake, by boat
across to Taku Arm, then across
a portage to Scotia Bay on Atlin
Lake and then by boat to Atlin
City. Atlin Lake was forty feet
higher than Taku Arm and the
distance across was 2~ miles, so
the Atlin Southern Railway was
built across the portage. This
little gold rush railway was one
of the smallest and most ex­
pensive in the 1orld, the pass­
enger being $2.00 one way. At fir­
st, it was operated by horsepower
but in 1899, the Duchess was
bought and sent north on the SS
Danube. At iellington, it had
been a coal burner, but when it
went to the Yukon, it was conv­
erted into a wood burner; some­
time later, it was changed once
again, this time to burn oil.
The lIDuchess is now preseryed
and on exhibition beside the
Vlhite Pass railway station at
Carcross, where it is very fam­
iliar to tourists.
Following the lIDuke and Duchess
ll
, Mr. Dunsmuir purchas-
PHOTOGRAPH AT RIGHT;
C.R.H.A. News Report
Artists conce ption of the
NANAIMO, built by Boiling
& Low of Leeds, in 1874, for
the Vancouver Coal Company.
):< )~ ):< *
ed three more Baldwin engines
which were of the same type, but
a little larger. They were the
Robert Dunsmuir
ll
in 1883, the
Departure Bay in l887.l and the
Victoria in 1889. They were
later rebuilt to standard gauge and worked
around the mines for
many years.
A few years previously, a Mr.
Chandler from San Francisco,
opened a mine at East Wellington
and he brought in three Baldwin
locomotives which were the same
as the later Dunsmuir engines.
They were the Premier built in
1878, and the ~ast Wellington
and San Francisco both built
in 1883; the first one was sec­
ond-hand, as they all arrived in
1883. They were 0-6-0 saddle
tank engines with 10×20 cylind­
ers and 30 driving wheels. A
short time later the mine was
closed because of a threatened
strike and the locomotives were
then purchased by Mr. Dunsmuir and
eventually were altered to
standard gauge. In 1905, the
Premier was transferred to the
Esquimalt & Nanaimo Railway for
switching purposes and was fin­
ally scrapped in 1912.
Montreal Tramways Company #1102 was a big, cen­
tre entrance suburban car built by the Ottawa Car Mfg.
Company for use On MTC suburban lines. Cars of this
class were used generally on the Lachine route, which
is the sign carried in this p{cture taken at St. Henri car­
house in Montreal in 1914.
C.R.H.A. News Report
Page 37
TWO NOVA SCOTIA CO~~.!.Ii:!<_Y_.!::.~Ii:~JOSLOS~~
The Board of Transport Commissioners for Canada has authorized the
Cumberland Railway & Coal Company to abandon its railway extending from
Springhill Junction to Springhill, N.S. The railway, four miles long, is a sub –
sidiary of Dominion Steel & Coal Co. Limited, and carried coal to a connect­
ion with Canadian National Railways at Springhill Junction until the mines
were closed following an explosion several years ago.
The neighbouring Maritime Coal, Railway & Power Company has also
reportedly indicated that it would cease all service some time during April;
this independent railway extends twelve miles from a C.N.R. connection at
Maccan, N.S., to Joggins, on Chignecto Bay. Both railways have been prov­
ided exclusively with steam power, the Cumberland Railway possessing 0-8-0,
2-8-2, 2-8-0 and 0-6-0T types, while the Maritime Railway has two 2-6-0s,
and a 4-6-0.
Page 38
Dbservations
C.R.H.A. News Report
..•.. a department of news and comment,
by Forster A. Kemp
* A break with the past will be made when Canadian National administrative
offices begin moving from buildings in the vicinity of McGill and St. Paul
Streets, in Montreal, to the new 17.5 -million dollar office building, behind
Central Station on DeLagauchetiere Street. This move will begin during
April, and will probably be completed by June 1st. The Government of
the Province of Quebec has purchased the ten-storey building at 355 McGill
Street and the five-storey building at 360 McGill Street (originally the
head office of the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada –still bears the legend
Grand Trunk cut into the stone) for one million dollars, and will consol­
idate its Montreal offices, which are now scattered in various buildings.
CN leased space in other buildings in the McGill Street area is to be sub­
leased as it becomes vacant.
* Work is continuing through the winter on the Place-Ville-Marie project
above Montreals Central Station. A three-storey structure was recently
erected between Cathcart Street and Dorchester viaduct near the site of the
former north approach ramp. The temporary roadway to the lower entr­
ance of the Queen Elizabeth Hotel has been diverted through this building.
and excavation has begun along Mansfield Street. It is reported that one
million dollars will have to be spent on a ventilation system for the track
area, due to the use of diesel locomotives for train service and switching
in the station and through the adjacent Mount Royal Tunnel.
* Another city-centre development is to be undertaken on a five-block
area of CN land in Moncton –the present location of the station, express
and divisional office buildings, Atlantic Region general office building and
CTC building, several officials residences and extensive lawns and gar­
dens. Most of the buildings were erected by the Intercolonial Railway prior
to 1912. The CNR has entered into an agreement with Mr. Arthur Rudnik­
off, a prominent Montreal builder, representing the Terminal Center Cor­
poration and Camp Investments, Limited, for a multi-level c01TIplex of buil­
dings on this site. close to the downtown business district of Moncton, to
become a multi-million-dollar centre of transportation, business, com­
merce and entertainment.
* Fredericton, N.B., became the second Provincial capital to be deleted from
CN timetables on January 10th, when RDC trains 627 and 628 made their
last runs between Newcastle and Fredericton. (Victoria, BC, lost its CN
passenger train and steamship services before World War II). Hearings
were also heard recently by the Board of Transport Commissioners on CN
applications to discontinue passenger services between Montreal, Granby
and Waterloo, Que., and between Ottawa and Barrys Bay, Onto
* U.S. railways continued to cut passenger services also, and the action of the
Lehigh Valley Railroad resulted in the discontinuance of through CN-LV
and Reading passenger service between Toronto, New York and Philadelphia
on the Maple Leaf, one of two CN passenger services to bear this name.
This was the last through passenger train between Toronto and Philadelphia
and the last Pullman sleeping car service operated by the Reading Company.
The CN trains, nos. 89-90 and 93-94 (numbers change at Hamilton) will
C.R.H.A. News Repor.!….._ Page 39
continue to operate between Toronto and Niagara Falls, Onto The other
Maple Leaf train, No.20 from Chicago to Toronto, is a remnant of the
time when through service was offered between New York and Chicago via
Hamilton over the Lehigh Valley-Grand Trunk (later CN) route. The last
Lehigh Valley passenger trains ran on February 3rd.
* A few years ago, passenger services were undergoing considerable speedup
in schedules and now freight trains on the Toronto-Vancouver runs of both
Canadian railways have had similar treatment. On January 23rd, Canadian
Pacific inaugurated train #901, providing fourth-morning arrival in Van­
couver. On February 2nd, train #949 was placed in service from Montreal
to Winnipeg on a 41-hour, 50-minute schedule, connecting at Winnipeg with
trains to Saskatoon and Edmonton and to Regina, Calgary and Vancouver,
where freight will arrive on the fifth morning. Canadian National also made
a reduction in time of its Toronto-Vancouver freight service of 24 hours
after its line west of Kamloops was restored to service following devastat­
ing floods and slides.
* While the main line CN connection to Vancouver was severed, considerable
Canadian National freight was moved via Prince George and the Pacific Gr­
eat Eastern Railway to Vancouver. This recalled to older BC residents that
the original owners of the PGE, Foley, Welch and Stewart, had contracted
with a CN predecessor, the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, that GTP freight
for Vancouver would be routed via the PGE. The PGE, however, did not
reach Prince George until 1952 and the CN, successors to the GTP, consid­
ered that the agreement no longer applied, especially since their own line
was more direct. This was the first time that any large amount of CN
traffic had moved over the PGE to Vancouver.
* Next move for the Pacific Great Eastern Railway is under consideration by
the British Columbia Government –an extension to the Beaton River area,
about fifty miles northwest of the present terminal at Fort St. John. The
area is rich in oil and other minerals.
* Canadian Pacific Railway has applied to the Board of Transport Commiss­
ioners to abandon the 49.6-mile Coquihalla Subdivision of the Kettle Valley
Division, which extends from Hope to Brodie, B.C. Heavy slides occurring
in November 1959 closed the line and it has not been in use since that time,
all Kettle Valley trains being rerouted through Merritt and Spences Bridge.
The application is being opposed by Penticton, B.C., since the Subdivision,
one of the most spectacular sections of the Canadian Pacific Railway from
an engineering point of view, has served in the past as an alternate link
between the east and Vancouver when Fraser Canyon lines were washed out.
The Coquihalla line was built nearly fifty years ago by the noted engineer,
Andrew McCulloch; its locale is completely devoid of settlements.
* Royal Assent has been given to the construction of an 8~ mile branch in
Alberta by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. It is being built to tap
a British American Oil Company gas and sulphur extraction plant near
Rimbey, Alta. The plant is expected to produce 82 carloads a day.
Parliament has also approved the construction, by Canadian National Rail­
ways, of a 60-mile branch between the Chibougamau line and Mattagami
Lake in northwestern Quebec. The $8,400,000 line. will transport base
metal ores.
**********
CN s NEW PAINT SCHEME (cont d)
old Or new. Roofs and lettering on
passenger cars utilize black paint
while the CN trademark design is
in orange at each end of the car sides.
The colour design adopted for the
road-switcher is black, with red-ora­
nge ends and trademark design on the
longer housing. There is a light-grey
stripe along the running-board and
the same colour is used for the loco­
motive number. It is expected that
this colour design will be extended to
yard engines, and the A and B unit
design to freight diesel units.
The passenger units and the three
passenger cars left Montreal on train
No.1, Super Continental, on Sunday,
February 12th, and made a transcon­
tinental return trip to Vancouver and
back. The road switcher was placed
in service the following week. These
experimental pieces of equipment are
in service to gather comment and to
see how the schernes stand up to nor­
mal wear and tear and dirt conditions.
The decision about extending these
schemes to all equipment will not be
taken for a few weeksj however, it
seems likely that they will be adopted,
without serious modification. CN says
that the new schemes are simpler to
a pply than the old ones and hence pro­
duce desirable savings.
(ttuttubiutt 1Rutlrnub I;tstnrttul 1sSnttuttntt
. !jEWS REPORT No.120
Editorial Address: P.O. Box 22, Station :S, Montreal 2, Canada.
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