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Canadian Rail 115 1960

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Canadian Rail 115 1960

————
ews Report
crha
STATION B
MONTREAL 2 . QUEBEC
P.O. BOX 22.
NUMBER 115 ……… OCTOBER 1960

TE N YEARS OF CRHA TRIPS. To
observe our tenth anniversary of rail
trips, we illustrate this month our firs t special railway train, consisting
of Canadian National dies el -el e ctric unit car 15837 and a passenger car,
whichranfromMontrealto Huberdeau, Que
. andreturnonOctober 1, 1950.
)
crha
ews Report
P.O. BOX 22.
STATION B MONTREAL 2. QUEBEC
NUMBER 115
III … OCTOBER 1960
——————-
TEN YEARS OF CRHA TRIPS. To observe our tenth anniversary of rail
trips, we illustrate this month our first special railway
train, consisting
of Canadian National diesel-electric unit car 15837 and a passenger car,
which ran from Montreal to Huberdeau, Que. and return on October 1, 1950.
———————
f~R.H,~~
~~~Y_1L~~D~J~E2 ~~£~_~~
NOTICE OF N1EETING :
The October Meeting of the Association will be held
(
in the M c Cormell Engineering Building at McGill University, Univer­
sity Street at ilton Street. Use the Milton St reet entrance. The.i..
rne etin g will tar.; place on Wednesday, October 12th, 1960 at 8:15 PM.
Mr. O.S.A. Lavallee will give an illus t r ated talk entitled CraigeU-.
achie, Befor e and After which will in corpo r ate original photographs
takenonthelineoftheCanadianPacificRailwayin thewestabout 1880.
As usual, rnember s are invited to bring guests and prospective new
rnerribe r s tothisrrieetin g, Theroornnurnbe r willbepostedat the door.
ASSOCIATION NEWS
TheSepternber meeting, atwhichMr.FrankLewin show ed colourslideswhich
he had taken on a visit to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in 1958,. was one of
the rrios t inte r e s tin g pro gr-arrirrres we have had in recent rrionth s , His visi t was rnade
whentourists werefirstperrrrirted intothe U.S.S.R.twoyearsago, andtherewere
rriany features of railway and other interest to thos e in attendance at this splendid
show. Particularly noteworthy was the extensive use of steam Iocorriotive s on the
railways, in clud in g v a r ie co Iou r e d 2-8-4s of large propor tions but light construction.
Mr. Lewins non-railway pictures were als o splendidly chosen, showin g v iews
in
the five principal citites which he vi sited, in cludin g rnariy impressive buildings.
At the Septerrrbe r Lrrre e t irig , the following pe rsons were introduced, L. i r:el i
n3.:ClS proposed for election to regular rriernbership at the October rne etin g ;
. ~ . ..
Mr . J.B . Porteous Mr. WiLli arn T • Stewart
The Cha.irrn.an ofthe Member s hip Cornrrritte e, Mr .S tephen CheasIey, wishesto
rem ind thernem be r s hip that,withthe startofanewseasonofCRHAmeetingactiv­
ity, now is a very appropriate tim e to bring new rrierrrber s in to CRHA. The corrtin-.
uedgrowthofour As sociation is anend whichshouldbe the goalofever y-rnerribe r;
and subscriber.
The InterprovincialRailway (Rollin g Stock cornrrritte e] is busily putting the two
QuebecRailwa y carsto ltb ed forthe winter;manyrnem.hers areawarethat thecars
are stored for us,on a ternpor a r y basis, through the kind intere st of the Canada Cr:­
eosottng:Ccrripany at Delson , Que.,and working parties ass errible the r e nearly every.
.
Saturday. Work in hand includ e s painting the roofs .of th e tw o cars, al so the under-.
body equipment and runnin g gear. There is also some glass to replace, in order to
rrrak.e the ca r interiors show -proofwhiletheyare stored out s ide. Thoseinterested
in giving a hand should call M r. Lavallee a t CR.9-8822.
The Association has now been advised that the Canadian Pacifi c Railway is hol­
dingfo r deliv e ryto CRHA, fourwoodenpassenger-traincars, to wit : BaggageCar
#3987, built in 1910; Coach #1554 built in 1912; .Instruction Car #56, formerly the
observation-pa r lour car M alahat, built in 1893; and Official Car No.1, built by
Crossen between 1868 and 1871, formerly St. Lawrence & Ottawa Railway car No.9.
The Baggage Ca r is at West on Shops in _~!~~~~:~;_~h e other cars are at Angus Shops.
*
~ Wil1 you be with us onNov ernber 6th, when;e r e v enac t th e Last Spike Cererriony?
NOTICE OF N1EETING:
The October Meeting of the Association will be held
in the McConnell Engineering Building at McGill University, Univer­
sity Street at .i..ilton Street. Use the Milton Street entrance. The
meeting will ta place on Wednesday, October 12th, 1960 at 8 :15 PM.
Mr. O.S.A. Lavallee will give an illustrated talk entitled CraigeU-.
achie, Bdore and After which will incorporate original photographs
taken on the line of the Canadian Pacific Railway in the west about 18~.
As usual, members are invited to bring guests and prospective new
members to this meeting. The room number will be posted at the door.
ASSOCIATION NEWS
The September meeting, at which Mr. Frank Lewin showed colour slides which
he had taken on a visit to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in 1958,. was one of
the most interesting programmes we have had in recent months. His visit was made
when tourists were first permitted into the U.S.S.R. two years ago, and there were
many features of railway and other interest to those in attendance at this splendid
show. Particularly noteworthy was the extensive use of steam locomotives on the
railways, including vari~coloured 2-8=4s of large proportions but light construction.
Mr. Lewins non-railway pictures were also splendidly chosen, showing views
in the five principal citites which he visited, including many impressive buildings.
At the September meeting, the following persons were introduced, ok,; L. ir
nacy s proposed for electi<:>~ to regular merribersi1.ip at the October meeting:
Mr. J .B .. Porteous Mr. William T • Stewart
The Chairman of the Membership Committee, Mr. Stephen Cheasley, wis:hes to
remind the membership that, with the start of a new season of CRHA meeting activ­
ity, now is a very appropriate time to brihgnew members in to CRHA. The contin-.
ued growth of our Association is an end which should be the goal of every member
and subscriber.
The InterprovincialRailw,ay .(Rolling Stock committee) is busily putting the two
Quebec Railway cars to ftbed for the winter; many members are aware that the cars
are stored for us, on a temporary basis, through the kind interest of the Canada Gr­
eosoting Company at Delson, Que.,and working parties assemble there nearly every,

Saturday. Work in hand includes painting the roofs .of the two cars, also the under-.
body equipment and running gear. There is also some glass to replace, in order to
make the car interiors show-proof while they are stored outside. Those interested
in giving a hand should call Mr. Lavallee at CR.9-8822.
The Association has now been advised that the Canadian PacUic Railway is hol­
ding for delivery to CRHA, four wooden passenger-train cars, to wit: Baggage Car
#3987, built in 1910; Coach #1554 built in 1912; .Instruction Car #56, formerly the.
observation-parlour car Malahat, built in 1893; and Official Car No.1, built by
Crossen between 1868 and 1871, formerly St. Lawrence & Ottawa Railway car No.9.
The Baggage Car is at Weston Shops in_::!~~~:r:c:.it;_!he other cars are at Angus Shops.
~~Will you be with us onNovember 6th, when ~e re-enact the Last Spike Ceremony?
C.R~H.A. . News Report ~ 1960 P as..e 53_ .
FARNHAM -CENTUR Y ~OLD RAIL CENTRE ••••••••• by Omer S.A. Lavallee .
The town ofFarnham, Que,, situat ed about fortymiles ea stofM ontrealonthe (
Canadian Pacific Rai Iw ay I s.th rough rout e to the Maritimes , is a railway community
of more tha n one hundred ye ars standin g. The town is the headquarters of the Can-
o.
adi an Pacific Railways Farnham Divis.ion, who se area cov er s all CPR lines east of
th e SaintLawren c e River in the Prov ince of Qu ebe c . It possesses an extens ive yard ,
in
cludingengin e te r m ina l andrepa irfacilities, ca r repa irtr acks, with thedivisional
headquarters hous ed in a modern.sta tion bu ildin g which was opened in 1951. .
It is now nearly on e hundred and two years since th e first railway was opened into
this community, be ginning an er a which saw
rail lines radiate in eight dir ection s , like
spokes of a w heel, in aU directions of the
Eastern.Township s . For a cons ide rable
period; Farnham was th e headquarters of
the South Eastern Railwa y, an extensive
rail systern .who s e parts now fo r m se ctions
of.both Canadian Pacific and Canadian Nat­
ionalrail lines in eas te r n Qu ebec.
,It
was in th e year 1853 that the Stan s t-
N
R�
F�
SER
d
Scal e approximate. OSAL Del.
!I .-
~~~-E_ Sta nst ea d , Sh effo rd & Cha.rrrb.ly Ry. s hewn thus: , , I I I
South East e rn Railway Ii Ii 1 , 111 II
Mont rea l, P or tland & B o s ton Ry. Ii II
~
~ l( )(
Lake Cham plain & S t :. .!–_:.~ E ~ ~ S ~ _J~l -lI~s.tion R y. 11 1111 1111 111 11 1
ead, Sheffo r d & Chambly Railway was in co r porated to serve, es s en tially, the th ree
comitie s encompassed by th e railway s narne, The southe rn counties of Quebec, bor­
de rin g onneighbouringNewEn gland, hadbeenareas ofheav y settlement,even atthi s
e
arly time. An extensiv e far ming community had gr own Ll,, populated both byFrench­
Canadian s and by En glish – s peakin g se ttlers, rria.ny of wh om had come nor th into Can­
ada at
the time of the Revolution in the Un ited State s. V/ith t he com pl etion of the Ch­
amplai n & Sa int Lawren ceRailRoadfromLapr ai rie, o;;pos it e Mont real, to St.J ohns,
on the Richelieu River , in 1836, it seemednatu ral and desir able that the railwayshould
be
pr oIonged in to the Town ships; This was not to be , how ev er. When the railway
er a
came to Canada in the ea,1ly ,1850s, the C&StL tu r ned south to the inte r na tiona l
bourrda ry at R
ouses Point, and a connect ion with American railr oa ds. Th e result of
this was the in corpora tion of the S. S. & ,C . Ry, by localinte rests in Waterloo, Que•
.
-, ~Rn $ t,n1ctio .n g?t under way. in 1858,wi th a br idge ov ~r .th e Richelieu from St.Johns
. . ,. .. .~ . ,
New $ Re po rt ~,.,..1…;.9_6 __ 0..-.,, __ _
FARNHAM -CENTURY~OLD RAIL CENTRE • •••••••• by Orner S.A. Lavallee
The town of Farnham, Que., situated about forty miles east of Montreal on the ( j
Canadian Pacific ,Railways. through route to the Maritimes, is a railway community
of more than one hundred years standing. The town is the headquarters of the Can-
,
adian Pacific Railways Farnham Divis.ion, whose a,rea covers all CPR lines east of
the Saint Lawrence River in the Province of Quebec. It possesses an extensive yard,
including engine terminal and repair facilities, car repair tracks, with the divisional
headqual;ters housed in a modern, station building which was opened in 1951.
It is now nearly one hundred and two years
this community, beginning an era which saw
rail lines radiate in eight directions, like
spokes of a wheel, in all directions of the
mastern. Townships. For a considerable
per.iod., Farnham was the headquarters of
the South Ea.stern Railway, an extensive
railsy.stem whose parts now form sections
oLboth Canadian Pacific and Canadian Nat­
ional rail lines in eastern Quebec.
since the first railway was opened into
SS&:G
EngineHo.
,It was in the year 1853 that the Stanst~
F
A
R
N
SER
Scale approximate. OSAL Del.
~~~-E_~
Stanstead. Shefford &: Chambly Ry. shewn thus: -,I—-1r-I–~+-
South Eastern Railway , I II II
Montreal. Portland &: Boston Ryo 11 II ~ ~ )( )(
Lake Champlain &: St:.!–_::~E~~S~_J~~l~<;.tion Ry. IIItlllllllllHI
d
ead, Sheffbrd &: Chambly Railway was incorporated to serve, essentially, the three
counties encompassed by the railways name.· The s(luthern counties of Que1:;>ec, bor­
dering on neighbouring New England, had been are;:ts of heavy settlement, even at this
early time. An extensive farming community had grown Ll:, populated both by French­
Canadians and by English-speaking settlers, rnany of whunl had corne nOI,th into Can­
ada at the time of the Revolution in the United States. V/ith the completion of the Ch­
amplain &: Saint Lawrence Rail Hoa.d from Laprairie, olposite lv1ontreal, to St.Johns,
on the Richelieu River, in 1836, it seemed natural and desirable that the railway should
be :prolonged in to the Townships!. This was not to be, however. When the railway
era carne to Canada in the ea1ly .1850s, . the C&StL turned. south -to the international
boundary at Rouses Point, and a connection with American railroads. The result of
this was the incorporation of the S. S·. &: ,C. Ry. by local interests in Waterloo, Que.
,: !
. . ~R~$t,ructio.ng~t under. way,.in 1 858,wj.th a bridge over .the Riche.lieu from St.Johns
,g. R .H.A :r:i~.E Re£9.!..!_:..!960
Page 54
to
Ibe rv i He,th en a straightrunacrossflat, leve l,fer tile fa r Ulla nd, through theCOUlUl­
unities of Step Br igide andBtvGz-egoi re, to th e vi lla ge of Wes t Farnharrr, While const­
ruction pr ogressedonw ardtowardGranbyandWaterlooser v icewasinaugurated f r om
(
St.:Jchris ,t o We s t Farnh arrr, and th e firsttrain ent e red th e latter place, the subject of
ou r
study, on Ja nuary ls t, lS59. Inlate r years, th e word W es t was dropped. and th e
town becarne kn own sirrrply as Farnh.arri; Th e SS&C bui lt a wye and engin e house in
the town , entering at all on th e accorripa rryirig Ula p. On De c ernbe r 31st of th e same
y
ear, th e su cceeding section (lib on th e rria p]was opened th r ough to Gra nby..
For twelve year s , Farriha rnwas se r ved adequately by theS.S.& Cv.Ry,, but as th e
t
ownbeganto grow in siz e and in i m por-tan ce; s ituated in an attractive spot on th e
Yamaska Tciver, loca lr a ilw a yint e r e s t s again ea rneto theforeby th e inco rpora tion of
the South Ea s t e r n Railw a y, to effect a di rect connection betw e en this town and th e Int.­
erna tional line he ar Newpor t. Farnharn became the hea dquarters of th e Sou th East ern
andianelaborate,rnulti-is tor e ybrickstation andgenera l offi ce buildingwasbu ilt, along
with engine hou se; car and Iocornotive sh ops and a large yard. Th e South Eastern op ~
enedthefirstsection ofitsline, begin nin g atx on th e rriap, withaconnection with
th e
~.s&
C; to the Province Lin e near Ri chford, Verrnorrt, in 1871. The pointatwhich
the SER left Farnharnis sh own at h . In lS73 , th e SER, th r ou gh anAUlerican subsid ­
ia r y,
reached Ne wport and a conne ction, there, with th e Connecticut &Pass um psi c
Ri
ver s Ra ilroad Co rripan y,
With th e opening oftheSouthEastern, Fa r-nham becarnea targetfor oth errail­
roads. InIS77, theMont real,Po r tlan d & B ostonwas open ed through f rorn Longueuil,
opposIte Mont rea l, to Fr e lighsburg by wayofFar-nharrr.Ipoirrta c
lll
and d on the map).
This railwaywas unde r th e cont r ol ofth e SouthEas t e rnRailway, andre allyafforded
th e
SER a connection into Mont real.
Having now ra il line s radiating in five direct ions, to Sts.Johris, Montreal, Granby,
NeZvp? r tan d Frelighsburg, rnatte r s were corrrpli ca.ted s orrrew.hat by th e opening, in
October , l879 ~ of th e 3 6
11
_ga u ge Lak e Ch.arrrpl.ai n & Saint Lawrence Junction Railway,
Wh
ichextehded f r o rn a conneetion with th e Central VermorrtRaflway at Stanbridge,
th
roughFar nham ,;St . Pie arid.Bt; Hyacinthe, to St.Gui llaume. This lin e was built to
b
ring cigri cu ltu ra l pr oducts , chieflyhay, from th e fertile valley of-th e.Ri ch e l.i e u, th en
forwar d it on via th e CentralVermont through St. Albans. The LC&StLJR ca rne into
Farnhamat th e we st end of town (m ap reference e}, made a doubl e -gauge connect ­
ion w
iththeSERatthelattersstation)fl), th enproce ededon double-gaugetrackto
a switch at ith e east end of the SER yard (kif), crossed the SS&C wh ere M e igs is now
Located (v), and soacr oss the Yarria s ka to Sts Pie, St. Hyacinthe and St.Gu illaurne.
,Thi s lHU e lin e sh ortly carrie under th e con trol of the powe rful South Easternvand
afteronlytwoyears,asanarrow-ga ugelin e, it wasconv ert ed tosta nd ard-gauge and
assimilated in t othe SE:R. Now pos ses si ngseven r~i1 routes, thesta ge wassetfor the
Ias t , spok e in th e wheel.
IntheearlyE i ghties ; th e Canadian Pac ific Ra ilway acquired control of th e South
East~r n , as pa r t of its policy of constz-uctionIn western Canada, arid expansion by ac>
qUi siti~nj)f exis tingrail1ines in the east~ No sooner hadthe tr an scon tinental been
cOUlpi~t~d i~ i sss, than the CPR t~lYned it s attention eas tw a rd, for a di rect lin e across
the Sta te of Ma in e to New Br unswick and Nova Scot ia .,;~ sh or t er th an ariyriow exi s ting.
Accor dingly under the ch art e r of a
1
paper co rnpan y, th e At lantic & North We s t Rail­
~, aY.. ~~e , CPR buil tf rorn Mont re al to F arnh aUl, ,by~ay ;of St. Johns and Ib e rvLl .le, in
. ,. , .. ,,;., ~. ., \
· G.B.B.A Page 54
to Iberville, then a straight run across flat, level, ,fertile farmland, through the comm­
unitiEisof Ste. Brigide and St. Gregoire. to the village of West Farnham. While const­
ruttion progre~sed onward toward Granby and Waterloo, ,.·service was inaugu~ated from
St.·· J ohris . -to West Farnham, and the first train entered the latter place, the subj ect of
our study, on January 1st, 1859. In later years, the word West was dropped; and the
town became known simply as Farnham
ll
• The SS&C built a wye and enginehouse in
the town, entering at 1Iaf! on the accompanying map. On December 31 st of the same
year, the succeeding section (lfb on the map) was opened through to Granby ..
For twelve years, Farnham was served adequately by the S.S.& C.Ry.. but as the
tdwri. began tic grow in size and in impo:rtance, situated in an attractive spot on the
yarn:aska River, local railway interests again carne to the fore by the incorporation of
the South Eastern Railway, to effect a direct connection between this town and the int­
e·rriat:l.6na:l lin~:hear Newport. Farnham became the headquarters of the South Eastern
and an elaborate, multi-storey brick station and general office building was built. along
with engine house; car and locomotive shops and a large yard. The South Eastern op~
ened the first section of its line, beginning at x on the map, with a connection with
the ~S&C;to the Province Line near Richford, Vermont, in 1871. The point at which
the SER left Farnham is shown at h,. In 1873, the SER, through an American subsid~
iary, reached Newport and a connection. there, with the Connecticut & Passumpsic
Rivers Railroad Company.
With the opening of the South Eastern, Farnham became a target for other rail­
roads. In 1877, the Montreai,Portland & Boston was opened through from Longueuil,
oPP9site Montreal, to Frelighsburg by way of Farnham.(points c: and d on the map).
This railway was under the control of the South Eastern Railway, and really afforded
the SER a connection into Montreal.
Having now rail lines radiating in five directions, to St.Johns, Montreal, Granby,
Newp?rtand Freligh:sburg, matters were complicated somewhat by the opening, in
October, i879, of the 3 6,·I-gaugeLake Champlain & Saint Lawrence Junction Railway,
which extelided from a connedion·· with the Cent,ral Vermont Railway at Stanbridge,
thr()ugh Farnham, St. Pie and,St~ Hyacinthe, to St. Guillaume. This line was built to
bring agricultural products, chiefly hay, from the fertile valley of ·the .Richelieu. then
forward it on via the Central Vermont through St. Albans. The LC&StLJR carne into
Farnham at the west end of town (map reference e
l1
), made a double-gauge connect~
ion with the SER at the latters station )tlj), then proceeded on double-gauge track to
~ s~itch at·the east end of the SER yard (k), crossed the SS&C where Meigs is now
located (ylf), and so across the Yamaska to St.Pie, St. Hyacinthe and St.Guillaurne.
, ,
Thislittle line shortiy carne under the control of the powerful South Eastern,and
after only two years as a n:arrow~gauge line, it was converted to standard-gauge and
assimilated into the SER. Now possessing seven rail routes, the stage was set for the
iast /spoke in the wh~el.
In theearlyEighties, the Canadian Pacific Railway acquired control of the South
East~rn, as part of its poHcy of construction {n ~estern Canada, arid expansion by ac­
quisiti~iI ~f ~~isting rail lines. in the east. No sooner had the transcontinental been
compiet~d i~ 1885, than the CPR t~rned its attention eastward, for a direct Hne across
the State of Maine to New Brunswick and Nova Scotia =~ shorter than anynow existing.
Accordingly, under the charter of aflpaper company, the Atlantic & North West Rail­
~aY .. J~e, C~R built ir.o~. M~nttea~ t.o Farnham, by. I;~Y 6£ St. J ohni> and Iberville, in
C.R.H.A. _ News Re,Eort -1960 Page ,55
1887. Between Iber viIle and Farnham, it paralleled the SS&C to the north, and made
its entrance into the Ya m a s ka River town just ~ ,ie~ hundred feet to the north of the
older railway (llg on the map).It~ course eastward lay~long the SER for a few miles ( __
to Brookport, wher e the route reverted to a new line through Foster, and Magog to the )
~ity
of,S~,erbrooke.
. .. ., >. •
Farnham had, by th i s time, progressed from the sleepy farm villa g e of thirty
years before. to a busy railway town, with train bells and whistles sounding constantly
to remind the inhabitants of the s ource of their p r o s p e r ity. A particular point of con­
gestion was at the west end of the town (XII on the map) where the MP&B and CPR cr­
ossed the SS&C. There was a two-ball mast signal erected here, governing movements
over the several lines. Operation of this signal is d es c r i bed in a Central Vermont Ry,
rule-book for 1897, which the w r iter possesses, the Central Vermont having acq~ired
control of the SS&C in 1867, and the MP&B in 1891. In 1891, also, the SER was reorg­
anized as the, Montreal & Atlantic Railway and was thereafter operated as part of
the Canadian Pacific Railway. Hence the reference to the CPR and to the IIM P &B and
,SS&C Divisions of the Central Vermont, in the Yollowi n g extract from the r ule FARNHAM
Junction with M.P. & B. and S.S.& C. Divisions and C.P.Ry. Two red
balls by day, or two red lights by night.
When no signal is shown, S.S.& C. trains have right of track.
When one red ball or one red light is shown, C.P.R. trains have H ght
of track.
Wh en two red balls or, two red lights are shown, M.P.& B. Division
trains have right of track.
~t
was not until 1925 that the first reduction in trackage was made of the lines ser­
ving Farnharri, On August 31st of that year, the Canadian National Railways, who ~a~
succeeded the Central Vermont Railway as proprietors of the old MP&B andSS&C
li~es
on November. 1st, 1923, abandoned the old MP&Bline (exiting at c
ir
) betwe~n
Farnham.and Ste , Ange1e. The portion from SteAngele in to St, Lambert continued
to be operated as part of the electric Montreal & Southe~n Counties Railwayurrtil the
autumn of 1956.
,,
In 1935, ,C a na dia n National Railways, now in the process of eliminating unprofit­
able parallel operation with other lines, abandoned the oId SS&C line between a point
a short distance east of Ibe r v i Ile on the Central Vermont line, known as SS&C Junc­
tion, to Farnham (line entering at a). Thereafter, CNR trains between Iberville and
Far nha.m ranovertheCPR, ut ilizing theshor tLerrioyncSubdivisionin.Iber vi.Lle bet­
weentheCNRandCPRIine.s.; Due to the dire ctioriofthe switches ateachendofthe
Lemoyne Subdivision, this section had th e unusual idiosyncracy of having all trainrop­
erationmadeinabacking-updi rection. CanadianNationalpassengertrainsranov e r
this route between Montreal and Waterloo until November 25th; 1951, when service
to Granby and Waterloo was begun by diesel train over the M&SC route through Mar­
ieville and St. Cesai r e , CNR4-6-2#5056wasonthelasttrainonthat,day,whi ch was
marked, on the westward and last tr ip, by the issuance of a 31 If order by the CPR
Dispatcher at Farnham, extending best wishes of the CPR Farnham Division officers
to the CNR t.rainvcrew onthe la s t run.
The only other line to be abandoned was the Frelighsburg .Subdivi s ion of theCNR,
the ta il end of the old Montreal, Portland & Boston, which saw the e~d of s e r vi c e on
C.R.H.A. News Re120rt -1960 Pag~ 55
1887. Between Iberville and Farnham, it paralleled the SS&C to the nOl;th, and made
its entran<;e ipto the Yamaska River town just a .few hundr.ed feet to the north of the
older railway eg on the map). Its course eastward lay ~long the SER for a few miles
to Brookport, where the route reverted to a new line through Foster, and Magog to the
city of. S}:le,rbrooke.
. .
. F~rnh;iIn had, by this time, progressed from the sleepy farm village of thirty
years before. to a busy railway town, with train bells and whistles so:unding constantly
to remind the inhabitants of the source of their prosperity. A particular point of con:
gestion was at the west end of the town (flX on the map) where the MP&B and CPR cr­
ossed the SS&C. There was a two-ball mast signal erected here, governing movements
over the several lines. Operation of this signal is de,scribed in a Central Vermont Ry~
rule-book for 1897, which the writer possesses, the Central Vermont having acquire.~
control of the SS&C in 1867, and the MP&B in 1891. In 1891, also, the SER was reorg­
anized as the. Montreal & Atlantic Railway and was thereafter operated as part of
the Canadian Pacific Railway. Hence the reference to the CPR and to the MP&B and
.SS&C Divisions II of the Central Vermont, in the yollowing extract fro.m the rule-book~
FARNHAM
Junction with M.P. & B. and S.S.& C. Divisions and C.P.Ry. Two red
balls by day, or two red lights by night.
When no signal is shown, S.S.& C. trains have right of track.
When one red ball or one red light is shown, C.P.R. trains haveHght
of track •
.
When two red balls or, two red lights are shown, M.P.& B. Division
trains have right of track.
It was not until 1925 that the first reduction in trackage was .made of the lines ser­
ving FC!-rnha.m. On August 31st of that year, the Canadian National Railways, whp hild
succeeded the Centr·al Vermont Railway as proprietors of the old MP&B a.nd SS&C
li~es on November 1st, 1923, abandoned the old MP&B line (exiting at c
i
,) betwe~n
Farnham. and Ste. Angele. The p.ortion fr-o.m SteAngele in to St. La.mbeit continueq.
to be op.erated as part of the electric Montreal & Southern Counties Railway uritil the
autumn of 1956.
In 1935, Canadian National Railways, now in the process of eliminating unprofit­
able parallel operation with other lines, abandoned the old SS&C line between a point
a short distance east of Iberville on the Central Ver.mont line, known as SS&C Junc­
tion, to Farnha.m (line entering at a). Thereafter, CNR t;nains between Iberville and
Farnham ran over the CPR, utilizing the short Lemoy.,nc Su.bdivision in,Ib~rville bet-
ween the CNRand CPR line.$,. Due to the directib:n of the switches at each end of the
Lemoyne Subdivision, this section had the unusual idiosyncracy of having all train;;op­
eration .made in a backing-up direction. Canadian National passenger trains ran over
this route between Montreal and Waterloo until November 25th, 1951, when service
to Granby and Waterloo was begun by diesel train over the M&SC route through Mar­
ieville and St .. Cesaire. CNR 4-6-2 #5056 was on the last train on that. day, which was
.marked, on the westward and last trip, by the issuance of a 31 If order by the CPR
Dispatcher at Farnha.rn, extending best wishes of the CPR Farnham Division officers
to the CNR traIn crew on the last run.
The only other line to be abandoned was the Frelighsburg SubdivisiO:r: of the CNR,
the tail end of the old Montreal. Portland & Boston, which saw the end of service on
C.R.H.A. N~ws Report -1960 Page 5 6
March 6th, 1939. About this tim e also, th e CNR abandoned that part of the SS&C line
inIFarnham extending from lIZ ~ on the map, to v. running over the C.P.R. between
thesepoint s. Theg..r,ade cross ing justbeforetheYarnaskabridgesbecameajunction,
(
known thereafter as Me igs . The wye behind the old SS&Cstation rerna.i.ned until com­
pa r a tivelyrecent year s . Avis itthereabouttenyearsagoshowedthewyerailsin­
ta
ct, with all fis hp,lates unbolted. The switch at the Ifta ilIf of the ~iJy e was then a
stub switch, with an ancient har p swi.tchstand,
On February 9th, 1949, the original South Eastern Railway headquarters building,
the multi-stor ey b rickstructurereferredtoelsewhere i:h this story, was destroyed by
fire. The on lypartremainingintactwasthevaultshaftonallfloors. Manyinterest­
in g original SER records were recovered from th e s e vaults, including two old SER
lette r bo oks from which Mr. Lorne Perry took extracts for these pages about two
years ago. Th e Canadian Pacific set to work building a new sta tion for Farnham, the
present rnodern and spacious structure being opened on February 16th, 1951. It ser­
ves the needs of both CPR and CNR, the latter still operating passenger tr a ins between
Farnham,and Waterloo, via Granby•
.
During theea r ly part of this year (1960), Canadian Pacific dismantled part of the
FARNHAM and environs
A
~

_ :I~
, , .J ., ~-
; N,\­, I ,
I
/
,
,
.
.
……….
FARMHAtil Ut1960
….. -,. d
roundhouse at Farnham, reflectingincreas ed utilization offewerdiesellocomotives.
PariSof the old brick South Eastern Railway buildings remain, however, as a reminder
of the times bef ore the advent of the highway, when all traffic moved by r a i I, giving
growth and status to towns whi ch grew up around ra ilwa y headquarters, and of which
Farnharn is today one of the friendliest and plea s a ntes t examples.
~:::
~~ ~< ~:; >r: ;)::: ::: ,):::: ~::: >i:::
§TE:AM ON NORTHERN ALBERTA RAILWAYS: Robert Sandusky, who is presently
orr .anextendedbus in e s s assign ment in weste r n Canada,reportsthatavis it tothefac­
ilities of.the Nor -the r n Albe r ta Rail~ays at Dunve gariYar d , just north ,~ f, Edmonton, on
Septerriber 16th, revealed the following stearnlocomotives, pr e sumablyserviceable.
Ihose -rna rked withanasteriskwe reunderstearn:2-10-0sNos.51: , 52,54,57, 101:,
102. 2-8;;Os No s. 72~ ; 73, 74>t., 4-6-2No.161anddiesels302and304. No.51wentout
on,that da y on train #7 to Wat erways . The Barrhead freight on the same day ran with
No . 72. The Barrhead and Waterwa ys branches are still stearn oper ated ,
:.:::: ,):(,)~ **~:;>::::* t.::: )::::
C.R.H.A. Page 56
MaI:ch 6th, 1939. About this time also, the CNR abandoned that part of the SS&C line
in~Farnham extending from zit on the map, to y running over the C.P.,R. between
these points. The g..r,a:deeJ:ossing just before the Yarnaska. bridges became a junction,
blown thereafter as !Meigs!1. The wye behind the old SS&C station remained until com-
paiatively recent years. A visit there about ten years ago showed the wye rails in
tact, with all fishplates unbolted. T he switch at the tail
l1
of the ~i~ye was then a
stub switch, with an ancient !1harp!! switchstand.
On February 9th, 1949, the original South Eastern Railway headquart~rs building,
the multi-storey brick structure referred to elsewhere it this story, was destroyed by
fire. Fheonly part remaining intact was the vault shaft on all floors. Many interest­
ing original SER records were recovered from these vaults, including two old SER
letter books from which Mr. Lorne Perry took extracts for these pages about two
years ago. The Canadian Pacific set to work building a new station for Farnham, the
present mo4e,rn and spacious structure being opened on February 16th, 1951. It ser­
ves the needs of both CPR and CNR, the latter still oper<+ting passenger trains between
Fa,rnham. and Waterloo, via Granby.
, .
During the early part of this year (1960), Canadian Pacific dismantled part of the
FARNHAM and environs
~
.
, _.IU.~ ~
!~tI.~ I
…… ~ d
roundh6u·s.e at Farnham, reflecting increased utilization of fewer diesel locomotives.
PariSof the old brick South Eastern Railway bulldings remain, however, as a rerninder
of the times before the advent of the highway, when all traffic moved by rail, giving
growth .and status to towns which grew up around railway headquarters, and Qf which
Farl).h~m is today one of the friendliest and pleasantest examples.
STEAM ON ~~TH~RN_~BE.B..!.~!<~ILW~r~: Robert Sandusky, who is presently
on,an ext~nded business assignment in western Canada, reports that a visit to the fac­
ilities .of~he ~orthern Alberta R,ailways at Dunvegan Yard, just north of· Edmonton, on
Septerp.ber 16th, revealed the following stearn locomotives, presumably serviceable.
Those.marked with an asterisk were under stearn: 2-10-0s Nos.51*, 52, 54, 57>., 101:
102. 2-8~Os Nos. 72~,· 73, 74>.. 4-6-2 No.161 and diesels 302 and 304. No.51 went out
on. that day on train #7 to Wat~rways. The Barrhead freight on the same day ran with
No. 72. The Barrhead and Waterways branches are still stearn operated~
..
C l:R~ H.A.�
News Report -1960
Page 57

At the Associati6ns Banquet
.. FtEMINISCENCES OF AHEARN AND SOPER whi ch was he Ld in Montreal
t . . by~ ;SeYInour Rathbone � during t he Spring, the Guest
(
., ,, . , � of Honour was Mr. Seymour
;, , Rathbone , Chairman of the
J;
,~ Board of Ahearn & Soper Company Limited, a pioneer electrical
,� firm, whose interests embraced t he building of street railway
cars under their own name, and later as the Ottawa Car Manuf­
acturing Company , and also the bUilding and operation of the
electric railway in Ottawa, until it was taken over by the
Ottawa Transportation Commission in 1948. Mr. Rathbone has
ki ndly provided us with a transcription of his talk, which we
r~produceherewith.

,
~; <;~
Mf. Chairman; Ladies and Gentlemen,
, I was moved by Mr. Sopers
kind in.troduction. Warren Y. Soper, now the third generation of the
family as President of Ahearn & Soper, has been, since he was a small
boy, a loyal friend of mine as has been Mr. Frank Ahearn, also from
,:,;boyhood . Frank Ahearn, the son of the late Hcn. Thomas Ahearn, was:
-t.h e last President of the Ottawa Electric Railway. My long a.ssocLat-,
:i on with· these two families has meant much to me.
r Ifyou were to ask me -Whats my line?, I could not saYi add ~�
r esses , but I am honoured to have been asked by your Association to�
;
~pealt to your members on the early activities of Ahearn & Soper and�
,t hei r , pioneer days of formation of the Ottawa Electric Railway. I­
:
m u s ~ ~pologize for reading this brief narrative, but as I · am well�
,l aunched en
:
route

to my 82nd birthday, I can t
c
trust my memory.�
I was not: an employee of the Ottawa Electric Railway but will
tell you of some old records and of memories of my days with the late
Hon. Thomas Ahearn and the late Warren Y. Soper.
, Thomas Ahearn, Ottawa-born and Warren Y., Soper, born in Old T9wn,� :Mai ne ,
were telegraph operators in Ottawa while still in their teens;� ,wi t h t
n.e:,,Great North Western Telegraph Company. Mr. Ahearn waa ,wi t h� t hat Company
in the office of J.R. Booth. TheY both became very ex:.,.�
:perct and at the age of eighteen, Mr. Ahearn joined the staff of i.oper-­�
atorswith the Western Union Telegraph Company in New York City; he�
was , there on the memorable Black Friday when fortunes melted away.�
,
T.h~ s e two young men applied themselves vigourously and very soon their�
,:endeavour s became well and favourably known. While still veryyoung, Mr. Ahear-n was
appointed to the office of Local Manager of the Bell
Telephone Company: in Ottawa and Mr. Soper as Manager of the Ottawa
office of the Dominion Telegraph Company. Their occupations brought
them together,and in the year 1881, they decided to resign their .
important offices and form a partnership as Ahearn & Soper, Electrical
9cintra6tors. They secured the district representation of the Westing-,
hoUse Electric & Manufacturing Company, dealing with that notable or­
ganizations Chicago office. After a few years representing Westing­
house , Ahearn & Soper were instrumental in persuading Mr. George .West­
, i nghouse: t o build .an electrical apparatus plant in Hamilton, Ontario, (
where nis Company already had a small air brake plant.
Prior t ~ t h~year 1891, Ottawa stransportation syst.em consisted�
of a few small horse-drawn street cars –six in all –which had be­�
gun operation in 1870. I have ridden in those quaint little cars in�
NewsReport -1960 Page 57
• 3 –
,j At the Associations Banquet
c, REMINISCENCES OF AHEARN AND SOPER which was he Id in M6ntreal
j by-Seymouf,Rattlbone during the Spring, the Guest
of Honour was Mr. Seymour
,, , Rathbone, Chairman of the
J.;, Board of ,Ahearn & Soper Company Limited, a pioneer electrical
firm, whose interests embraced the building of street railway
cars under their own name, and later as the Ottawa Car Manuf­
, -.
acturing Company and also the building and operation of the
~lectric railway in Ottawa, until it was taken over by thB
Ottawa Transportation Commission in 1948. Mr. Rathbone has
,kindly provided us with a transcription of his talk, which we
; ;., r,eproduce herewith.

1;
Mr. Chairman Ladies and Gentlemen,
I was moved by Mr. Sopers
kind introduction. Warren Y. Soper, now the third generation of the
family as President of Ahearn & Soper, has been, since he was a small
boy, a loyal friend of mine as has been Mr. Frank Ahearn, also from
:,ibo,yhood. Frank Ahearn, the son of the late Hon. Thomas Ahearn, was: –
the, last Presiq.ent of the Ottawa Electric Railway. My long associat,:,
ion with-these two families has meant much to me.
If you were toask me -Whats my line?ll, I could not:, sayi add­
,resses, but I am honoured to have been asked by your Association to
: ~pealt to your members on the early actlvi ties of Ahearn & Soper and
:the,~r ,pioneer days of formation of the Ottawa Electric Railway. I j
mustapciloe:;ize fot: reading this brief narrative, but as I, am well
:launched en route to my 82nd birthday, I can it trust my memory .
. ! ,
I was nott an employee of the Oj:itawa Electric Railway but wi-II
,tell you of some old. records and of memories of my days with tbe late
:Hon . Thomas Ahearn and the late Warren Y . Soper.
, Thomas Ahearn, Ottawa-born and Warren Y., Soper, born in Old T9wn,
Maine, were telegraph operators ,,in Ottawa while still in their teens,
,with tJie ,Great North Western Telegraph Company. Mr. Ahearn was ,with
that Company in the office of J~R. Booth-. They both became very ex~
pent and at the age of eighteen, Mr. Ahearn joined the staff of oper­
,~tbrs with the Western Union Telegraph Company in New York City; he
.. was there on the memorable Black Friday when fortunes melted away.
,~hE?se two yo,ung men applied themselves vigourously and very soon their
endeavours became well and favourably known. While still very young,
Kr. Ahearn was appointed to the office of Local Manager of the Bell
Telephone Company in Ottawa and Mr. Soper as Manager of the Ottawa
office of the Dominion Telegraph Company. Their occupations brought
them together, ,and in the year 1881, . they decided to resign their,
important: offices ~nd form ~ partnership as Ahearn & Soper, Electrical
Contraqt6r.s. They secured the district representation of the Westing­
hoUse Electric & Manufacturing Company, dealing with that notable or-
ganlzations Chicago office. After a few years representing Westing­
housEi, ,Ahearn & Soper were instrumental in persuading Mr. George West­
,inghouse,:,to builo. an electrical apparatus plant in Hamilton, OntariO,
wbere his Company already had,a small air brake plant.
Priorto-the year 1891, Ottawas transportation system consisted
of a few small horse-drawn street cars –six in all –which had be­
gun operation in 1870. I have ridden in those quaint Ii title cars in
( )
C.R.H.A . News ReQort – 1960
Pa.€@….58
the winter time , t he floors covered with straw and heated with a tiny
coal stove in the centre of the car. Twenty years af t er the opening
(
of the horse railway, and in spite of the fact that cynics said that
snow conditions in Canadas winter wor l d would not pe r mi t of operating
electric streetcars, a party of U. S. interests negotiated for some
months with the Corporation of Ottawa f or the construction of an elec­
t ric railway. This offer fell t hrough and on crctober 20th , 1890,
Ahearn & Soper forwarded t he following letter to t he Corporation:
Ottawa, October 20 , 1890.
The Mayor and Corporation of Ottawa,
Gentlemen:
,Unde r st andi ng that the security offered by the Company
with whom negotiations have been carried on for some mDnths
for the construction of an electric railway in this 6ity, is
not satisfactory to your Corporation and that t he time stip­
ulated for making such security satisfactory has .exp dr-ed ,
thereby terminating your negotiations with that Company, we now
offer to undertake the immediate formation of a local
Company for the construction and operation of the railway! in
accordance with the t erms of the agreement already prepared
and a s security for t he proper fulfilment of the contract,
we enclose herewith our accepted cheque in favour of your
Corporation for the sum of $5 ,000 .00 .
Yours truly,
Ahearn & Soper
This let ter was~si gned by the late Warren Y. Soper, gr andfa t her of Mr.
Warren Y. Soper, todays President of the Ahearn & Soper Company, Lim­
ited and with us at this banquet tonight.
After much hes i t a t i on and refusal on the par~ of Ottawas financ­
iers to j oi n t he Company, because of their belief that such an oper­
ation was not feasible,Ahearn and Soper were successful ,and their
offer was accepted. The Company was formed with Thomas Ahearn as Pres­
ident and Warren Y. Soper, Vice-President. Eight months later, on June
20th,1891, the first small electric cars appeared on Ottawas streets.
The man, t hen a boy of five, who closed t he switch to start the service
was Frank Ahearn, later to become President of the Ottawa Electric
Railway Company on the passing of his father , the Hon. Thomas Ahearn,
in,1938 . Three cars we r e built and equipped by Ahearn & Soper at their
small plant formed as t he Ottawa Car Company from what was the Wylie
Carriage factory.
The horse-drawn cars operated by the Ottawa City Passenger Railway
competed for two years with t he Ottawa Electric Railway and then went
out of business.
The snow pr obl em was covered by the manufacture of electric snow
plows at the Ottawa Car Companys plant. The tracks were ,c l ea r ed and
the Railway Company was obligated to remove .: t he snow from the streets
on which t he car lines were. This was done by loading and drawing the
snow away on t he Companys horse -drawn ,snow boxes. In l ater years,
with the advent , of motor cars, the City under-t.ook the removal of the
snow from t he curbs at its own expense .
C.R.H.A. News Report ~ 1960 Pagec 58
the winter time, the floors covered with strai and heated with a tiny
coal stove in the centre of the car. Twenty years after the opening
of the horse railway, and in spite of the fact that cynics said that
snow conditions in Canadas winter world would not permit of operating
electric streetcars, a party of U. S. intErests negotiated for some
months with the Corporation of Ot~awa for the construction of an elec­
tric railway. This offer fell through and on aetober 20th, 1890,
Abearn & Soper forwarded the following letter to the Corporation:
The Mayor and Corporation of Ottawa,
Gentlemen:
Ottawa, October 20, 1890.
Understanding that the security offered by the Compan~
with whom negotiations have been carried on for some months
for the construction of an electric railway in this 6ity, is
not satisfactory to your Corporation and that the time stip­
ula ted for making such security sa tisfactory has ,expired,
,thereby terminating your negotiations with that Company, we,
now
offer to undertake the immediate formation of a local
Company for the construction and operation of the railway in
accordance with the terms of the agreement already prepared
and as security for the proper fulfilment of the contract,
we enclose herewith our accepted cheque in favour of your
Corporation for the sum of $5,000.00.
Yours truly,
Ahearn & Soper
This letter was::-signed by the late Warren Y. Soper, grandfather of Mr.
Warren Y. Soper, todays President of the Ahearn & Soper Company, Lim­
ited and with us at this banquet tonight.
After much hesitation and refusal on the par~ of Ot:tawas financ­
iers to join the Company, because of their belief that such an oper­
ation was not feasible, ·Ahearn and Soper were successful and their
offer was accepted. The Company was formed with Thomas Ahear.n as Pres­
ident . and Warren Y. Soper, Vice-Pre sident. Eight months la ter, on June
20th, 1891, the first small electric cars appeared on Ottawa s st·r~et:s.
The man, then a boy of five, who closed the switch to start the service
was Frank Ahearn, later to become President of the Ottawa Electric
Railway Company on the passing of his father, the Hon. Thomas Ahearn,
in. ·1938. Three cars were bui 1 t and equipped by Ahearn & Soper at their
small plant formed as the Ottawa Car Company from what was the Wylie
Carriage factory.
The horse-drawn cars operated by the Ottawa City Passenger Railway
competed for two years with the Ottawa Electric Railway and then went
out of business.
The snow problem was covered by the man~facture of electric snow
plows at the Ott
1
awa Car Company I s plant. The tracks were cleared and
the Railway Company was obliga.ted to remove ,-the snow from the streets
on which the ear lines were. This was done b.y loading and drawing the
snow· away on the Companys horse -drawn .snow boxes. In later years,
with the advent of motor cars, the City undertook the removal of the
snow from the curbs at its own expense.
C.R.H~A. News Report-1960 Pa~9
The first Superintendent of t he Ottawa Electric Railway Company was Mr.
J.E. Hutcheson who later left Ottawa for Montreal t.o become
Superintendent of the Montreal Tramways Company. ,,; (
; .. ~
011: June 22nd , . 1895, the Ottawa Journal said , editorially:
,j : ; .; ;r ~How the ,Street Railway serves t he district in all the�
29mdLesof track ih Ottawa; if your friends,whowill come.v�
to the gr owi ng capital this summer , want to know how many�
cars are in service here, tell them there are 68 cars and�
that nowhere are cars kept in better repair and cleaned and�
dusted for the comfort of the public.�
This tribute was dated within two daYi? of t he fourth anniversary of the
commencement of the Ottawa Electric Railway Companys service.
In1894,-the Ottawa Electric .Rai l way contracted with the Federal
Government to carry the mail from the Post Office to the Broad Street
Railway Station and t he old Canada Atlantic Station. This contract was
in force for some years when the Company lost it to a cartage firm.
The irbny :of fate willed that the contract was closed on the day Ahearn
& Sop(er~were about to put into service twoadditional Post Office cars.
~
-.{: : . r-~ ••
I n,1897 , ~I!hen Canadas capital city was celebrating the 60th Ann­
iversary Jubilee of the reign of Queen Victoria, Ahearn andSoper were
entrusted by the Federal Government to illuminate t he entire face of
the Parliament BUildings with thousands of el ect r i c lights. This qUite
overpowering and wonderful sight still lingers in the memory of Ottawa
old-timers. Your narrator recalls carrying out instructions of his
employ~rs
(on immediate completion of the installation) to stand on
Parliament Hill and endeavour to count t he lamps. The situation became
embarrassing when passers-by gradual ly formed a gr oup who were amused
at the lamp counter whom they were satisfied had escaped from, or
ahouLd: be dtrected to, a ment a l institution.
L
. JDUr i ng t hi s same celebration, Mr. Ahearn was instrumental in org­
anizing the first coast-to-coast communication network which, t hrough
tlie medium of the recently-completed telegraph circuits was able-,t o
carrynews of the capitals participation in the celebration to all the
majorccent.r-ea in Canada.
. ..
r;;,.l· Oi:l Christmas Eve, 1897, the Ottawa Electric Railway gaily decor,…
atedasmall car with Santa Claus (Mr. ,War ren Y. Soper) standing be side a
Christmas tree on the car, and drove through the car lines throwing
candy, apples, oranges and nuts to t he crowds of children following.
In the afternoon of that day, Mr .Ahea rn acted as Santa in a second run.
1901 saw the Company build a handsome specially~equipped car to
convey the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York (later King George V
and Queen Mary), for a tour through the car li nes .
: Ycun.
narrator recalls that when he j oLned Ahearn & Soper in 1895,r
(sixty-five years ago) he wa s interested in noting that the O. E. Ry.
operations were largely direct;edfrom the offices of Ahearn and Soper
on-Sparks:Street, by meansof·notes and,phone calls by Mr. Ahearn and
Mr. Soper/Ito;Mr. Hutcheson.atthe,;0,E,.Railway offices on Albert Street.
Mr. Soper would hear a car pass the ,Spar ks Street . office with a flat
wheel; he would call Seymour, get the number of that car. I would
News Report-1960 Page 59
The
first Superintendent of -the Ott-awa Electric Railway Company
was Mr. J.E. Hutcheson who later left Ottawa for Montreal to become
Superintendent of the Montreal Tramways Company.
Or1; June 22nd, 1895, the Ottawa Journal said, edltor:1ally:
;~::!..; }IHow the St-reet Railway serves the district in all the
29 mi,l~es of track ih Ottawa; if your friends ,who-will come
to the growing capital this summer, want to know how many
cars are in service here, tell them there are 68 cars and
that nowhere are cars kept in better repair and cleaned and
dusted for the comfort of the public.
This tribute was dated within two day~ of the fourth anniversary of the
comme.ncement of the Ottawa Electric Railway Companys service.
In 1894, the Ottawa Electric Railway contracted with the Federal
Government-to carny the mail from the Post Office to the Broad Street
Railwa:.y Station and the old Canada Atlantic Station. This contract was
in fores-for some years when the Company lost it to a cartage firm.
The irbny-:Of fate willed that the contract was closed on the day Ahearn
& Soper~ ,Vere about to put into service twoaddi tional Post Office cars.
-: .. , …..
~ .
]n,r1897, ~,Then Canadas capital city was celebrating the 60th Ann­
iversary Jubilee of the reign of Queen Victoria, Ahearn and Soper were
entrusted by the Federal Government to illuminate the entire face of
the Parliament Buildings with thousands of electric lights. This quite
overpow$ring and wonderful sight still lingers in the memory of Ottawa
old-timers. Your narrator recalls carrying out instructions of his
emploY,ers ( on immediate completion of the installa tion) to stand on
Pa~liament Hill and endeavour to count the lamps. The situation became
embarrassing when passers-by gradually formed a group who were ammsed
at the lamp counter whom they were satisfied had escaped from, or
shoulif be d,ire,cted to, a mental institution.
I.
>: D-urlng this same celebration, Mr. Ahearn was instrumental in org­
anizing the first coast-to-coast communicatton network which, through
the medium of the recently-completed telegraph circuits was, able-to
carry,n,ews of the capitals participation in the celebration to all the
majj?;t: – ;;,lCjOB Christmas Eve, 1897, the Ottawa Electric Railway gaily decor;-.
ated a small car with Santa Claus (Mr. ,Warren Y. Soper) sta.nding beside
aChristmas tree on the car, and drove through the car lines throwing
candy, apples, oranges and nutB to the crowds of children following.
In the afternoon of that day, Mr.Ahearn acted as Santa in a second run.
1901 saw the Company build a handsome specially-equipped car to
convey the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York (later King George V
and Queen Mary), for a tour through the car lines .
. .
, Your, narrato.r recalls that when he join-ed Ahearn & Soper in 1895,
(sixty-five years ago.) he was interested irrnoting that the O. E. Ry.
operations were largely directed ,from the offices of Ahearn, and Soper
orr. Sparks:Street, by meansofnotes aNd. _phone calls by Mr. Ahearn and
Mr. Sopertc Mr. Hutcheson. at the O.E.Railway· offices on Albert Street.
Mr. Soper would hear a car pass the . Sparks Street offic·e with a flat
wheel; he would call Seymour, get the number of that car. I would
C.R.H.A. News ReQort -1960 Page 60
run and come back with No. 26, sir. An immediate call to Mr. Hutch­
eson, Jim, car 26 just pa s sed here with a flat wheel –take it off.
An amusing instance of these directions was the occasion when Mr.
Soper, . who had obviously agreed with Mr. Ahearn that I had little of a
mechanical mind called me into the private office and said IlSeymour,
will you tell Mr. Ahearn and me the meaning of remote control It? My
reply was · Well sir, Im not sure unless it means the manner in which
you and Mr. Ahearn direct the operation of the Ottawa Electric Railway
by phone calls and notes from this office to Mr. Hutcheson at the O.E.
Railway office. I have .a l way s felt that my, answer saved the situation
for me. ~.
The electric cars ,Ahea r n & Soper made were highly thought of and
orders came to the firm from outside sources. Your narrator recalls
Mr. Soper goi ng to Montreal with an offer to the Montreal Tramways Com­
pany to furnish one hundred cars and returning the following day with
the
order~ A.& S. also furnished. cars to the municipal systems in
Quebec ; Trois Rivieres, Oshawa, Port Arthur, Fort William,
Winnipeg, Edmonton, Calgary, Regina, Saskatoon, Moose Jaw,
Halifax, St.Johns,Newfoundland(narrow gauge ) , Saint John,NB,
Kitchener, and the Windsor,Essex & Lake Shore Elec. Ry ..
In ·the early days of the . Ot t awa Electric Railway and before motor
cars came i nt o being, the Company built a summer playhouse in the west
end of the city, which at tbat time was very suburban and necessitated
transportation by street car. The Ottawa people flocked out in large
numbers in the old open cars to he entertained by an interesting stock
company. Another popular venture of the O. E. Ry. was the opening ofa
paVilion at Britannia Bay where band concerts in the summer evenings
brought very large crowds of passengers in the cars.
The electric heaters installed in the first electric cars in Ott­
awa were invented and patented by Tromas Ahearn and manufactured in the
Ahearn & Soperhea t e r factory on Albert Street, at one time a small,
brick dwellinghouse. -Mr. Ahearn also invented and patented cooking
heat.er-s, Aniriterestingproof of this is the old Ottawa Windsor Hotel
dinner menu of August 28, ~ 1892, whdch proudly boasted that Every item
on this menu has been cooked by the electric heating appliances inven­
ted and patented by Mr . T. Ahearn of Ahearn & Soper of this city and is
the first instance in the history of the world of an entire mea1 being
cooked by electricity. The bread and meats were cooked in an 81ectric
oven and the liquids in other electric heaters. The menu~goes on to
list an Electric Dinner
ll
beginning with soup and running through a
number of if ish, meat and vegetable courses, ending up with such att­
ractive desserts as Apple souffles, wine sauce or IlCocoanut Drops,
vanilla ice cream and black tea , gr een tea, or coffee.
Mr. Ahearn and Mr . Soper also promoted the formation of the Ottawa
Electric Company in competition with the Chaudiere Electric Light Com­
pany, then serving Ottawa with,light and which Company they.later ab­
sorbed. Mr. Ahearn became President of the Company With offices on
Sparks Street a short distance from the Ahearn & Soper office on the
same street, f r om where he would have daily communication with Mr.Soper
on O. E. Ry. and other matters by Mor se telegraph key, both Mr. Ahearn
and Mr. Soper having a key secretly installed in the top right hand
drawer-s of their desks;
C.R.H.A. News Report· -1960 Page 60
run and come back with No. 26, sir. Ah immediate call to Mr. Hutch­
eson, Jim, car 26 just passed here with a flat wheel –take it off.
An amusing instance of these directions was the occasion when Mr.
Soper, . who ·had obviously agreed with Mr. Ahearn that I had little of a
mechanical mind called me into the private office and said Seymour,
will you te 11 Mr. Ahearn and me the meaning of remote control ? My
reply was, Well sir, Im not sure unless it means the manner in which
you and Mr. Ahearn direct the operation of the Ottawa Electric Railway
by phone calls and notes from this office to Mr. Hutcheson at the O.E.
Railway office. I have -always felt that my. answer saved the situation
for me.
The
electric cars Ahearn & Soper made were highly thought of and
orders came to the firm from outside sources. Your narrator. recalls
l1r. Soper going to Montreal with an offer to the Montreal Tramways Com­
panytofurnish one hundred cars and returning the following day with
the order. A.& S. also furnished cars to the municipal systems in
Quebeci Trois Rivieres, Oshawa, Port Arthur, Fort William,
Winnipeg, Edmonton, Calgary, Regina, Saskatoon, Moose Jaw,
, Halifax, St.Johns,Newfoundland(narrow gauge), Saint John,NE.·,
Kitchener, and the Windsor,Essex & Lake Shore Elec. Ry ..
In. the early days of the Ottawa Electric Railway and before motor
cars came into being, the Company built a summe:r playhouse in the west
end of the city, which at that time was very suburban and necess1tated
transportation by street car. The Ottawa people flocked out in large
numbers in the old open cars to he entertained by an interesting stock
company. Another popular venture of the O. E. Ry. was the opening of.a
pavilion at Britannia Bay where band concerts in the summer evenings
brought very large crowds of passengers in the cars.
The electric heaters installed in the first electric cars in Ott­
awa we-reinvented and patented by T:bomas Ahearn and manufactured in the
Ahearn & Soper heater factory on Albert Street, at one time a small,
brick dwelling house. -Mr. Ahearn also invented and patented cooking
heaters. Ahihteresting proof of this is the old Ottawa Windsor Hotel
dinner menu of August 28, 1892, which proudly boasted that Every item
on this menu has been cooked by the electric heating appliances inven­
ted and patented by Mr. T. Ahearn of Ahearn & Soper of this city and is
the first instance in the history of the world of an entire meal being
cooked by electriCity. The bread and meats were cooked in an 81ectric
oven and the liquids in other electric heaters. The menu-goes on to
list an Electric Dinner beginning with soup and running through a
number of if ish, meat and vegetable courses, ending up with such att­
ractive desserts as Apple souffles, wine sauce or Cocoanut Drops,
vanilla ice cream and black tea, green tea, or coffee.
Mr. Ahearn and Mr. Soper also promoted the formatipn of the Ottawa
Electric Company in competition with the Chaudiere Electric Light Com­
pany, then serving Ottawa with. light and which Company they later ab­
sorbed. Mr. Ahearn became PreSident ·of the Company with offices on
Sparks Street a short distance from the Ahearn & Soper office on the
same street, from where he would have daily communication with Mr.Soper
on O. E. Ry. and other matters by Morse telegraph key, both Mr. Ahearn
and Mr. Soper haVing ·a key secretly installed in the top right hand
dravlers of their desks.
C.R.B.A.�
News Rel2.0rt:-1960 Page 61
In 1924 . the O. E.. ·Ry . .00. introduced buses on one of its routes.
They.ranfora·short period, when the cars-again took over. In 1939,
buses were again introduced and continued to spread over new routes.
The Ottawa. Electric Railway was privately-owned for 58 years when in
the .year
r1948
it.was taken Co~er by the City and became the Ottawa Tran­
sportation Commission. . . :
,.
:: ~~ .I·;have -many personal remembrances of the late Mr. Soper-, Be was
a ski.l1edamateur magician and was a corresponding friend of the re..­
nowned. Thurston. I recall that on the occasions when Thurston came to
Ottawa to perform, his first move on arrival at the station was to imm­
ediately come to callan Mr. Soper at the Ahearn & Soper office. Mr.
Soper gave a number of performances at the old Russell Theatre for
charitable purposes and had a weekly date at Ashbury College for the
entertainment .of the students.
Lopd Aberdeen, at that period Governer General of Canada and in
resid~nce:at Rideau Hall, Ottawa, and who was, at times,a visitor to
the Ahearn & Soper offices came in one morning to tell Mr. Soper how
much he had enjoyed a benefit performance Mr. Soper had given the ,prev­
ious evening at, the Russell Theatre. Mr. Ahearn and Mr. Soper were at
the mom~nt in conference. Mr. Ahearn, unnoticed, nodded to Mr. Soper,
who wrote on a small slip of paper a message to Mr. Ahearn, handed it
to Lord Aberdeen and asked him to crumple it and hold it. Mr. Ahearn
then placed his right hand on Mr . Sopers and suggested that Lord Aber~
deen place ,his hand on theirs. Mr. Soper telegraphed to Mr.Ahearn with
·
� hi s :. finger ~· · t.he r mes aage he had written (Lord Aberdeen being quite un­
aware ·of the proficiency of the two men as amateur telegraphers). Mr.
Ahe.arn, who had a small pencil between his thumb and forefinger repeat­
~d
~the ~ords of the message on the cuff of his white shirt and .a sked
t.he ..
Governer . General to check. The puzzled dismay of Lord Aberdeen
was a ·source of profound gratification and amusement to the two .t e l e ­
graphers .
. Two of my
outstanding recollections of both Mr. Ahearn and Mr.
SdperwereMr.Ahearns boast, I started as a messenger boy and am
.p~o ~d· o~ it ~ . 1 tried to do my work well. I never lnitered by the ~ay,
I..:d j,d not have -t i me a s I needed every minute to perfect myself in tele­
.gr l;1iphy . The boy who loiters on the way when sent on an . errand too
o:f:tenre.mains the errand boy throughout lifeII •
…_::;.Mr . ~ope r r s f avourite quotation was Elbert Hubbards Carry your
Mess.agato Ga.r-c La?, and Life is just one damn thing after another,
Seymour, now go after it~ –and I went ~~
.r, ·:Your narrator looks back on his many years of association with two
of Canadas prominent,-successful and interesting business men as , a
privilege and a very happy memory.
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
,,.-. ~
. ­
,.,:~ews Report No. 115 October 1960�
!];di t or i al Addr e s s :; Box22,StationB,.Mont r ea l 2; Quebec.�
.� Editor: ,; Ome r S.A. Lavallee Asst. Edttor: . W. Pharoah .
Publisher: John Saunders
Committee
~ Anthony Clegg David R. Henderson
Paul·R. McGee Lorne C. Perry
C.R.B.A.
News Beport: 1960 Page 61
In lI924 t~e O. E. Ry. /Jo. introduced buses on one of its routes.
They-ran ·fol: a . short period, when the cars:-again took over. In 1939,
buses were again introduced and continued to spread over new routes.
The €>ttawa Electric Railway was privately-owned for 58 years when in
the.year1948 it. was taken over by the City and became the Ottawa Tran­
?portatldn OQrnmission.
, .1. . J
-:: : -I;hav.e -many personal remembrances of the late Mr. Soper. Be was
a s-kil]~edamateur magician and was a corresponding friend of the re~
nowned. Thurston. I recall that on the occasions when Thurston came to
Ottp,wa to perform, his first move on arrival at the station was to imm­
ediately come to calIon Mr. Soper at the Ahearn & Soper office. Mr.
Soper gave a number of performances at the old Russell Theatre for
charitable purposes and had a weekly date at Ashbury College for the
8Btertainment.of the students.
Lopd Aberdeen, at. that period Governer General of Canada and in
residence; at Rideau Hall, Ottawa, and who was, at times,a visitor to
the Ahearn & Soper offices came in one morning to tell Mr. Soper how much
he had enjoyed a benefit performance Mr. Soper had given theprev­
ious evening at, the Russell Theatre. Mr. Ahearn and Mr. Soper were at
the mom~mt.in conference. Mr. Ahearn, unnoticed, nodded to Mr. Soper,
who wrote on a small slip of paper a message to Mr. Ahearn, handed it
to Lord Aberdeen and asked him to crumple it and hold it. Mr. Ahearn
then placed his right hand on Mr. Sopers and suggested that Lord Aber·
d-een: place ,his hand on theirs. Mr. Soper te legraphed to Mr .Ahearn with
,hf:s .. .f:tnger, thelmessage he had written (Lord Aberdeen being quite un-
aMare of the proficiency of the two men as amateur telegraphers). Mr.
~he:arniwho had a small pencil between his thumb and forefinger repeat­
~dthe ~ords of the message on the cuff of his white shirt and asked
t.he~ Governer . General to check. The puzzled dismay of Lord Aberdeen
was a·source of profound gratification and amusement to the twotele­
graphers .
. ,
Twoof my outstanding recollections of both Mr. Ahearn and Mr.
Sops.r,were Mr. Ahearn s boast, I started as a messenger boy and am
p.IjoU;q,·of it. I tried to do my work well. I never lnitered by the ,way,
I,.4::td not have-time as I needed every minute to perfect myself in tele-
:gr~phy .. ,The boy who loiters on the way When sent on an errand too· o:f:t:
en·re.mains the errand boy throughout .life .
,
;~; ;1r .. S.opers favouri-te quotation was Elbert
Message to GarCia, and Life is just one damn
Seymour, now go after it! –and I went ~ ~
Hubbards Carry your
thing after another,
– . : Your narrator looks back on his many years of association with tw.o
of Canadas prominent, successful and interesting business men as a
privilege and a very happy memory.
GANADJ;AN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
, ;~:.: .
;,:. _,:J:.lews Report No. 115 October 1960
EqJtorialAddress: Box 22, Station B, Montreal 2, Quebec.
_I Editor:Omer B.A. Lavallee
Publishe-r: John Saunders
Commi ttee~. Anthony Gle.gg
Paul R. McGee
Asst. EdItor: . W. Pharoah
David R. Henderson
Lorne C. Perry
0
0 (-Y r ,. ·1-.:. ,. r–~ 1./ n­
.-,r­
;;;; -;; _ :.:.t .J l- ;~ ~ · – .2 ~J -!~ _:J.I:.!·r. .A,� Page U·,2)· ·
A� department of news and co~nentary, by
o­B S E R V A T ION S Arrt hcny CIs.:..:;.
(
••. TEN YEAR3 AGO ••••• (October 1950 i ssue of News Repor t )
Ii­ On October 1st, 1950, the Asso ciation held a railr oad excur s i on
from Hontreal to Huberdeau, to comnenor at.e tty,:; 2Si ~h anni.ver-s ar-y
of the famous Montreal to Vancouver run of erm. dLeseIv-eLect r-Lc u
nit car #15820, in 67 hours.
it­ The CAnadi an Nat i onal Railways has placed an order for di esel ­e
lectr i c locomotives, to replace Montr eal &Southern Count i es Rai lw
ay el ect r i c tr ains betv:een Mont r eal and Granby and CNR
steam t rai ns bet .ween Montreal and iJat erloo;1Que.
I­ The Central Vermont Rai lway wi l l name locomotive No. 601 IlCi t y
of St . Al bans
il
as a highlight of the railway centennial day in
St. Albans on Wednesday, uct ober 18t h. il
eIthasbeenrepor t ed thata fullyautoDlati c train, wi ththetraincrew
on board stand i ng by, made a t est run b~twee n London, Ont . , and Tor­
onto during the latter par t of Septernber , The t ests were conducted
by General Mot.or-s Diesel Limited of Lor.do n, ·l.F:Llg a Canadian National
Railways locomot ive, cars and track. A cJ,npany spokesman confirmed t h
at the t est s had been under day sir!ce -Iun.. i 11ll1 were recently com­pl
eted. The company conduct ed the ~eHt ~ i.n conjunct ion with West i ng­house
Company Air Br ake Di vision thr~ ~gh it s subsidiar y, Canadian
Jestingt,ouse Company Limited, and General Eal Lway Signal Company of
Ro chester, N.Y.
e� F
urther to the news item last month, ef f ective Sept ember 24th, the
Canadi an Nat ional s Cont Lnent.aL Lim.Lt cd has been providi ng sleepi ng c
ar ser vice only between Montreal and Nort h Bay, Ont., Saskat oon and
Edmonton, Al.ta, , and between KeLowna and Vancouver-, B.C. Dini ng car
fa cil:ties are not now avai lable. SJ.t;eri.i19 C2..r ser vi ce between Mon­
treal and Nor t h Bay i s pr ovided by an 1q JJoI!et t e car; between Sask­
atoon and Edmonton a four double-bedroom and a-sect i on car is in ser­
vice; and bet .ween KoLowna and Vancouver-/ t >:.e sleepi ng car has four
sections, eight dupl ex roomettes and f Gl1.c double bedr ooms. The run
of t he CorrtLnent.aL il between Saskat.con and Edmonton does not , of course
duplicat e that of the ilSuper Cont inent ald! as Nos. 3 and 4 oper at e via
Nor t h B a ~ tl eford and Vermilion, while Nos.1 and 2 ser ve Biggar and
·,aimvright .
e�
Eff ective Sept ember 25th, Canadian Paci f i c Br iti sh Columbia Coast Ser­
vice betwBen Vancouver , Victoria and Seat t le, was curtailed and the
ageing Pr-Lncess El ai ne i1 was withdr avm from service for the winter
mont hs. Last winter , the iiElaine;1 pr ovi ded a dai l y round trip between
Vict oria and Vancouver . Daily servi ce between Nanaimo and Vancouver
for the wi.nt.er-months wi.Ll. be provided by the trai n-fer r y Prmcews of
Vancouver, the Princess of Nanaimo11 and the Pri.ncess Patricia11 or
Pr-Lncess I,-Iarguer i t e. Ei ght daily tr ips are planned.
e

Effecti ve September 26th, Canadian Paci fic reduced its Montreal-Ottawa
via Vank~e ek Hill passenger service t o four round trips per day. This
was accompl i shed by the cancellation of train #237, leaving Montreal
S.I:.~·J •. A .•
o B S E R V A T ION S
Obs (jrv :::,1:, if:. .,:.-::. _7,~,O, ____________ P;…a ……… g~e_. _0_·-2 …… 5-·
A department of news and co~nentary, by
A:1t~10i1~r Cls.=,-~.
••• TEN YEAR3 AGO ••••• (October 1950 issue of News Report)
On October 1st, 1950, the Association held a railroad excursion
from Hontreal to Huberdeau, to comr.lenOYate c·b::.; 2j;~h acm:i.ve:tsary
of the famous Montreal to Vancouver run of Glm. diesel·,electric
unit car #158201 in 67 hours.
The CAnadian National Railways has placed an order for diesel­
electric locomotives, to replace Montreal & Southern Counties
Railway electric trains betvieen Montreal and Granby and CNR
steam trains between Montreal and vJaterloo ~I Que.
I The Central Vermont Railway will name locomotive No.601 TlCity
of St .. Albans
il
as a highlight of the railway centennial day in
St. Albans on Wednesday, uctober 18th. 11
s It has been reported that a fully autoDlatic train, with the train crew
on board standing by, made a test run b~tween London, Ont., and Tor­
onto during the latter part of Septr::::fY1Let 0 The tests were conducted
by General Hotors Diesel Limited of LOIlrton,11c.;Llg a Canadian National
Railways locomotive, cars and track. A cJ~pany spokesman confirmed
that the tests had been under way sir! ce ,jnrl~: i lllrl were recently com­
pleted. The company conducted the ~eHt~ i.n conjunction with Westing­
house Company Air Brake Division thr0~gh its subsidiary, Canadian
Jestingt+ouse Company Limited, and General Railway Signal Company of
Rochester, N.Y.
s Further to the news item last month, effective September 24th, the
Canadian Nationals HContinental Liri1ited
ii
has been providing sleeping
car service only betlAieen Montreal and North B2.y, Ont., Saskatoon and
Edmonton, Alta., and between Kelowna and Va. n(0 ll.ver, B.C. Dining car
facil~ties are not now available. SJ.t;8,·.-i.i 19 C2.r service between Mon­
treal and North Bay is provided by .om V)JJoI!et ce car; between Sask­
atoon and Edmonton a four double-bedroom ~nd a-section car is in ser­
vice; and betveen Kelmma and Vanco1l.ver / t:~e sleeping car has four
sections, eight duplex roomettes a:!d fGll.C double bedrooms. The run
of the dContinental between Sa3l:G1toc
1
n cmd Edmonton does not, of course
duplicate that of the nSuper Continental il! as Nos. 3 and 4 operate via
North Ba~tleford and Vermilion, while Nos.l and 2 serve Biggar and
iaimvright.
e Effective September 25th, Canadian Pacific British Columbia Coast Ser­
vice between Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle, was curtailed and the
ageing ilPrincess Elaine
il
was withdrawn from service for the winter
months. Last winter, the ilElaine iI provided a daily round trip between
Victoria and Vancouver. Daily service between Nanaimo and Vancouver
for the Jinter months VTill be provided by the train-ferry l1Princews of
Vancouver
ll
, the I;Princess of Nanaimo il and the ilPrincess Patricia 11 or
iiPrincess Nart~uerite i.. Eight daily trips are planned.
e Effective September 26th, Canadian Pacific reduced its Montreal-Ottawa
via Vank~eek Hill passenger service to four round trips per day_ This
was accomplished by the cancellation of train 1/:237, leaving Montreal
t
G.R.H.A. Observations-1960 Page S-36
at 6:50 PM except Saturday and Sunday, and train if238 leaving Ottawa
at 1:10 PM except Saturday and Sunday.
(
e Canadian National Railways abandoned that part of its Rouses Point
Subdivision between Edi son Avenue (St. Lambert) and Br osseau, Que.,
effective 2:01 PM, October 11th, 1960. All trains now go over the new
line between Brosseau and Castle Gardens, 4.0 ~iles , the latter stat­
ion situ.ated on the former llont.r-ca.I &, Southern Counties Rai l way. Pass­
enger trains are running as extras until the new timetable is issued
at the end of the month. The abandonment was br-ought. about as a res­
ult of extensi ve road construction in conj unction wi.t.h the new Cham­
plain Bridge acr oss the St.Lawrence Ri ver between Verdun and Ville
Brossard, and al so to _ .-:~//_——--
elimina t e the mul t i -I ~~.-::. ,lOr] -.Ie.
-lIN:plic i~y of ra i~ lines ..
an t.h i s expand Lng ar ea. , Ob-
The line abandoned was t /~.� ~t:~
~~ -1 It ff
part 01 a ).J.ne OUl /-r
i.n l !~ t:. ? d t vcrt . j t .he -J f. r
1 ~, ; ;- .L V~~ :l,:g A:·y,;(.kT ./ .~~ .(__ [VI$Ot AlE.
or-Lg.ina.L ChampLai n and ..
I
, .. /-0
Saint Lawr snce Hai l Road/// ….. _ fj/~�
I
f
lllo ….. T ……. ¥ _; ._-~ r-t~ J ….. ……, ll ~rJ(.W
… om i.apra …Y .Lt? co ;jv • 1 ·.. ..:JI!tb
Lambert, :~u e o -:., V/. — –…… L./ ·v z:-
t LINE
~.
. -/.­ -.. <,;;;
._;-~ fo ). I, • i; 1.
V
1 … , d I
i.,

­
e J..he .Gr1e h&:..lr oaa. an _
-…. ,i the Del :;:vv&re, Laokawarma & ;Je;;:;t e:n Railroad

will sl.ort.Lvcease to exist, and:~ [l e new� merged
system, to be known as the Er:ie- Lack­�awanna
;~a
il road yd.ll formalLy come into being.�
Ant .Lci patr ::1[; a.pprovaL c,f the merger , the new�

/TO flIM~Hf
companj a~opt ed an embJ.em and a slogan selec-L� ted fr
om more than 2,400 employee suggestions. The emblem and trade­�
mark 1i!i11 be dia.nond-shaped wi.t .h a disc bearing the letters IIE and L�
while t he new slogan w i.Ll, be Iho Friendly Servi ce Route, The prop­�
osed r;1ergAr was appr oved by the Interstate Commerce Commission early�
, n C:.lonT e < -.:),,.-.
1uc.1.-;» .J ~.~.~ ,…;t:.;: ……
e AccorC: i nc; to statistics, r-ai l.waye are the safest form of transportation
in America. There was only one passenger fatality in a train accident
in al l of 1959, but e.Leveri passengers died in tr-ai.n ser-vi.ce accidents
in which t he passene;er
1s
negl igence !Jas t he primary cause, such as when pa
ssenGer s tr i ed to board or leave movi ng trains. It was the smallest
number of t r G.in f atalities in history.
l:- fnnoticed among t he many passenger -ser vi ce abandonments in recent months
was the cessation of service between Hamil t on, Allandale and M~aford on
Canadian Nat i onal lines in Ontario. Ih Ls was the run formerly served
by diesel-electri c unit car D-l and trailers.
e Plans have been announced by t he National System to discontinue trains
107 and 10L5, operating dai l y except Sunday bet.ween Hervey, Que . , and
Fitzpatrick, Que. This will come into ef fect October 31st, the last
run being made on Saturday, Oct ober 29th. Trains //110 and. #109 will
have their schedules ad.just ed. at the saLle time.
e The Bo
ard of Tr anspor t Conllnissioners will hear evidence in Niagara FallS
on October 19th, in connection with a New York Central RR application
to abandon the most northerly portion of its Niagara Branch, runnin~ to
Niagara-on-the-Lake. A previous application was deferred.
G.R.H.A .. Observations-1960 Page S-36
at 6: 50 PH except Saturday and Sunday, and train /1238 leaving Ottai.va
at 1:10 HJI except Saturday and Sunday.
e Canadian National Railvlays abandoned that part of its Rouses Point
Subdivision between Edison Avenue (St. Lambert) and Brosseau, Que.,
effective 2:01 PIvI) October 11th, 1960. All tr2ins now go over the new
line between Brosseau and Castle GCl.rdens, 4.0 :niJ.es, the latter stat­
ion situ.ated on the former l-Iontreal & Southern Counties Railway. Pass­
enger trains are running as extras until the new timetable is issued
at the end of the month. The abandonment -laS brought about as a res­
ult of extensive road construction in conjunction VJith the new Cham­
plain Bridge across the St.Lawrence River bet,ween Verdun and Ville
Br~s?ard, ~~d al~o. to I —/-//,/
ellmLnate ~ne mULtl-/ J ~
/::::fC I IN rS,or J.
plicity of rail lines r –
in this expanding area. ,. ov
The li.ne abe.neIoned was.! /~,/ rt:;~
part of a J.ine built /-r-
in.l?5
2
l,
dciVer~i~lg thd
e
LA:?:I;Rr / ~j.(,-(1),-;01 AlE.
~r~glna nampl::-l~ an /0
.:Jalnt Lctt;JY.::::r:~e ltall Road/ f ……. _ Li,,
… 1 11,1
f
~o) T -ra-; rl 0 …. 0 ~+-; -. /.1 ….
.1. .!! ..wC.t.1–J ..l-~ … lJ __ v. . …. -.JI!f)
Lambert, :~ue ~ t:–V/_ _. –.: .!::/NZ-
l
Or,,;loo 0 , . , i: h I.. . …… _
e The Erie rl&~lroad and —

?O fIIM:i.tit
the Del:J.-vv&re, Larkavvenna & liJe;;:;te:::-n Railroad
will sLortl v cease to exist, and:::[i8 neVJ
merged system, to be knovvn as the Er:I e-Lack­
awanna ;~ai1 road will fGrmal1y come into being
Antici.pat:tng approva.l L,f the merger, the nev
company a~opted an embJ.em and a slogan selec-L
ted from more than 2,400 employee suggestions. The emblem and trade­
mark vITiIl be dia.nond-shaped with a disc bearing the letters liE and ilL II/hile
the neVi slogan will be liThe Friendly Service Route 11. The prop­
osed mer-gRr was approved by the Interstate Commerce Commission early
l•
11 c l.~nt-r·< )...:).,...-.
oJ,,, ~v J ;;, •. vC; •
e Accorcing to statistics, railways are the safest form of transportation
in Amerjca.. There was only one passenger fatality in a train accident
in all of 1959, but eleven passengers died in train service
il
accidents
in which the passenGerfs negligence was the primary cause, such as when
passenGers tried to board or leave moving trains. It was the smallest
number of trG.in fatalities in history.
l:: fnnoticed c:IIlong the many passenger-service abandonments in recent months
was the cessation of service between Hamilton, Allandale and Me-aford on
Canadian national lines in Ontario. T;-lis was the run formerly served
by diesel-electric unit car D-l and trailers.
s Plans have been announced by the National System to discontinue trains
107 and 10(~, operating daily except Sunday betvveen Hervey, Que., and
Fitzpatrick, Que. This will come into effect October 31st, the last
run being made on Saturday, October 29th. Trains HIIO and #109 will
have their schedules ad.justed at the salfle time.
e The Board of Transport Comrnis sioners will hear evidence in Niagara Falls
on October 19th, in connection with a New York Central RR application
to abandon the most northerly portion of its Niagara Branch, runnin~ to
Niagara-on-the-Lake. A previous application was deferred.
;iII< t 1:; C
C. R. H.:A. Observations-1260
Page ~JZ
DONT FORGET THE BANQUET ON NOVEMBER 7£H 1t
Members and subscribers r esident in the Montreal area have al­
ready recoived a circular announcing a Banquet, which will be
held in ~he Alouette Haom, !indsor Station, Montreal
l
on ~ilon­
day, November 7th, 1960. The Banquet will mark the i:>eventy­
Fifth Anniversary of the Dr i vi ng of the Last Spike completing
the Canadian Pacific Hailway, which occurred at Craigellachie,
B.C., on ~ove mber 7th, l d85.
The guest speaker will be Mr . N.R. Crump, President, Canadian
Pacific Railway, and Honorary Vice-President of our Assoc­
iation• .It is hoped that all members and their families res­
ident in this area will take this opportunity to hear one of
Canadas foremost transportation spokesmen, also enjoy a con­
vivial di~ner in company with other CRHA people and their
families~
.
FOR THIS SPECIAL OCCASION, a SPECIAL PIUCE of :1>2. 50 per person
has been H~ t for the dinner, which will include four courses,
with an entree of Roast Beef, for which the CPR restaurant is
justly famed. The dinner will begin at 7:00 PM, but the Room
will be open from 5:30 PM for those who desire liquid refresh­
ment, th ~price of which is not included with that of the meal.
Those wi~hing to reserve may phone Dr.Nicholls, VE.3-8263, or
Mr. Orner ~avallee, CR.9-8822, or mail them in to P.O.Box 22,
Station B IIontreal 2, Canada marked Banquet Reservations.
RESErtVATI6NS ARE ABSOLUTELY N~CESSARY, and they must be made b
efore November 3rd.
RESERVE NOW 1
.
_.~ –_…_-,-_._._-_._.._ ._-~_ .
eAnorderfor anaddit i onal 50steelfl at car s foruseonCanadianNat­
ional Railways lines i n Newfoundland has been placed with the Eastern
Car divisiori~o f Domi ni on Steel & Coal Corp., Trenton, N.S. The cars
supplelnent ap order of 80 cars placed wit h Dosco last July. The
flat cars, 40 feet in l ength, are similar in °rleight to cars now in
service in tho province, but have an increased capacity of 35 percent
due to the 4~e of low-alloy steel. (Page S-33, last issue, delete phrase
sLmi.l.ar to ot her-s in service in Newfound.Land v)s
e Canadian Nat~onal Hailways and Hober val &Saguenay Railway Company
recently accepted delivery of four specially-desiGned aluminum hopper
cars frombuilder Mar i ne Industries Limited. The cars, d8veloped by
the Aluminum Company of Canada, and mechanical and research departments
of CNH, each carry nine more tons of payload than eXisting CNR hopper
cars, are easier to unload and more readily adaptable to var:.ous servj.cps..
Three of the cars will go into service immediately, carrying ~ulk mat­
erials like lime, cement, alumina, gypsQm, polyethylene and adipic
acid~ The fourth wi l l be subject to t ests. Empty, each car wel~hs 16
tons.
e The Board of Transport Commissioners has ordered six Canadian railways
to erect new aluminum warning signs that shine brightly in the lights
of approaching autos. The sign is the same as the familiar X-shaped
wooden sign, except that it is made of aluminum. The words Railway
Crossing
li
, and in Quebec iiTraverse de Chemin de Feri!, r emain the
same s t yl e and size.
(
~t1, l
·C.R.H.A.
¢
Observations-1960
DONT FORGET THE BANQUET ON NOVEMBER 7LH 1t
.
, .,~
Members ~rtd subscribers resident in the Montreal area have al­
ready reoe.;i.ved a circular announcing a Banquet, vlhich will be
held in 1.1ne Alouette Hoom, lindsor Station, Montreal1. on lJlon­
Eiay, November 7th, 1960. The Banquet will mark the .::>eventy­
Fifth Anniversary of the Driving of the Last Spike completing
the Canadian Pacific Hailway, which occurred at Craigellachie,
B.C., on ~dvember 7th, IC05.
The guest speaker will be Hr. N.R. Crump, President, Canadian
Pacific Railway, and Horwrary Vice-President of our Assoc­
iation. It is hoped that all members and their families res­
ident in this area will take this opportunity to hear one of
Canadas foremost transportation spokesmen, also enjoy a con­
vivial dinner in company with other CHHA people and their
families ~ .:
FOR THIS $r~CIAL OCCASION, a SPECIAL prUCE of :~2. 50 per person
has been ~@t for the dinner, which vvill include four courses,
with an ~nt.ree of Roast Beef, for which the CPR restaurant is
justly famed. The dinner will begin at 7:00 PM, but the Room
will be open from 5:30 PM for those who desire liquid refresh­
ment, th¢.price of which is not included with that of the meal.
Those wis.lting to reserve may phone Dr.Nicholls, WE.3-8263, or
Mr. Orner L~vallee, CR.9-gS22, or mail them in to P.O.Box 22,
Station J)I-Iontreal 2, Canada marked Banquet Reservations II.
RESErlVATX6N.3 AH.E ABSOLUTELY N~CESSARY, and they must be made b
efore N~Vember 3rd.
RESERVE NOV! l
—-~——. —-~~—————-_.*——
e An order for an additional 50 steel flatcars for use on Canadian Nat­
ional Railways lines in Newfoundland has been placed with the Eastern
Car divisioriof Dominion Steel & Coal Corp., Trenton, N.S. The cars
supplement ap order of 80 cars placed with Dosco last July. The
flat cars, 40 feet in length, are similar in Pleight to cars now in
service in ~he province, but have an increased capacity of 35 percent
due to the ~se of low-alloy steel. (Page S-33 last issue, delete phrase
i1similar to others in service in Newfoundland
it
.)

e Canadian Nat~onal Railways and Hoberval & Saguenay Railway Company
recently ace~p~ed del~very of fo~r sp~c~ally-desiGned aluminum hopper
cars from bUJ_IQer Marlne Indu5tr18s Llmlted. The cars, dnveloped by
the Aluminum COr:lpany of Canada, and mechanical and research departments
of CNR, each carry nine more tons of payload than existing CNR hopper
cars, are easi~r to unload and more readily adaptable to var~ous servjc~s.
Three of the cars will go into service immediately, carrying bulk mat­
erials like lime, cement, alumina, gypsQm, polyethylene and adipic
acid. The fourth vlill be subject to tests. Empty, each car welr;hs 16
tons.
e The Board of Transport Commissioners has ordered six Canadian railways
to erect new aluminum warning signs that shine brightly in the lights
of approaching autos. The sign is the same as the familiar X-shaped
wooden sign, except that it is made of aluminum. The words Railway
Crossing)!, and in Quebec iiTraverse de Chemin de Fer
il
, remain t.he same s
tyle and size.

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