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Canadian Rail 116 1960

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Canadian Rail 116 1960

(
ews Report
crha
STATION S
MONTREAL 2. QUESEC
P.O. SOX 22.
NUMBER 116 NOVEMBER 1960.
***
SEVENTY FIVE YEARS AGO -The
Honourable Donald A. Smith
drives the last spike completing the Canadian Pacific Railway from
the Atlantic to the Pacific. 9 :22 AM, Saturday, November 7th, 1885.
THE SPIKE Silve r or gold ? Van Horne had rumbled Iron.
No flags or bands announced this ceremony,
No Morse in circulation through the world,
And though the vita l words like Eagle Pass,
Craigellachie, were trembling in their belfries,
No hands were at the ropes.
– – -E.J. Pratt.
crha
ews Report
P.O.
BOX 22.
STATION B
MONTREAL 2. QUEBEC
NUMBER 1 1 6
***
NOVEMBER 1960.
SEVENTY FIVE YEARS AGO -The Honourable Donald A. Smith
drives the last spike completing the Canadian
Pacific Railway from
the Atlantic to the Pacific. 9 :22 AM, Saturday, November 7th, 1885.
THE SPIKE
Silver or gold? Van Horne had rumbled ffIron
ff

No flags or bands announced this
ceremony, No Morse in circulation th.rough the world,
And though the vital words like Eagle Pass,
Craigellachie, were trembling in their belfries,
No hands were at the ropes.
– – -E.J. Pratt.

EAGLE PASS -NOVEMBER 7TH, 1885�
(
I
LET THE STORY be exploded once and fo r alii /there was no golden
spike at Craigellachie. The spike which the Honourable Donald Alex­
ander Smith, later Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal drove into the tie
linking the r a ils between Montreal and Port Moody was an ordinary
iron one, just lik e all of the others used in construction, taken right
from the keg. This was the inten tion of the officers and the Company
when it became obvious that the rails wouldbe joined in Eagle Pass,
and this was the way it was carried out.
On Friday, November 6th, 1885, a par ty of officers of the Canadian
Pa;cific Railway Companywereon board theofficialcar,Saskatchewan
at Revelstoke, B.C. Included inthi s group were th e Honourable Donald
A. Smith and Mr. George R. Harris, of Boston, both directors of the
railway company. Then there was the noted engineer, Sandford Flem­
ing, John H. ~cTavish, Land Commissioner, and John M. Egan, Gen­
eral Superintendent of the Western Division. All of these were the
guests of William C. Van Horne, Vice-President of the Canadian Pac­
ific Railway who, with his secretary, Arthur Piers, and his business
car attendant, Jimmie French, made up the group on board the car
Saskatchewan

! •
Late that day, Van Horne was advised that the last rail would be
laid in Eagle Pass, som e 29 miles to the wes t, early on the following
morning. Accordingly, engine 148 was coupled up, and the special
train which was to be the first to pass from Atlantic to Pacific tidewat­
er , clim b ed slowly out of the Columbia va lley, over new, rough, un>
ballas t ed tr ack into the va lleys of th e Monashene Mountains. Many eyes
watch ed over the passage of the train –Herbert S. Holt, for example,
was on duty at a slidin g rnud cut which had been giving trouble.
Ea r ly on the morning of the seventh, the train arr ived at the gap
in the ra ils; just a little afte r nin e 01 clock that morning, the last rail
la y in place. It was only na tu ral th at Donald Smith should be the one
sele ctedto perfo rm thecrowning actofthistran s contin ental drama-­
as the senior in years and ex perien ce among the progenitors of this
railway of whi ch Prime Mini s t er Mackenzie, in 1875, had said could
not likely be completed in ten years with all the power of men and all
the money of the Empir e . Smith grasped tne s ~, ,ike maul, took a few
swings at th e spik e –and bent it. The spike was ,,-JrieL out. Egan took
another from the keg, inserted it , and, gingerly this time, Smith tapped
carefully until the spike was anch ored in the tie. Then, with effort
worthy of a pr ofess ional tracklayer, he drove it home. Arthur Piers
loo
kedathis watch. Itwas just 9:22 AM,PacificTime. Therewas,
s
ilence for som e se conds after the last blows fad ed into echoes in the
Gold Range, as if it was difficult fo r th e minds of those pre s ent to con­
ceive th at this project, one of the most ambitious in the world at the
time it was started, was now fina lly completed.
j
J
( )
EAGLE PASS -NOVEMBER 7TH, 1885
LET THE STORY be exploded once and for all-;J-i:here was no golden
spike at Craigellachie. The spike which the Honourable Donald Alex­
ander Smith, later Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal drove into the tie
linking the rails between Montreal and Port Moody was an ordinary
iron one, just like all of the others used in construction, taken right
from the keg. This was the intention of the officers and the Company
when it became obvious that the rails would be joined in Eagle Pass,
and this was the way it was carried out.
On Friday, November 6th, 1885, a party of officers of the Canadian
P~cific Railway Company were on board the official car, IISaskatchewan
at Revelstoke, B.C. Included in this, group were the Honourable Donald
A. Smith and Mr. George R. Harris. of Boston, both directors of the
railway company. Then there was the noted engineer, Sandford Flem­
ing, John H. A:1cTavish, Land Commisstoner, , and John M. Egan, Gen­
eral Superintendent of the Western Division. All of these were tie
guests of William C. Van Horne, Vice-President of the Canadian Pac­
ific Railway who, with his secretary, Arthur Piers, a,nd his business
car attendant, Jimmie French, made up the group on board the car
Saskatchewan
1f

Late that day, Van Horne was advised that the last rail would be
laid in Eagle Pass, some 29 miles to the west, early on the following
morning. Accordingly, engine 148 was coupled up, and the spe,cial
train which was to be the first to pass from Atlantic to Pacific tidewat­
er, climbed slowly out of the Columbia valley, over new, rough, un­
ballasted track into the valleys of the Monashene Mountains. Many eyes
watched over the passage of the train ~-Herbert S. Holt, for example,
was on duty at a sliding mud cut which had been giving trouble.
Early on the morning of the seventh, the train arrived at the gap
in the rails; just a little after nine 0 clock that morning, the last rail
lay in place. It was only natural that Donald Smith should be the one
selected to perform the crowning act of this transcontinental drama, -­
as the senior in years and experience among the progenitors of this
railway of which Prime Minister Mackenzie, in 1875, had said could
not likely be completed in ten years with all the power of men and all
the money of the Empire. Smith grasped the s.:-ike maul, took a few
swings at the spike –and bent it. The spike was … ~rieL out. Egan took
another from the keg, inserted it, and, gingerly this time, Smith tapped
carefully until the spike was anchored in the tie. Then, with effort
worthy of a professional tracklayer, he drove it home. Arthur Piers
looked at his watch. It was just 9 :22 AM. Pacific Time. There was
silence for some seconds after the last blows faded into echoes in the
Gold Range. as if it was difficult for the minds of those prese,nt to con­
ceive that this project, one of the most ambitious in the world at the
time it was started, was now finally completed.
WHERE THE LAST SPIKE WAS DRIVEN
(
-­–
lvia I… uf the
CANA D V.N PA, C IF IC MILWA Y
C
o r r , ~ a n y
Salm on A n n to Revel stoke, B.C;.
S c a l e 8 m
i. ::: 1 i nch .
Suddenly and spontaneously, cheer upon ch eer rent the Nov e mbe r
a
ir; s om e called for a speech from Van Horne, a nd hi s r e pl y w a s noted
for its modesty and for its brevity -­All I can s a y is th a t t h e wo rk
h a s been well done in every way. With a pow e r f ul s ense of th e d ram­
a tic , the proceedings were brought t o an abrupt end by the condu ct o r
calling, All aboard for the Pacific!
On Sunday, November Bth, 1885, t h e tra in whi ch included th e official
car Sas kat chewan! arr ived at Port Moody on B u rra rd Inlet, the first to
cross the Dominion of Canada from sea to sea.
The name C r a i ge lla chi e which has since been applied to the stat­
ion which marks the spot where the last spike was d r iven, i s t h e Scot­
tis h war cry of the clan of Grant, and it means Sta nd Fas t. Both
Smith and his cous in, George Stephen, fi r s t P r e s ident of the C.P.R.,
were des cendants ofth e G rants, and had us e d t his word between them
as as ymbol of encouragement whenever matters had s e em e d hopeless.
Vail Ho rne w rote later t h a t he was m u ch im press e d b y tnis , and deter­
m ined that if he was s till w ith t h e Canadian Pacific R a i lwa y w h e n the
las t spike should be d riven, the site would be n a m ed Cz-a.ige.Ll.ach fe ;
-. j •.. . , ~ ..,I :, . ~ .: l · , . d ·r.,
WHERE THE LAST SPIKE WAS DRIVEN
h/ia .. uf the
CANADIA…N .Pi1.CIFIC .MILWAY
CJ!I4~any
~l1non .A.rrn to Revelstoke, B.C.
Scale 8 mi. = 1 inch.
Suddenly and spontaneously, cheer upon cheer rent the November
air; some called for a speech from Van Horne, and his reply was noted
for its modesty and for its brevity –All I can say is that the work
has been well done in every way. With a powerful sense of the dram­
atic, the proceedings were brought to an abrupt end by the conductor
calling, All aboard for the Pacific!
On Sunday, November 8th, 1885, the train which included the official
car Saskatchewan arrived at Port Moody on Burrard Inlet, the first to
cross the Dominion of Canada from sea to sea.
The name Craigellachie which has since been applied to the stat­
ioh which marks the spot wh.ere the last spike was driven, is the Scot-
oj Usb. war cry of the clan of Grant, and it means Stand Fastlf. Both
Smith and his cousin, George Stephen, first President of the C.P.R.,
were descendants of the Grants, and had used this word between them
asasyinbol of encouragement whenever matters had seemed hopeless.
Van Horne wrote later that he was much impressed by t.nis, and deter­
mined that if he was still with the Canadian Pacific Railwaj when the
last spike should be driven, the site would be named Craigellachie.
~-; ri· .,…,.~., . .,, . .. I-• .I ..
C .R .H .~_. Ne~~R~r t -1160 ~~~_~~
Y..!.s:..!.QB__~_~~ !.~ !…!:..~ .:..l2 .:..
The Editorial Commit t ~e observes,with profound re gr et,
the passing of Notary Victor-Morin, in his 96th year, on
September 20th, 1960.
Vietor Morin, born at f St. Hyacinthe, in what is now the
Provi~ ce of Quebec; on Au gus t 15th, 1$65, r was one of
FrenchCanadas mos t outs tanding men ofculture and
l
etters. The many ac complishments and successeso;f
his
long and useful life are a matter of record; suffice it
,I
to say tha t he was Honorary Pr e s ident of the Ca n adian
Railroad Histor i cal Asso ciatjon from its inception in
1932, until 1957. At th e sam e time, he relin qui shed a
long-term presidency of the Antiquar ian & Numismatic
Soeiet yof Montreal –the famed Cha teau de Ra rnez.ay
r ,. r 1
Mus eum . Hewas.aNotar y, anhonorar y Doctor ofLaws,
a part President of th e Royal Society of Canada, a Pr of-
I.
ess or ofLawatthe UniversityofMont r e al, one ofthe
founders ofthe ChateaudeRarnezay, and alsoofthe Civ ­
ic L ibra ~ y of Mont real and, dur ing his Pres iden c y of the
St. JeariBa.pti ste Socie ty, largely respon sible for the
erection of th e Cross on Mount Royal which is orie of
[ 4
Montreal s mos t distinctive landm arks.
,-I ;
Victor Morin wa s the father of thirteen children, man y
of whom su rvive him. The member s of the-As sociation
join with the Office r s and Di r e ctor s in extending their
, deep and ;.~b iding sym pathy to the family of Victor Morin,
I a ca lm , gracious and belov ed personality.
~
1
R. 1. P.
THE NOVEMBER MEETING :
House in Ottawa on O
ctobe r 14th, Donald
TheRegularMonthlyMe etin g oftheAss ­Forbes Angu s, H~noura ry President and
ociation willbeheldon Wedn es day, Nov­charte r rriernb er: of, the; As socia t ionwas�
ember 9th, 1960, in the lvfc Connell Eng,,:, made a Knight of G ~ a ce of I the Order of�
ine erin g Building,M cGillUniv e r s ity, M il­.Sa i nt John of Jer-usa lerri, Mr. Angus has�
ton
and Univer s ity St re ets , Montreal, be­beeri-acttve in the Orde
,
r for som e yea r s,�
ginning at 8:15 PM. Mr.O.SA .Lavallee ,
having, until recently, held th e post of�
who addressed th e As s o ciation atthe Oct­Provin cial Com mi s s ion er for Ou ebe c,�
ober meeting on the topic Craigellachile, On beha lf of the officers and members of�
Before ami Aft e r ~ill show, bY,cinema: th e Asso ciation, theEditor ial Committee�
togr aph, a , collection of photogr aphs of
extends its.sincer e con gratulation s to Mr.
I.­
railway operations along the Canadian Angus on this attain rnerrt,�
PacificRailway in ~h e Ro cki es in th e 1880s;�
I
Member s .a re cordially invited to bring At the October meeting, which was
I
f
~ iend s as guests.
held on October 12th, .the following per­
j
sons were elected to Regular Membership
ASSOCIATION NEWS in the As s o ciation ~ ,
I
,<
.Mr . Rober t L E ,sperance�
At an investiture,held at Governm ent Mr.JamesB.Porteous�
)
VICTOR MORIN, LL.D.
———————-
The Editorial Committee observes, with profound regret,
the passing of Notary VictorMorin, in his 96th year, on
September 20th, 1960.
Victor Morin, b~rn at I St. Hyacinthe, in what is now the
Provi~ce of Quebec, on August 15th, 1 $65, was one of
French Canadas most outstanding men of culture and
letters. The many accomplishments and successes of
his l~:mg and useful life are a matter of record; suffice it
to say that he was Honorary President of the Canadian
Railroad Historical Association from its inception in
1932, until 1957. At the same time, he relinquished a
long-term presidency of the Antiquarian & Numismatic
Society of Montreal –~the famed Chateau de Ramezay
. MU,seum. He was ?a Notary, an honorary Doctor of Laws,
.a part President d£ the Royal Society of Canada, a Prof­
essor of La~ at th~ University of Montreal, one of the
founders of the Chateau de Ramezay, and also 6£ the Civ-
ic Libra~y of Montreal and, during his Presidency of the
St. J~an .Baptiste Society, largely responsible for the
erection of the Cross on Mount Royal which is one of
Montreals most distinctive landmarks.
Victor Morin was the father of thirteen children, many
of whom survive him. The members of the Association
join with the Officers and Directors in extending their
. deep and abiding sympathy to the family of Victor Morin,
I
a calm. gracious and beloved personality.
R. 1. P.
THE NOVEMBER MEETING:
The Regular Monthly Meeting of the As.s~
ociation will be held on Wednesday, Nov­
ember 9th, 1960, in the McConnell Eng­
ineering Building, McGill Uhiversity, Mil­
ton and University Streets, Montreal, be­
ginning at 8 :15 PM. Mr.O.S.A.Lavallee •
who addressed the Association atthe Oct~
ober meet~ng on the topic Craig,ellachi7e,
Before and After ~ill show, by cin,ema~
tograph, a collection of phbtographs of
railway operations along the Canadian
Pacific Railway in the Rockies in the l880Sj
Members. a,re cordially invited to bring
f~iends as guests.
A.SSOClA,TION NEWS
At an investiture held at Governrpent
, .
House in Ottawa on October 14th, Donald
Forbes Angus, Honourary President and
charter member,: of the Association was
made a Knight of Grace of the Order of
S~int John of Jerusa1em~ Mr. Angus has
._ been acti:ve in the Order for some years.
having. until recently, held the post of
Provincial Comm.is.sioner for Quebec.
On behalf of the officers and members of
the Association. the Editorial Committee
extends its sincere congratulations to Mr.
Angus on thi.s attainment~
At the October meeting. which was
held on October 12th., the following per­
sons were elected to Regular Membership
in the Association:
Mr. Robert L E,sp.erance
Mr. James B. Porteous
C.R.H.A. New j, Report -1960
!
Page 63
M
r. Wi lliam T. Stewa r t
At
the sam e meeting, the following per­
sons were introduced as can didates for
election to Regular Membership at the
Nov
ember meeting :
Mr•.Jean-e
Guy Major
M
r. gerald McGur hi ll
Mr . Peter Murphy
M r .
Peter Ni cholls
M
r. E.A. Spr inger
The following per s ons were introduced as
can didates for election to Junior, M em­
be r
ship at the Nov ember meeting:
M r . John Hay
Mr . D
ouglas Henr y
Mr. Jacques Loi s e lle
M
r. Lindsay Ie r r e au
.l 🙂
M r. Kenneth Wils on

i,
New m ember s ar e reminded that if they
wi sh to take par t in Committ ee wo rk, or.
1
in any of the many activities of the As s­
1.,
ociation,they may get infor m ation by call­
ing theMembership CornrnitteeCha.ir.man ,
M
r.Stephen Ch eas ley at HU.4 -6262, or his
lieutenant, M r. Mi chael Taylor, at OR.l­
5436.
FALL FOLIAGE 1960
T
he Trip Committee staged another
su
ccessful w eekend of trips, with ap p r ox~
irri~te ly 85persons going on the Tenth Ann ­
i

ersaryExcu rsionfromMontr eal to Hub­
e
rdeau on Saturday, October 15th. Appr­
oximately 150 we1-e pr e sent for the trip
bnSundayvOctober 116th, wh en th~ de s tirr-
ation was Ste. Agathe. The attendance
wa
~ very good, in spit e of overcast wea ­
ther conditions on both days.
The Satu rda y trip, our first excursion
lusin g a diesel~ ele~tr ic road looom otive,
mar k ed ten years of CRHA trips , which
had commenced on October l s t, 1950, ov­
er this sa m e route. The locomotive was
a General Motors 1200 hvp, road switcher
No.1914, of a des
ign quit e unfamiliar to
our fr
iends from the U ~ite d State s. The
tr ain included thr ee carsandfr om all a cc>
aunt
s, the participahts enj oyedfhernselves v
erymuch,theHuber d eau line possessing
a t
wisting and undulating charm . Many
pi cture st ops were rnade along the lin e .
(
The pas s engers were so punctual in erri>
barking and in disem barking that th e
Trip Committee wa s able to put two or
three more st ops into the sched ule, and
still manage to return to Mont real right
on tim e.
On
Sunday, October 16th, the motive
power was pr ovided by Canadian Pa cific
G
-5 class 4- 6-2 No. 1270, which w as th e
~:mly stea rn locom otiv e rurmirig on the en­
tire system that day. The ingine per­
for m ed
well and flawlessly, though th e
.Sunda
y morning weather had deter io rated
below that of Satu rday, and one moving
pi ctur e run was made out of a fog near
Val Mor in. The returntrip in the after­
noon was slightly better and the sun man­
aged to break through at St. Jerom e, so
~th e pas senger s were perm itted off th e
tr
ain to take pi ctur e s of No. 1270 in sun­
light.
On the Satu rday trip, Mr. E.G. Wild
re presented the Canadian National Rail­
w
ays, while the Sundaytrip saw Mr..Jack
Beatty represented the Can adian Pa cific
Pas s enger Departm ent, while As sis tan t
S
uperintendent Mr. W.H. Oattes carne al­
ong as well. Both trips kept ri ght on
s
chedule th r oughout, and both returned to
Mont real on tim e.
FU TURE TRIPS
——–,
On the Fall Foliage weekend, a folder
was disfr ibut ed giving details of yet an­
o
ther excur sion to be held this fa ll, on
.Sunda y, Nov ember 6th. A foId er was also
m ailed with the last News Repor t, An
account of this trip, which is to mark the
Seventy-fifthAnniversar y ofthe Dr iv ing
of the Las t Spike at Cz-a.igeIl.ach.ie, com ­
pleti
ng the Can adian Pa cific Railway from
Montr
eal to Por t Moody, on November 7th
1885, will be giv en in the De cernber num ­
be
r. Through a special arrangem ent with
the Canadian Pacific Railway, this train is
to be hauled by A-I class 4-4- 0 No.29.
News Report -1960
/ p,age 63
Mr. William T. Stewart
At the same meeting, the following per­
sons were introduced as candidates for
election to Regular Membership at the
Novernber rneeting:
Mr •.
Jean~Guy Major
Mr. Ge raId McGur hill
Mr. Peter Murphy
Mr. Peter Nicholls
Mr. E.A. Springer
The following persons were introduced as
c
andidates for election to Junior, Mern~
bership at the November rneeting:
Mr.
John Hay
Mr. Douglas ,Henry
Mr. Jacques Loiselle
Mr.
Lindsay Terreau
.
Mr. Kenneth Wilson
,
New members are reminded that if they
wi
sh to take part in Cornrnittee work, or
in
any of the many activities of the Ass-
I
ociation, they rnay get inforrnation by call-
i
ng the Memhership Comrn,ittee Chairrnan,
Mr
.Stephen Cheasley at HU .4-6262. or his
lieutenant, Mr~ Michael Taylor, at OR.l-
5436.
FALL FOLIAGE 1960
The Trip Committee staged another
successful weekend of trips. with approx~
imately 85 persons going on the Tenth Ann­
iversary Excursion frorn Montreal to Hub­
erdeau on Saturday, October 15th. Appr­
oximately 150 were present for the trip
on Sunday, October 16th, when the destin­
ation was Ste. Agathe. The attendance
was very good. in spite of overcast wea­
ther conditions on both days.
The Saturday trip, our first excursion
lusing a diesel~electric road looornotive,
marked ten years of CRHA trips, which
had commenced on October 1 st, 1950, ov­
er th
is same route. The locolUotive was
a General Motors 1200 h.p. road switcher
No.l9l4, of a design quite unfamiliar to
our friends from the United States. The
train included three cars and from all acc­
ounts. the participants enjoyedthemselv-3s
velly much, the Huberdeau line possessing
a twisting and undulating charrn Many
picture stops were made along the line.
The passengers were so punctual in ern~
barking and in disembarking that the
Trip Committe.e was able to put two or
three more stops into the schedule, and
stUl manage to return to Montreal right
on tirne.
On Sunday, October 16th, the rnotive
power was provided by Canadian Pacifico,
G-5 class 4~6-2 No. 1270. which was the
only steam locomotive runnh.g on the en­
tire systern that day. The ~ngine per­
formed well and flawlessly, though the
Sunday morning weather had deteriorated
below that of Saturday, and one moving
picture run was made out of a fog near
Val Morin. The return trip in the after­
noon was slightly better and the sun rnan­
aged to break through at St Jerome. so
the passengers were permitted off the
train to take pictures of No. 1270 in sun­
light.
On the Saturday trip, Mr. E.G. Wild
r
epresented the Canadian National Rail­
ways, while the Sunday trip saw Mr.Jack
Beatty represented the Canadian Pacific
Passenger Department, while Assistant
Superintendent Mr. W.H. Oaftes came al­
ong as well. Both trips kept right on
schedule throughout, and both returned to
Montreal on time.
FU TU RE TRIPS
On the Fall Foliage weekend, a folder
w.as distributed giving details of yet an­
other excursion to be held this fall. on
Sunday. November 6th. A folder was also
mailed with the last News Report. An
account of this trip, which is to mark the
Seventy-fifth Anniversary of the Driving
of the Last Spike at Craigellachie. com­
pleting the Canadian Pacific Railway from
Montreal to Port Moody; on November 7th
1885, will be given in the Dece-mber num­
ber. Through a special arrangement with
the Canadian Pacific Railway, this train is
to
be hauled by A~ 1 class 4-4-0 No.29.
(
C.R.BA.
News Rep0r.t:1:960 Page 6~
Seventy-Five Years Ago ••••••••
~AGL~
PASS, NOVE~R 7TH, 1 8~
(
by Orne r S.A. Lavallee.
The event which Canadian railway people will remember this month is one of the
firstmagnitude inCanadiantransportationhistor y. The cornple ti on of the railway
from the East to the Pacific Coast is an accomplishm er.t. w hic.h shonId rarik, in im­
portance, beside the birth of Canadian railways in 1836, the rnuid en voya ge of the
steamer Accomodation in 1809, and the completion of -t:he Inrcr colonial Pa i l-vay in
1876, for it was an event freighted with destiny for C ariaria a s a whole, gaiire rin g in
one rn otion, as it were, half a continentof deserted prairie and tumbled mountains,
from which the bountiful he artland of the Canadian prair ie and the far-famed play­
ground of the Rocky 1vlountains was subsequently carved.
Under the headline 1871-1885, Fourteen Years Patience Rewarded At Last,
the edition of the Victoria Daily Colonist of Sunday, November 8th, 1885, printed a
very complete contemporary account of the completion of the Canadian Pacific Rail­
way in Eagle Pass. In a dispatch By C.P.R. Telegraph Exclusively to the Colonist
and dated End of Track, November 7th, 8 p.m., the paper had this to say:
If Track laying commenced at six 0 clock this morning on last mile, and at nine
0 clock, the last rails had been brought forward and measured for cutting in two,
which latter was done with one while the other was partly cut and left intact until
the official party should ar r ive . Major Rogers rnade several blows with a heavy
sledge on the last r ail, helping to cut it. One twenty foot rail was taken up and plac­
ed on one of the trucks to be laid when the Van Horne party who are expected in a
few minutes arrive. Everyone at the connection is
JUBILANT OVER T HE COlviPLETION
of the line, and especially those who have been so intimately connected with its con­
struction. Yesterday the weather was clear and cold. During the night heavy rain
fell and forty miles west of her e there is a fo ot of snow on the track. At Gorge Cr­
eek, the weather is cloudy and raining slightly. Photogr a phe r s are on the spot to
photograph the proceedings. Mr, ~l.J. Haney, general superintendentofthePacific
Division, arrived several days previously in his official car•••••.
Inaseconddispatch,dayed EaglePass,November 7ththeColonistgoesonto
say, II The train consisted of the official car, sleeper and baggage car, and as soon
as the engine stopped, a short distance frorn the end of track, the tracklayers began
placing the last 20 fe et. This was accomplished and in about fifteen minutes, the
last spike was placed in position for driving. This hcaotrr was relegated to Hon, D.A.
Smith, ivrajor Rogers, C.E., holding up the tie. The official party and visitors were
then for med on ea ch side of the track while the photographer took several views, af­
ter which the boDourable gentleman cornrrrenced driving the spike, which was an iron
one, the venerc,L,1e major keeping the tie well up. A ihV well-aimed blows firmly
fixed the spike to the rail, thus completing connection with the Atlantic and Pacific.
As the last blow was struck, a hearty cheer burst forth from the crowd, which con­
sisted altogether of about 150 persons. Thre e other rousing cheers were given for
the success of the Canadian Pacific, proposed b y J .1Vi. Ross, C.E. and the ceremony,
of driving the last spike of the great transcontinental line was completed. Manager
Van Horne was asked to say a few words on the occasion. He said: All that I have
C.R.H.i..
News Rep0:t-1960 Page 6~
Seventy-Five Years Ago ••••••••
~AGLE PASS, NOVEMBF;:.R 7TH, 18~
by Omer S.A. Lavallee.
The event which Canadian railway people will remember this month is one of the
first magnitude in Canadian transportation history. The r.om~letion of the railway
from the East to the Pacific Coast is an accomplishmer.t Ji.hich shodd rar:k, in im­
portance, beside the birth of Canadian railways in 1836,i.he m::idei1. voyage of the
steamer AccoLuodation in 1809, and the completion of i:he Iatercol.·.:mial Paih.ray in
1876, for it was an event freighted with destiny for Canad!1 as a whole, gatll~ one Inotion, as it were, half a continent of deserted prairie and tumbled mountains,
from which the bountiful heartland of the Canadian prairie and the far-famed play­
ground of the Rocky Mountains was subsequently carved.
Under the headline 1871-1885, Fourteen Years Patience Rewarded At Last,
the edition of the Victoria Daily Colonist of Sunday, November 8th, 1885, printed a
very complete contemporary account of the completion of the Canadian Pacific Rail­
way in Eagle Pass. In a dispatch By C.P.R. Telegraph Exclusively to the Colonist
and dated End of Track, November 7th, 8 p.m. !I, the paper had this to say:
Track laying commenced at six 0 clock this morning on last mile, and at nine
0 clock, the last rails had been brought forward and measured for cutting in two,
which latter was done with one while the other was partly cut and left intact until
the official party should arrive. Major Rogers ma.de several blows with a heavy
sledge on the last rail, helping to cut it. One twenty foot rail was taken up and plac­
ed on one of the trucks to be laid when the Van Horne party who are expected in a
few minutes arrive. Everyone at the connection IS
JUBILANT OVER THE CO!viPLETION
of the line, and especially those who have been so intimately connected with its con­
struction. Yesterday the weather was clear and cold. During the night heavy rain
fell and forty miles west of here there is a foot af snow on the track. At Gorge Cr­
eek, the weather is cloudy and raining slightly. Photographers are on the spot to
photograph the proceedings. Mr. Iv •• J. Haney, gen~ral superintendent of the Pacific
Division, arrived several days previously in his official car .•••••
In a second dispatch, dayed Eagle Pass, Noveluber 7th the Colonist goes on to
say, If The train consisted of the official car, sleeper and baggage car, and as soon
as the engine stop{}ed, a short distance from the end of track, the tracklayers began
placing the last 20 feet. This was accomplished and in about fifteen minutes, the
last spike aras placed in position for driving. This bcoour was relegated to Hon. D.A.
Smith, Nlajor Rogers, C.E., holding up the tie. The official party and visitors were
then forIned on each side of the track while the photographer took several views, af­
ter which the bouourable gentleman commenced driving the spike, which was an iron
one, the vener -de major keeping the tie well up. A fhV well-aimed blows firmly
fixed the spike to the rail, thus completing connection with the Atlantic and Pacific.
As the last blow was struck, a hearty cheer burst forth from the crowd, which con­
sisted altogether of about 150 persons. Three other rousing cheers were given for
the success of the Canadian Pacific, proposed by J .1Vi. Ross, C.E. and the ceremony,
of driving the last spike of the great transcontinental line was completed. Manager
Van Horne was asked to say a few words on the occasion. He said: All that I have
C R H A
-_.
_�
he 6~
, _ Nels R~E£E~.: 1960
…_—- -_.._._—-_.. …_~~
got to say a,s t.nat, l.t .wss .wel.l. ·done in .every . ~~…y.. .. ..:he L:e.cemony was very simple,
( ) in contrast to the spread made by the Northern .Pacific , .and·.i t ···i s hoped that·-ss
gr.est.asuccess.willattend··the.VanHornespike…dr-ivingas·di sast er didthat of
Villard. The news was at once telegraphed east.. and west,-and··will·soon·be·known
on
both continents. ..Afterthe·cars had·passed-ove:v..the connection, tlle·1ast..spfke
.
was driven fromits–place, cut-into small pieces,··and .di stributed to members of
the party.–. Van·Horne· sent ·messages to the Pr esi dent in England, .to.High Commis­
sioner Tupper, to Governor-General ·Lansdowne,..Lieutenant-Governor .Cornwal l , .and
others. After the ceremony,..the .train was .backed..to..the····tank··for water, ·and ·
superintendent Haneys ·,tr.ain .proceeded .to·.GhickamooseNar.r.ows • . In conversation
withMr Van Horne, he·sai d that-he·hadbeenconnected·wi t h therailroadsince
1881 i. whentherewere.butfifteen·md.Le.s.built,-and now-that he·had ..reached·t he
pinnacle..of success in the effort··to build the .line , ·hewas·happy -and ..satisfied.
The trip from ~nnnipeg..to the first crossing:of the Columbia was made in.thirty­
___ _ three and.ea half ·hours , _~he distance being.1022 miles;_but_when _t he.l i ne.was0
ballastedand in working order, they expected to go from Wi nnipeg to Port Moody
in about 45 hours time
The
third despatch, dated Kamloops·November·7th, cont l nUed.: b.lngl.ne 14d
and a train of three cars in.charge of Engi neer Mee and Conduct or Selkirk
rounded the curve .at .10 .10, .mountain time. The cans .we.re ..the.generalmanagers
official coach ~Matapedia·~ an elegant. and luxurious af f ai ri the_~Saskr;tchewan,
and another car divided .i.rrt o various compartments for. culinary,eating, and
sleeping purposes.. . The party.-consisted of General Manager Van..Horne, Vice..
President ·of t.he CPR, Hon, Donal d A Smith,manager.of-the Hudson.te -Bay Go. in
Canada, and .directors Sandford Fleming,C.E4.,.M:v..Harris··..of Boston, -H.H. Abbott,
the company solicitor,.J _H McTavish, CPR land-commissioner.··of Wi nni peg, J MEgan,
manager of the North Americ an Contracting Company , who has charge of all work
east of Griffin Lake , and H B Peers , Mr Van Hornes private secretary.
The fourth·despatchwas·sent from.Spanees .brl.a.ge, tl..Ll:lu..on Novemoer·1-th,
and said in part: lIItOf fici al t rafn-in charge or.Engineer·Mee.and Conductor
Trodden passed-the-western-train-at SiokamoGse·Narrows,.l eaving.1at -t er.point
at 12.15 pm,·..mountain.time..-..SuperintendentHaney,-MajorRogers·r-and.Mr H-J
~ambie
, C..E. , accompanied· the-party,..andvgood-time was made .val.ong ,t he shores
of Shuswap.and Thompson.Rivers… -Kaml.oops r-eached-cat; ] .50 pm, wher e -a stop of
half ·an -hour was made ~· and…Justic8 ·,-and·.,Nlr s .ival kem.,..Mr .Speakel:-Mar a-·of -the
Legislative…A.ssembly;.,.MJ;G:vaham··-of t.ha-H..BCGmpany,-and–Ma.FCus:·Smi t h..,-t he
Dominion Government..engineer visited the pa~ty.,. -t he.l at t er. -goi ng.–Gn.-Ooaro
t.he–tJ;ain and–p;r-oc.eeding-with·i t .–.A-·l ar.ge.crowd. ..gathsJ;ed at,-the…Cosmopolitan
Hotel·tosee·the··novel-sight, and–as-theoff·ic·ialcar.-passedl··gavethree·rousing
cheers.· A··few ·minutes! stay was made at Savona sstation,and l£ngineerMc·Nab
took charge..of the thJ::ottle. .llery.quick time-was·made.t o.Spenoe s Bridge; .t he
distance–of–f.ifty:-miles..being.-cove~ed -,in .lit.tle -.over an hcur-. ….A few.. minutes
stopwas made, and thetrainstartedforNorthBend, where theywillr emai n for
the night, running through the canyons of the Fraser to Moody by daylight.
The fifth despat .ch came .1. 5 0 f r om Spences Bridge , and since t i., ..v.. d
Craigellachie hadonly beenpr esent ed thatdaytoanUnsuspectingworld,the
corz-espondent oftha Colonist…. may be forgiven for misspelling it when he
telegraphed: The point where the last spikewas driven was christened Cr ai gl ea
and the name tegraphed allover two continents.
(
got to say ~s t.hat. ~t.·V/..as··.wel.l..···done in.everY-i~G;4Y … –lhe(.;e.f·emonywas very simple,
in contrast to the spread made by the Northern··Paoific j ·and·.it· ·is· hoped that·-as·
gFeat·a success·will attend-the· Van Horne spike .. dI!iving as·disaster did that of·
Villard. The news was at onc·e telegr&lphed·east-andwestt-and -w.ill··soon··be·known
on both continents~ . ·..After. the ·cars had-passed-over.the cormeotion, the-last-spike
. was, driven from.lt.s_place, cut-.into small pieces,··and ·distributed to members of
the party. —ian Horne-sent messages to the Pr,esident in.England
t-
to· High Commis­
sioner, Tupper to Governor-General .. Lansdowne ,. -Lieutenant-Gov:ernor .Cornwall, .8Rd
others. After the ceremony,.·-the ·train was·baGked-to-the·t·ank···for water, . and .
superintendent Haney~s~tr.ain -proceeded. to·-ChickamooseNarrows •. In conversation
with Mr Van HorRe, he ·said that he .. had·been·connected·with·therailroad since
1881 i . when there·were· but fifteen miles· built, -and now-that he -had .. reached ·the .
pinnacle-of success in the effor.t·to build the.line,-hewashappy–and–satisfied.
The trip. from ~iinnipeg .. to the first crossing: of the Columbia.wasmade in.thirty-
__ three..and..:..8 ~alf -.hmlls,_ahe dis_tance be_ing lQ22mile.s_; b_ut-Whe.n_the line_was
ballastedand in working order, they expected to go from Winnipeg to Port Moody
in about 45 hours I time ….•.
1he
third despatch, dated KamloopsNovember. 7t.h,contlnued: .I1ing~ne14d
and a train of three car.s in.charge of EngineerMee and Conductor Selkirk
rounded the curve at. 10 .10, .. mountain time. The GaFS wex!8-the .. generalmanager~ s
official coach ~lJlatapedia· ,an elegant .. tind luxurious affair;, the-~Sask~;tchewan,
and another car divided into-various c.ompartments for culinary., eating, and
sleeping purposes .. The par.ty. cons.i.sted of General Manager Van· Horne , Vice.,.
President ·of the· CPR., Hon~ Donald A Smith,manager.of.-the Hudson·~s -Bay Co. in
Canada, and.directors Sandford Fleming
1
·C.E4.,.Nlr. .. Harris·· .. of Boston, -H. H. Abbott,
the company.solicitor, J_H McTavish, CPR land-commissioner···of .Winnipeg, J MEgan,
manager of the North American Contracting Company, who has charge of all work
ea.st of Griffin Lake, and H B Peers, NIr Van Horne
9
s private secretary.
The fourth .. despatch.was-sent from.Spenees jjr~a.g8, tlli:)u··on lIJovemberc-l-th,
and
said in part :-Offioial train·incharge of·· ·Engineer·Mes·and Conductor
Trodden passed the·-weste.r.n·-train-at SickamoGse-Narrows, .leaving–lat:ter. point
at 12.15 pm,—mountain-time .. –.-Superinter ~ambie, C.E .• ,.accompanied.the-party,–and–good-time was made.-along.,the shores
of·Shuswap.and.Thompson.Ri.vers ….. Kamloops reGiched-at 3·.50 pm·,. wher.e.-as-top of
hal-f··· an . hour· was mad e·, .. -and .. -J ustice-~nd· .Mr s .W alkem.,·Mr . Sp eake~ -Mara-··of -the
Legislative . …Assembly.., -11b;~ Gr.aham·-of the ·H-B Com~ny s -and·-MaFcus··Smith.,-the
DGminion GG:v:er.rnnent .. engineer visitsci :the pa;r.ty.,. .the.lattsv.-going–Oll-.-Ooard
t.he–train and … p:r.Gc.eeding-w:ith-.it .–. .A-·lar.ge -c;t:owd .. gathered at.-the.-Cosmo,politan
Hotel to see· the–novel-sight, and··aa·-the off·ic·isl car.-passea..J .. gave thNS·-rousing
cheers.· A··few ··minutes~ stay was ·made at Savona s ·station1and ing-ineeF·Mc-Nab
took charge .. of the throttle. -Very. quick time·-wa·s···mad·e .to.Spence~s Bridge,. ·the
distance-of .-fifty:-miles … being.-cove~ed -in·-little–over an hOl.lr….Ji.. few ….. minutes
stop was made, and the train started for North Bend, where they will remain for
the night. running through the canyons of the Fraser to Moody by daylight. It
The fifth despatch came o.l.so from Spenceo s Bridge, and since tl._ .. v.I.d
Craigellachie had only been presented that day to an Unsuspecting world, the
corres:poriiE!mt of the -Coloriist may be forgiven for misspelling it whim he
telegraphed: -The point where the last spikewas driven was christened Craiglea
and the name tegraphed allover two continents.
C.R.H.A.
News Report… 1960 Page 66
certain errors or inconsistenCies in the Colonist account, they
may well be iorgiven. However, merely to reconcile this account with that usually
given, we would observe that in the third dispatch above, the statement that the train
rounded the curve at 10:10 mountain time refers of course to Eagle Pass, and not
to Kamloops from which station the dispatch was sent. 10:10 mountain time is 9 :10
Pacific time, or only twelve minutes before Srn.ith drove the last spike a t 9 😕 2, a srn,;
Pacifictime,accordingtoArthurPiers. Inthesarnedispatch,Ar thur Pip,s I n urne
is wrongly given as H.B. Peers. In the second dispatch, the staterncnt t i1il -i; Van
Horne sent a messa.ge to the president in England refer s , of conrsc to ·dH: Ltd
that George Stephen, later Lord Mount Stephen, the first President vi rhe Raihray,
was not at the Eagle Pass ceremony, but was then in England looking afte r the rail­
ways financial affairs.
The m emo made in Arthur Piers diary at the time of the Eagle Pass ceremony,
states:Last s pike driven by Hon; D. A . Smith on Saturday 7th November 1885, at
9 :22 a vrn, (Pacific Time), at station 1514 –or 15.94 miles east of centre of Sica­
mous Bridge, or 11.02 miles west of west end of Griffin Lake.
The same edition of the Colonist gave an editor ia l no less than twenty-four
inchesin length, alm ost fifteenhundred words,tothecompletionoftherailway,end­
ing with the tribute, ••••••it is therefore with feelings of loyalty to the Dominion and
of hopefulness for our future that we hail the completion of the Canadian Pacific
Ra ilway.
NOTE: Enclosed with this issue of the News Report is a eopy of
the description of the Last Spike Ceremony, handed out to pass­
engers on board the special train which took part in the reenact­
m ent of the famous ceremony sponsored by C.R.H.A. at a point
on the St.Lin Subdivision, near Morit rea I, on November 6th, 1960.
WEEKEND IN WINNIPEG, CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL
by Steve Walbridge. ASSOCIATION
.-::-::-;——–­
News Report No. 116
A TRIP ON THE City of Winnipeg November, 1960.
Hydro Railway behind a 4-4-0 built in Editorial Address:
18B2, a visit to see the unusual equip­
ment of the Greater Vv innipeg Water
Dis tr-i ct R ailway, and a trip through the
Canadian Pacific Railway yards to see
P.O.Box 22, Station B Montreal 2.
Editor: Omer S..A.• Lavallee
Asst. Editor: William Pha r oah
Publisher: John Saunders
the ste arn engines stored at Weston Sh­
ops is a com.bination that was difficult
tc resist. The Winnipeg Model Railroad
Club arranged just such a series of ev-
Committee: Anthony Clegg,
David R. Henderson,
P aul R. McGee
Lorne C. Per~y
ents for the w ee k end of October 15th and
.
16th, 1960, when they played hosts to a Convention of the
Thousand Lakes Region of
the National Model Railroad Association.
The City of Winnipegs City Hydro constructed a railway from Lac du Bonnet,
80 miles northeast of Winnipeg, to Pointe du Bois, Manitoba, in 1908. In 1928, a br­
anch was built from Pointe du Bois to Slave Falls. These lines were built to trans­
port equipment and supplies required to build powerhouses at the two latter points.
C.R.H.A.
News Report,.1960 Page 66
certain errors or inconsistenCies in the Colonist account, they
may well be orgiven. However, merely to reconcile this account with that usually
given, we would observe that in the third dispatch above, the statement that the train
rounded the curve at 10:10 rno1.lntain time refers of course to Eagle Pass, and not
to Kamloops from which station the dispatch was sent. 10:10 mountain time is 9:10
Pacific time, or only twelve minutes before SrnJth drove the last spike at 9:22; a.m.,
Pacific time, according to Arthur Piers. In the same dispttt~h, Arthur Pic<:s nJ.~ne
is wrongly given as H.B. Peers. In the second dispatch, the st3.ter::-~Lnt t.i1F~i; V<
Horne sent a n1.essage to the president in England refers, of C01lr;;~; todu.: L.ct
that George Stephen, later Lord Mount Stephen, the first President vf 1-11( Railva.y,
was not at the Eagle Pass ceremony, but was then in England looking after the rail­
ways financial affairs.
The memo made in Arthur Piers diary at the time of the Eagle Pass ceremony,
states~Last spike driven by Hon. D. A. Smith on Saturday 7th November 1885, at
9 ;22 a.m. (Pacific Time), at station 1514 –or 15.94 miles east of centre of Sica­
mous Bridge, or 11.02 miles west of west end of Griffin Lake.
The same edition of the Colonist gave an editorial no less than twenty-four
inches in length, almost fifteen hundred words, to the completion of the railway, end­
ing with the tribute, •••••• it is therefore with feHings of loyalty to the Dominion and
of hopefulness for our future that we hail the completion of the Canadian Pacific
Railway.
NOTE: Enclosed with this issue of the News Report is a eopy of
the description of the Last Spike Ceremony, handed out to pass­
engers on board the special train which took part in the reenact­
ment of the famous ceremony sponsored by C.R.H.A. at a point
on the St.Lin Subdivision, near Montreal, on November 6th, 1960.
WEEKEND IN WINNIPEG, CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL
by Steve Walbridge. ASSOCIATION
A TR!P ON THE City of Winnipeg
Hydro Railway behind a 4-4-0 built in
18B2, a visit to see the unusual equip­
ment of the Greater Vv innipeg Water
Di.strict Railway, and a trip through the
Canadian Pacific Railway yards to see
the stealn engines stored at Weston Sh­
ODS is a combination that was difficult
~
tc resist. The Winnipeg Model Railroad
Club arranged just such a series of ev­
ents for the weekend of October 15th and
News Report No. -116——–
November, 1960.
Editorial Address:
P.O.Box 22, Station liB Montreal 2.
Editor: Orner S.A.. Lavallee
Asst. Editor: William Ph:raroah
Publisher: John Saunders
Committee: Anthony Clegg,
David R. Henderson,
Paul R. McGee
Lorne C .. Pel.ir.Y
16th, 1960, when they played hosts to a Convention of the
the National Model Railroad Association.
Thousand Lak~s Region of
The City of Winnipegs City Hydro constructed a railway from Lac du Bonnet.
80 miles northeast of Winnipeg, to Pointe du Bois, }.jJ.anitoba, in 1908. In 1928, a br­
anch was built from Pointe au Bois to Slave Falls. These lines were built to trans­
port equipment and supplies required to build powerhouses at the two latter points.
C R H:.-:-.::A=–_ . –__~w s Repor t -.1~ 60 ___ ..__.__.. Page 67
Fr oma
junctionwi t h the::Canadian.Pac ific-,l-(ai.Lway-.atL8c ·QU Don:uet , (,[Lt:::City Hydr o
{
wline runs.east.ward for 26-miles-through fairl y flat farm and-bush country. . :.
crosses the Wi nnipeg Ri veron a-bridge-which is ·shar ed with hi ghway traffic. j+
this point, the-trains stop to couple up toa water si phon, drawing wat er from the
river.. The .t rack fol-lows the corrtour.cof rock cuts. Sho;rt !lections-of track-rise over outcroppings of. grey and brown granite
up gr ades of nearly 510. Some of the tracks ar e ·built over logs-t hr ough-swamps. In
all, the .56-1b. rail . provides-an int er esting, if not -always-smoot h,. road . The·six­
mile line southward to Sl ave Falls branches southward just outside.of.Poi nt e du
Bois. Snow fences of discarded ties, in herring-bone fashion similar to the cedar
rail fences one sees on Lower ~ueb ec farms , at t est to the ingenuity of the mainten­
ance-of-way personnel .
Engi ne
No. 3 is a-mast.erp.i.ece-ot maintenance ana gooo-housekeepi ng. .Built in
1882 for the Canadi an Pacifi c by Dubs .and Company of·Glasgow,–.Scot land, it s shiny
.138
1 •
siderodsstillbearthe·cm markings22_ and Mechani cally,ithasmany
features whi ch first appear ed-on engines muchits junior .-.Air-sander s wer e added
in 1957; its snow plough, permanentl y mounted, brushesthe tall .gr ass at the edge
oftheright-of-waytoone·side-·as.i t passes.·· -The.pai nt is -spot l ess, and ione
wouldnothesitateto-eat his..lunch-of f itsdeck. Engineer.Arthur·Bat eman ,.a re­
tired CNR engineer, obviously enjoys every minute·····of..his runs.0n.No. -3, and gives-·
the unmd.stakabkeDanadLan -Pacific· bel l ·and·-whistle··full and-fr equent exercise
wher e no crossings exist for miles. Fireman Clifford ·Shand j. al t hough having.fired
No. -3 for only eight.t:dps, has acqui.r-edr t he necessary-skills in short order. Nor­
mally, he..operates.a.rail…buscbetween Point e·du·.Bois-·2nd Sl &ve Falls.· .Conduct or
David Hodge -succeeded-his f<+ther who..enjoyed ··30 ..years.of ser vice,on the line.-One
of the most interested passengers was Dan Spadini , who r etir ed recently after 47
years at Pointe du Bois, 42 of whi ch wer e spent firing No. 3 after it ar r i ved on
the scene in 1918 .
The
..wooden combine-is-as.wel l -.kept and..spotless as No…j •..–.I::lel i eved t o-have
beenbui.Lt.by Pull man,-it shows ·s number-l OJ ..:i,.ngol d numer-al.a.ihi.gh-on..thevarnished
transom· intheexpress.section.··The openvestibulesat·.each-end car e-pa.lnt .ed .a
bright yellow. Fresh green-paint,.with yellow.l etter i ng.on··.the··outside of the car
is outdone on the-insi de by ·white enamelled ceilings and varnished-woodwcrk in the
coach section. The reversible wicker seats ar e in excellent condition. A stove
and a lar ge powder rcom behind bri ghtl y varnished wood panel s compl ete the interior.
At Poi.nt .e-cu Boa.s, -.mot ori zed rai l aquapment, Whi ch-is·Ll.tH=Q mucn-mo.re frequently
than No. J,_was arranged on ~exhib ition . -.A -fJlack-.rai l-bus·, built in-.1922…for the
Northern Pacific, a..Maek-truck of._.19Jo vant age, a-Ford rail-car–built..locally in
193.5-36, and a Davenport ·gas-el ectr ic–loGomoti ve Quilt··.inH)27,..completetherost-er
of -mot Lve power ~· . -·In addition,a–well-kept–snow plough-with-a. front-·end·.cupo.La.and
a.
-few..f lat…cars..were also–seen.—The-hospitality of City Hydro in fi.ring up No.3
forthisoccasion, and ofits empLoyeesduringthetripandlaterin theirrecrea­
tion centre would be di f ficult t o su~pass.
Avisit to the Gr eater Winnipeg Wat er District-Railroad was very int erest i ng,
and included a shor-t run in.Mack car 31. -This railroad was built in 1912.to transport
mater-LaLs usediri constructlngthe92:milelong aqueduct-whi ch bri ngsWirinipeg
t
s
wat e.r suppl yfromShoar Lak
er on the Mani t oba-Ontario border. Three 44-hp General
Elect ric diesels now provide the motive power for trainloads of gravel.
(
From a junction .with the::-:Canadian .. Eacific-.1tailway-.at ·Lac ·(iU Dundee, l.·ht;:; .ti.ity Hydro
line r-uns··eastward fOl- 2b.miles-through,fairly flat farm. and_bush country. , :w
crosses t,he Winnipeg River.on a· bridge. which is ·shared with highway traffic. At
this point, the–trains stop to couple up to ·a water siphon drawing water from the
river ..The .track fol:-lows the contour,·.of -the country., with numerQUS, cu;t!ves a.nd few
rock cut s. Sho;rt .ections… of t·rack ·rise over outcroppings of–grey and brown granite
up grades of ne:arly 5%. Some of the tracks 8l-e·built over logs-through-swamps. In
all the 56-lb. rail-provides-an interesting, if not .always-smooth,. road. The-six­
mile line southward to Slave Falls ·branches southward just ··outsideofPointe du
Bois. Snow fences of discarded ties, in herring-bone fashion similar to the cedar
rail fences one sees on Lower ~uebec farms, attest to the ingenuity of the mainten­
ance-of-way personne~.
Engine No. 3 is a .masterpiece-·01 maintenance ana gooa .housekeeping. Built in
1882 for the Canadian Pacific by Dubs -and Company of· Glasgow ,-.. Scotland, its shiny
side rods still bear the ·em markings 22-and .138
11
, Mechanically, it hUs many
features which first appeared-on engines much its· junior. –Air-sanders were added
in 1957; its snow plough, permanently mounted
r
brushes ·the tall.grass at the edge
ofthe right-of-way to-one,side·-as .it.passes .. ,· .The.paint is·spotless, and ·one
would
not hesitate to. eat his .. lunch-off its deck. Engineer .Arthurc-Bateman,-.a re­
tired CNR engineer, obviouslyenj ays every minute ··,·of,-his runs· on -No.3, and gives­
the unmistakable·Canadian. Pacific, bell and· ·whistle· fUll aRe.· frequent ,exercise
where no crossings exist fo~ miles. Fireman Clifford ,Shana, ··although having. fired
No. -.3 for only eight-trips, has acquired.the necessary· skills in shor-.t order. Nor­
mally, he., operate.s.aiI.rail,bus-between Po·inte ·Qu·.Bois–sndSlave Falls~ ,CoMuctGr
David Hodge. succeeded-his f~ther who.-enjoyed.30 .. years .. of service·,·on the line. -One
of the most interested passengers was Dan Spadini, who retired recently after 4,7
years at Pointe du Bois, 42 of which were spent firing No. 3 after it arrived on
the scene in 1918.
The-.wooden combine. is-as .well~.keptand .. -spotless as No. –.:$. ·-l::lelievedto-· have
been.buil t -by Pullman , -it show s·a numoer-lO.:$ .. j,.n gold numerals· ,high .. oR-. t he ,varnished
transom· in theexpl-6ss–section. , The open vestibules at·. each ·end~re -paiRted a
bright yellow. Fresh green-paint, .with yellow .lettering-on-,ths–Outside of the car
is outdone on the inside by white enamelled ceilings and varnished-woodwcrk in the
coach section. The reversible wicker seats are in excellent condition. A stove
and a large ·~powder room
tt
behind brightly varnished wood panels complete the interior.
At .Pointe-du Bois~motorized rail equ~pment, which·· is ,ilSeQ mUU!l–more frequently
than No. J,_was arranged on-exhibition. -.A-.lIlack.-rail-ous-,-built in–1-922-.for the
Norther-n Pacific I a .. Mack-truck of … 19JO vintage., a-Ford :vail-Gar-built–locally in
1935-36, and ei·DaveRport .gas-electric–loGomotiv:e built-in 1!j27, -complet.e the rost-er
o.t:-motive PGwer~.—In addition, a-.well-kept–snow plough-with–s· front .. -end· .cupola -and
8-few .. flat-.-cars.-were also.-seen .. –rae-hospitality of City Hydro in fi.ring up No.3
for this occasion, and of its employees during the trip and later in their recrea­
tion centre would be difficult to su;rpass.
A viSit to the Greater Winnipeg Water District Railroad was very interesting,
and included a short run in,·.MacK car 31. This railroad was built in 1912. to transport
materials used iriconstructIng the 92:mile long aqueduct which brings Jfiimipegs
wa.te.r supplyfromShoalLaka on-the Manitoba-Ontario border. Three 44-hp General
Electric dies.els now provide the motive powe,r for trainloads of gravel.
C.R.H;A. News ReJ2.ort -, 1960 Page 68
In addition to Mack Car: 31, bul l t in 1928, .whi ch provides thrice weekly
passenger serviqe on the line, a 1948 Packard rail car, and a Peerless
(1 car of uncertain age were on exhibit.
The Canadian PacifiO then pl ayed host to the gr oup by operating a two c
oach train f r om St. Boniface , (a most unusual occurrence in it­
self) , to the yards at Weston Shops where dozens of steam locomot ives a
re stored. The last l ccomotive to be stored saw service in mid-Sep­
tember. This visit pr ovi ded a long sought opportunity to phot ograph
No . 3100, a 4-8-4 which, along with 3101 used to haul the overnight
trains bet ween Montreal and Toronto until about 1953. A particularly
interesting sight was No . 2850, which hauled t he Royal Train in 1939
during t he visit of King George VI. Minus the crowns on its runningJ
boards , and t he Royal coat of arms, it still carries t he raised num­
bers 2850. A gene r ous assortment of 5100, 5400 , 6900, 5700, 1200,
1000, and 2300 series engines pr ovi ded numerous opportunities for
photos . A steam crane, built about 1884 and still in a lmost daily use , was on
view not far from a hand-power turntable.
This was a long-to-be-remembered weekend, excel lent ly planned and
carried ·o.ut by the Winnipeg Model Railroad Club.
0-0-0-$.-0-0-0
Canadas two major ra ilways publ i shed their
THE NEW TIMETABLES winter schedules on October 30, and, as
by Forster A.Kemp usual, the publications cont ained fewer
trains and more adver t i s ing mater ial; Both
were changed in f ormat. The Canadian Nat ­
ional introduced a new red-and-white cover with the sloped letters CN
featured instead of the traditi onal maple leaf and water-insignia which
descended from the Grand Trunk design of 1896. The new design is also
used on the Mont r eal suburban folders, St Eustache(green), Cartierville
(brown) , St. Hyacinthe(red). Folder A is still 80 pages in length.
Canadian Pacific took the opportunity to re-arrange its passenger sche­
dule layout, shortening the contents from 64 t o 48 pages . All mixed
train schedules have been excluded, and lists of stations served by
mixed trains published at the back of the timetabl e. Passengers are
advised to consult agents for schedules.
Passe
n~Services Discontinued The following passenger services have
apparentlybeen discontinued, ending passenger.service over their·routes.
Canadian National Railways :
CN 361-366 New Glasgow.-Pictou N.S. effective November 19 CN
333-334 ,Pi ct ou – Oxford Juct. N.S. II
CN Mi xed 221-222 Barrys Bay -Whitney, Ontario
CN Mi xed 388-389 Lindsay -Haliburton, Ontari o (September 3)
CN 660-661- 61 62 -662~663 Hamilton -Allandale – Meaford, Ont o (June 19)
GTW 22 & 57 Durand -Muskegon, Michigan

Canadian Pacific Rai lway(subsidia;i~s i ncluded)
DAR Mixed 21-22 Windsor -Truro, N.S.

Q,CR Mixed Tring Juct. ~ Megant i c, Que.

Q,OR Mixed Vallee Juct -Lac Frontiere, Que.

CPR Mixed 782-783 Sharbot Lake -Renfrew, Onto

C.R.H.A. News Report -1960 Page 68
In addition to Mack Ca~, 31, bull t in 1928, which provides thrice weekly
passenger serviqe on the line, a 1948 Packard rail car, and a Peerless
() car of uncertain age were on exhibit.
The Canadian Pacifie then played host to the group by operating a two
coach train from St. Boniface, (a most unusual occurrence in it­
self) , to the yards at Weston Shops where dozens of steam locomotives
are stored. The last lccomotive to be stored saw service in mid-Sep­
tember. This visit provided a long sought opportunity to photograph
No. 3100, a 4-8-4 which, along with 3101 used to haul the overnight
trains between Montreal and Toronto until about 1953. A particularly
interesting sight was No. 2850, which hauled the Royal Train in 1939
during the visit of King GeorgE:) VI. Minus the crowns on its running
boards, and the Royal coat 0 farms, it still carrie s the rai sed num­
bers·2850. A generous assortment of 5100, 5400, 6900, 5700, 1200,
1000, and 2300 series engines provided numerous opportunities for
photos. A steam crane, built about 1884 and still in almost daily use,
was on view not far from a hand-power turntable.
This was a long-to-be-remembered weekend, excellently planned and
car.ried o,ut by the Winnipeg Model Railroad Club.
THE NEW TIMETABLES
by Forster A.Kemp o-O-O-lk-O-O-o
Canadas two major railways published their
winter schedules on October 30, and, as
usual, the publications contained fewer
trains and more advertising material. Both
were changed in format. The Canadian Nat­
ional introduced a new red-and-white cover with the sloped letters CN
fea tured instead of the traditional maple leaf and vafer insignia which
descended from the Grand Trunk design of 1896. The new design is also
used on the Montreal suburban folders, St Eustache(green) , Cartierville
(brown), St. Hyacinthe(red). Folder A is still 80 pages in length.
Canadian Pacific took the opportunity to re-arrange its passenger sche­
dule layout, shortening the contents from 64 to 48 pages. All mixed
train schedules have been excluded, and lists of stations served by
mixed trains published at the back of the timetable. Passengers are
advised to consult agents for schedules.
Passen~Services Discontinued The following passenger services have
apparently been discontinued, ending passenger service over their routes.
Canadian National Railways:
CN 361-366 New Glasgow -Pictou N.S. effective November 19 CN
333-334 ,Pictou -Oxford Juct. N.S. II Ii
CN Mixed 221-222 Barrys Bay -Whitney, Ontario
CN Mixed 388-389 Lindsay -Haliburtorr, Ontario (September 3)
CN 660-661-61 62-662..,.663 Hamilton -Allandale -Meaford, Onto (June 19)
GTW 22 & 57 Durand -Muskegon, Michigan
Canadian Pacific Railway(sub$idiaries included)
DAR Mixed
Q,CR Mixed
Q,CR Mixed
CPR Mixed 21
-22 Windsor -Truro, N.S.
Tring Juct. -Megantic, Q,ue.
Vallee Juct -Lac Frontiers, Q,ue.
782-783 Sharbot Lake -Renfrew, Onto
C.R. H.Af. News ReJ2.ort-1960 Page 69
CPR 447-449 448-450 Chalk River -Mattawa, Onto -Angliers, Que.

CPR 201-202 North Portal – Moose Jaw, Sask. (effective December 31)

CPR Mixed 740-743 744-745 Guelph Juct. -Guelph, Ontario

Passenger Services ~Reduc ed
Canadian National Railways
-j
GT 16…. 17 Island Pond, Vt. -Portland, Me . discontinued Sept. 5 to
June, 1961
CN 27-28 Montreal -Ste. Rosalie withdrawn.
CN 107-108 HerveyJ-Fitzpatrick, Que. withdrawn.
CN 83-84 Montreal -Hawkesbury, Onto (Sunday only) withdrawn.
CN 77 Toronto -London, Onto withdrawn June 26, 1960.
CN 40 London – Toronto, Ontr ~l lvia Stratford replaced by No .16 June 26.
GTW 19-54 Detroit -Durand, Mich. withdrawn, replaced fby suburban
t rains 70-75 Detroit -Pontiac , Mich.
CN 102-103 Capreol, Onto -Winnipeg withdrawn.
CN 11-12 Winnipeg -Saskatoon withdrawn (Nos . 3-4 make local stops.
CN 187-184 Toronto -Niagara Falls, Onto (Saturday only) withdrawn.
CN 649-650-658 Cochrane -Kapuskasing, On~. replaced by bus service.
CN 27-36 Toronto -Stratford, Ont o Saturday service cancelled.
CN Mixed 225-226 Dauphin , Man. -Rorketon, Man. reduced to weekly ser.
CN 65-66 Regina -Swan R~ver reduced to twice-weekly service.
Canadian PacificRailway
,….L.t ..l,
CPR 309-310 Calgary -JFort MacLeod -Lethbridge, Alta. RDC reduced

ti J r , – ;~ to tri-weekly service.
J I
CPR 311-312 Calgary J Vul can -Lethbridge. RDC reduced to four times
weekly service. Calgary -Lethbridge service reduced to ­
O~B
trip daily . Nos. J309-311 and 310-312 have the same
terminal times .
r
Equipment Changes The removal fOf sleeping and dining service from CNR
Nos . 3, 4, 53, and 54 The Continental, and CPR Nos . 3, 4, 7, and 8 The
Dominion l, was well publicized. On The Dominion, sleepers oper­
ate between Montreal -Sudbury, Toronto -SUdbury-Saul t Ste. Mar i e ,
and Fort William -Winnipeg. Parlour cars with dining service run
Mont r ea l -Ottawa. On The Continental there are sleepers Montreal ­
North Bay (thence to Englehurst via O.N.R.), Saskatoon -Edmonton, and
Kaml oops Juct. -Vancouver (Kelowna sleeper via trains 193-194). A
parlour gr i l l car operates Montreal -Ottawa on No.3, but returns on
No.4 only on Sunday .
Cafeteria cars are included in several trains on CNR lines, re­
placing diners and dinette cars . The rSuper Continental carries both
dining and dinette cars, while The Canadian carr-ies two Skyline Cof­
fee Shop dome ~coaches and a dining room car . Dome lounge sleepers now
run on CPRNos. 41-42 , The Atlantic Limited, between Montrealrand
Saint John, N.B . • They are also used as parlour cars in Montreal ­Quebec
pool trains 155-156 , The Viger, and 153-154, The Frontenac,
as well as in Saturday train 142 . Stainless steel coaches and sleepers
have been distributed to these and other trains on the CPR.
Other Changes Canadian National Railways now shows a mixed train
weekly between St. Eustache and Lac Remi, Que. This service was begun
last June . Diesel motor unit D-l is now used on Senneterre -Noranda ­( )

C .R.H.A·~ News Report-1960 Page 69
CPR 447-449 448-450 Chalk River -Mattawa, Onto -Angliers, Que.
CPR 201-202 North Portal -Moose Jaw, Sask. (effective December 31)
CPR Mixed 740-743 744-745 Guelph Juct. -Guelph, Ontario C )
Passenger Services Reduced
Canadian National Railways
GT 16-17 Island Pond, Vt. -Portland, Me. discontinued Sept. 5 to
June, 1961
CN 27-28 Montreal -Ste. Rosalie withdrawn.
CN 107-108 Hervey -Fitzpatrick, Que. withdrawn.
CN 83-84 Montreal -Hawkesbury, Onto (SUllday only) withdrawn.
CN 77 Toronto -London, Onto withdrawn June 26,1960.
CN 40 London -Tororito, Onto via Stratford replaced by No.16 June 26.
GTW 19-54 Detroit -Durand, Mich. withdrawn, replaced by suburban
trains 70-75 Detroit -Pontiac, Mich.
CN 102-103 Capreol, Onto -Winnipeg withdrawn.
CN 11-12 Winnipeg -Saskatoon withdrawn (Nos. 3-4 make local stops.
CN 187-184 Toronto -Niagara Falls, Onto (Saturday only) withdrawn.
CN 649-650-658 Cochrane -Kapuskasing, Onto replaced by bus service.
CN 27-36 Toronto -Stratford, Onto Saturday service cancelled.
CN Mixed 225-226 Dauphin, Man. -Rorketon, Man. reduced to weekly ser.
CN 65-66 Regina -Swan River reduced to twice-weekly service.
Canadian Pacific Railway
CPR 309-310 Calgary -Fort MacLeod -Lethbridge, Alta. RDC reduced
CPR 311-312 Calgary -~ Vulcan
weekly service.
one trip daily.
terminal times.
to tri-weekly service.
-Lethbridge. RDC reduced to four times
Calgary -Lethbridge service reduced to
Nos. 309-311 and 310-312 have the same
EqUipment
Changes The removal of sleeping and dining service from CNR
Nos. 3, 4, 53, and 54 The Continental, and CPR Nos. 3, 4, 7, and 8 The
Dominion, was well publicized. On The Dominion, sleepers oper­
ate between Montreal -Sudbury, Toronto -Sudbury -Sault Ste. Marie,
and Fort William -Winnipeg. Parlour cars with dining service run
Montreal -Ottawa. On The Continental there are sleepers Montreal –
North Bay (thence to Englehurst via O.N.R.), Saskatoon -Edmonton, and
Kamlbops Juct. -Vancouver (Kelowna sleeper via trains 193-194). A
parlour grill car operates Montreal -Ottawa on No.3, but returns on
No.4 only on Sunday.
Cafeteria cars are included in several trains on CNR lines, re­
placing diners and dinette cars. The Super,Continental carries both
dining and dinette cars, while The Canadian carries two Skyline Cof­
fee Shop dome coaches and a dining room car. Dome lounge sleepers now
run on CPR Nos. 41-42, The Atlantic Limited, between Montreal and
Saint John, N.B .. They are also used as parlour cars in Montreal -Quebec
pool trains 155-156, The Viger
ll
, and 153-154, The Frontenac,
as well as in Saturday train 142. Stainless steel coaches and sleepers
have been distributed to these and other trains on the CPR.
Other Changes Canadian National Railways now shows a mixed train
weekly between St. Eustache and Lac Remi, Que. This service was begun
last June. Diesel motor unit D-l is now used on Senneterre -Noranda –
C9.R•H•A• News Report -1960 Pa~O
Rouyn trains 621-622. It haul s a through coach from Montreal. Canad­
ian National Railways has changed t he name of i t s SUdbury Junction
station to Sudbury and no longer operates the branch trai ns which for­
( )�
merly took pa ssenger s fromtrains at the junction to the old dOlolnt own
Sudbury station, a distance of 5.3 miles .
A new
symbol appears in C N timetabl es . It i s V, meaning Vending
Machines -Food
ll
and it appears at Detroit, Michigan and Capreol, Ont..
-%-%-%-%-%-%-%-%-%-%-%-%­
CANADIAN RAILWAY MUSEUM CAUSE CONTINUES TO GAIN MOMENrUM
The idea of a Railway Museumin Cqnada,,or iginall y voiced by the
C.R.H.A. for the Montreal area, seems to be spreading. In mi d-October
the Hal i fax Chronicle Herald commented as follows:
While t he future of Nova Scotia I s pioneer locomotive Samson
continues to be clouded by indecisi on, it is becoming inc reas­
ingly apparent that there i s need for a full-fledged railroad museum
in this pr ovi nce.
Such an ins:titution not only would provide suitable accommod­
ation for that veteran which is in storage in New Gl a sgow but
would also serve as a showplace for many other engines and all i ed e
quipment which have played important par ts in this vita l fiel d
of public service .
The
time for such a step to be taken i s now. The past decade
has witnessed the transition from steam to diesel. It still
should be possibl e to obtain at least one of the ir on horses for
permanent exhibit i on , but this will not be the case much longer.
Another factor to be consi dered is that many still live who have
worked on these transportation lines. Soon they will be gone a
nd the loss of their momentoes could quickly follow. Tickets,
pa sses, timecards, sWitch- keys, conductor s I punches ,_ lant erns,
hand hewn ti es and even the various types of rai l s , ar.e only a few
of the items which could be gathered now.
As a s
ite for such a museum, Tr uro appear s to be a nat ur al if
only because of its central posi tion in the rai l network of the
,pr ovi nce .
The
re appears to be no doubt but that such an invest ment would
appea l to our own people as wel l as visitor s . Si mil ar establish­
ments elsewhere are attracting surprising numbers. Such interest
is al so wel l indicat ed by the recepti on accorded the railroading
series whi.ch IJ.B.King

has been wr i ting for thi s newspaper.
Meanwhile , according to motive power forms issued by the Canadian
National Railways , the following locomotives have been sol d to the
C.R.R.A. effective September 15 , 1960: 49, 1520 , 2601, 3239 , 4190, 5550,
5702, 6015, 6153. Abrief descripti on of these engines can be found in the Se
ptember, 1960 issue of the News Repor t .
Other items of interest in the motive power forms are that loco­
motive 2616 has been turned over to the Rotary club at Haliburton and th
at 6213 has been sent to the C.N. Exhibiti on at Toronto eff. Sept.1/60.
( )
C.R.R.A. News Report -1960 Page 70
Rouyn
trains 621-622. It hauls a through coach from Montreal. Canad­
ian Nat10nal Railways has changed the name of its Sudbury Junction
station to Sudbury and no longer operates the branch trains which for­
merly took passengers from trains at the junction to the old do~ntown
Sudbury station, a distance of 5.3 miles.
A new symbol appears in C N timetables. It is V, meaning Vending
Machines -Food and it appears at Detroit, Michigan and Capreol, Ont ..
-%-%-%-%-%-%-%-%-%-%-%-%-
CANADIAN RAILWAY MUSEUM CAUSE CONTINUES TO GAIN MOMENrUM
The idea of.a Railway Museum in Cqnadaoriginally voiced by the
C.R.R.A. for the Montreal area, seems to be spreading. In mid-October
the Halifax Chronicle Herald commented as follows:
While the future of Nova Scotias pioneer locomotive Samson
continues to be clouded by indecision, it is becoming increas­
ingly apparent that there is need for a full-fledged railroad
museum in this province.
nSuch an ins:titution not only would provide suitable accommod­
ation for that veteran which is in storage in New Glasgow but
would also serve as a showplace for many other engines and allied
equipment which have played important parts in this vital field
of public service.
The time for such a step to be taken is now. The past decade
has witnessed the transition from steam to diesel. It still
should be possible to obtain at least one of the iron horses for
permanent exhibition, but this will not be the case much longer.
Another factor to be considered is that many still live who have
worked on these transportation lines. Soon they will be gone
and the loss of their momentoes could quickly follow. Tickets,
passes, timecards, switch-keys, conductors I punches ,. lanterns,
hand hewn ties and even the various types of rails, ar.e only a few
of the items which could be gathered now.
As a site for such a museum, Truro appears to be a natural if
only because of its central position in the rail network of the
province.
There appears to be no doubt but that such an investment would
appeal t.o our own people as well as visitors. Similar establish­
ments elsewhere are attracting surprising numbers. Such interest
is also well indicated by the reception accorded the railroading
series which J.B.King has been writing for this newspaper.
Meanwhile, according to motive power forms issued by the Canadian
National Railways, the following locomotives have been sold to the
C.R.H.A. effective September 15, 1960: 49, 1520, 2601, 3239, 4190,
5550, 5702, 6015, 6153. A brief description of these engines can be
found in the September, 1960 issue of the News Report.
Other items of interest in the motive power forms are that loco­
motive 2616 has been turned over to the Rotary club at Haliburton and
that 6213 has been sent to the C.N. Exhibition at Toronto eff. Sept.l/60.
-, C.R.H.A. Observations -1260 Page S-38
A department of news and commentary, by
OBSERVATrIONS Anthony Clegg
()
. . . TEN YEARS AGO . . . . . (November 1950 issue of News Report)
The assignment of two diesel locomotives to t he Shawinigan

Falls Terminal Railway in September (CPR 7010 and CNR 8010)

has brought the use of el ect r i c engines to an end, after

fifty years of juice operation.

The Sudbury -Copper Cliff Street Railway ceased operation

of its electric rail lines on Saturday , Sept. 30, 1950. The

whistle of SCCSR No. 30 was donated to the Association by

Greenspoon Brothers.

The A.C. & H.B. Ry. are awaiting delivery of five diesel

road switchers from G.M.D.L. , London, Onto
II
e Haulers , the electric locomotives t hat hauled the long-di stance
trains through Mount Royal Tunnel to the waiting steam or diesel loco­
motives at Val Royal or Gohier have been abandoned as uneconomic by
the Canadian National Railways. During the past year or so, the
haulers have been pUlling the trains and their diesel locomotives
t hrough the tunnel but now only diesel power will be used except on the
local commuter trains. This change has already resulted in an obnox­
ious smell in the tunnel and the situation wi l l no doubt become worse
when the Place Ville Marie hole is cover-ed over. However, it is to be
hopedthatthe gr eat ly reducedvisibilityinthe tunnelwillnotresult
in a re-occurrence of the January 12, 1946 tragedy, when diesels 7903
and 15819 met with disastrous results. From t hat time until recent
days, diesels were banned except in emergencies , and safe clean service
has been maintained by electric traction.

e It ha s been reported that t he Sydney and Louisburg Railway has pur­
chased six Alco 1000 H.P. switchers from the Minneapolis and St. Loius.
e The Canadian Pacific Railway has announced pl ans to abolish free trans­
portation for a wide range of people from t he Governor-General to fire
rangers. The plan, whi ch goes into effect January 1, 1961, will no
doubt be followed by the Canadian Nat i onal Railways and the other Canad­
ian li ne s . Cancellation of free transportation privileges will effect
all passholders except Members of Parliament, Senators , and the Com­
pany s own employees. Employees and dependents of other railways will
be r equired to pay half-fare . The CPR also pr opo sed that existing
legislation, which obligates the railway companies to pr ovi de passes
for M.P. ls, Senators, and empl oyees, be rescinded.
e Due
to the strike of four operating brotherhoods against the Rutland
Railway and the cessation of all train operations over the line, the
CN-CV system has rev ised its track layout in the Rouses Point -Alburg
area, taking back into the CN-CV system the gaunt l et bridge tracks
formerly leased to t he Rutland l i ne for operation and joint use.
e The Canadian Pacific Railway i s continuing with t he conversion of pas­
senger cars into service boarding cars. Recent cars converted have
been dining car ASHBY , 3-compartment 2-bedroom buffet solarium JAMES
-C,R.H.A. Observations -1960 :Page S-38
OBSERVATfIOrfS
A department of news and commentary, by
Anthony Clegg
… TEN YEARS AGO ….. (November 1950 issue of News Report)
II The assignment of two diesel locomotives to the Shawinigan
Falls Terminal Railway in September (CPR 7010 and CNR 8010)
has brought the use of electric enginas to an end, after
fifty years of juice operation.
tI The Sudbury -Copper Cliff Street Railway ceased operation
of its electric rail lines on Saturday, Sept. 30, 1950. The
whistle of SCCSR No. 30 was donated to the Association by
Greenspoon Brothers.
II The A.C. & H.B. Ry. are awaiting delivery of five diesel
road switchers from G.M.D.L., London, Onto II
e IiHaulers
li
, the electric locomotives that hauled the long-distance
trains through Mount Royal Tunnel to the waiting steam or diesel loco­
motives at Val Royal or Gohier have been abandoned as uneconomic by
the Canadian National Railways. During the past year or so, the
haulers have been pulling the trains and their diesel locomotives
through the tunnel but now only diesel power will be used except on the
local commuter trains. This change has already resulted in an obnox­
ious smell in the tunnel and the situation will no doubt become worse
when the Place Ville Marie hole is covered over. However, it is to be
hoped that the greatly reduced visibility in the tunnel will not result
in a re-occurrence of the January 12, 1946 tragedy, when diesels 7903
and 15819 met with disastrous results. From that time until recent
days, diesels were banned except in emergencies, and safe clean service
has been maintained by electric traction.
,
e It has been reported that the Sydney and Louisburg Railway has pur­
chased six Alco 1000 H.P. switchers from the Minneapolis and St. Loius.
e The Canadian Pacific Railway has announced plans to abolish free trans­
portation for a wide range of people from the Governor-General to fire
rangers. The plan, which goes into effect January 1, 1961, will no
doubt be followed by the Canadian National Railways and the other Canad­
ian lines. Cancellation of free transportation privileges will effect
all passholders except Members of Parliament, Senators, and the Com­
panys own employees. Employees and dependents of other railways will
be required to pay half-fare. The CPR also proposed that existing
legislation, which obligates the railway companies to provide passes
for M.P.s, Senators, and employees, be rescinded.
e Due to the strike of four operating brotherhoods against the Rutland
Railway and the cessation of all train operations over the line, the
CN-CV system has revised its track layout in the Rouses Point -Alburg
area, taking back into the CN-CV system the gauntlet bridge tracks
formerly leased to the Rutland line for operation and joint use.
e The Canadian Pacific Railway is continuing with the conversion of pas­
senger cars into service boarding cars. Recent cars converted have
been dining car ASHByli, 3-compartment 2-bedroom buffet solarium JAMES
( )
C.R.H.A. Observations -1960 Page 8-39
BAY,
10-compartment ,GLEN,AVON, and several cafe-parlour cars. Sev­
eral ,of the 2800-2814· series colonist cars have a l so been,converted.
( J
The .La.st of the l4-si-ngle bedroom cars with names in t he GRAND series
have been withdrawn: from service on trains 21 and 22 and sent to Angus
Shops for conver-sLon . . There were ten of, these cars, having an appear­
ance like cars of the Pullman Company because of exterior air condition­
ing ducts . The single bedrooms were fitted with per manent beds, not
convertible for day use. They.,were usually operated in Mont r eal ­
Toronto and Ottawa – Toronto night trains. Although they had super i or
riding qualities, t he pr i ce of single bedrooms i s much more t han that
of roomettes and duplex-roomettes , which have become popular in recent
yea r s , and cars 2112 and 2212 usually had vacant rooms. They will
probably become service bunk or boa rdi ng cars. . ..F.A.K.
.
e Canadian National Railways has completed another step in its moderni zed
signalling program with the extension of centralized traffic control
from Winnipeg-Sioux Lookout to Armstrong, Ont . , a total distance of
nearly 400· miles. The system enables all train movements bet ween these
points to be supervised by one man seated at a central control pane l
in theCNRs Winnipeg station. CTC also is in opera t i on li n, t he Com­
pany I s Winnipeg .t er mi na l s,. Work is now under way to install CTC west
of Winnipeg between Portage laPrairie and Me lv i l le. This sy st .em is
expected to go into operation during 1961.
, . r .
e The Ca;adian Pacific Railway has applied to t he Board of Transport Com-
missioners for permission to abandon two Dominion Atlantic routes. in
the 1Annapolis Valley . The routes involved are in t he Weston subdivis­
ion from Centreville to Weston and in Kingsport Subdivision from near
Aldershot to Kingsport . Total l ength is about 30 mi l es . The CPR
applied to discontinue the Centreville-Weston route t wo year s ago but
the Transport Commissioners advised the Company t o ho ld off on t he
possibility traffic would increase . The rail way , however, says i n its
latest submission that traffic has reached new l ows .
e
Canadian Nat i ona l Railways is testing a new t ype of a i r – t ight car i n w
hich temperature can be brought down to minus 320 degrees Fahrenheit
by liquid nitrogen . The car, designed primarily f or t he frozen fo od
industry, left Vancouver recently with 70 ,000 pounds of f r ozen br occol i ,
cauliflower, raspb erries and blackberries, consigned to Yor k Farms ,
Toronto on its initial test in Canada.
e A.)new method of bracing cargo in a Canadian Pacific freight car began
tests at Lethbridge , Alta . on Oct . 13, for t he first time in Canada.
In,flatable rubber dunnage, an air mattress-like affair manufactured by
the Firestone Industrial Products Company , was used t o pr event shifting
in a carload of beer being moved from Sicks Lethbridge Brewer y Ltd.
tro Edmonton . . One of t he CPRs insulated boxcars, especiall y suited for
such shipments because cf its construction and its abi l i t y to be heated
in cold weather, .wa s Leaded with 2 ,800 dozen bottles, in cartons, leaving a
space of about eight inches across t he car between t he side, door s . The
inflatable dunnage was pl a ce d in this space an d ai r f or ced into the
bag to appropr1ate pressure. The method great ly reduc es damage and, at
the same time, is cheaper and qui cker than wooden shoring.
s Late in October, Canadian National Railways offered for sale, its two
Headquarters BUildings in, downtbwnMontreal. Located at 360 and 355
McGill Street and constructed about1900, t he buildings will be surplus
when the ,Rai l ways new structure on.Lagauchetiere street is completed
in t he spring of next year.
( }
C.R.H.A. Observations -1960 Page S-39
BAY, 10-compartment GLEN AVON, and several cafe-parlour cars. Sev­
era1.:of the 2800-2814 ser.ies colonist cars have also been converted.
The 1ast.of the 14-single. bedroom cars with names in the GRAND series
have been wi thdrawn: from service on trains 2.1 and 22 and sent to Angus
Shops for conversion.. There we.re ten of these cars, having an appear­
ance like cars of the Pullman Company because of exterior air condition­
ing ducts. The single bedrooms were fitted with permanent beds, not
convertib1e-for day use, They. were usually operated in Montreal –
Toronto and Otta.wa -,Toronto night trains. Although they had superior
riding qualities, the .price of single bedrooms is much more than that
of roomettes and dup1ex-roomett-es, which have become popular in recent
years, and cars 2112 and 2212 usually had vacant rooms. They will
probably become service bunk or boarding cars. . .. F.A.K.
.
s Can<;tdian National Railways has completed another step in its modernized
signalling program with the extension of centralized traffic control
fr0m Winnipeg-Sioux Lookout to Armstrong, Ont., a total distance of
nearly 400· miles. The system enables all train movements between these
points to be supervised by one man seated at a central control panel
in the ,CNRs Winnipeg station. CTC also is in operation in the Com­
panys Winnipeg terminals;. WO,rk is now under way to install CTC west
of Wi.nnipeg between Portage 1aPrairie and Melville .. This system 1s
exp~cted to go into operation during 1961.
e The Canadian Paci·fic Railway has applied to the Board of Transport Com­
miss~oners for permission to abandon two Dominion Atlantic routes in
the Annapolis Valley. The routes involved are in the Weston subdivis­
ion from Centreville to Weston and in Kingsport Subdivision from near
A1dershot to Kingsport. Total length is about 30 miles. The CPR
applied to discontinue the Centreville-Weston route two years ago but
the Transport Commissioners advised the Company to hold off on the
pOBsibi1ity traffic would increase. The railway, however, says in its
1at.est submission that traffic has reached new lows.
e Canadian National Railways is testing a new type of air-tight car in
which temperature can be brought dOivn to minus 320 degrees Fahrenheit
by liquid nitrogen. The car, designed primarily for the frozen food
industry, left Vancouver recently with 70,000 pounds of frozen broccoli,
caUliflower, raspberries and blackberries, consigned to York Farms,
Toronto on its initial test in Canada.
e A new method of brac·ing cargo in a Canadian Pacific freight car began
tests at Lethbridge, A1t.a. on Oct. 13, for the first time in Canada.
In.f1atab1e rubber dunn<;tge, an air mattress-like affair manufactured by
the Firestone Industrial Products Company, was used to prevent shifting
in a carload of beer being moved from Sicks Lethbridge Brewery Ltd.
t~o EdmO.nton. , One of the CPRs insulated boxcars, especially suited for
such shipments because cf its construction and its ability to be heated
in cold weather,. was loade.d with 2,800 dozen bottles in cartons, leaving a
space of about eight inches aoross the car between the side doors.
The inflatable dunnage was placed in this space and air forced into the
bag to approprffiate pressure, The method greatly reduces damage and, at
the same time, is cheaper and quicker than wooden shoring.
e Late in October, Canadian National Railways offered for sale, its two
Headquarters Buildings in downtown.Montrea1. Located at 360 and 355
McGill Street and constructed about 1900, the buildings will be surplus
when the .Rai1ways new structure on Lagauchetiere street is completed
in the spring of nBxt year.
C.R.H.A. Observations -1960 Page ,S-40
e� A
first step )has been taken by the National Capital Commission on ,ra i l ­way
unification!in Ottawa with an application to the Board of Transport, Commiss
ioners for permission to connect CPR and CNR tracks at Walkley .
Road, Gladstone Avenue and at Bells Corners. Alan K. Hay, chairman of ~
t he , commission, sa i d a final agreement is near between the railways,
prov,iding for unification in the Ont.arLo vpo rt.Lon of the National Capit­
al . When completed, it vlill remove 35 miles of-track from t he. metro­
politan area, eliminate 70 level crossings and make available for des­
irable redevelopment , a total of 440 acres of railway-occupied land.
The establishment of a terminal company to operate the railways in the
Ottawa area will not take place for some time. When that time; comes,
however, a number of additional rail lines will be removed. They are:
The CPR main line from Nepean Bay to Bells Corners, the CPR Ottawa ­
Hull connection via the Interprovincial Bridge , the CPR Sussex Street
spur, the CNR connection to the Chaudiere area via the crosstown tracks,
the CPR Broad Street yards and local freight terminal, the CNR Nicholas
Street and Ottawa East roundhouse facilities. Future construction pro­
jects are reported to include: building a new union station in the
Hurdman area, bUilding various track conneotions bet ween the CPR and
CNR to permit joint ·operation, building a new freight switch yard at
Walkley Road for the ,DPR, building a diesel locomotive shop for the
proposed terminal company at Walkley, bUilding trackage in new indust­
rial area at Hurdman, bUilding a freight shed on t he Russell Road for
CPR, bUilding five structures on t he CPR Prescott subdivision to elim­
inate existing railway level crossings on heavy traffic c-ity sJtreets,
extending the existing railway signal system to i nclude new rail con:..
nection and the new union station, re:building existing telegraph lines,
on the CPR Carleton Place subdivision when it is abandoned.
e
Another extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway has been propos­
ed by t ne B.C . Government. (The new! route would lead north from Fort
St. John across the Beatton river to the Alberta border where i t, wouLd
link with the NAR, building westward from Hines Creek. It is estimated
the project would cost $25 million. The railway extension, if approved
by NAR officials, would place the PGE in line wi t h the proposed Pim,e
Pointrailway –the joint CNR.. CPR line planned to tap the mineral
riches of Pine Point on t he Great Slave Lake . The PGE and ,t he NAR now
link at Dawson Creek. The prop ~sed new link woul dJbe between FortSt.
John and Hines Creek . I
e Permission has been grant ed by t he Board of Transport Commissioners for
the National system to discontinue passenger service on· the Short Line
between;Oxford Juct. and Stellarton, N.S. via Pugwash, Tatamagouche,
and Pictou. The discontinuance of this run will bring to an end local1.
train service in the Stellarton.. -New Glasgow area .� .
e� The
official opening of t he CNRs new automatic classification yard in
Moncton took place November 2 . r Premiers of t he four Atlantic Provinces
were ~n hand to watch the Presidint of the Nati onal System drive the
symbolic last spike to completeithe yard .
e The
20,400 Ton Empress!of France has been placed in brokers hands, ac­
cording to a Canadian Pacific statement i ssued in London, England, Oct .
4, and she wi l l be withdrawn f r om the Companys Atlantic service at the
end of her last voyage from Montreal to, Liverpool on Nov. 30, where she
is due on December 6 .. The entry in April, 1961 of the new I:.8,000,000
EmplJess of Canada , 27,300 tons , how bUilding at Vickers-Armstrongs Naval
Yard , Walker-on-Tyne , w i~11 make t.hei Empress of France redundant to the
Companys normal requirements.
C.R.H.A. Observations -1960 Page S-40
e A first step has been taken by the National Capital Commission on ,rail­
way unification in Ottawa with an application to the Board of Transport
Commissioners for permission to connect CPR and CNR tracks at Walkley
Road, Gladstone Avenue and at Bells Corners. Alan K. Hay, chairman of
the c-ommission, said a final agreement is near between the railways,
providing for unification in the Ontario portion of the National Capit­
al .. When completed, it will remove 35 miles of track from the metro­
politan area, eliminate 70 level crossings and make available for des­
irable redevelopment, a total of 440 acres of railway-occupied land.
The establishment of a terminal company to operate the railways in the
Ottawa area will not take place for some time. When that time comes,
however, a number of additional rail lines will be removed. They are:
The CPR main line from Nepean Bay to Bells Corners, the CPR Ot.tawa –
Hull connection via the Interprovincial Bridge, the CPR Sussex Street
spur, the CNR connection to the Chaudiere area via the crosstown tracks,
the CPR Broad Street yards and local freight terminal, the CNR Nicholas
Street and Ottawa East roundhouse facilities. Future construction pro­
jects are reported to include: building a new union station in the
Hurdman area, building various track connections between the CPR and
CNR to permit joint operation, building a new freight switch yard at
Walkley Road for the CPR, building a diesel locomotive shop for the
proposed terminal company at Walkley, building trackage in new indust­
rial area at Hurdman, building a freight shed 0n the Russell Road for
CPR, building five structures on the CPR Prescott subdivision to elim­
inate existing railway level crossings on heavy traffic city streets,
extending the existing railway signal system to include new rail con;..
nection and the new union station, re-building existing telegraph lines
on the CPR Carleton Place subdivision when it is abandoned.
e
Another extension of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway has been propos­
ed by the B.C. Government. The new route would lead north from Fort
St. John across the Beatton river to the Alberta border where it would
link with the NAR, building westward from Hines Creek. It is estimated
the project would cost $25 million. The railway extenSion, if approved
by NAR officials, would place the PGE in line with the proposed Pilllle
Point railway –the joint CNR:CPR line planned to tap the mineral
riches of Pine Point on the Great Slave Lake. The PGE and the NAR now
link at Dawson Creek. The proposed new link would be between Fort St.
John and Hines Creek.
e Permission has been granted by the Board of Transport Commissioners for
the National system to discontinue passenger service on the Short Line
between Oxford Juct. and Stellarton, N.S. via Pugwash, Tatamagouche,
and Pictou. The discontinuance of this run will bring to am, end local
train service in the Stellarton -New Glasgow area.
e The official opening of the CNRs new automatic classification yard in
Moncton took place November 2. Premiers of the four Atlantic Provinces
were on hand to watch the Presidint of the National System drive the
symbo lic last spike II to complete the yard.
e The
20,400 Ton Empress of France has been placed in brokers hands, ac­
cording to a Canadian Pacific statement.issued in London, England, Oct.
4, and she will be withdrawn from the Companys Atlantic service at the
end of her last voyage from Montreal to Liverpool on Nov. 30, where she
is due on December 6 .. The entry in April, 1961 of the new b8,000,000
Empress of Canada, 27,300. tons, now building a-t Vickers-Armstrongs Naval
Yard, Walker-on-Tyne, will make the Empress of France redundant to the
Companys normal reqUirements.
(
CN
RAILWAYS.
Canadian Nationals New Insignia 1?1
Someftime ago it was announced that the Canadian National Railways­ System was going
to adopt a new look -new colours, a new crest, etc. Now,­
although no official word has been received, it looks as if the new insignia­
and colours have been adopted. The last edition of the National Systems­
timetables appeared with a radically new red and white cover design – and­
now literature is appearing with a new C.N. insignia as shown at the top­
of this page.­
This design may not be officially approved and ~~y be only a trial.
Frarikly we prefer the former maple-leaf crest; we should like to receive
,opi nions on this from our readers.
If adopted, this CJJ design will be the sixth type of crest
used by the National S!stem s ~nce its inception in 1918.
In the early years of the Canadian National a modified form of
the Canadian Government Rallways insignia wasJused, followed by a somewhat
oval-shaped design that did not lastvery l ong. After the Canadian National
had absorbed the Grand Trunk Railway, ·in 1923, the tilted rectangle of the
latter railway was used with Canadian National wording. In the 1940s a maple
leaf was added as a background for the rectangle, while only a few
ye~rs
ago ,t he tilt of the square was eliminated and the presently-recognized
crest came into general useo
0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0
On November 8th last, Postmaster-General Hamilton inaugurated
a two-week experimental run of mail service between Quebec and Toronto using
thepiggy-backsystem of trucks and trains.
Under rt he system, mail is loaded i nto trailers and carried on flat
cars between the two citieso -The railways have loaned trucks and trailers to
the Post Office Department for t he experiment.
0 -0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0
Dayliner service on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway between Prince
George and Fort St
r
John ;i1l·be cancelledbefore theendof the year.Most •
like!:i-datEtror the-l ast runofthissnort-lived servlceisNoveinbei:-2oth or
Noveriiber-27th~ -Initsplace;a paElsengercar will be freight–train; provi di rig mxed traiiJ:service tothenort herlYpodrif-tl:i:reet imes
each week. The
railway blamed a shortage of passengers on the cancellation.
( j
RAILWAYS.
Canadian Nationals New Insignia!? 1
Some time ago it was announced that the Canadian National Railways System
was going to adopt a new look -new colours, a new crest, etc. Now,
although no official word has been received, it looks as if the new insignia
and colours have been adopted. The last edition of the National Systems
timetables appeared with a radically new red and white cover design -and
now literature is appearing with a new C.No. insignia as shown at the top
of this page.
This design may not be officially approved and may be only a trial.
Frankly we prefer the former maple-leaf crest; we should like to receive
,opinions on this from our readers.
If adopted, this CJ~ design will be the sixth type of crest
used by the National System since its inception in 1918.
In the early years of the Canadian National a modified form of
the Canadian Government Rarlways inSignia was used, followed by a somewhat
oval-shaped design that did not last v.ery long. After the Canadian National
had absorbed the Grand Trunk Railway, in 1923, the tilted rectangle of the
latter railway was used with Canadian National wording. In the 1940s a maple
leaf was added as a background for the rectangle, while only a few
ye~rs ago ,the tilt of the square was eliminated and the presently-recognized
crest came into general useo
0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0
On November 8th last, Postmaster-General Hamilton inaugurated
a two-week experimental run of mail service between Quebec and Toronto using
the piggy-back system of trucks and trains 0
Under the system, mail is loaded into trailers and carried on flat
cars between the two citieso The railways have loaned trucks and trailers to
the Post Office Department for the experiment.
0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-0
Dayliner service on the Pacific Great Eastern Railway between Prince
George ana. Fort St. J onn will be cancelled before the . end of the year •.. Most
likelydatefor the-last run ofChisshort-Iivea service is N~eInber2Oth or
Noveriiber27th~ -In. its place; 8, passenger car will be-aaded to the regular
freight train; proviairig iiiiXed train: service to the norther!l PO:lrit· three times
each week. The railway blamed a shortage of passengers on the cancellation.
—— —– —
C.R .H.A .� Observations -1960
e� Through the World Bank , Canadians are currently financing another CNR,.
the Colombian National Railroads. Recently, t he internation bank ap­f
proved a loan to provide equipment for the CNR
1s
new Atlantic Railroad!
in Colombia. When t he railroad is completed, it will interconnec~
Colombia r s railway systems and provide the first fast and reliable ;
transportation between Atlantic Ocean port s, central Colombia and the :
Pacific . The Banks funds will finance purchases of 16 diesel locomot­
ives as well as rolling stock and maintenance equipment.
e Highway traffic across Montreals Victoria Bridge returned to nor mal
at 12 oclock noon, Friday, October 21, with completion of the new rail
diversion to the south shore. Initial work to adapt the br idge to the
St . Lawrence Seaway operat1!ons began in 1957 and t he whoLe project now
has been completed seve ral months ahead of schedule.
!
e The Orient Express,.a favorite setting for adventure and spy fiction, l
is discontinuing its Vienna-Budapest-Bucharest run, reports Cananian
Press . Some days ~ the Austrian railroad administration announced,
there wasn t a single passenger. The western terminus of the train is
Calais , France. Henceforth t he express, which runs t hree times a week,
will go only as far east as Vienna.
e The f i r st
of sixty new high speed electric locomotives , costing $32 mil­
lion, were placed in service recently by the Pennsylvania Railroad.
They will replace ninety older and less powerful engines . .
e A
fully automatic subway train, wi th no crew member s aboard, was suc­
cessfullytested in New York recently and the transit aut hor i ty des­
cribed the train as tlfool proof
tl
saying it pl anne d to place it in op­
eration between Grand Central Terminal and Times Square . This aroused
the ire of Transport Workers Union President QUi l l who promptly t hreat­
ened a strike if the train is pl aced in regular service.
e
Pullman-Standard division of Pullman, Inc. has announced it has ~ ceiv­
ed orders for 323 ofits new 87-foot piggyback flat cars. The floors
of the new cars are only 31 inches above the rail, almost a foot lower
than normal. This wi ll hel p solve overhead clearanc e problems in
piggybacking, the company said. Trailer Train Co ., rai lroad-owned
pool, ordered 200 of the new cars and 123 wer e ordered by Nor th Amer­
ican Car Co., a rail car leasing firm.
..
e Two United Kingdom companies, Eagl e Star Insurance Company and Second
Covent Garden Proper ty Company , have agreed;to become joint owners of
Place Ville Marie , a large real est at e development loca ted on the C
NR 1 S Central Station pr operty in Montreal. Webb &.1Knapp (Canada) and
the two U.K. fi rms wil l pr ovi de $30 million in equity capital and
debentures. Ear l i er, $50 mi l l i on of permanent mor t.gage financing was
announced. Under the agreement, Webb & Knapp (Canada) and the U.K. . gr oup
will each own an equal amount of st ock in a new holding company,
Trizec Corp . Ltd.. Pl ace Yille Mar i e Corp., former l y a subsi diary of :
Webb & Knapp (Canada) becomes a Whol ly- owned subsi di ary of Trizec.
THE .EDITORIAL COMMITTEE extends congratulations to all who particip­
at ed in our recent,contest aimed at introduc i ng the News Report to
new reader s. The results of the contest were extremely grat i fyi ng and
we par t i cularly·congratulate the two folloWing contest winners whose ef fo r t s
r~ sulted in the most new News Report subscriptions:
MR. DOUGLAS BROWN Lachine , Que.
MR.
REGINALD BUTTON Hamilton, Onto

C.R.H.A. Observations -1960
e Through the World Bank, Canadians are currently finanCing another CNR,
the Colombian Nauional Railroads. Recently, the internation bank ap­
proved a loan to provide equipment for the CNRs new Atlantic Railroad
in Colombia. When the railroad is completed, it will interconnect
Colombias railway systems and provide the first fast and reliable
transportation between Atlantic Ocean ports, central Colombia and the
Pacific. The Banks funds will finance purchases of 16 diesel locomot­
ives as well as rolling stock and maintenance equipment.
e Highway traffic across Montreals Victoria Bridge returned to normal
at 12 oclock noon, Friday, October 21, with completion of the new rail
diversion to the south shore. Initial work to adapt the bridge to the
St. Lawrence Seaway operations began in 1957 and the whole project now
has been completed several months ahead of schedule.
e The Orient Express, a favorite setting for adventure and spy fiction,
is discontinuing its Vienna-Budapest-Bucharest run, reports Cananian
Press. Some days~ the Austrlan railroad administration announced,
there wasnt a single passenger. The western terminus of the train is
CalaiS, France. Henceforth the express, which runs three times a week,
will go only· as far east as Vienna.
e The first of sixty new high speed electric locomotives, costing $32 mil­
lion, were placed in service recently by the Pennsylvania Railroad.
They will replace ninety older and less powerful engines ..
e A
fully automatic subway train, with no crew members aboard, was suc­
cessfully,tested in New York recently and the transit authority des­
cribed the train as tlfool proof saying it planned to place it in op­
eration between Grand Central Terminal and Times Square. This aroused
the ire of Transport Workers Union President Quill who promptly threat­
ened a strike if the train is placed in regular service.
e Pullman-Standard division of Pullman, Inc. has a,nnounced it has ~ceiv­
eO. orders for 323 of its new 87-foot piggyback flatcars. The floors
of the new cars are only 31 inches above the rail, almost a foot lower
than normal. This will help solve overhead clearance problems in
piggybacking, the company said. Trailer Train Co., railroad-owned
pool, ordered 200 of the new cars and 123 were ordered by North Amer­
ican Car Co., a rail car leasing firm.
, .
e Two United Kingdom companies, Eagle Star Insurance Company and Second
Covent Garden Property Company, have agreed to become joint owners of
Place Ville Marie, a large real estate development located on the
CNR 1 S Central Station property in Montreal. Webb & Knapp (Canada) and
the two U.K. firms will provide $30 million in equity capital and
debentures. Earlier, $50 million of permanent mortgase fi.nancing was
announced. Under the agreement, Webb & Knapp (Canada) and the U.K.
group will each own an equal amount of stock in a new holding company,
Trizec Corp. Ltd .. Place Ville Marie Corp., formerly a subsidiary of
Webb & Knapp (Canada) becomes a wholly-owned subsidiary of Trizec.
THE EDITORIAL COMMITTEE extends congratulations to all who partiCip­
ated in our reqent contest aimed at introducing the News Report to
new readers. The results of the contest were extremely gratifying and
we particularly congratulate the two following contest winners whose
efforts resulted in the most new News Report subscriptions:
MR. DOUGLAS BROWN Lachine, Que.
MR. REGINALD BUTTON Hamilton, Onto

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