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Canadian Rail 114 1960

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Canadian Rail 114 1960

ews Report
crha
STATION
S
MONTREAL 2 . QUESEC
P.O. SOX 22.
>::: >:< >::::
NUMBER 114 SEPTEMBER 1960 AN ENGINE AND ITS FRIENDS –Canadian National Railways 4-8-4 No.
6153 is the object of all visual and photographic attention as it
stands at
Alexandria, Ont,; during the Associations Last Run of Steam on CNR If
excursion on Sunday, September 4th. An earlier decision not to preserve
this
engine was reversed by CRHA at the request of members and friends.
CRHA Photo -Paul McGee.
(

o
l
crha
ews Report
P.O
. BOX 22.
STATION ··B
MONTREAL 2. QUEBEC
NUMBER 114 SEPTEMBER 1960
AN ENGINE AND ITS FRIENDS –Canadian National Railways 4-8-4
No. 6153 is the object of all visual and photographic attention as it stands at
Alexandria, Ont., during the Associations Last Run of Stearn on CNR
excursion on
Sunday, September 4th. An earlier decision not to preserve
this engine was reversed by CRHA at the request of members and friends.
CRHA Photo -Paul McGee.
C~~~ ~~~~_~~£~E!~~~~~ ~~~a~~~
NOTICE OF MEETING:
Meetings of the Canadian Railroad Historical
(
Association are held on the second Wednesday of each month, except
during the summer months of July and August. They are held in Room
110, McConnell Engineering Building, McGill University, University
Street, Montreal. Dates of the next several meetings are as follows:
October 12th October monthly meeting.
November 9th November II II
December 14th December II II
January Ll th, 1961 Annual General Meeting.
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
THE END OF STEAM ON CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Five hundred members , associates and friends of the Association gathered in
Montreal on Saturday and Sunday of Labour Day weekend, September 3rd and 4th,
to pay homage, for the last time, to a Canadian National steam locomotive in oper­
ation on that system. By far the largest attendance ever experienced in ten years
of CRHA railway excursions , it was a fitting tribute to the end of an era which had
begun on the CNRs earliest ancestor more than 124 years before, in 1836. The
engine was specially selected by CNR mechanical officers in view of its good running
condition, and it justified official confidence by performing well and flawlessly dur­
ing the two excursions. The engine selected was 4-8-4 type No.6153.
The observance was divided into two parts: an excursion on Saturday intended
principally for railway enthusiasts, who attended to the number of 282. The train
ran from Montreal to J oliette, Que., and moving picture runbys were staged at Ville
St. Pierre, Ballantyne, Montreal Nord and the Bout de I Ile bridge on the eastbound
trip, while further stops were made westbound at Crabtree, Paradis J ct. , I Assomp­
tion and St. Paul I Ermite on the westbound journey. Altogether eight runbys were
made, in addition to pictures at Montreal Central Station, from which po int the en­
gine hauled the train, at J oliette where the engine was watered and the train turned,
and at Gohier on the return trip where electric locomotive 188 replaced No .6153
for the run through the M ount Royal Tunnel.
The beautiful, clear, sunny weather of Saturday was in distinct contrast to the
dawn of Sunday morning which revealed a slow, constant rain. The Trip Committee
is quite confident that had Sunday dawned as beautifully as Saturday, our train would
have been filled to a capacity load of nine hundred. As it was, exactly five hundred
persons came along on this historic trip. Extensive publi ci ty had been issued to the
public in general, and accordingly the Trip Committee felt it imprudent to arrange
moving picture runbys on Sunday with so many people inexperienced in this enthus­
iasts idiosyncracy on b oard. Again, No.6153 departed directly from Central Station
and with a passenger stop at Lachine, and operating stop at Coteau, proceeded to the
first picture stop which was at DeBeaujeu where we met Train No.4. Another stop
was rnade at Alexandria where Train No.4? was allowed to pass us, as -w e were
steadily losing time owing to the amount of time taken to entrain and detrain the lar­
ge number of passengers. Arrival in Ottawa was made about an hour and !fifteen min­
utes late. On hand were several thousand citizens of the national capital, to give us
a welcome we will not s oon forgeL
C. R.H.A. News Renort-1960 Paoe 47
___________________________________ L ___________________________________ ~ ___ _
NOTICE OF MEETING:
Meetings of the Canadian Railroad Historical
Association are held on the second Wednesday of each month, except
during the summer months of July and August. They are held in Room
110, McConnell Engineering Building, McGill University, University
Street, Montreal. Dates of the next several meetings are as follows:
October 12th October monthly meeting.
November 9th November
December 14th December I
January 11th, 1961 Annual General Meeting.
+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +
THE END OF STEAM ON CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Five hundred members, associates and friends of the Association gathered in
Montreal on Saturday and Sunday of Labour Day weekend, September 3rd and 4th,
to pay homage, for the last time, to a Canadian National steam locomotive in oper­
ation on that system. By far the largest attendance ever experienced in ten years
of CRHA railway excursions, it was a fitting tribute to the end of an era which had
begun on the CNRs earliest ancestor more than 124 years before, in 1836. The
engine was specially selected by CNR mechanical officers in view of its good running
condition, and it justified official confidence by performing well and flawlessly dur­
ing the two excursions. The engine selected was 4-8-4 type No.6153.
The observance was divided into two parts: an excursion on Saturday intended
principally for railway enthusiasts, who attended to the number of 282. The train
ran from Montreal to Joliette, Que., and moving picture runbys were staged at Ville
St. Pierre, Ballantyne, Montreal Nord and the Bout de I Ile bridge on the eastbound
trip, while further stops were made westbound at Crabtree, Paradis J ct., I Assomp­
tion and St. Paul I Ermite on the westbound journey. Altogether eight runbys were
made, in addition to pictures at Montreal Central Station, from which point the en­
gine hauled the train, at Joliette where the engine was watered and the train turned,
and at Gohier on the return trip where electric locomotive 188 replaced No.6l53
for the run through the Mount Royal Tunnel.
The beautiful, clear, sunny weather of Saturday was in distinct contrast to the
dawn of Sunday morning which revealed a slow, constant rain. The Trip Committee
is quite confident that had Sunday dawned as beautifully as Saturday, our train would
have been filled to a capacity load of nine hundred. As it was, exactly five hundred
persons came along on this historic trip. Extensive publicity had been issued to the
public in general, and accordingly the Trip Committee felt it imprudent to arrange
moving picture runbys on Sunday with so many people inexperienced in this enthus­
iasts idiosyncracy on board. Again, No.6l53 departed directly from Central Station
and with a passenger stop at Lachine, and operating stop at Coteau, proceeded to the
first picture stop which was at DeBeaujeu where we met Train No.4. Another stop
was lnade at Alexandria where Train No.47 was allowed to pass us, as -we were
steadily losing time owing to the amount of time taken to entrain and detrain the lar­
ge number of passengers. Arrival in Ottawa was made about an hour and tfifteen min­
utes late. On hand were several thousand citizens of the national capital, to give us
a welcome we will not soon forget.
, )
( )
~~~~~~~__~ ~~~~_8~E~E!~~~~~� ~~a~_~~
So.me of the pa s sengers re.mained on board the tr a in while it was tu rned and the
engine serviced at De ep Cut ; precise instructions had been prepared, printed and
(

distributed to the passengers through the ti.mely foresight of M r . Burns, the CNR s
Superintendent in Ottawa. Those who did not go with the train spent tw o hours in
the capital, patronizing the various restaurants and vis iting Parlia.ment Hill. Fin­
ally, all was in readiness for the-retu rn trip, and owing to the fact that we were
still very .much behind schedule, it was decided to skip a planned pictu re stop at
Hawthorne, and also not to per .mit !mej passengers off the train for the water stop at
Alexandria. In co nsequence, .much ti.me was regained and our arrival at Turcot was
rriade only a few .minutes behind .s chedule.
At
Turcot, the tr ain was .mov ed up to Ste, M arguerite Street, th en backed in on
the roundhouse lead to allow the passenger s to se e and photogr aph the uncoupling of
No
.6l53, and its housing proce du re for the last time. Canadian Nationa l officer s had
arranged things very well, and in add ition to the five hundred spectators, CNR had
four kindred spe cta tors to watch 6153 ta k e its last ride under stearn on the tur n­
table, in the for.m of three engines fro.m the Museu.m Train, 4-4-0 No .40, 0-6-0T No.
247 and 2-6-0 No. 713. The four th guest was a CRHA rnernbe r. CNR No.1l65,
whi ch wa s donated to the Association last July 2lsL A.mid .much whistling, st ea.ming
and bell ringing, Engineer Honsin ger put 6153 away in stall 53, and as the Vanderbilt
t ende r disappeared in to the roundhouse, the do ors we r e closed by Turcots General
Supervisor, M r . Hor s rrian, and our P r esident, Dr. Nicholls. So.me of the no sta l gia
of
seeing the las t CNR engine du.mp its fire for go od was dispelled by an announ ce­
.mentwhichDr.Nichollsrnade, at thisjuncture, to thepress, to the effectthatthe
CRHAMuseu.mCo.m.mittee hadreplaced No . 6100 on its pres e rvat ionlistwithNo.
6153, thus en s u r ing it a per.manent pl ace , not only in his t ory, but in ou r projected
Museu.m of Tran s portation. There, No . 6l53 will join othe r CNR engines planned for
pre s ervation, including 4- 6 -4T No . 49, 2-10-2 No. 4190, the .most powerful ste arn
loco.motive in the Co.m.monwealth, and fle et – footed No . 5702 which powered our Fall
Folia ge excursion to Garneau in the autu.mn of 1958.
After No. 6153 had be en housed, diesel passenger IA unit No.6525 was coupled
on fo r the run in to Centr al Sta tion . While the passenger list in cluded five hundred
passenge rs westbound to Ottawa, there were 503 on the return trip, the supernu.m­
e r a r
i es being Roger, Mauri ce and Ar.mand Guilbault of Ott aw a, who had got on the
train innocently at Ottawa For a little ride and were inadvert ently ca r ried to Mon ­
treal. It was atributetoourOttawa na tives in thernembe rs hip, BillMcKeown, who
lookedafte r the boys after they weredi s cov e r ed, andBarryAdair,whodr ovethe.m
back to thei r anxious pa rents, that they we r e we ll looked after dur ing t heir adven­
tur e. The Trip Co.m.mitt e e bought the.m a suppe r at Central Station. It was a partic­
ularly significant trip for young Ar.mand Guilbault, 11, younges t of the thr e e, who
had never be en on a tr ain in hi s life . None of the.m had ever been to Montreal prev­
iously, and the bt g city was a little over whel.ming afte r the qui et life of the federal
capital which, at ti.mes, poss e s s e s pleasant pastoral aspects.
The Trip Co.m.mittee ar e pa r ticula r ly indebted to Mr. R.D.Bourgeois, CNR City
T
icket Agent at M ontreal, and his assistant, Mr . E.G.Wild, to whose personal efforts
.much of the succ e ss of the weekend was due. We would be re.mis s if we were to fail
to .mention the attractive window dis play in the City office window , with the Associa­
tions crest and a .model of a 6060 class engine. Saturday s trip was acco.mpanied
by Mr. Gibson, Assistant Supe rinte ndent, while the Sunday t rip was in the personal
charge of Mr. Burns, Supe r intendent at Otta wa. –O.S.A.Lavallee.
So.me of the passengers re.mained on board the train while it was turned and the
engine serviced at Deep Cut; precise instructions had been prepared, printed and
distributed to the passengers through the ti.mely foresight of Mr. Burns, the CNR s
Superintendent in Ottawa. Those who did not go with the train spent two hours in
the capital, patronizing the various restaurants and visiting Parlia.ment HilL Fin­
ally, all was in readiness for the–return trip, and owing to the fact that we were
still very .much behind schedule, it was decided to skip a planned picture stop at
Hawthorne, and also not to per.mit thte;passengers off the train for the water stop at
Alexandria. In consequence, .much ti.me was regained and our arrival at Turcot was
.made only a few .minutes behind schedule.
At Turcot, the train was .moved up to Ste. Marguerite Street, then backed in on
the roundhouse lead to allow the passengers to see and photograph the uncoupling of
No.6153, and its housing procedure for the last ti.me. Canadian National officers hcd
arranged things very well, and in addition to the five hundred spectators, CNR had
four kindred spectators to watch 6153 take its last ride under stea.m on the turn­
table, in the for.m of three engines fro.m the Museu.m Train, 4-4-0 No.40, 0-6-0T NQ.
247 and 2-6-0 No. 713. The fourth guest was a CRHA tI.me.mber
H,
CNR No.1165,
which was donated to the Association last July 21sL A.mid .much whistling, stea.ming
and bell ringing, Engineer Honsinger put 6153 away in stall 53, and as the Vanderbilt
ten«er disappeared into the roundhouse, the doors were closed by Turcots General
Supervisor, Mr. Hors.man, and our President, Dr. Nicholls. So.me of the nostalgia
of seeing the last CNR engine du.mp its fire for good was dispelled by an announce­
.ment which Dr. Nicholls .made, at this juncture, to the press, to the effect that the
CRHA Museu.m Co.m.mittee had replaced No. 6100 on its preservation list with No.
6153, thus ensuring it a per.manent place, not only in history, but in our projected
Museu.m of Transportation. There, No.6l53 will join other CNR engines planned for
preservation, including 4-6-4T No. 49, 2-10-2 No. 4190, the .most powerful stea.m
loco.motive in the Co.m.monwealth, and fleet-footed No.5 702 which powered our Fall
Foliage excursion to Garneau in the autu.mn of 1958.
After No. 6153 had been housed, diesel passenger All unit No.6525 was coupled
on for the run in to Central Station. While the passenger list included five hundred
passengers westbound to Ottawa, there were 503 on the return trip, the supernu.m­
eraries being Roger, Maurice and Ar.mand Guilbault of Ottawa, who had got on the
train innocently at Ottawa for a little ride and were inadvertently carried to Mon­
treaL It was a tribute to our Ottawa natives in the .me.mbership, Bill McKeown, who
looked after the boys after they were discovered, and Barry Adair, who drove the.m
back to their anxious parents, that they were well looked after during their adven­
ture. The Trip Co.m.mittee bought the.m a supper at Central Station, It was a partic~
ularly significant trip for young Ar.mand Guilbault, 11, youngest of the three, who
had never been on a train in his life. None of the.m had ever been to Montreal prev­
iously, and the big city was a little overwhel.ming after the quiet life of the federal
capital which, at ti.mes, possesses pleasant pastoral aspects.
The Trip Co.m.mittee are particularly indebted to Mr. R.D.Bourgeois, CNR City
Ticket Agent at Montreal, and his assistant, Mr. E.G. Wild, to whose personal efforts
.much of the success of the weekend was due. We would be re.miss if we were to fail
to .mention the attractive window display in the City office window, with the Associa­
tions crest and a .model of a 6060 class engine. Saturdays trip was acco.mpanied
by Mr. Gibson, Assistant Superintendent, while the Sunday trip was in the personal
charge of Mr. Burns, Superintendent at Ottawa. –O.S.A.Lavallee.

——————–
_
~~~H ~~ ~_~~~_~~E£E~~~~~~ ——~~~_~2_
THE PHOTOGRAPHS :
Six photographs supplem e nt the account of the most suc c e ssful Labour Day
Weekend Lias t RunofSteamonCNRex c ursions,in additiontoour cov e r .
(
S;..9..:~.!_~i~!.~_~: ThisphotographwasmadeatAl e xand r iaby our Pa ul McGe e, and
shows a very small part of t he five hun dre d pa r ticipants admiring th e en gine .
!i~!…!~~~!.iE.~~: Three photogra ph s taken by J . Norman Lowe of the Ca nadian
National Railways staff: T O P: D r . Nicholls and M r . Horsman closin g the
doors of stall 53 at Turcot Roundhouse after 6153 had been put away.
Se
cond_I.E~~.!..!_~::E~ : Threephotographstaken by PaulMcGee, theAssociation s
Official Photographe r : TO P: The specia l train awaiting the signal to depart
from Ottawa Union Station. LOWERLEFT: No.6153 meets the Co rrti.ne nta.I
Limited at DeBeaujeu, Que ,, — th e la stmeet involving a ste a m locomoti ve.
LOWER RIGHT : For a brief moment, hundr ed s of pe ople clear awa y from
the side of the train as Train No.47 pa s ses the CRHA specia l at Alexandria.
EXCURSION SIDELIGHTS :
…..Windsor Station was a hotel for a night –Eighteen members of the Upper Can­
ada Railway Society who attended the Labour Day ex cursion s, ar r ived in st yle on
TrainNo.22in th e roomcar WiIlowGrove, onSaturday, Sept ember 3rd. Thecar
was also us ed as a Iiote l on Saturday night,and return ed to Toronto on Sunday eve­
ningonTrain#21. No .22 in cid entally,wasmore thananhourlateon Sat u rdaymor­
ning, necessitating holding th e CNR special since mos t of the UCRS hierarchy were
onboard. Wewillnotchide the CPR too severelyforthisoccurenc e considering
t
hatnotonly wa s itLabou r Dayweekend,butthepopula r passenge r im pre s ar io, Mr .
Jack Beatty , was away on his va cation as well.
.
….SpeakingoftheUCRShie rarchy, theUCRSRecordingSecretar y, Mr. John Frey ­
seng, did an ex cellent job in the kitchen of the lunch-counter ca r on the Joliettetrip,
and we ar e pl eased to acknowledge his se r vi ces publicly .
…..Unfortunately, engine -ride promoter s arestill at it on our excu r s i on s ; CRHA fel.t
that its policy of no engine ca b rides would be pr etty well-known by now. We were
m i staken; one cab-crasher had to be remove d from the engine by M r .Gibson on
t
he Joliette tr i p. Those who act sim ilar ly in future will be dealt with a} _l~oId a.t~ l/ .
…..We did not lack for press , radio and television coverage for th e trip. Three Mon­
treal ra dio st ation s, plu s the CBC te levi s ion outlet, publicised th e excursions in ad­
van c e. TheMontrealandOt taw a presscar r i edillustratedaccountsoftheexcursion
but the ni cest tou ch of all was the Montreal If Star s editorial on Thursday, the 8th
commenting on th e Ass o ciation and upon its aims and its museum pr oject.
…….spe a kin g of excursions, tickets are now on sale for the Tenth Anniv ersar y
autumn folia ge weekend ex cursions out of Morrtr-ea l on October 15th and l oth,
The Saturday trip is a CNR di esel excursion into the La uren tians on what is
certainly the rnos t scenic rail line out of Montreal. The Sunday trip will be
ov e r th e CPR with 4- 6-2 No .1270 at the hea d end. 5.3..9..!~_tziE~_~~~1:.-£nl ~j_~~:9.E_
_~~~H~~ _______________________ ~_~~~_~~E£E~~~~~~ _____ —–__________ ~~~_~2_
THE PHOTOGRAPHS:
Six photographs supplement the account of the most successful Labour Day
Weekend Last Run of Steam on CNR excursions. in addition to our cover.
S;..9.,;~.!_~i~~~~~: This photograph was made at Alexandria by our Paul McGee. and
shows a very small part of the five hundred participants admiring the engine.
!i~!…!£~!:.!.!..R..~~: Three photographs taken by J. Norman ~owe of the Canadian
National Railways staff: TOP: Dr. Nicholls and Mr. Horsman closing the
doors of stall 53 at Turcot Roundhouse after 6153 had been put away.
Second_I.E~~.!..!_~~E~: Three photographs taken by Paul McGee, the Associations
Official Photographer: TOP: The special train awaiting the signal to depart
from Ottawa Union Station. LOWER LEFT: No.6153 meets the l1Continental
Limited at DeBeaujeu, Que., –the last meet involving. a steam locomotive.
LOWER RIGHT: For a brief moment. hundreds of people clear away from
the side of the train as Train No.47 passes the CRHA special at Alexandria.
EXCURSION SIDELIGHTS:
••… Windsor Station was a hotel for a night –Eighteen members of the Upper Can­
ada Railway Society who attended the Labour Day excursions, arrived in style on
Train No.22 in the room car Willow Grove, on Saturday, September 3rd. The car
was also used as a hotel on Saturday night, and returned to Toronto on Sunday eve­
ning on Train #21. No.22 incidentally, was more than an hour late on Saturday mor­
ning, necessitating holding the CNR special since most of the UCRS hierarchy were
on board. We will not chide the CPR too severely for this occurence considering
that not only was it Labour Day weekend, but the popular passenger impresario, Mr.
Jack Beatty, was away on his vacation as well.
….. Speaking of the UCRS hierarchy, the UCRS Recording Secretary, Mr. John Frey­
seng, did an excellent job in the kitchen of the lunch-counter car on the Joliette trip.
and we are pleased to acknowledge his services publicly .
….. Unfortunately, engine-ride promoters are still at it on our excursions~ CRHAfelt
that its policy of no engine cab rides would be pretty well-known by now. We were
mistaken; one cab-crasher had to be removed from the engine by Mr.Gibson on
the J oliette trip. Those who act similarly in future will be dealt with at,_l~o},i;ia.td/ .
….. W e did not lack for press, radin and television coverage for the trip. Three Mon­
treal radio stations, plus the CBC television outlet. publicised the excursions in ad­
vance. The Montreal and Ottawa press carried illustrated accounts of the excursion
but the nicest touch of all was the Montreal Star s editorial on Thursday, the 8th
commenting on the Association and upon its aims and its museum project.
……. speaking of excursions. tickets are now on sale for the Tenth Anniversary
autumn foliage weekend excursions out of Nlontreal on October 15th and 16th.
The Saturday trip is a CNR diesel excursion into the Laurentians on what is
certainly the mo~t scenic rail line out of Montreal. The Sunday trip will be
over the CPR with 4-6-2 No.1270 at the head end. ~..9..!!!_tziE~_~~~~£~J_~~p..9_
C.R.H.A. li.c:..~~or t -1960 Pa~ 50
ANOTHER CANADIAN NATIONAL 4-8-4-PRESERVED
On September 8th, at a ce remony at th e Canadian National Exhibition Grounds
(
in Toronto, th e Ci ty of Toronto received Canadian National 4-8-4 No¢62 13 as a gift
from the National system. The engine had previously bean moved into position in
the
Groundsover tem por ar ytra ck; thismove is illustrated in detailintheSept­
ember 1960issueofourcontemporar y publica tion, the UCRSNewsIette r,
No. 6213 was built in 1942 by the Montreal Ldcomotive Works. Selection of the
engine on behalf of the City of Toronto was made by a Committee of th e Upper Can­
ada Railway Society headed by Mr, Jim Brown, who saw the project th r ou gh to com­
pletion, in cludin g the designing and in stallation of a lightin g system at the perman­
ent exhibition site, whereby the whee ls and valve m otion are i llurrrinated at night.
In th e same issue of t he UCRS News letter, the r e is a memorable picture of
the President of that body, Mr. John Mills, showing the Hon. George Hee s, the Min­
is te r
of Transport for Canada, the prope r cab-window stance for a railway fireman.
CNR #6167 USED ON TWO EXCURSIONS OUT OF TORONTO.
Yet another CNR 4-8-4, No.6167,was used on two excur s ions out of Toronto dur­
ing the month of July .
On Sunday, July 10th, this engine pulled a spe cial train for the Upper Canada Rril­
way Societ y from Toronto to Niagara Falls , via Hamilton, Caledonia and Dunnville.
The trip ret urn ed by wa y of Grimsby. lvlany interesting picture runbys were made,
including one at th e top of the escarpment abov e Hamilton, and a particularly excel­
lent one over the Grand River at Caledonia. At Por t Colborne, the engine was wat ­
ered by a mobile highway water-car r ier and tr ailer, and the trip proceeded, with
other picture stops to Niagara Falls , where a lengthy layover allowed passengers to
go to view the Falls, which retain a perennial charm. Many members from Mont ­
real attended this excursion which was well-patronised by our Toronto friends.
On the following Sunday, July 17th, the Buffalo Chapter of the National Railway
H
istoricalSociety sponsored anexcursionfromBuffalo,viaHamiltonandToronto
to Zephyr, Orit ,, and retu r n, usin g this en gine for the majority of the tr ip . These
were Canadian National Railways I last s t earn excursions in Ontario.
~, >::: >:~ >:*;:*:::;:>::{:: ~:�
NI1~ E CANADIAN NATIONAL ENGINES SELECTED FOR PRESERVATION�
Late in August, the P r e s ident of th e Canadian Railroad His torical Association,
Dr. R.V .V. Nicholls , who is also Chairman of the Museum Committee, announced
that the Association had decided to acquire nine Canadian National Rys , ste arn loco­
motivesfor preservation. Thede cis ionwasmadeafter alen gthyperiodofcorr es
pondence with t he CNR plu s a ver bal assu r ance, amon g othe r thin gs, trrat Lc ::;R..tiA
Mus e um would have custody of the Mus e um Train when it is not needed fo r exnibit­
ions or commemmorations of a histo rical nature .
Thenineengin e s sel e ctedwere chosen to repre sentavaried,yettypica l colle c ­
tion of engines , bear ing in m ind th ~ major ancestor s of the CNR –the Grano Truru,
the Canadian No r thernandthe CanadianGov e r nment ra ilsystem s, as wellas deve.l>
opment of motive power on the CNR itself.
(
C.R.H.A. ______________ ~~~~£rt-1960
ANOTHER CANADIAN NATIONAL 4-8-4-PRESERVED
.–
On September 8th, at a ceremony at the Canadian National Exhibition Grounds
in Toronto, the City of Toronto received Canadian National 4-8-4 No~,62,13 as a gift
from the National system. The engine had previously bean moved into position in
the Grounds over temporary track; this move is illustrated in detail in the Sept­
ember 1960 issue of our contemporary publication, the UCRS Newsletter.
No. 6213 was built in 1942 by the Montreal Ldcomotive Works. Selection of the
engine on behalf of the City of Toronto was made by a Committee of the Upper Can­
ada Railway Society headed by lVir. Jim Brown, who saw the project through to com­
pletion, including the designing and installation of a lighting system at the perman­
ent exhibition site, whereby the wheels and valve motion are illumillated at night.
In the same issue of the UCRS Newsletter, there is a memorable picture of
the President of that body, Mr. John Mills, showing the Hon. George Hees, the Min­
ister of Transport for Canada, the proper cab-window stance for a railway fireman.
CNR #6167 USED ON TWO EXCURSIONS OUT OF TORONTO.
Yet another CNR 4-8-4, No.6l67, was used on two excursions out of Toronto dur­
ing the month of July.
On Sunday, July lath, this engine pulled a special train for the Upper Canada Rril­
way Society from Toronto to Niagara Falls, via Hamilton, Caledonia and Dunnville.
The trip returned by way of Grimsby. lvlany interesting picture runbys were made,
including one at the top of the escarpment above Hamilton, and a particularly excel­
lent one over the Grand River at Caledonia. At Port Colborne, the engine was wat­
ered by a mobile highway water-carrier and trailer, and the trip proceeded, with
other picture stops to Niagara Falls, where a lengthy layover allowed passengers to
go to view the Falls, which retain a perennial charm. Many members from Mont­
real attended this excursion which was well-patronised by our Toronto friends.
On the following Sunday, July 17th, the Buffalo Chapter of the National Railway
Historical Society sponsored an excursion from Buffalo, via Hamilton and Toronto
to Zephyr, Ont., and return, using this engine for the majority of the trip. These
were Canadian National Railways last stearn excursions in Ontario..
NI1~E CANADIAN NATIONAL ENGINES SELECTED FOR PRESERVATION
,. _. –……. -.,—————–_ …… _—————————————–
Late in August, the President of the Canadian Railroad Historical Association,
Dr. R.V.V. Nicholls, who is also Chairman of the Museum Committee, announced
that the Association had decided to acquire nine Canadian National Rys. stearn loco­
motives for preservation. The decision was made after a lengthy period of corrr.s··
pondence with the CNR plus a verbal assurance, among other things, t,l1at LlC ::RHA
IV1useum would have custody of the Museum Train when it is not needed for exnibit­
ions or commemmorations of a historical nature.
The nine engines selected were chosen to represent a varied, yet typical collec­
tion of engines, bearing in mind th~ major ancestors of the CNR –the Grano TruIlh.,
the Canadian Northern and the Canadian Government rail systems, as well as devel­
opment of motive power on the CNR itself.
—————
49
C.R.H.A. News Report-1960
—–_!:~~~.!.
A list of the locomotives follows:
Engine Builder Dat e
(
I .:!.Y~
—-­
4-6-4T Mont real 1914
1520 4 -6-0 Kingston 1906
2601 2-8-0 Montreal 1907
3239 2-8-2 Kingston 1916
4190 2-10-2 Kingston 1924
5550 4-6-2 Mont r eal 1913
5702 4-6-4 Mont real 1930
6015 4-8-2 Kingston 1923
6153 4-8-4 Montreal 1929
Remarks
Class X-IO-a. Ex GTR # 1544.
M
ontreal suburban forney- t ype engine.
Class H-4-a. Ex Can.Norther n #1223, a
l
ater Ca nadian National #1223.
Class N-4-a. Ex GTR #746 .
Clas s S-l-a. EX GTR #2839.
Clas s T-2-a. The most powerful st­
earn locomotive in the Commonwealth.�
Ex CNR #4 100.
Class K-2-b. Ex Intercolonial #451,�
later Can.Govt.Rys. #451.�
Class K-5-a. Good example of pr e -�
pool servi ce passenger engine.�
Class U-I-a.�
Class U-2-c. Last s t earn loc om otive�
to run on CNR, Sept. 4 , 1960.�
The Association is also interested in 4-8-2 No. 6069, Class U-l-f, built by Mont r eal
Locomotive Works in 1944, the last class of steam locomotives to be built for CNR.
However, Canadian National Railways are considering adding this engine to th e Mus­
eum Train and it has the r efor e not been included in this list.
CANADIAN PACIFIC WITHDRAWS THE LAST PAY CAR
On Wednesday, July 6th, 1960, your Editor made the last payment from what is
believed to be the last railway pay car to operate in all of NorthAmerica. Once a
popularandfamiliarfacetofold-time ra ilway operations, the paycaris apar t of
an era which has va nished along with its contem por aries –the compound s tea m
locomotive, the ball signal, and va r nish ed passenger cars.
One is ola ted example remained, however, until July of this year , at which tim e
the Canadian Pacific repla ced the time-hon oured cash payment system on its Inter­
nationalofMainese ction, withthe universalsystem ofpaymentbycheque. The
last paycar to be used was the CPR observation -com partm ent-sle e pin g car F or t
S
impson which will now be utilized as a supe rintendents car. Until December ,
1957, however, th e last tr ue paycar, CPR #52, rolled the rails of th e Moosehead and
Mattawamkeag Subdivis ion s once a week to bring employees th eir pay in cold, hard
United States curren cy.
Probably one of the bes t -kept e(Y·L ~:K· ..: ~es secrets in American railroad his tory,
the
story was kept so well tha t only t.,e .vr i te r I s closest friends knew the tr ue nat ­
ure of part of his duties with the Canadian Pacific Railway Company . The story of
Canadian Pacific payca r s has never been published in any form, but in the near fut­
ure, it is hoped to publish a detailed account, supplemented by pictures and plans.
O .S.A.L.
_C_._R~._H~ .. A~. ________________________ ~N_e_w~s_R~e~p~n~r~t_-_19~6~0.~ _________ , _________ ~~~~l
A list of the lo,comntives follows:
En,Eine
I.Y.p~
Builder Date Remarks
———————
49 4-6-4T Montreal 1914 Class X-IO-a. Ex GTR # 1544.
Montreal suburban forney-type engine.
1520 4-6-0 Kingston 1906 Class H-4-a. Ex Can.Northern # 1223, a
later Canadian National # 1223.
2601 2~8-0 Montreal 1907 Class N-4-a. Ex GTR #746.
3239 2-8-2 Kingston 1916 Class S-l-a. EX GTR #2839.
4190 2-10-2 Kingston 1924 Class T~2-a. The most powerful st-
eam locomotive in the Commonwealth.
Ex CNR #4100.
5550 4-6-2 Montreal 1913 Class K-2-b. Ex Intercolonial #451,
later Can.Govt.Rys. #45l.
5702 4-6-4 Montreal 1930 Class K-5-a. Good example of pre-
pool service passenger engine.
6015 4-8-2 Kingston 1923 Class U -I-a.
6153 4-8-4 Montreal 1929 Class U-2-c. Last steam locomotive
to run on CNR, Sept. 4, 1960.
The Association is also interested in 4-8-2 No. 6069, Class U -l-f, built by Montreal
Locomotive Works in 1944, the last class of steam locomotives to be built for CNR.
However, Canadian National Railways are considering adding this engine to the Mus­
eum Train and it has therefore not been included in this list.
CANADIAN PACIFIC WITHDRAWS THE LAST PAY CAR
On Wednesday, July 6th, 1960, your Editor made the last payment from what is
believed to be the last railway pay car to operate in all of North America. Once a
popular and familiar facet of old-time railway operations, the pay car is a part of
an era which has vanished along with its contemporaries –the compound steam
locomotive, the ball signal, and varnished passenger cars.
One isolated example remained, however, until July of this year, at which time
the Canadian Pacific replaced the time-honoured cash payment system on its Inter­
national of Maine section, with the universal system of payment by cheque. The
last paycar to be used wa,s the CPR observation-compartment-sleeping car lfFort
SimpsonII which will now be utilized as a superintendents car. Until December,
1957, however, the last true paycar, CPR #52, rolled the rails of the Moosehead and
Mattawamkeag Subdivisions once a week to bring employees their pay in cold, hard
United States currency.
Probably one of the best-kept e{!L~:l(…:~es secrets in American railroad history,
the story was kept so well that only Lc .Iriter s closest friends knew the true nat­
ure of part of his dutie,s with the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. The story of
Canadian Pacific paycars has never been published in any form, but in the near fut­
ure, it is hoped to publish a detailed account, supplemented by pictures and plans.
O.S.A.L.
l
C.
~ ~.H.A.� Obsefvations-1260 Page S-30
OBSERVATIONS
———————–I
I
..••.••a departnent of news and comment, by Anthony Clegg.
I� 1 …. _
During ~rr . Cleggs absence on vacation in Europe, sev
eral member s contributed for this issue
~
� The alterat i on of CNR passenger sch e~ules between Toronto and London on
June 26th act ual l y resulted in the elimin~t i on of one train in each
dilcction. Train 16 replaced Train 40 via Guelph, while the schedule
of Trai n 20 was lengthened by 40 minut es to permit extra stops and f or
b~ cking into Hami l t on. In the opposite direct i on , localtrain 77 w
as eli~ inated , r educing Toronto-London (via Brantford) ser vi ce to
six from seven trains in each direction. Three trains operate via
Guelph, as before.
~~ff e ctive Au[ ust 1st, 1960, Quebec Central Railway withdrew its mixed tr ai n s
ervice between Megant i c and Tr ing Jct., Que . , ober the Megant ­
ic Subdi Vi si on, and replaced it with a wayfreight service.
A C
anadian National Railways and Canadian Pacif i c Rai lway have r ecently
confirmed that, beginning Sept ember 24th, they will operate full
sl eepi nc car service on only t.wo of their four transcontinental tr­
ains. In a joint statement, CNR President Donald Gordon and CPR
Presi dent N. R. Crump said full sleeping Cd~ setvice would be avai l ­
able only on CHRs Super: Cont.Lnerrt.a.L (Ir-eLns 1,2,51 and 52)andC PR
lr C G.n a:~ i2.n 11 (Trains 1, 2, 11 and 12) during the wi nter Hoff-season.
;,bi.le no i ndication was made when servi ce on the ot.hcn t wo trains,
Gl,m VlC:.;r.t::l2ntal
1i
and CPR Domf.nLon1f would be r-esumed, it i s expected
t hat tnL:; ;,:;i 11 take place at the spring change of schedules . The two
t
~ ~ins ;i 11 not actually be dropped fro2 schedules , but wi l l be con­
finec;, to express, mai l and coach traf fic over the ful l route, with
c
8r ~ ~in loc&l sleepi ng car serviceo
Cau
ac.Lan Pacifi c is expected to pLace surplus Budd-bui l t stainless
3::;:01 equLpmerrt thus released fro:n t he Dom.i.nLon in two other ser ­v
i ces, the ilFrontenac t
::~ 3 .1A~l a :Tt; i c Limi tedi between Morrt r-eaL and Saint John. It is under­
5~ood t~at nor~a11y , at least, the lat~ er wil l be an al l -stai nless­
~~
~c l tr~i2 ~hring the winter season.
l :, ,.:;i~~3c lJi-:e 0eptember 7th, 1960, the J,laine Central Railroad discont i n­
ued reGul arly-scheduled passenger tr ain service over all its lines.
On 3G~teilibe r 5th, passenger trains Nos . 4 and 9 operatinG between
T,7:::.:l·::<:oro and Portland made their last trips fromthese terminals
a~j
on the following day, the New England lines passenger-carrying
f
iJ. c i1it ~cs , in operat i on for mor e than a century, were completely
.J ~i.. :.h .. :::,c:~wn . The Supreme Court of the State of Uraine decided in favour
of a~ &~rlicat io n by the railway to make this move , whi ch cuts direct
s ervi ce fromthe Mar i t ime Provinces to NeVIEngland. Pas senger s who for.rer-Ly
had a through service between Sai nt John and Boston, Mass.
LiUSt n ovr travel ei t her via lViontreal or Sherbrooke , Que .
ix ]. >13 L2hi.c:;h Valley Rai l road has announced it s int ention to di scont inue t:le l
ast of its passenger runs on October Lst., This involves four
trai ns, two in each direct i on between Buffalo and New York city(PRR
St&tion) whi ch carry New York-Toront o sleeping cars for CNR connect­
Obsefvations-1960
OBSERVATIONS
••••••• a departr;lent of news and comment, by Anthony Clegg.
~—————————-~———-
During I1r. Cleggs absence on vacation in Europe,
several members contributed for this issue
Page 3-30
t The alteration of CNR passenger sche~u1es between Toronto and London
on June 26th actually resulted in the elimin3.tion of one train in each
dil·ection. Train 16 replaced Train hO via Guelph, while the schedule
of Train 20 was lengthened by 40 minutes to permit extra stops and
for b~cking into Hamilton. In the opposite direction, local train 77
was eli~inated, reducing Toronto-London (via Brantford) service to
six from seven trains in each direction. Three trains operate via
Guelph, as before.
irEffective Au[:ust 1st, 1960, Quebec Central Railway l,,lithdrew its mixed
train service bf~tween IvIegantic and Tring J ct., Que., ober the Ilegant­
ic Subdivision, and repl~ced it with a wayfreight service.
A Canadian National Railways and Canadian Pacific Railway have recently
confirmed that, beginning September 24th, they will operate full
sleepinG car service on only two of their f01.:r transcontinental tr­
ains. In a joint statement, CNR Presid.ent Donald Gordon and CFR
President N. H. Crurap said full sleeping CdT. selj!vice would be avail­
able Oilly on CERs Super Continental
ll
(Trains 1,2,51 and 52)and CPR
liC&na:~i2n U (Trains 1, 2, 11 and 12) during the winter off-season iI.
1;Jni.le no indication was made when serv ice on the othelj! two trains,
ClJ;.{ YlC::.;r:.t:~1.:ntal II and CPR uDominion if would be re3wl1ed, it is expected
that tnj.3 ;:;i11 take place at the spring change of schedules. The two
tr~ins dll not actually be dropped from schedules, but will be con­
finec; to e::p2:9SS, mail and coach traffic over the full route, with
cer~~in loc&l sleeping car serviceo
CaL8.
,::L:.tn Pacific is expected to plat::e surplus Budd-built stainless
3::2:01 eq . .:ipment thus released froli! Vle r?Dominion
n
in two other ser­
vices, the ilFrontenac iI and llViger;1 betiiJ8en ilIontreal and Quebec, and
t::~3 1A~laat.ic Limited
iT
between Montreal and Saint John. It is under­
s~Jod t~lat nor::1ally, at least, the lat~.::,er will be an all-stainless­
~~~c~ t~&i2 ~~ring the winter season.
£ ~i;3c~i~e September 7th, 1960, the t~ine Central Railroad discontin­
ued reGularly-scheduled passenger train service over all its lines.
On 38~te~ber 5th, passenger trains Nos. 4 and 9 operating between
~~:l~e~oro and Portland made their last trips from these terminals
&~j on the following day, the New England lines passenger-carrying
f~cilit:es, in operation for more than a century, were completely
:J:::.h … :.rc~wIl. The Supreoe Court of the State of 1-1aine decided in favour
of a:. Sf~plication by the railway to make this move, which cuts direct
5dYvice from the IIaritime Provinces to NevI England. Passengers who
foriJerly had a through service between Saint John and Boston, Mass.
Lust nov-J travel either via lvlontreal or Sherbrooke, Que.
fx 2,:18 L:::hiC;h Valley Railroad has announced its intention to discontinue
t:,e last of its passenger runs on October 1st. This involves four
tl~2.::..ns, tVlO in each direction between BO.ffalo and NeVI York city( PRR
St&.tion) vlhich carry NeVI York-Toronto sleeping cars for CNR connect-
C.R.H.A.�
Observations-1960
Pago 5-31
ion, and two trains each way between Lehighton, Fa., and New York, NY.
i
The thrice-weekly CNR passenger service between Lindsay and Halibur­
ton, Ont . , was discontinued September 3rd.
fl.� Grand Ir-unl: iJest er n Rai Lr-oad has t aken formal act i on to eliminate its
last t .vro pass enger trains between Durand and Muskeron on its Detroit
Division Ihe trains involved are No. 57 leaving Detroit at 11.:::5 PJ1
and No, 22, eastbound, leaving i-luskegon at 12:01 AM. They ,11.;_1 con­
tinue to operat e between Detroit and Durand but the GIWhas filed a
petition with t he Mi chi~~n public service commission to di sccnt inue the D
urand-l·.lus.ke;;JYl ser vi ce. This development was forecast last June wh
en the post office cancelled mail contracts OD. he two trains.
i
The recent strike of trainmen on the Grand Trunk Wester n RR, the
first st r ike on the line in more than forty years, also resulted in
changes to Mc nt.r-eaL-Chl oago services. Trains operating I·Iont real -Tor ­o
rrt.o-eChLcago, which nor-noLl.y operat e over GTW lines from Port Huron,
Mi ch . , were terminated at Sar nia, Onto Conversely, trains leaving C
hicago t o Mont real and Toronto were cancelled between Chi cago and
Sarnia. On Fr-r.dav , September 9t h , however, thi s nine-day strike was
settled when a US Federal mediat or entered the dispute. Train ser­
vice on the GTtJ was rest ored to normal on the foTl.owl.ng day.
i
Sunday, AUEust 7t h, J960, was changeover day for the Canadian Pacific
Haili-!?jr!s VJinchester 8ubdivi si on between Dorval and Ballantyne, Que. A new
line for the doubLe-rt .r-a ck subdivision had been constructed and
it re~ain ed only for t he line to be connected at the ends and at the
spur s. ~ ~l8 wor-k at Ballantyne was complicated by the connections to
St. Luc Ydrd; Sar t in Yard and Cote de Liesse piggyback terminal, with
si dings and crossovers, all controlled by Hampstead interlocking tow­
er. At varval , there is a connection to the Canadian Nat i onal Rail­
ways, used by passenger trains 15 &~d 6, and normally al so by the
diesel uni t s for the3e trai ns (on that day, units for train 15 were int
erBhanged at Parsley-St.Luc ). There are ~lso several industrial
sidinGS villi ch were prOVi ded ~ith interim connections, to both old and new l
ines.
A new
GrlOV~HILL st~ tion Was built at about mi leage 3.3 (o pposite 4ath
Avenue, Lachine) , 0.4 mi les west of the for mer one at 40th Avenue and
0.2 mi les fr-om Summer-Lea station, r eplacing both former stations.
Thi s has br-ought fort h loud pr otests from Lachine commuters, who only
r ecent l v l ost CNR commuter train service. The new line was in full
operat i on on Monday, August 8th, and all track on the old line was
lift ed by Sunday, August 14th. The Summerlea stat i on was demolished
on August 17t h.
There is a slieht diversi on at 55th Avenue to al l ow space for const­
ruct ion of the CDR port i on of the underpass at that point. The for­
mer CPR roadbed is being re-graded to link up with CNR lines at,Dor­
val and wi.t.h t he new CNH r oute now being constructed between 40th
Avenue and Tur cot Yard. II i s expected that a new union station will
be buil t at Dorval , to be used by all CNR trains which now stop at
Lachi ne and by Trains 15 and 6 whi ch, in the meant i me, are stopping
on si[;nal at Poi.rrt e Clai re. The connection to the piggyback terminal
is now in the form of a ~~Je . Sidi ngs now extend from Ballantyne to
the new Grovehi l l stat i on. All mai n track on the new line is laid
with new l OO-lb. Macki e section nal on creosote-treated ties in stone
C.R.H.A.
Observations-1960
Page S-31
ion, and two trains each -tray between Lehighton, Pa., and New York, NY.
ir. The thrice·-,;eekly CNR passenger service between Lindsay and Halibur­
ton, Unt., vv3.s discontinued September 3rd.
fl. Grand Trunk T,Jestern R::dlroad has taken formal action to eliminate its
last tv.JO passenger trains between Durand and Muskeron on its Detroit
Division ;!~he trains involved are No.57 leaving Detroit at 11:::.5 P]1
and No ~ 22, eastbound, leaving lIuskegon at 12: 01 AM. They wl.;.l con­
tinue to ODerate between Detroit and Durand but the GIW has filed a
L
petition with the nichi~~n public service commission to disccntinue
the Durand-I.Tus.ke,:sJYl service. This development ,ras forecast last June
when the post office cancelled mail contracts Oll he two trains.
fl. The recent strike of trainmen on the Grand Trunk Western RR, the
first strike on the line in more than forty years, also resulted in
changes to Montreal-Chicago services. Trains operating Montreal-Tor­
onto-Chicago., which norGvl.lly operate over GTW lines from Port Huron,
Mich., were terminated at Sarnia, Onto Conversely, trains leaving
Chicago to iAontreal and Toronto were cancelled between Chicago and
Sarnia. On Fri.day, SepteE1ber 9th, however, this nine-day strike was
settled when a US Federal mediator entered the dispute. Train ser-
vice on the GlVv vlaS restored to normal on the following day.
lk Sunday, August 7th, J960, was changeover day for the Canadian Pacific
Haih·:s.}r1 s VJinchester Subdivision betvveen Dorval and Ballantyne, Que.
A neVI line for the double-·track subdivision had been constructed and
it re~ained only for the line to be connected at the ends and at the
spurs. ~~:8 ItJork at Ballantyne was complicated by the connections to
St. Luc Yard; Sortin Yard and Cote de Liesse piggyback terminal, with
Sidings and crossovers, all controlled by Hampstead interlocking tow­
er. At vorval, there is a connection to the Canadian National Rail­
ways, used by passenger trains 15 &~d 6, and normally also by the
diesel units for the3e trains (on that day, units for train 15 were
interBhanged at Parsley-St.Luc). There are ~lso several industrial
sidin[;s v new lines.
A
nevJ Gl-{U.~EILL st::tion vJas built at about mileage 3.3 ( opposite 48th
Avenue) Lachine), 0.4 miles west of the former one at 40th Avenue and
0.2 miles 1r01:1 SumrD,er1ea station, replacing both former stations.
This has br~uGht forth loud protests from Lachine commuters, who only
recentl v lost Clm commuter train service. The new line was in full
operation on Honday, August 8th, and all track on the old line was
lifted by Sunday, August 14th. The Summerlea station was demolished
on August 17th.
There is a slieht diversion at 55th Avenue to allow space for const­
ruction of the CNR portion of the underpass at that point. The for­
mer CPR roadbed is being re-graded to link up with CNR lines at,Dor­
val and iiJith the no;., CNR route nmv being constructed between 40th
Avenue and Turcot Yard. II is expected that a new union station will
be built at Dorval, to be used by all CNR trains which now stop at
Lachine and by Trains 15 and 6 vlhich, in the meantime, are stopping
on siGnal at Pointe Claire. The connection to the piggyback terminal
is now in the form of a vvye. Sidings now extend from Ballantyne to
the new Grovehil~ station. All main track on the new line is laid
with new 100-lb. Mackie section :mil on creosote-treated ties in stone
C.H..H.A.� ObsurvatioDs-1960
Pww s-32
ballast. The roadbed was built mainly of rock excavated from CNR
cuttings near Ballantyne.
( i1:.� Mont r eal has +ost a l andmark dating back to electric railway days.
The nCafe Mi nui t
ll
at the north-east corner of Mount Royal and Park
Avenues, was dismantled dur i ng Aucust ; built in 1904 by the Mont real P
ark &Island Rai lway ti:ompany, it was later sold to the Mont real St­
reet Rai lway and t.hcn to the ;,Iont r eal Tramways Company. It was used
by these companies as a station, ti cket office and empl oyees shelter
until r eplaced by anot her building in 1940, becoming, at that time,
a restaurant and night cl ub . Tothe end, however , it retained the
traditional railway station gi nger bread trappings, overhanging roof,
and ornate wooden pi l lar s .
ir.� One of our readers, Mr . D. M. Ri ce of: Granville, Mass . , points out
t hat our previous r eport (on page S-lO) of t he Jabush Iron Companys r
ailway connecting wi t h t he Quebec, North Shore & Labrador, is in­
correct. The Iron Ore Company of Canada completed a branch on May 22nd
fromCarolLake to theQNS&Latmi le224, nowknown asRossBay
Junction. The vJatush Rai lway is to be an extension of the Carol Lake Br
anch. Mr , Hi ce also repor t s that the VIabush company is expect ed
to build a new ore dock at Pointe Noire near Clark City, and a new
line will be built to Pointe l;oi r e around Sept Tles Bay, connecting
with the QNS&L at mil e 7. Pointe Noire is al ready served by the
standard-gauge r-ai.Lway of t.he Gulf Pulp &, Paper Company who own, or
owned recently, two 0-6-0 st-eamLoconot .Lves wi.t.h balloonstacks.
1l. The offi cial opening of t he Mon cton Yard of Canadian Nat i onal Rai l ­ways is
scheduled for October 4th. Thi s wi l l gi ve Monct on the di s­
tinction of having the fi r st of four new CNU classification yards in
operation. The others are under construction at Mont real , vlinni peg
and Toronto.
i1:.� Canadian Nat i onal Rai lways new 52-mile branch line between Optic
Lake and Chisel Lake in nor t her n Mani t oba was officially opened on Fr ida
y, September 2nd, when Major J. L. Charles, CNR consulting eng­ine
er, drove home a symbol ic spike of pure zinc at the mi ni ng commun­
ity of 8110V,r Lake. The line was built to serve the new Hudson Bay
Mining and Smel t ing Company Limited mines in the Chisel Lake area, 75
miles northeast of The Pas. Hundreds of enthus iast i c mi ner s and
t heir fa.ni Li.es gr-eeted the first train to ar r i ve at Chisel Lake, pul­
led by CNR. diosel eruLne No.1389. Jhen the train left for the return
trip, it was pull i ng the first 50-ton ore car to the Fl i n Flon smel­
t er. ShLpmerrts ar e expe ct ed to average 1000 tons per day.
t� lhe British Yukon Navigation Company steamer Keno II sailed down the
Yukon River on Aur:ust 25th, fromvlhitehorse, Y. T., on a three-day
voyage t o Dawson City, vmere it wi l l be set up as a mar i ne museum. The s
mal l sternwheeler made the trip without major incident, manned
by veteran of f i cers of the river serVice, whi ch l ast functioned in
the season of 1953. Once d.uring the downr iver voyage, which included
the Fi ve Finger s Hapids and Lake Lebarge of song and literature, the
Keno it ran aground on a sand bar , but was r efloated without di f f i c­
ulty to concl ude this la st trip. Several other BYNCo. sternwheelers
are still stored on t he ways of t he shipyard at Whi tehor se.
t� Pacific Great Easter n Rai lway has sold diesel-electric locomotive No. 553
to the Svdney &Louisbourg Rai lway. The 550-HP unit was built
C.H..H.A. ObsurvatioDG-1960
Pace S-32
ballast. The roadbed was built mainly of rock excavated from CNR
cuttings near Ballantyne.
lk Montreal has +ost a landmark dating back to electric railway days.
The nCafe Minuitl1 at the north-east corner of Mount Itoyal and Park
Avenues, was dismantled during Aur;ust; built in 1904 by the Montreal
Park & Island Railway ti:ompany, it was later sold to the Montreal St­
reet Rail way and then to the ;,Iontreal Tramways Company. It was used
by these companies as a station, ticket office and employees shelter
until replaced by another building in 1940, becoming, at that time,
a restaurant and night club. To the end, however, it retained the
traditional railway station gingerbread trappings, overhanging roof,
and ornate wooden pillars.
f.r. One of our readers, Ilr. D. M. Rice of Granville, Mass., points out
that our previous report (on paE~e S-lO) of the vvabush Iron Companys
railway connecting with the Quebec, North Shore & Labrador, is in­
correct. The Iron Ore Company of Canada completed a branch on May 22nd
from Carol Lake to the QNS&L at mile 224-, now known as Ross Bay
Junction. The VJa;~)ush Railway is to be an extension of the Carol Lake
Branch. I
v
1r. Rice also reports that the VJabush company is expected
to build a new ore dock at Pointe Noire near Clark City, and a new
line will be built to Pointe r;oire around Sept lIes Bay, connecting
with the QNS&L at mile 7. Pointe Noire is already served by the
standard-gauge railway of the Gulf Pulp &, Paper Company who own, or
owned recently, two 0-6-0 steal:1 10c0r.1oti ves i{lith balloon stacks.
ik The official opening of the Moncton Yard of Canadian National Rail­
ways is scheduled for October 4th. This will give Moncton the dis­
tinction of having the first of four new CNU classification yards in
operation. The others are under construction at Montreal, vlinnipeg
and Toronto.
i:r Canadian National Hailways new 52-mile branch line between Optic
Lake and Chisel Lake in northern Manitoba was officially opened on
Friday, September 2nd, when I;lajor J. L. Charles, CNR consulting eng­
ineer, drove home a symbolic spike of pure zinc at the mining commun­
ity of ono Mining and Smelting Company Limited mines in the Chisel Lake area, 75
miles northeast of The Pas. Hundreds of enthusiastic miners and
their fa;llilies greeted the fir~t train to arrive at Chisel Lake, pul­
led by CNR diesel enrine No.1389. VJhen the train left for the return
trip, it was pulling the first 50-ton are car to the Flin Flon smel­
ter. ShiprJents are expected to average 1000 tons per day.
t The British Yukon Navigation Company steamer HKeno
il
sailed down the
Yukon River on Au[:ust 25th, from vJhitehorse, Y. T., on a three-day
voyage to Dawson City, where it will be set up as a marine museum.
The small sternwheelGr made the trip without major incident, manned
by veteran officers of the river serVice, which last functioned in
the season of 1953. Once during the downriver voyage, which included
the Five Fingers Hapids and Lake Lebarge of song and literature, the
;IKeno n ran aground on a sand bar, but was refloated without diffic­
ulty to conclude this last trip_ Several other BYNCo. sternwheelers
are still stored on the ways of the shipyard at iJhitehorse.
t Pacific Great Eastern Hailvvay has sold diesel-electric locomotive No. 553
to the Svdney & Louisbourg Hailway. The 550-HP unit vvas built
C.H.E.A.� Observations-1960 Pa,ge 5-33
at
the Er ie, Pa., USA works of the Gener al Electr i c Company in Feb­rua
ry, 1949. It will be r-enumber-ed 60 on t he Sydney &, Louisbourg.
The Sydney & Louisbourg received the first of an or der for three MLvv
dLese.Lv e.l.e ctr-Lc swi t cher s on .JuLy 15th, when No. 200 was pl aced in
(
ser vi ce. Nos . 201 a:..d 202 wer e not ed subsequerrtLy at Edmundst on, NB, en rout e
to Cape Breton. R l~~o~r has it that the 8&L i s cons ider i ng b
uying six more diesel-electric ::n[;iU2S, to come from a VUnited St
ates road which is civinc un scrvi.ce , lh Ls is unof f iciaL but if any
member-has f lr t~1 8r -det:Jils, we would be int erested to know. If thi s repor t is co
rrect, dis3elizat i ~n coul d come to the hither t o­al
l-2team Sydney &Loui sbourg well wi~ h in the four or five years
or i ginally predicted.
~
Canadian Nat ional Rai lways has pl aced an order wit h Easter n Car Com­pany
of Trenton, NS, for eighty steel 42
U
-gauge flat cars. Intended
for service in Newfoundland, the cars wi ll be delivered earl y in Dec­ember. Desicn of t
he cars makes use of considerable amounts of low al loy s
teel inst8ad of carbon structural steel . Whi le the cars wi l l c
arry 40 tons. each, simi lar to others in service in Newfoundland,t hey wi l l
have 3 5~ more capacity.
~
� Tv/ent y-t
l
t-TO diesel-hydraul ic swi.t chLng locomotives are be ing bui l t by
Canadian Locomotive Company Limited at Kingston, Ontar io, for ship­m
ent to Indi a. ~2 ,000 ,OO O of Colombo Pl an ~~nds wil l be used to pur­
chase the locomotives whi.ch wi ll be shi.ppad to Bombay and to Madras. Canadais
other locomotive builders, Nont real Locomotive Wor ks and Gener al
Ho t or-s Diesel Li;nited wi.Ll. compl ete producti on on current
orders for diesel locomotives by the end of September. Diesel ization of
Canetcla ls rai lways is just about accompl ished and no new motive pow
er Or .18rS are in sight. At London, Ont.arLo, G:mL plans to lay of f about 300 pr
oduction employees, ret aining only of f ice and sales staf f
during t he next few mont hs .
ir
Canadian National Hailways has now received the Lest diesel -el ectr i c 10COl
ilotives to complet e the changeover from stearn to diesel . Road s
wi.t cher-s }S92 and 3893 wer-e delivered by Mont real Locomotive IJ/or ks
on Au[~u st Lot.h , while ei.rri.Lar-t.ype, but smaller uni ts 1396 and 1397
were out.shopped by Gener,:?,l hotelS Diesel Lirnited at London on August 18th and 1
9th, respectively.
if.
Canadi an National He.illJaYs 0-6-0 No. 7312, which was recently sold to the
Strasburg Rai l r oad in Pennsyl vania, U.S.A. , operated by an ent h­u
siast s orranLaat.Lon, has been renumbered i131 II through the si mple
cxpodi.crrt of r ernovLng the ? and 12·1 dif£it s fr-om the engi ne number. It
re c~ntl y made its first t r i p over t he 4i-mil e line.
ir
Canadi a~l Pa cific Rai lway cl ass D- IO 4-6-0 No. 1057 has been sold to a p
riv2te indi vidual in Toront o, Ont. , and is stored on the property
of the ReGal Stationery Company there, as a pr eser vat ion project.
~
� Canacli .::tn Pacific Rai lway i s converting t he sl eepi ng car lIVaudreuil
ll
int o a dental car , ropl aci nE:: an old wooden car former ly used for this
purpose. Dining car llAshby, fi tted with diesel generat i ng equipment sev
erat years ago, wi ll be converted int o a servi 8e car. The si ngle­bedr oom c
ar Or-and Bay has becomo Rul os &, Safet y Instruction Car No . 5
0. This car is not fi tted wi.t.h el ect ri c lighting but, has elect ric power
for the signal demonst ration panel . It replaces car No. 56.
C.H.E.A. Observations-l960 Page 5-33
at the Erie, Pa., USA works of the General Electric Company in Feb­
ruary, 1949. It will be renuDlbered 60 on the ,Sydney & Louisbourg.
The Sydney & Louisbourg received the first of an order for three 1I:1LW
dies(~l-l:::lectric swit211GrS on July 15th, ,hen No. 200 was placed in
service. Nos. 201 a,pd 202 vvere notE;d [3ubsequently at Edmundston, NB,
en route to Cape Breton. Rln~o~r has it that the S&L is considering
buying six more diesel-electric ::n[~in2S, to come from aVUnited
States road lv-hich is fivinc UD s:;lvice
1i
• .elis is unofficiaL but
if any nemter has furt,1:1cr – det:Jil.s, we would bo interested to know.
If this report is correct, digselizati~n could come to the hitherto­
all-2team Sydney & Louisbourg well wi~hin the four or five years
originally predicted.
~ Canadian National Railways has placed an order with Eastern Car Com­
pany of Trenton, NS, for eiChty steel 42U-gauge flatcars. Intended
for service in Newfoundland, the cars will be delivered early in Dec­
ember. Desi~n of the cars makes use of considerable amounts of low
alloy steel in~tl,;ad of carbon structural steel. While the cars will
carry 40 tons each, similar to others in service in Newfoundland,they
will have 35fo more capacity.
~ THenty-t.,JO diesel-hydraulic switching locomotives are being built by
Canadian Locomotive Company Limited at Kingston, Ontario, for ship­
ment to India. J2,000,000 of Colombo Plan ftulds will be used to pur­
chase the locomotives vvhich will be ship~)ed to Bombay and to Madras. Can&da
j s other locomotive build8rs, I,Iontreal Locomotive VJorks and
Genera.l I,lotors Diosel Litnited will complete production on current
orders for diesel 10coii1otives by the end of September. Dieselization
of CanClda
l
s railways is just about accomplished and no new motive
po>,;or o:C:lGrs arc in sight. At London, Ontario, G~ TDL plans to layoff
about 300 production employees, retaining only office and sales staff
during the next few months.
ir Canadian National Hailways has now receivod the last diesel-electric
locolnotives to complete the changeover from ste~m to diesel. Road
switchers 3892 and 3893 were delivered by Montreal Locomotive Works
on AUDust 16th, while siwilar tYPE, but smaller units 1396 and 1397
were outshoppcd by General IJiotors Diosel Li[ai ted at London on A.ugust
18th and 19th, respectively.
ir Canadian National He.ilways 0-6-0 No. 7312, which was reccmtly sold to
the Strasburg Railroad in Pennsylvania, U.S.A., operated by an enth­
usiasts orcanization, has been rcmumbered i13l II through the simple
expodicmt of removing the 1171! and 11211 dir£its from the engine number.
It rec0ntly made its first trip over the 4i-mile line.
tr CanadicUl Pacific Railway class D-IO 4-6-0 No. 1057 has been sold to
a privutc individual in Toronto, Ont., and is stored on the property
of tho Regal Stationery Company there, as a preservation project.
ir Canacli.::m Pacific Railway is converting the sleeping car lIVaudreuil
l1
into a dental car, replacin[ an old wooden car formerly used for this
purpose. Dining car Ashby, fitted with diesel generating equipment
several years ago, will be converted into a servi88 car. The single­
bedroom car ilGrand Bayll has become Rulos & Safety Instruction Car No.
50. This car is not fitted with electric lighting bl1t has electric
power for the signal demonstration panel. It replaces car No. 56.
C.H.B.A.� Observations-1960 Page S-34
k
The Bluebell Railway Preservation Society is the l atest effort of
British railway enthusiasts to preser ve a li t tle of thei r railw-ay
hist ory. Af ter a years work, this society, n~mb ering more than 1200
(
mCLj ~)uS, r ocently celebrat ed the opening of a ~ ~ .-mil e por t i on of the Bl.uebel.L
Line il between Sheffield Park and Horsted Keynes, St;ssex, The
line is part of the formor-Br itish Hai1vJays branch line from Eaat
Gri nst ead to Lewes which was opened in lSC2 and closed in 1958 as
uneconomic. It is the only private enthusiasts railway of standar d
gauge in Br i tai n, although there are severa] narrow-gauge lines, two
of t hem, t he Festiniog Rai l way and the IaLyl.Lyn Hai lway, operat ed by
similar ent husiast societies. Hor-e than 2000 people at tended the
of f i ci al openi ng , which was pr esided over by Captain Anthony Kinnins.
His wi fe christened one of the engines nBl uebel l
l1 •
This 50-year-old
veteran of British 2ai l ways service cost £600 stg. Its companion, the
85-year- old St.epney, cost ::·750 stg, The stat i on at Sheffield Park
has been restored to its original chocolate and yellow colours, and
some of the tinplate advertisements have also been replaced.
k
One of the features of moder n railroading has been the elimination of
double track in many places. Canadian Pacific has r ecently been el­
i minating double-track in a f ew ~oc ati ons on its transcontinental
rout e. The longest section r educed to single track has beon from
Moose Jaw to Swift Curr ent, Sask, Other examples ar e Rev elstoke to
Taf t, B. C. , and Connaught to Glacier, B.C. through the Connaught
Tunnel. The latter cases permitted hicher clearances in tunnels for
hiCh trailer s loaded on dpiegyback
i
? cars ~
k
Mergers and proposed mergers hold t he spotlight in US railroad news.
Bot h the NowYork Central and the Chesapeak e &Ohi o Ry. wish to merge
w
it~ the Bal t imore &Ohio RR, but the C&O has no desi re for a thr8e­
way hook-up. T:Ieamvhilo, st.ocl-hoLdor-s of the Atlant i c Coast Line and
Seabonrd Hai l r oads have voted in favour of amalgamat i ng the two com­pani c
E.; . The Southern Rai l.way, howevor, is opposed, as ar e aLsotre
Q,I~O ) Central of Georgia and Florida East Coast R R~ The Mi l waukee Rd.
and the Rock Island system arc also considering amalgamation, a merc
er vrhi.ch would result in one of the largest railways in the USA
i
n t erms of trackage and r evenue.
The NeVI York ILmes r eports t hat t he Souther n Pacific Company plans to
mcr-re wi t.h three of its whol ly- owned subsidiaries, the Texas & How
Or-Leans lcai.Lroad, t he Ll Paso & Sout.hwest er-n Rai l r oad Company of Tex­
as, i3.nd the El Paso Southern . The three subsidiaries operate about 4000 mi
les of line in Texas and Louisiana. The first-mentioned line,
t he: Iexas & NewOrleans RH, was the reason behi nd the change in name, some yoar-s ago, of t he Ierm
skami.ng & Nort .her-n Ontario Rai l way to the
Ontario Iiort hland Rai lway . Simi lar i t y of initials caused much con­
fusion bcfor-o the name of the Ont ario Gover nment line was altered.
——————————–_.__..
FRO ~jl TEE lfNEUS HEPOaTll TEN YEARS ArGO – September 1950
The threatened strike of non-oper-at.Lnr; railway workers became a reality
at 6:00 AllI Tuesday, August 22nd. The st r i.ke was terminated through Gov­
ernment intervention at 9: 20 PI~1 on Jedl1GsdEly, August 30th.
Fair banks-Eorse units Nos. 4801-4·302, t wo HtY units totalling 4800 horse­
power, wer e recently used on test on Canadian National Railways.
C.R.B.A. Observations-1960 Page 5-34
~ The Bluebell Railway Preservation Society is the latest effort of
British railway enthusiasts to preserve a little of their railw-ay
history. After a years work, this so ciety, D1.:mbering more than 1200
mCL1~)~:rS, ro cently celebrated the opening of a ~~.-mile portion of the
1tBluebell Line il between Sheffield Park and Horsted Keynes, SJf:isex. The
line is part of the former British RailvJays branch line frum Ea:3t
Grinstead to Lmles which was opened in IS£::2 and closed in 1958 as
uneconomic. It is tho only private enthusiasts railway of standard
gauce in Britain, although there &re severa] narrow-Gauge lines, two
of them, the Festiniog Railway and the Ta.lyllyn Hailway, operated by
similar enthusiast societies. Ilore than 2000 people attended the
official opening, which was presided over by Captain Anthony Kinnins.
His wife christened one of the engines HBluebell
l1•
This 50-year-old
veteran of British 2ailways service cost £600 stg. Its companion, the
85-year-old IIStepneyil, cost ;2750 stg. The station at Sheffield Park
has boen restored to its original chocolate and yellow colours, and
some of the tinplate advertisements have also been replaced.
~ One of the features of modern railroading has been the elimination of
double track in many places. Canadian Pacific has recently been el­
iminating double-track in a few +ocations on its transcontinental
route. The longest section reduced to single track has been from
IvlO()S8 Jaw to Swift Current, Sa.sk. Oth~r examples are Revelstoke to
Taft, B.C., and Connaught to GlaCier, B.C. through the Connaught
Tunnel. The latter cases permitted higher clearances in tunnels for
hieh trailers loaded on dpiegybacki? carsd
~ Mergors and proposed mergers hold the spotlight in US railroad news.
Both the Now York Central and the Chesapeake & Ohio Ry. wish to merge
with the Baltimore & Ohio RR, but the C&O has no desire for a three­
way hook-up. Heamvhile, stocyho]dE~rs of the Atlantic Coast Line and
Seabo£lrd Hailroads have voted in favour of amalgamating the two com­p
anies. The Southern 11.ailw.:::.y J however, is opposed, as are also1:tB G
lildo, C0ntral of Georgia and Florida East Coast RH~ The Milwaukee Rd.
and the Rock Island system arc also conSidering amalgamation, a mer
ger vThich would result in one of the largest railways in the USA
in terms of trackage and revenue.
The Nev·J York Tir:ies reports that the Southern Pacific Company plans to
merre with three of its wholly-ovmed subsidiaries, the Texas & Hew
OrlcD.ns Hc.ilroad, the El Paso & Southwestern Railroad Comnany of Tex­
as, and the El Paso Southern. The three subsidiaries o~erate about
4000 miles of line in Texas and Louisiana. The first-mentioned line,
the TG:)c1s & New Orleans HH, was the reason behind the change in name,
SOEltj y:c.:c:.rs ago, of the Temiskaminr.: &, Northern Ontario Railway to the
Ontario Horthland Railway. Similarity of initials caused much con­
fusion before the nar;1e of the Ontario Government line was altered.
————————————_ •.. _—-
FROM TE1~ lfNEHS HEPO;::{Tll TEN YEARS AGO -September 1950
The threatened strike of non-operatin[~ railway workers became a reality
at 6: 00 AIll Tuesday, August 22nd. The stj.~ilce was terminated through Gov­ernment.
intervention at 9: 20 PM on iedi1GsdEly, August 30th.
Fairbanks-Eorse units Nos.480l-4802, two HjlY units totalling 4800 horse­
power, were recently used on test on Canadian National Railways.
Ttzeoïïuo]^{ 5o }no
•tl}9Ï ŒNV tzlçT HHæoI;90
sÜoESJ:n3XH ÏçæË
J{Æ€SlaAÏUuv tï}0[ S êvffHrj uo
: ooË ïas©ïŒ PuV
It was just ten
Âsso`ciati`on
was a di
•One, P
may ask
we¥e still corr:
lîmited at that
sored in more
no€, we had
ing the same
iently large
sti£y our fi
Now that the steamlo
syét.©m, anü iri order-
obe¥ tHaù the
to observe o
ting £ashicm, you are cordiallyiocomotive-hauledtraîne.:CÏïsg*gEÉtilËÏÈJïrü€n
ilï.®ad Hist®rical
an excursicm® It
car No.15837 a.nd
tffi_eaLu, Que. You
;r €, s o 7t i .rL. €,. e
Ce Wa€,c`omotives
f ai more
.apJæ SP®n-
Car Or
re, uS-
suffic –
to Hubæi.deau.
t on the Nationaî
+T=`fi.1 triïis 5`n fit.-
d.üŒ,tù¢;L`j ü ciléctriè
OCTOBÆ.R i5HH919€$0.
Canadian Nationa.l Railways diesel-elecLric ti.ain trip fro
m
Montreal (Central station) via St. Ëu.St:ache, St. J-erom
e, St.
Saiuveur, Mont£ort, Sixteen lsland tio HubE9rdeau, Que., a
ncl retu
urn® This route is one of`the most scenïc ra,il lines o
ut of Monm
trea] and is noted £or the variety o# au.kurim £oliage
coloui.ing .
R,aLilway route twists and turfi.s throug,h the hills on a
£ormer
narrSv#–gauge roadbed, complete with 39ï¢ gatF,.àdŒ
3Ê aïÈd ,sharp curu
ves! Train leaves Mon.tffeal (C®nËH.al sH:.„.>Jà
t,icm} at, Pi:3{`}.AMHe-
tu.mÉng not later than 6:0() ,PiM: 9 ËÏ.S.T.
SüiNI)`AY, 0ŒT0BÆPL 16THg 19(toD
C:anadian Pacifiè steam t]:a`L`n usimg Gœ5 4im6o
£ type Ï`j€Ji.È270a
£rom Montreal (Winasor Station), vûa Stœ6 HJite#eg3t£
, ,Su à!erome,
Piedmont and Val Morin `to Ste. Agathe, Que„ and retuFmo Trip
i§ into same region as Saturday trip with moï.e £
GFill ïÙo2iage!
Train leaves Montreal (Windsor Statlon) è¢ot Ç:30 AM
9 returning
n€)t ï:-`9.ter than 5:30 PM EST in time foF traim conn
ections out of
ML€lrîtï..<=:ai.

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