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Canadian Rail 110 1960

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Canadian Rail 110 1960

crha ews Report
P.O. BOX 22. STATION B MONTREAL 2 . QUEBEC NUMBER 1 1 a ~ ;r: * APRIL 1960

<{
DAYS OF STEAM on the I,B.& 0. is recalled by this photogr a ph
made on Easter Saturday, April 12th, 1952, of CNR Engine #1223 and
train #323 on the point
of leaving Bancroft, Orit,, for Howland Junc ­
tion over what was once the Irondale, Bancroft & Ottawa Railway.
No. 1223, presently
No. 1520, is being held at Stratford for CRHA.
Photogra ph by O.S.A. Lavallee.
(
crha ews Report
P.O.
BOX 22.
STATION B
MONTREAL 2. QUEBEC
NUMBER 1 1 0 APRIL 1960
DA YS OF STEAM on the I.B.& 0. is recalled by this
photograph made on Easter Saturday, April 12th, 1952, of CNR Engine #1223 and
train #323 on the point of leaving Bancroft, Ont., for Howland Junc –
tion
over what was once the Irondale, Bancroft l> Ottawa Railway.
No. 1223, presently No. 1520, is being held at Stratford for CRHA.
Photograph by O.S.A. Lavallee.
———
—-
———— — –
———
·C.R.H•.A. News ReE,ort • 1960 Pas.e 24
NOTICE OF MEETING:
The A.p r il monthly meeting of the Association
will be held on Wednesday. ! pril 13th, 1960, in Roo~ 203.
Montreal Transportation Commission Etri.ldirig, 159 Craig
Street West. at 8:15 PM. Mr. Lavallee will give a talk on
locomotives built by the Canadian Pacific Railway, between
1883 and 1944. /j s usual, gue s ts will be welcom e.
ASSOCIATION NEWS
The Banquet held on March 1st was a
social success. withappr oxim ately thirty­
five rnembe r s and guest s in attendance. It
was held in L a Salle Canadienne at the
Canadian Pacifics Windsor Sta tion; the
guest speaker was N1r. Lionel Rathbone,
Chairrn an of the Board of Ahearn ~, Soper
Corrrpa.ny L i.mited , who addressed the
gather ing with re miniscences ofhis sixty­
five ye ar career with CanadaI s pioneer
electric r a i lwa y firm. Nil. Rathbone was
introduced by our member Mr. Warren Y.
Soper, grand son of his namesake who was
co-founder of the firm. He was thanked
by Mr. Leonar d Seton, Q.C. The Presid ­
ent a ct ed as M aster of Ceremonies. Oth­
ers a t the head table included our Honor­
ary President, Mr. Donald Angus. Mr. S.
F. Dingle. vice-president, Canadian Nat­
ional Railways, and CRHI vice-president
Mr. S.S. Worthen.
MEMBERSHIP
The
follovin g persons were accepted
for re gular rrre rrrbe r ship in the /. ssociat­
ion a t the regular March m eeting, which
was held on M arch 9th:
Mr. E dward Blake.
Mr. Rowan Coleman (absent)
Mr. C.E. Redfern
D r . .h . V ance Ward (absent)
The following p ersons were accepted for
junior rnernber shi p in the I) ssociation:
M r . Jack A.llen
Mr. Ivri chael Bould
Mr. Glenn Car twr i ght
Mr. David Collins,
Mr. Wi lliam Scott
The following persons were proposed, for
the first tirrie , for regular membership in
the Association:
Mr. John Hutton
Mr. Arthur L . Martin
The followin g person, was proposed, for
the fir st tim e, for juniormembershipin
the ! ssociation:
M r , Andrew G. Martin
Lf PEL PINS
———,…­
T he / . ssociation has lapel pins for
sale; they are made of sterling silver and
attractively finished in blue enamel. They
may b e obtained for $ 2.00 by writing to
the As s ociation, marking the envelope
Lapel P in s , or those resident in the
Mont real area may telephone one of the
members of the Membership Committee,
whose n ames a nd telephone numbers app­
ear in the block below.
VOLUNTE E H REQUIRE D
—-_._———­
R e s pon s e t o the Membership Commit-
tees a ppea l for assistance in our last
issue was, we regret to say, nil. Thus,it
is still not too late to offer your services,
Mr. Stephen Cheasley and his Committee
will be very glad to hear from you.
–CAN ADiANRAIL ROAD HISTORICAL
ASSOC tA TION
News Repor t No. 110
pr il, 1960.
Editorial j dd r e s s : P.O. Box 22,
Station B, Montreal 2, Canada.
EDITOR: ••.•.•.• Omer $..A. Lavallee
PUBLISHER: John Saunders
COMlV1ITTEE: Ant hony Clegg
• David R. Henderson
…….. Paul R. McGee
•.••••• Lorne C. Perry
MEMBERSHIP COMN1ITTEE
Stephen Cheasley, Chairman. HU .4-6262
Paul R. McGee , HU.6-1498
(
. C.R.H •. A~ News Report .. 1960 Page 24
NOTICE OF MEETING:
The April monthly meeting of the .A ssoc:iation
will be held on Wednesday, ! pril 13th, 1960, in Room 203,
Montreal Transportation CO.mrnission Euilding, 159 Craig
Street West, at 8 :15 PM. Mr. Lavallee will give a talk on
locomotives built by the Canadian Pacific Railway, between
1883 and 1944. P s usual, guests will be welcome.
ASSOCIA TION NEW S
The Banquet held on March 1 st was a
social success, with approximately thirty­
five luembers and guests in attendance. It
was held in La Salle Canadienne at the
Canadian Pacifics Windsor Station; the
guest speaker waS Nlr. Lionel Rathbone,
Chairrnan of the Board of Ahearn & Soper
CompCny Li.mited. who addressed the
gathering with reminis cences of his sixty­
five year Career with Canadas pioneer
electric railway firm. Nil. Rathbone was
introduced by our member Mr. Warren Y.
Soper, grandson of his namesake who was
co-founder of the firm. He was thanked
by Mr. Leonilrd Seton, Q.C. The Presid­
ent acted as :tvlaster of Ceremonies. Oth­
ers at the head table included our Honor­
ary President, Mr. Donald Angus, Nir. S.
F. Dingle. vice-president, Canadian Nat­
ional Rililways. and CRHf vice-president
Mr. S.S. Worthen.
MEMBERSHIP
The £o11oing persons were accepted
for regular membl?l.ship in the !. ssociat­
ion at the regular March meeting, which
was held on March 9th:
Mr. Edward Blake.
Mr. Rowan Coleman (absent)
Mr. C.E. Redfern
Dr. :h. V,nce Ward (absent)
The following persons were accepted for
junior rnernbership in the,) ssociation:
Mr. J:=tck P.llen
Mr. llliich:=tel Bould
Mr. Glenn Crtrtwright
Mr. D:=tvid Collins,
Mr. William Scott
The following persons were proposed, for
the first time, for regular membership in
the Association:
Mr. John Hutton
Mr. Arthur L. Martin
The following person, was proposed, for
the first time, for junior membership in
the f ssociation:
Mr. Andrew G. Martin
L/lPEL PINS
The I ssociation has lapel pins for
sale; they are made of sterling silver and
attractively finished in blue enamel. They
may be obtained for $ 2.00 by writing to
the Association, marking the envelope
Lapel Pins, or those resident in the
Montreal area may telephone one of the
members of the Membership Committee,
whose narnes and telephone numbers app­
ear in the block below.
VOLUNTEER REQUIRED
Response to the Membership Commit­
tees appeal for ilssistance in our last
issue was, we regret to say. nil. Thus,it
is still not too late to offer your services,
Mr. Stephen Cheasley and his Committee
will be very glad to hear from you.
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL
ASSOC IA TION
News Report No. 110
pril, 1960.
——-
Editorial !ddress: P.O. Box 22,
Station B, Montreal 2, Canada.
EDITOR: …….. Orner S-A. Lavallee
PUBLISHER: ………. John Saunders
COMlV1ITTEE: ……. Anthony Clegg
• David R. Henderson
…….. Paul R. McGee
……. Lorne C. Perry
MEMBERSHIP COMN1ITTEE
Stephen Cheasley, Chairman, HU .4-6262
Paul R. McGee, HU .6-1498
:;.f.:.L , News Repor t -1960 Prlge.25
!
THE INTERPROV IN CI IL
The profit from our successful 1959
.
trip schedule is being wel.l-sexpended this
spring
,
on the r epair of our r ollin g stock.
As we mentioned last month, M&SC Car
No·.,611 is the chief recipient of attention
and will shortly be ready for painting.
Jobs on tap for the late spring and
early summer include repainting
Saskatchewan on the exterior. While itt
is intended to refinish the exterior of this
car in natural varnished wood eventually,
it is not anticipated that this can be under­
taken for a few years yet, consequently
the repainting will be done in the Canadian
Pacifics standard tuscan red. /~nother
job which is awaiting fine weather is re­
pair and repainting of Ottawa car #696,
which was the victim of vandalism while
stored at Hull, Que., last year. No. 696
rcq;:i:ES new wiridow glass, considerable
trr!:
~ i :0 1 r epa i r , and repainting. This will
be started following the painting of the
!Sciskatchewan. Both Cars are stored at
Lachine, the privatecar in the yard .of the
Dominion Bridge Company, while No. 696
is the temporary guest of Canadian P llis­
CL1>ners Limited.
T,HIP COMMITTEE
Once the Easter weekend two-etr ip s ch>
• .
th e Trip Committee, a full programme of
trips for 1960 is to be undertaken•
On June 4th and 5th,the UpperCanada
.
Railway Societywillsponsor an errthusIas>
ts weekend in Toronto featuring a trolley
tour of TTC l L~es on the Satur-day, and a
s
team trip to Port McNicoll, Ont., on the
Sunday usin g a Cr-riadian Pacific 4-6-4 of
the 2800 class. Details and circular will
be car r i ed as soon as UCRS supply us.
Also under considerationis a weekend,
possibly in July,marking the final, official
and ceremonial end of Steam on Canadian
National R,ilways, after 124 years of use
on the CNR and on its predecessors. It is
hoped that details will be available with
the May News Report.
Plans for the fall are still undeter~in­
ed in detail, but the usual Fall Foliage fix­
ture of October 1st and 2nd will prevail,
steam or diesel, or both. Also in the pl­
anning stage is a 75th Anniversary of the
Driving of the Last Spike completing the
CPR, which occurred at Craigellachie, BC
on November 7th, 1885. This one will just
~
to be steam! Obviously, we Can not
go to B.C. much as wed like to, but a
suitable spot will be found in which to
drive a commemmorative last spike. Dust
off your beaver hats, gentlemen! As Sir
edule is out of the way, notice of which was William Van Horne aptly remarked, —-­
given in last months News Report, and anybody who wants to attend wfl.l have to
details of which can still be obtained from pay full fare.
++++++++++++++++++++
••••f!. FOND FA.REW~LL_JO T!,IE I.B.&. 0. —by Orner S.A. Lavallee
DURING THE MONTH of March, the picturesque railway line through the
Enliburton Highlands of Ontario which was known far and wide, to natives and vis­
itors alike as the 1.B.& 0., was abandoned. Officially, this was the Irondale Sub­
division of Canadian National Railways, but it was known throughout its career by
the initials of the independent company which was responsible for its construction
in the late Nineteenth Century, the Irondale, Bancroft & Ottawa Railway Company.
IrcndaLe was on the line, Bancroft just a few miles off . it, but, like many similar
a
nl·:~Jt_ol.:;ly-planned projects whose names reflected aspirations. instead of accom­
p:isi.lIl..erits , the I.B.t O. never reached Ottawa.
I made only one trip over the I.B.& 0.; it was a railway reached only with diff­
iculty from Montreal, especially for a weekend trip, but unlike the bitter last days
of once-a-week service, the I.B.& O. had seen better services in comparatively
recent years. Thus it was, that on Easter weekend, 1952, the author, in the comp­
any of three other CRHA stalwarts, Anthony Clegg, Ken Chivers and Forster Kemp,
made the I. B. t> O. our goal.
(
News Report-1960
THE INTERPROVINCIIL the Trip Committee, a full programme of
The profit from our successful 1959 trips for 1960 is to be undertaken.
,trip s.chedule is being well-expended this On Ju,ne 4th and 5th, the Upper ~anada
spring on the repair of our rolling stock. R~ilway Society will sponsor an enthusias­
As we mentioned last month, M&SC car ts weekend in Toronto featuring a trolley
No.,611 is the chief recipient of attention tour of TTC lL~es on the Saturday, and a
and will shortly be ready for painting. steam trip to Por.t McNicoll, Ont., on the
Jobs on tap for the late spring and Sunday us;ng a C~nadian Pacific 4-6-4 of
early summer include repainting the 2800 class. Details and circular will
Saskatchewan on the exterior. While itt be carri2d as soon as UCRS supply us.
is intended to refinish the exterior of this A.lso under considerationis a weekend,
car in natural varnished wood eventually, possibly in July,marking the final, official
it is not anticipated that this can be under-and ceremonial end of Steam on Canadian
taken for a few years yet, consequently National R;:.ilways, after 124 years of use
the repainting will be done in the Canadian on the CNR and on its predecessors. It is
Pacifics standard tuscan red. Another hoped that details will be available with
j.::>b which is awaiting fine weather is re-the May News Report.
pdr and rep::dnting of Ottawa car #696, Plans for the fall are still undetermin­
which was the victim of vandalism while ed in dehdl, but the usual Fall Foliage fix­
stored at Hull, Que., last year. No. 696 ture of Odober 1st and 2nd will prevail,
rcq;:i::ES new window glass, considerable steam or diesel, or both. Also in the pl­
~:nt~i or rei); pe starte,d following the painting of the Driving of the Last Spike completing the
Saskatchewan. Both cars are stored at CPR, which occurred at Craigellachie, BC
Lachi~e, the private car in the yard ,of the on November 7th, 1885. This one will just
Dominion Bridge Company, while No. 696 ~ to be steam! Obviously, we Can not
is the temporary guest of Canadian P llis-go to B.C. much as wed like to, but a
CL,~:ners Limited. suitable spot will be found in which to
T.HIP COMMITTEE drive a commemmorative last spike. Dust
Once the Easter weekend two-trip sch-off your beaver hats, gentlemen! .A s Sir
edule is out of the way, notice of which was William Van Horne aptly remarked. —-­
given in last month 5 News Report, and anybody who wants to attend w,ill have to
details of which can still be obtained from pay full fare.
+++++++++++++++tt+++
… ./ FOND FA.REW§L~_JO TJ:fE I.B.&. 0. by Omer S.A. Lavallee
DURING THE MONTH of March, the picturesque railway line through the
Erl.liburton Highlands of Ontario which was known far and wide, to natives and vis­
itors alike as the III.B.& 0., was abandoned. Officially, this was the Irondale Sub­
division of Canadian National Railways, but it was known throughout its career by
tne; initials of the independent company which was responsible for its construction
in the late Nineteenth Century, the Irondale, Bancroft & Ottawa Railway Company_
·Iru!ld~.le w~,s on the line. Bancroft just a few miles off . it, but, like many similar
ard::ILo.l3ly-planned projects whose names reflected aspirations, instead of accom­
p:isiw:enis, the I.B.t O. never reached Ottawa.
I made only one trip over the I.B.t 0.; it was a railway reached only with diff­
iculty from Montreal, especially for a weekend trip, but unlike the bitter last days
of once-a-week service, the I.B.& O. had seen better services in comparatively
recent years. Thus it was, that on Easter weekend, 1952, the author, in the comp­
any of three other CRHA stalwarts, Anthony Clegg, Ken Chivers and Forster Kemp,
made the I. B. t> O. our goal.
C.R.H.A. News R eport-1960 Page 26
We left Montreal on CP #21 for Trenton. Since arrival at this Lake Ontario
town was rria d e in the wee hour s of the morni ng, we spuzued the sleeping Car for
once, and join ed the vul gar mob in the coaches which, sin ce it was Erl ster and the
great exodus f rom Montreal to Toronto wa s ta king place, were none of the best.
Ae.; a ,1.J.,Y;; ·~; e r of fa ct, they we re colonist cars and we spent the night in an a cuteiy
upr i ght pos ition, I sl ept fitfully, wh ile friend Clegg entertained Mr sChiver s with
a
necdotes, which s e err-ed to get funnier as the night wore on, Clegg. incidenta lly,
-, is famous for this, so that when 4 :0 0 A M rolled around and Trenton came in si ght,
hewasins pasms oflaughter , while therest ofus pondereduponthejusticeofa
cruel world or s ch cdule which would thus precipitat e pass engers upon a cold plat ­
forminthechillypr e-id awnofa C,nadianspring.Sometim e duringthenight, ar ound
Parham or Lonsda l e, we had p assed the several sections of No.22 which was ta king
the equa.Hy-igr eat Ior ontc -Jviontr eaI exodus ontheir way. Than ks also to a di abol>
ical system of so rting pas senger s according to origin and destination, whose only
apparent advantage is to drive rail passengers over to the busses or the air­
lines, Chivers, Cl egg and I rode in the uncornfor ta ble and crowded colonist car ,
merely be caus e we had embarked at Windsor Station inMontreal. Kem p, on the
other ha nd, who had scrambled aboard at Montreal West found himself in almos t
s c
l.e I ),: ses cion of a streamlined. air-conditioned coach, in which he slept peace­
fully and without interruption until Trenton (–as Kemp ~..?_u1:~).
We took several walks ar ound Trenton, had breakfast two or three tirnes in an�
a
ll- night restaurant (in Irentonl) and with the light of day Came a switcher, No.�
7222, which entertained us until the mixed was ready to leave for Bancroft about�
8 :00 AM. Ihis rtrain had4- 6- 0 No.1406ontheheadend,and a leisurelyGoodFri­�
day was spent going north through the scenery which our May 1959 trip traversed,�
from Trenton to Bancroft, via Anson, Marmora, B r-nno ckbur-n, Ormsby Jet., and�
Detl.or ; UponarrivalatBancroft,werepairedtotheenginehousebeforefinding�
our lodgings at the hotel, to determine what the I.B. & O. line power would be on�
the morrow. f 1as , the enginehouse was locked up, and though a tantalizing wisp�
of smoke rose from the smokeja c k, no nook or cranny enabled us to see what it�
contained. In those delicious pre-diesel days, our greatest worry was that it�
would turn out to b e an £.- 10 class 2-6-0, rather than the 1200 series 4-6-0 which�
was the real goal of our trip.�
IPHOTOGRA PHS :—;-~:-~-;~-:te-d p~~~~-;~g~~ows a few typical I.B. & O. scenes
I t a ken during the visit r eferred to; in this story. The top shows the ea s tbound
and westbound engines a t Howland, CN 11 25 16 and #1223, where the opposing
trains exchanged engin es . Centre photo shows engine #1223 dropping a Car
at Wilberforce, Orrt,; while the lower picture illustrates the elevated sta.tion
at Ba pti s te, Ont,, The cover picture was made at Bancroft prior to the depart­
ure of i r ain #323. —all photographs by the author.
Our exper ience of the night before was conducive to good sleep in the Bancroft
inn, and br i ght and early on E aster Saturday, breakfast under our belts, we were
backdownatthe CNRstation, watchin g No.1406 m akeupitstrainforthereturnto
Trenton. Ba,ckat the enginehous e,weappeared justintimetoseethedoer s open­
edto rev ea LNo, 1223,the enginewe wereafter ,a verynice.lightlittleex-Canad­
ian Northern 4-6-0, which was to take train #323 to Howland and Lindsay.
Just about this time, we acquainted ourselves with the crew, which was headed
(
News Report-1960 Page 26
—————-~————————~————————————-
C.R.H.A.
We left Montreal on CP # 21 for Trenton. Since arrival at this Lake Ontario
town was rni3.de in the wee hours of the morning, we spllTlled the sleeping Car for
once, and joined the vulgar lY,ob in the coaches which, since it was Erl ster and the
great exodus horn 11l1ontrcal to Toronto WClS taking place, were none of the cest.
Ar>; a .ll..-:!.t;er of fact, they w?re colonist cars and we spent the night in an ac:,tely
u
pright positicn, I slept fitfully, while friend Clegg entertained Mr.Chivel anecdotes, which seclTJ.e.:1 ~:o get funnier as the night wore on, Clegg, incidentally,
, is famous for this, so that when 4 :00 A M rolled around and Trenton carne in sight,
he was in spasrns of laughter, while the rest of us pondered upon the justice of a
cruel world or schedule which would thus precipitate passengers upon a cold plat­
form in the chilly pj~endawn. of a C,nadian spring. Sometime during the night, around
Parharn or Lonsdale, we had passed the several sections of No.22 which was blking
the eql·~allygreat T~ronto-Montreal exodus on their way~ Thanks also to a di:ibol­
ical system of sorting passengers according to origin and destination, whose only
apparent advantage is to drive rail passengers over to the busses or the air­
lines, Chivers, Clegg and I rode in the uncornfortable and crowded colonist ca 1,
merely becRuse we had ernbarked at Windsor Station in Montreal. Kemp, on the
other hnnd, who had scrambled aboard at Montreal West found himself in almost
scle P),; ;;.cssion of a streamlined, air-conditioned coach, in which he slept peace­
fully and 1;ithout interruption until Trenton (–as Kemp ~.?_uJ:5:!).
We took several walks around Trenton, had breakfast two or three times in an
all-night restaurant (in Trenton~) and with the light of day Came a switcher, No.
722.2, which entertained us until the mixed was ready to leave for Bancroft about
8:00 AM. This.train had 4-6-0 No.1406 on the head end, and a leisurely Good Fri­
day was spent going north through the scenery which our Ma.y 1959 trip traversed,
from Trenton to Bancroft, via Anson, Marmora, B)>nnockburn, Ormsby Jet., and
Detlor. Upon arrival at Bancroft. we repaired to the enginehouse before finding
our lodgings at the hotel, to determine what the I.B.& O. line power would be on
the morrow. /·las, the enginehouse was locked up, and though a tantalizing wisp
of smoke rose from the smokejack, no nook or cranny enabled us to see what it
contained. In those delicious pre-diesel days, our greatest worry was that it
would turn out to be an E.-10 class 2-6-0, rather than the 1200 series 4-6-0 which
was the real goal of our trip.
I PHOTOGRA PHS :–;~:-~ns~rte-d p~~~~-;~g:-:~ows-:-few typical I.B. & O. scenes
taken during the visit referred to; in this story. The top shows the eastbound
and westbound engines at Howland, eN 112516 and # 1223, where the opposing
tra.ins exchanged engines. Centre photo shows engine #1223 dropping a cal
at Wilberforce, Ont., while the lower picture illustrates the elevated station
at Baptiste, Ont., The cover picture was made at Bancroft prior to the depart­
ure of train #323. —all photographs by the author.
Our experience of the night before was conducive to good sleep in the Bancroft
inn, and b;:ight and eel rly on Easter Saturday, breakfast under our belts, we were
back down at the CNR station, watching No.1406 Tn8.ke up its train for the return to
Trenton. Back at the enginehous e, we appeared just in time to see the dOl)rs open­
ed to reveall.Jo. 1223, the engine we were after, a very nice, light little ex-Canad­
ian Northern 4-6-0, which was to take train #323 to Howland and Lindsay.
Just about this time, we acquainted ourselves with the crew, which was headed

C.R:H.A. New s ReEo:rt~1960

Page27
,… .. .¥.__ …–… :b ~ ,
on this day by a most friendly man, Conductor Burn, while *ho e n gl n c e r , Mr. Tho~
pson, handled No. 1223 as if he was hauling the lnternationnl Lin:..:r__d, ;:y. .f::re
~eaving,
Conductor Burn a sked us if we had our lunches, and upon as s ur ing him
;. ,.. _0 !. .
that our interest in his line would carry us through, r a tionle s s, to Lindsa y, }lIe
~
~te told that we could have lunch en route, at $1 per per son, all arrang,ment
which surprised us rather pl eas an tly. Afte r asking the sarrie question of the oihe r
passengers, he went back into the office and the P gent at Ban cf-oft s errt a telegram
to the Iunch-vstop, wherever it might be.
Leaving time Came and No. 1223, coupled to a. ba g ~ag e <·car and a coach, both
wooden equipment, gave a sma rt push a nd star t ed b:2cLi:ug the train to the wye at
York River, a &ew miles north of Banc r oft. Ba ncroft it s e lf is situated on what was
once the Central Ontario Ra ilwa y, and the LB.& 0 ., whan cornpleted , join ed the C.
O.R.atYorkRiver, andused th e latter s tr acks iuto P,,ncr oft. At Yo rkRive r ,
therewasa pause,briefly,whileConductorBurnwentinto the3x 3 [LiteralIyl] stat­
ion to register his train, then backingupto the north wye switch, we started running
in conventional direction, westward along the York River on the fringe of the Hali­
burton Highlands.
~
.t B r-ptis te, we paused briefly while passengers disembarked at the pictures­
que s ta tton, which is situated on a bank about fifteen feet above the track. It is
rea ch ed hom the platform by s ta i r s l After skirting Baptiste Lake, the tr a in
start ed itsst eepas c ent toHighlandGrove andMurnfor d, Thelatterplaceisat
1,346 feet abov e sea level, the highest point on the line. At each of these places,
local work was done, wayfreight loaded and unloaded and the occasional pas s en ger
picked up or set down. The speed of the train was not high –perhaps 20 rnvpvh,
at top, as we weaved and twisted through the rocky countryside on 56-lb. British
steel, product of the world-renowned mills a t Sheffield in the 1880s.
Kemp had prc-cn–.ptod th~ !a noldng C room. The other three of us sat in the body of the car, and when we fe lt the need
for orientation, we went inand consulted our navigator who would inform us le arn­
edly of the name of the river just crossed, or the la ke which we were approaching.
(This was before Forster started taking pictu res l) Kem p even showed up the bra­
keman who, in a congenial sort of wa y was na ming the lakes for us when he was
informed i mper iously byournavigator (who had neverbeenoverthelinebefor e,
butwasplacingallfaithinthetopographicalma ps ) thatthis wasnotDo g Lake -­
No indeed, it was Cat Lake, or some such place. The r ailwaym a;:-~bash e d, with ­
drew, and was not seen again. (T hose of my readers who have be en d em oHsh ed
from full height by the i m perishable m emory of brother Kemp, will appreciate how
the trainman must have felt.)
About t his time, No. 1223 was getting thirsty, and we shortly pulled up to the
sta tion at Gooderham, a pleasant ha rrrle t w hich was the spot at which the gastron­
omic ne eds of both the engine and th e passengers would be looked to. All of us,
crew and passengers, descended and repaired into the station to find that a lady,
who was in sorne manner or means connected with the railway, had turned the
wa iting room into a pleasant, but regrettably unadvertised, dining room. Meanwhile
the fireman had connected No.12l3 to one end of a water siphon, and in the ensuing
twenty-seven minutes, while the engine watered itself, the rest of us, passengers.
crew and all attacked a v e r y nice lunch of roast beef, all for the modest fee of $ 1.
C .. l<.H.A. N~ws_.R .. eE0.r.t..:l.26~* Page27
,l k EaiL
on this day by a most friendly man, Conductor Burn, while -the engineer, Mr. Tho~
pson, handled No. 1223 as if he was hauling the Internation~l I>ifr:..:rd, ;:::~-)ie
l~avillg, Conductor Burn asked us if we had our lunches, and upon assuring hi~
f~~t our interest in his line would carry us through, rationless, to Lindsay, we
weie told that we could have lunch en ;route, a.t $ 1 per person, an arrang(:ment
which surprised us rather pleasantly. After asking the ,arne questiun of the oiher
passengers, he went back into the office and the P gent at Bancroft sellt a telegram
to the lunchstop, wherever it might be.
Leaving time Came and No. 1223, coupled to a bag~age~car and a coach, both
wooden equipment, gave a smart push and sta:ded b:2cLi:ug the train to the wye at
York River, a tew miles north of Bancroft. Bancroft itself is situated on what was
once the Central Ontario Railway. and the l.B.B 0., wht:n cornpleted. joined the C.
O.R. at York River, and usen the latE€r s tlacks into B,7lncroft. At York River,
there was a pause, briefly, while Conductor Burn went into the 3×3 (literally!) stat­
ion to register his train, then backing up to the north wye switch, we started running
in conventional direction, westward along the York River on the fringe of the Hali­
burton Highlands •
…. t B?ptiste, we paused briefly while passengers disembarked at the pictures­
qu.e station, which is situated on a bank about fifteen feet above the track. It is
reached from the platform by stairs! After skirting Baptiste Lake, the train
started its steep as cent to Highland Grove and lviurnford. The latter place is at
1,346 feet above sea level, the highest point on the line. At each of these places,
local work was done, wayfreight loaded and unloaded and the occasional passenger
picked up or set down. The speed of the train was not high –perhaps 20 m.p.h.
at top. as we weaved and twisted through the rocky countryside on 56-lb. British
steel, product of the world-renowned mills at Sheffield in the 1880s.
Kemp had prc-cnptod th~ sIY)ol<:lng C room. The other three of us sat in the body of the car, and when we felt the need
for orientation, we went in and consulted our navigator who would inform us learn­
edly of the name of the river just crossed, or the lake which we were approaching.
(This was before Forster started taking pictures~) Kemp even showed up the bra­
keman who, in a congenial sort of way was naming the lakes for us when he was
informed imperiously by our navigator (who had never been over the line before,
but was placing all faith in the topographical maps) that this was not Dog Lake -­
No indeed, it was Cat Lake, or some such place. The railwayma;;~bashed. with­
drew, and was not seen again. (Those of my readers who have been demolished
from full height by the imperishable memory of brother Kemp, will appreciate how
the trainman must have felt.)
About this time, No. 1223 was getting thirsty, and we shortly pulled up to the
station a.t Gooderham, a pleasant hamlet which was the spot at which the gastron­
omic needs of both the engine and the passengers would be looked to. All of us,
crew and passengers, descended and repaired into the station to find that a lady,
who waS in S-)lne manner or means connected with the railway, had turned the
waiting room into a pleasant, but regrettably unadvertised, dining room. Meanwhile
the fireman had connected No.1223 to one end of a water siphon, and in the ensuing
twenty-seven minutes, while the engine watered itself, the rest of us, passengers,
crew and all attacked a very nice lunch of roast beef, all for the modest fee of $1.
C.R.H.A.
News Repo~ t-I_.:..9_60~_ P age 28
Typically, the engine crew sat in one corner, the tr ain crew in the other, while the
p
assenge rs dis t r ibuted themselves about the other neat ta ble s.
Just as we were finishing dessert, the tender of No.1223 was se en to overflow,
and
the crew opined that it was time to get going ~ Ah, the cL :l r~n of th·. }~; .;; hon –
wate r stop, wh e re time is not a considera tion and leis ure is pa r arnourit , Ve clirrib >
ed aboard, fully and satisfactor ily stuffed, while t r ai.n Il32 3 r es urned its way down
the valley of the Bu rnt Rive r . We had no t r o uble r ~ 2aj ;).;1~ g ~eLc (l t;le ; Ir ondale and
Furnace Falls were left far be hind, as we pr oc eeded with a will to our rneet with
the oppos ing train at Howland.
Our haste was in vain. Howland W ,lS devoid of other signs of life upon our arr­
ival. We were informed that our en gine was ex chan ged wi th the other train at this
point, since the other engine was too heavy for the LB.& O. We bent to the task of
turning No. 1223 on the armstrong turntab Ie, andhadjust completed thistas k
when the othertrain ar r ived with 2-8- 0 No. 25]6 at its hea d end. We turned this
engin e too, then the engines exchanged t rains , We ba de a fond au r ev oir to the creV
but not before the two engines were brought fa ce to face for a photograph with the
respectiv e crews•
.As we departed s outhwa Id f r orri Howland , s moke in the Burnt River va lley told
us ofthe pr o gress of No .1223 ba ckto Ban croft, ov er the I.B.&. 0., a brav e little
r
ailway whose na m e will rem ain in sc ribed forev e r in the anna ls of Canadian
r a ilroading.

~+>:+ *+ *+ *+ : + >: + ::
~

1.1A :2 OF Tr:E IRONDALE , BANCROFT
6, OTTAW j RP ILWA Y COM P ANY . /28)
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nrn ount
n o r .hc: ;s : C,[ :>Jlonto.)
!,.•_ _.—.
>:: T j f (:; >~T-: ,/ CF.!Lo PUBLICATrONS will be releas ed on the Ea ste r excursion
w
-=: · , ; · ~ . : . : , i > c~ !~,~ :,u:i · ~)~ :.· ;pecr;fti–~i;;S:-Youll want both of them for your r ailway
libr a r y. News ReportreaderswillhavealldetailswiththeMayissue. :0:0:<::
C.R.H.A. News Report-l_.;..9_6_0 ___________ P_a…lOgl.,;e_2_8_
Typically, the engine crew sat in one corner, the train crew in the other, while the
passengers distributed themselves about the other neat tables.
Just as we were finishing dessert, the tender of No.1223 was seen to overflow,
and the crew opined that it was time to get going~ Ah, the cL.r::-n. e.f th. ~~ ;;;hon-
water stop, where time is not a consideration and leisure is Fl.nimount. Ve cLilnb­
ed aboard, fully and satisfactorily stuffed, while trab f/3Z3 r~snm;2d its way down
the valley of the Burnt River. We had no trollb~e 1:;2aj;).:1l13 3cLcdt;le; Irondale and
Furnace Falls were left far behind, as we proceeded with a will to our rneet with
the opposing train at Howland.
Our haste was in vain. Howland w?.s devoid of other signs of life upon our arr­
ival. We were informed that our engine was excl1anged with the other train at this
point, since the other engine was too heavy for the LB.e. O. We bent to the task of
turning No.1223 on the armstrong tUr1!table, al~d had just completed this task
when the other tr8jn arrived with 2-8-0 No. 2516 at its head end. We turned this
engine too, then the engines exchanged t:.ains. We bade a fond au revoir to the cren
but not before the two engines were brought face to face for a photograph with the
resp ctive crews •
.As
we departedsouthward frorn Howland, slnoke in the Burnt River valley told
us of the progress of No.1223 back to Bancroft, over the 1.B.&. 0., a brave little
railway whose name will remain inscribed forever in the annals of Canadian
railroading.
*: TV/C; :~<:../ CF.:.:r, PUBLICATIONS will be released on the Easter excursion
w,,:·:;;~.:.:,i; E~u~,:,uT~)~l:L ·ZpE:cTalti·-~i;;s:-Youll want both of them for your railway
library. News Report readers will have all details with the May issue. *::<1
C.R.H.A. Observations-1960 5-12
(
PACIFIC NORTHERN RAI LWAY — During the
oB S E R V A T IO NS past mont~ , more det ai led information
has been released on the proposed A depar t
ment of notes and rout e of the ~Jenl1e r-Gre n r-a i.Lway into
news, by Anthony Clegg.� northern British Col umbi a, construct ­
ion of which i s expected to commence
in July of this year. Basi cally, it
is the mor e westerly route of the t …TO possLbl e s chemes as shewn on Map
nAil , page S-ll, Mar ch i s sue, except f or t.h« moet southern 75 mil
es or so. According to an announcement by Ei nar Gunderson, a di r e
ctor of the ~lenne r -Gre n company, the rai l line wi ll commence at Surnmi t Lake ne
ar Prince George, connecting with the Paci f i c Gr
eat Easter n Rai l way at that point. It wil l proceed nor t hwest er ­
ly, roughly parallelling the CNR s Nechako , Telkwa and Bulkley S
ubdiKi si ons but some fifty mi les to the nor t h ; north of New Haz­
elton, it wi l l meet the western line shovm as a possible route on Map
i(Aii, page S-11, and veer nor-t.hwar-ds toward Yukon and Alaska .
Estimates place the cost of the 700-mi le project at JI 05 million.
Accor ding to Vancouver newspapers, ~tr . Gordon of the C.N.R.
is r eported t o have offered Premier Bennett of B.C., the use of
the Nati onal s line from Prince George to Hazel t on in order to el­
iminate the noed for constructing about 250 mi les of parallel line at a
cost of somo ~30 mi l l i on. Det ailed conditions of the offer
have not been discl osed, but it is believed to include rental of
running rights over t he C.N.R. line, whi ch is now not used t o any­
thinglikefull capacity. It is reportedthat Mr. Bennett has de­cl i ned
the offor. The company is in the process of be ing incor­
por ated and wi l l be a reality by the end of March. The incorpor­
ation is in the name of the dPacif i c Nor thern Hai lway Companyrl.
~
Dur ing the past few weeks, the Canadian National has chopped ~
more trains fromits passenger ser vi ce timet abl es, the run bet ween
I~ontrGal , Ni colet and Victoriaville. This was the li ne served by
the noted ilShad Flyer
l1
dur ing steam days (see News Repor t No, 84,
December 1957) and an er st whi le Rai l iner run . February 27t h, Sat­
urd~y , was the last dny of service.
The loss of these trains reduces weekday passenger service bstween Mont
real and St . Lambert to three tr ains in each direction,
compared with ten wouthward and thirteen nor t hward trains in 1939.
(not counting the twenty-mi nute service formerly pr ovided by the
~lont r eal &Southern Counties elect r i c railway.)
M Another new r ail line is in prospect for northern Quebec. Mat t a­
gami Mines Limited have announced plans to set up a zinc mining
project in the Lake Mattngami area, about 90 mi les north of Amos, Q
ue. It is proposed to establ ish a townsite and ore concentrating
plant near the mine, which will be connectod by road to Amos, and
by rai l to the Bar raute-Chi bougamauline of the C.N.R. near Kiask
Falls or Val Pi che , Que .
~
Briefs presented to the Royal Co~mission on Coal by the ePRand the
CNR reflect the fast-diminishing use of coal. Both lines predicted
the di sappearance of al l locomotive coal by the end of the current
year. Only 60,400 tons of Nova Scot ia coal were sold to Canadian
r ailways in 1959, compared to 1,190,000 t ons i n 1950.
C.R.H.A. Observations-1960 S-12
~-~-~-~-~-~-~-:-:-~-~-~ I
A department of notes and!
news, by Anthony Clegg. I
i
PACIFIC NORTHERN RAILWAY –During the
past mont~, more detailed information
has been released on the proposed
route of the ~Jenl1er-Gren raih1ay into
northern British Columbia, construct­
ion of which is expected to commence
in July of this year. BaSically, it
is the more westerly route of the tHO possiole E;chemes a,s shc,vm on
Map )YAil, page S-ll, March issue, excep0 fnr th(:~ most southern 75 mil
es or so. According to an announcement by Einar Gunderson, a
director of the ~Jenner-Gren company, the rail line will commence
at Summit Lake near Prince George, connecting with the Pacific
GreClt Eastern Railway at that pOint. It will proceed northwester­
ly, roughly parallelling the CNRs Nechako, Telkwa and Bulkley
Subdi~isions but some fifty miles to the north; north of New Haz­
elton, it will meet the western line shmill as a possible route on
JIap i( A II, page S-ll, and veer northvv-ards toward Yukon and Alaska.
Estimates place the cost of the 700-mile project at JI05 million.
According to Vancouver nei.vspapers, IvIr. Gordon of the C.N.R.
is reported to have offered Premier Bennett of B.C., the use of
the Nationals line from Prince George to Hazelton in order to el­
iminate the need for constructing about 250 miles of parallel line
at a cost of some ~30 million. Detailed conditions of the offer
have not been disclosed, but it is believed to include rental of
running rights over the C.N.R. line, which is now not used to any­
thing like full capacity. It is reported that r,lr. Bennett has de­
clined the offer. The company is in the process of being incor­
porated and will be a reality by the end of fIarch. The incorpor­
ation is in the name of the IIPacific Northern Railway Companyrl.
fI. During the past few weeks, the Canadian National has chopped-oo
more trains from its passenger service timetables, the run between
I~ontreal, Nicolet and Victoriaville. This was the 1 ine served by
the noted,IShad Flyer!! during steam days (see News Report Ho. 84,
December 1957) and an erstwhile Railiner run. February 27th, Sat­
urcL::cy, ivas the last day of service.
The
loss of these trains reduces weekday passenger service
bstween Montreal and St. Lambert to three trains in each direction,
compared with ten wouthward and thirteen northward trains in 1939.
(not counting the tltlenty-minute service formerly provided by the
Ivlontreal & Southern Counties electric railway.)
ft Another new rail line is in prospect for northern Quebec. Matta­
gami Mines Limited have announced plans to set up a zinc mlnlng
project in the Lake Mattagami area, about 90 miles north of Amos, Q
ue. It is proposed to establish a townsite and ore concentrating
plant near the mine, which will be connected by road to Amos, and
by rail to the Barraute-Chibougamau line of the C.N.R. near Kiask
Falls or Val Piche, Que.
fI. Briefs presented to the Royal Co~mission on Coal by the ePRand the
CNR reflect the fast-diminishing use of coal. Both lines predicted
the disappearance of all locomotive coal by the end of the current
year. Only 60,400 tons of Nova Scotia coal were sold to Canadian
railways in 1959, compared to 1,190,000 tons in 1950.
5-13
C.R.H.A. Obs er va Hans -1960
:fr The Nat i onal Capital Commd.ss i.on of Ot t awa plans to spend ~2 mi l l ­ion in the
1960-61 federal fiscal year as a st art on the five -ye~r
<~12 , 00 0 , 000 railway re-location and newunion stati on project . The
expenditure wi l l cover necessary railway relocation work to make c
ert ai,n t hat construction of the Queensway wil:: riot. be heLd up in
any way, par t i cularl y in its Bank Str eet railway yard section .
:fr Di eselizati on is coming to the Sydney &. Louisburg Rai Lway Company,
one of the last railways in North America tn operate steam locom­
oti ves exclusi vely. The company, a subsi diar y of Dominion Steel
&Coal Corporati on, has announced that it wil l purchase four die­sel
locomotives within t he next f ew months . A company spokesman s
aid The move is unavoidable as we no longer are able to obtain
sufficient parts for a steamLocomot.Lve;
u The Great Nor t her n Rai lway will abandon its two eveni ng trains
linking Vancouver and Seat t le at the end of the mont h, because of
a shortage of passengers and loss of int ernal U.S. mai l business
to motor tr ansport. The mor ning and mid-daytrains on the Inter­
national streamliner route wi l l continue to oporate.
n­ The Pennsylvania Rai l r oad has joined the Readi ng Company in asking
Pen n sy~van ia stat e authorities t o boost comTIu ~ er far es by twenty­
five per c8nt on li nes serving Philadelphia andthe NewYork Cen­
tr a]. Railroad seeks a one dol l ar per ticket increase on 26-pidd .
tickets. The l at t er part of this n e~s i t em i s inter est ing in that it seems
to indicate a departure fromthe Hcent s per mi le phil o­sophy
of pricing commuter services. Uhile it is a fact that it
cost s 2. Li.t t Le more to transpor t a commut er twenty rm. Les t han to
car ry himt en mi les, it is by no means double the cost .-for int­e
rest and depreciati on on equipment , yard and t cr-mt..naL costs, et c.
are almost as great for the shor t-haul rider at peak periods as f
or t hose whom the t r ains carry to the end of the run.
~
� Not repor ted as an item of news, but merely as a matter of rumour and
sp~culat ion : due to the determined eff or t s of the Bost on and
Maine RR to rid themselves of al l non-RDC passenger ser vice, the
Canadian Nat ional -Central Vermont system and the New Haven Raily
road are consi dering a plan to rout e the through Montreal to New
Yor k trains via the CVs Southern Division through Norwich and New Londo
n, Conn. This would gi ve the CV a much lar ger propor t i on of
the rates, while not reducing the NYNH&Hs mileage. Regular pass­
engor ser vi ce on the Central Vermont s Southern Divisi on has not boon oper ated s
ince the Wor l d War II years, when a gas-elect r i c c
ar provided t he local runs.
CORRECT_IONS – Page S-4. Historians should not put too much faith
in thefirstitemon this page ofthe Febr uar y issue. Whi l e the
announcement isstilltheof ficialwor d from the CPR,steamloc­
omotives have been s oen operating in the Toronto area since the
beginning of the year.
Page S- l l . (Map of new railway lines in Alberta and Quebec ). The map was o
riginally dr-awn to a scale of 1Ii -100 miles, but
the reduct i on necessar y to include it on our 8~ xll II paper r educ­
ed the scale to 200 mi les to the inch. If you ke ep your News
Rep
or t~ for future ref erence, please correct this er r or !
C.R.H.A. Observations-1960
5-13
~ The National Capital Conunission of Ottawa plans to spend $2 mill­
ion in the 1960-61 federal fiscal year as a start on the five-ye~r
,[p12,000,000 railway re-location and new union station project. Tho
expenditure will cover necessary railway relocation worK to mnke
certain that construction of the Queensway will not be Iv~ld up in
any way, particularly in its Bank Street re.ilway yard section.
:U: Dieselization is coming to the Sydney &, Louisburg Railway Company,
one of the last railways in North America to operate steam locom­
otives exclusively. The company, a subsidiary of Dominion Steel
& Coal Corporation, has announced that it will purchase four die­
sel locomotives within the next few months. A company spokesman
said itThe move is unavoidable as we no longer are able to obtain
sufficient parts for a steam locomotive. 17
~ The Great Northern Railway will abandon its two evening trains
linking Vancouver and Seattle at the end of the month, because of
a shortage of passengers and loss of internal U.S. mail business
to motor transport. The morning and mid-day trains on the Inter­
national streamliner route will continue to operate.
k The Pennsylvania Railroad has joined the Reading Company in asking
PennsyItvania state authorities to boost COITllTIuuer fares by tvventy­
five pl~rc(-mt on lines serving Philadelphia and the New York Cen­
tral Railroad seeks a one dollar per ticket iticrcase on 26-Fidd .
tickets. The latter part of this ne~s item is interesting in that
it seems to indicate a departure from the Bcents per mile philo­
sophy of pricing cornmutcr services. Uhile it is a fact that it
costs a little more to transport a commuter tl-renty miles than to
carry him t.en miles, it is by no means double the cost ~~ foT int­
erest and depreciation on equipment, yard and tcrm~ .. Eal costs, etc.
are almost as great for the short-haul rider at peak periods as
for those whom the trains carry to the end of the run.
:U: Not reported as an item of news, but merely as a matter of rumour
and spE:.culation: due to the determined efforts of the Boston and
Maine RH to rid themselves of all non-RDC passenger service, the
Canadian National -Central Vermont system and the New Haven Raily
road are considering a plan to route the through Montreal to New
York trains via the CVs Southern Division through Norwich and New
London, Conn. This would give the CV a much larger proportion of
the; rates, while not reducing the NYNH&Hs mileage. Regular pass­
enger service on the Central Vermonts Southern Division hns not
been operated since the Ii/orld War II years, IIIThen a gas-electric
car provided the local runs.
CORRECTIONS -Page S-4. Historians should not put too much faith
inthe first item on this page of the February issue. While the
announcement is still the official word from the CPR, steam loc­
omotives have been seen operating in the Toronto area since the
boginning of the year.
Page S-ll. (Map of new railway lines in Alberta and Quebec).
The m2..p was originally dr,:=:.wn to a scale of l -100 miles, but
the reduction necessary to include it on our 8~xlliT paper reduc­
ed the scale to 200 miles to the inch. If you keep your News
Report~ for future reference, please correct this error~
S-14
C.R.B.A.
Observations-1960
U Opposition appears to be gr owi ng in western Canada as a result of
(
the CPRs announced intention t o discontinue t he Portage-la-Prair­ie –
Saskat oon -Wetaskiwi n passenger run, trains 41 and 42. vJ.O. Srnythe , a Wi l
kie pa~~er who repr esent 8d several cent r al Saskat ch­ewan
towns at the Board s hearings on the application, said that
he wil l make represent at ions through his member of par l iament to
the Federal Cabi net, asking them to suspend an or der of the Boa.r d
of Transport Commissi oners al l OWing CPRto halt the passenger and
express service. The Ci t y of Saskatoon wi l l urge the CPR to re­rou
te one of the CPRs transcontinent al passenger trains fromthe
o.in line to the company s line bet.ween Por tage-Ia-Prai ri e, Man. ,
and Wet askiwin, Al t a.
. ­
The Board order pcrmdtt Lng the r-ai.Lway to drop the two trains
i s ef fe ct i ve April 24th or 45 days af ter the CPR has post ed not i ce
at al l stations on the line.
1I.­ ThGGerman-bui l t ddese.l, locomot i ves ordered by two rai lways in the Un
ited States –(r epor t ed in News R8 po~t No .l 07) –wi l l be going int o s
ervice on the Rio Grande and Southern Paci fi c lines.
* A,plan to merge tho Minneapol is, St . Paul &Sault Ste. Marie (the
1$ 00 Line II) , the Hsconsi n Central , and the Dulut h, Sout h Shore &
At lant i c railroads has been approved by direct ors of the li nes in­
volved Qnd now Qwaits ratification by shareholders and the I.C.C. I
hc new, 4800-mi le railway woul d be known as the Soo Li ne Hailway
Company, in which the Canadi an Pacific would have a majority of
sto ck . CPR control s al l three lines at pr esent , and owns the DSS&A out
right. Purpose of the merger would be an estimated ann­u
al saving of one and a quarter mi ll ion dol lars.
M OnMar ch 5th, Soo Line tr ains 7 and 8, runni ng between Mi nneapol i s and St . Paul , and Sault
Ste. Marie, Mi chigan, were discontin­ue
d, thus ending passenger conn ections by rai l between the United
States and Canada via the Soo. CPRsti l l operates passenger
service fromthe Ontario side to the CPR mainline at Sudbury.
~
� In May, 1959, the Board of Tr ansport Commissioners ordered the C
anadian rai lways to place reflective markings on al l new boxcars p
urchased and on an equal number of ol der cars when overhaul ed. D
uring the latter part ofthe year , the CPRmarked 3,000 cars wh
ile the CNR mar ked 696. The Board has now order ed that dur ing 196
0, each road must mar k 3,000 units, new or ol d.
M The sale of Empire Freightways, Limi ted, to the Canadian National R
ailways was neither confirmed nor denied by J.F.Fraser, president
of the trucking company, at a press interview recently. The CPR al r
eady hasa subst antial interest in trucki ngf:irms across Canada.
Now it appears that the CNR also, out of sel f -defene;e is gett ing int o
the highway tr anspor t business. The CNR has confirmed, how­
ever, that it has it s sights set on purchasing Mi dland Superior
Lxpress Company LDnited, of Calgary, as wel l as other trucki ng comp
ani.es in wostern Canada.
n A nGWsi gnal syst em —and one believed to be unique for railway
use —is now in oper ati on on the Canadian Nat ional line acr oss
Victoria Br idge . Due t o t he r econstruction and r epl acement of se­
veral spans of this mile-long bridge, it was necessary to place
C.R.H •. :1-.
Observations-1960 5-14
u Opposition appears to be growing in western Canado. as a result of
the CPRs announced intention to discontinue the Portage-In-Prair­
ie -Saskatoon -Wetaskiwin passenger run, trains 41 and 42. W.O.
Smythe, a Wilkie paillYer who represent0d several central Saskatch­
ewan towns at the Boards hearings on the application, said that
he will make represontations through his member of parliament to
the Federal Cabinet, asking them to suspend an order of the Doa~d
of TrclDsport Commissioners allowing CPR to ho.lt the passenger and
express service. The City of So.skatoon will urge the CPR to re­
route one of the CPRs transcontinental passonger trains from the
IJ,,in line to the company I s line between Portage-la-Prairie, Man.,
and Wetaskiwin, Alto..
, –
The Boo.rd order pcrnitting the rc:.i1wo.y to drop the two trains
is effective April 24th or 45 days after the CPR has posted notice
at all stations on the line.
tI. The German-built diesE;l locomotives ordered by two railways in the
United States –(reported in News Report No.107) –will be going
into service on tho Rio Grande and Southern Pacific lines.
* A,plan to merge the Minneapolis, St. Paul & Sault Stet Marie (the
1$00 Line j!) , the Jisconsin Central, and the Duluth, South Shore &
Atlantic railroads has been approved by directors of the lines in­
volved and now awaits ratification by shareholders and the I.C.C.
lbo new, 4800-mile railway would be known as the Soo Line Railway
Company, in which the Canadian Pacific would have a majority of
stock. CPR controls all three lines at present, and owns the
DSS&A outright. Purpose of the merger would be an estimated ann­
ual saving of one and a quarter million dollars.
* On March 5th, Soo Line trains 7 and 8, running between Minneapolis
and St. Paul, and Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, were discontin­
ued, thus ending passenger connections by rail between the United
States and Canada via the Soo. CPH still operates passenger
service from the Ontario side to the CPR main line at Sudbury.
t In May, 1959, the Board of Transport Commissioners ordered the
Canadian railways to place reflective markings on all new boxcars
purchased and on an equal number of older cars when overhauled.
During the latter part of the year, the CPR marked 3,000 cars
while the CNR marked 696. The Board has now ordered that during
1960, each road must mark 3,000 units, new or old.
~ The sale of Empire Freightways, Limited, to the Canadian National
Railways was neither confirmed nor denied by J.F.Fraser, president
of the trucking company, at a press interview recently. The CPR
already has a substantial interest in trucking f:iJ.~ms across Canada.
NOVJ it appears that the CNH also, out of self-defene;e is getting
into the high-,vay transport busines s. The CNR has confirmed, how­ever,
that it has its sights set on purchaSing Midland Superior
Express Company Llinited, of Calgary, as well as other trucking
CO~lp.:~nies in western Canada.
t A new Signal system -and one believed to be unique for railway
use -is now in operation on the Canadinn National line across
Victoria Bridge. Due to the reconstruction and replacement of se­
veral spans of this mile-long bridge, it was necessary to place
C.H.H.A. Observations-2960 Page 8-15
heavy steel gi r der s between the two tracks on the bridge, limiting
clearances to only ni ne inches. Three- quar t er s of a foot is a
tight clearance at the best oftimes,nine inches from a temporary­
(
placed steel girder on a main ar ter y like Victoria Br idge borders
on the precarious. But that was al l the space available. So to
forestall any unfor-t unat.e incident under the ci r-cumst.ances, spec­
ial signs have been installec act i vat8d by electric eyes placed on
the bridge at the new clearance Lu.ri.ts and beamed upwards. Any
object extending beyond the 9;1 lililit aut.omat. Lcal. Ly cuts the beam
and trips the special signals. These consist of neon signs, spel­
ling out the word S TOP, which light up when act i vated by one of
the det ect i ng instruments. If this happens, the despatcher and
signal maintai ner s are alerted and the tr ain must be compl etely
inspected before tho illuminated STOP signs may be passed. It has
happened once or twice; a bad-order car with bulging sides has
tripped the mBchani sm at least once, while on another occasion a
firemans arm extending beyond the cab window has thrown the pre­
cautionary system into effect .
One s
et of the elect r i c eye det ect or s arc placed on both sides of
bot h tr acks at both ends of the bridge, whi le another set are
pl~ccd closer to the work ar ea . The neon signs are placed at very
frequent intervals acr oss the Br idge , sirnalling both east and
west tracks in either direction.
t A new design of rail car, t ho Alcan Tank Hooper Car, has been or­
der ed by two Canadian railways, the Canadian National Railways and
the Rober val-Saguenay Rai lway. The design of tt is al umi num car
was developed by Al uminum Company of Canada Limited engineers wor­
king wi th the mechanical and research depar-tment-s of the Clm. The
prototype cars, looking somewhat like a gigant i c sausage wrapped
in foil, will be oper ated in their unpainted condition. They wil l
be abl e to carry ten tons more payload than existing standard hop­
per cars, will be easier to unload and with fow except i ons , will
be suitable for all products now handled in covered hoppers.
They will, in addi t i on, be suitable for certain special loadings
for which protective linings are required in conventional cars.
Specifi cat i ons of the Alcan Tank-Hopper car are as follows: gr oss w
eight, 210,000 Ibs; light weight 31,000 (coQpared wi t h 51,000 Ibs
for the equi valent in a steel cQr); capacity 179,000 Ibs.; cubic
capacity 3,000 cu. ft.
i The Canadian Pacific llai lway has orderod 300 70-ton flatcars, 53 fe
et six inches in length, 100 of them oquipped with end bulkheads.
The order for this rolling stock has boen placed wi t h Dominion
Steol &Coal Corporation, Trent on, Nova Scot ia.
t I~t0r 0 st i ng Canadian railway statistics from the Ontario Govern­
menti s brief to the Royal Commission on Transportation:
Revenue Freight per head of population -(1918) 15.72 tons.
(1943)
15.01 n
(1958)
10.20 il
Passengers per head of population -(1913) 6.14 passengers
(1958) 1.25 i!
C.H.H.A. Ogservations-2960 Page 3-15
heavy steel girders between the two tracks on the bridge, limiting
clearances to only nine inches. Three-quarters of a foot is a
tight clearance at the best of times,nine inches from a temporary­
placed steel girder on a main artery like Victoria Bridge borders
on the precarious. But that was all the space available. So to
forestall any unfortu..1ate incident under the circw-llstances, spec­
ial signs have been instal18~ activat8d by electric eyes placed on
the bridge at the new clearance LLuits and beamed upwards. Any
object extending beyond the 9
i1
liii1it automatically cuts the be,2m
and trips the special signals. These consist of neon signs, spel-
ling out the word S TOP, which light up when activated by one of
the detecting instruments. If this happens, the despatcher and
signal maintainers are alerted and the trclin must be completely
inspect8d before the illuminated STOP signs may be passed. It has
happened once or twice; a bad-order car with bulging sides has
tripped the mechanism at least once, while on another occasion a
firemans arm extending beyond the cab window has thrown the pre­
cautionary system into effect.
One set of the electric eye detectors are placed on both sides of
both tracks at both ends of the bridge, while another set are
placed closer to the work area. The neon signs are placed at very
frequent intervals across the Bridge, sirnalling both east and
west tracks in either direction.
t A new design of rail car, the Alean Tank Hooper Car, has been or­
dered by two Canadian railways, the Canadian National Railways and
the Hoberval-Sagucnay Rc::tihIay. The design of tr. is aluminum car
was developed by Aluminum Company of Canada Limited cn~ineers wor­
king with the mechanical and research departments of the CHR. The
prototype cars, looking somewhat like a gigantic sausage wrapped
in foil, will be operated in their unpainted condition. They will
be able to carry ten tons more payload than existing standard hop­
per cars, will be easier to unload and with few exceptions, will
be suitable for all products now handled in covered hoppers.
rhey will, in addition, be suitable for certain special loadings
for which protective linings are required in conventional cars.
Specifications of the Alccm Tank-Hopper car are as follows: gross
weight, 210,000 Ibs; light weight 31,000 (compared with 51,000 Ibs
for the equivalent in a steel car); capacity 179,000 Ibs.; cubic
capacity 3,000 cu. ft.
t The Canadian Pacific dailway has ordered 300 70-ton flatcars, 53
feet six inches in length, 100 of them equipped with end bulkheads.
The order for this rolling stock has been placed with Dominion
Steel & Coal Corporation, Trenton, Nova Scotia.
tI. I~1terc!sting Canadian railway statistics from the Ontario Govern­
rnunt i s brief to the Royal Commission on Transportation:
Revenue Freight per head of population -(1918) 15.72 tons.
(1943) 15.01 n
(1958) 10.20 il
Passengers per head of population -(1913)
(1958)
6.14 passengers
1.25 11
C.H.H. A. Observations-1960 Page 3-16
fl Britain –birthplace of the first atcam locomotive –has turned
out its last Hiron horse

Appropriately named dEvening Stari/, the
engine pulled out of the Wester n Region!s 10co80tive shops at Swi ­
ndon on Mar-ch 18th, near the building whi.ch houses Nor-t.h Star ,
one of the earliest Great Western engines dating back 120 years.
iJ:. Th8 engi ne , No.92220, a Class i1FiI 2-10-0, is to be 2ssigned to t.he 1es
tern Regi on, B.R. During the course of CCJ:oE10nies mar ki ng the)
delivery of this engine, an official promised that No . 92220 woul.d
never face the scrap-yard. As it was being pl aced in service, the en
gine had al r eady been earmarked for preser vation in one of the
several British railway museums . No.92220 is the last of thousands
upon thousands of steam locomotives which h:J.ve oper2ted over the
railw2ys of Britain, starting at the beginning of the Nineteenth
Centur y when Trevithick introduced the first successful rai,lway
steam locomotive at Pen-y-daran, Cornwall. In comparatively rec­
Gnt years, some 20,000 steam locomotives were at work on the rail­
ways of Britain, but these have dwindled to a present-day figure
given as 14,231 steam locomotives. There are 484 main-line die­
sels. In three years, the steam locomotive figure will have been h
alved to 7,000. To replace the steam locomotives, British Rail­
ways have embarked on an extensive dieselization and electrific­
ation plan, and twenty years from now there wi l l be only diesels
and electric trains in operation. By 1980, Evening Star
ii
will
have taken its place in history, beside Nor-t.h Starn and other
famous locomotives in Britains railway museums .
iJ:. In June of this year, the railways of the Union of South Africa
will celebrate their centenary, one hundr ed years havi ng elapsed
since the opening of the first two-mile section of the Natal Rai l ­way Company
Limited. This railway was author i zed in 1859, and the
initial section, between Durban and t he POint, opened on June 26t h 1
860. Simultaneously, a longer r-af.Lway in the then-neighbouring
colony of Cape of Good Hope was in the course of construction;
thi s was the Cape Town, Uel l i ngt on &Docks Hai l way Company Limited ex
tendi ng 57 miles from Cape Town to Jell ingt on. The C.T.W.& D.Ry.
opened in 1862, formed the nucleus of t he Cape Government Railways
in 1873, while t he Natal line was t akon over by the Natal Govern­
ment in 1877. ItailVJay extens i ons went on rapidl y and in 1897, the
firstlink was opened wi t h Rhodesia when the railway from CapeTo~TI
thr ough to Bulawayo was completed. Upon the union of thu colonies
of t he Cape, Natal, Transvaal and Orange River in 1910, the pres­
ent South African Railways & Harbours system was formed.
t­ The possibility that a tunnel will be constructed under the Eng­
lish Channel from Engl and to France is reported once again to be
qui te strong in England. The British Cabinet is awai t i ng the re­
port of a study group on this project, the Government having ind­
icated its appr oval , in principle, of such a tunnel. The tunnel
presont l y envi si oned would be limited to rail traffic, and is ex­
pected to cost some £100,000,000. It is thought that much of the
traffic will be pf.ggyback trucks and automobilos, as well as
passengers. Railway interchange goods traffic between ~n gl an d and
the Continent is also increasing. fhis traffic is presently sub­
ject to the vagaries of the weather, espocial l y in Winter, while a
tunnel woul d eliminate this factor and pormit of a high density of
traffic on a year-round basis.
c.n.H.A. Observations-1960 Page S-16
fl Britain –birthplace of the first st.e.::un locomotive –has turned
out its last iron horse
H•
Appropriately named Evening Staril, the
engine pulled out of the Western Region!s 10co80tive shops at Swi­
ndon on lI:1arch 18th, near the building vlhich houses ilNorth Star?!,
one of the earliest Great Western engines dating back 120 years.
Y:. The engine, No.92220, a Class ilFl1 2-10-0, is to be assigned to the
I:!estern Region, B. R. During the course of C8:i:Gillonies marking th(~
delive:r;-y of this engine, an official promised that No. 92220 would
never face the scrap-yard. As it was being placed in service, the
engine had already been earmarked for preservation in one of the
several British railway museums. No.92220 is the last of thousands
upon thousands of steam locomotives which helve operated over the
railways of Britain, starting at the beginning of the Nineteenth
Contury when Trevithick introduced the first successful rai;Lwo.y
steam locomotive at Pen-y-daran, Cornwall. In comparatively rec­
Gnt YGClrS, some 20,000 steam locomotives were at work on the rail­
ways of Britain, but these have dwindled to a present-day figure
given as 14,231 steam locomotives. There are 484 main-line die­
sels. In three years, the steam locomotive figure will have been
halved to 7,000. To replace the steam locomotives, British Rail­
ways have embarked on an extensive dieselization and electrific­
ation plan, and twenty years from now there will be only diesels
and electric trains in operation. By 19[50, Evening Star
ii
will
have taken its place in history, beside ilNorth Starn C..nd other
famous locomotives in Britains railway museums.
Y:. In June of this year, the railvJays of the Union of South Africa
will celebrate their centenary, one hundred years having elapsed
since the opening of the first two-mile section of the Natal Rail­
way Company L:Lllited. This railway vJclS authorized in 1859, and the
initial section, between Durban and the POint, opened on June 26th
1860. Simultaneously, a longer raih,!ay in the then-neighbouring
colony of Cape of Good Hope was in the course of construction;
this was the Cape Town, Jellington & Docks Hailway Company Limited
extending 57 miles from Cape Town to Ih:llington. The C.T.W.& D.Ry.
opened in 1862, formed the nucleus of the Co.pe Government Hailways
in 1873, while the Natal line VIas tnken over by the Natal Govern­
ment in 1877. Hailway exteBsions went on rapidly and in 1897, the
first link was opened with Rhodesia when the railway from CapeTo~n
through to Bulnwayo was completed. Upon the union of thQ colonies
of the Cape, Natal, Transvaal and Orange River in 1910, the pres­
ent South African Railways & Harbours system was forraed.
Y:. The possibility that a tunnel will be constructed under the Eng­
lish Chnnnel from England to France is reported once again to be
quite strong in England. The British Cabinet is awaiting the re­
port of 0. study group on this project, the Government having ind­
i.cated its approval, in principle, of such a tunnel. The tunnel
presontly envisioned would be limited to rail traffic, and is ex­
pected to cost some £100,000,000. It is thought that much of the
traffic will be dpiggybackll trucks and automobiles, as well as
passengers. Railvmy interchange goods traffic between ICngland and
the Continent is also increasing. fhis traffic is presently sub­
ject to the vagaries of the weather, especially in Winter, while a
tunnel would eliminate this factor and permit of a high density of
traffic on a year-round basis.
C•.tt.H .. Observations-1960 Page S-17
il. TOrWNTO DEVELOPMENTS – The City of Toronto is to be gi ven a 6200
(
series Northern Type steam locomot ive by the Cana dIan Nat i onal
Railvays. The railway will givG nna pay al l costs of moving the
350-ton, 100-foot locomotive to the si t e selected by the City aut ­
horities. The Upper Canada H.:J.ilw<.lY Societ y has of f ered to keep
the locomotive clean, vn1ile th~ Young Mens Canadian Club may pay
part of the cost of mount i ngit. I1:J.ny sites have been consf.do red
by the muni cipal offLci.a.Ls , but it now appear-s that the [,lO E,t 1.5
i
.( o­ly
location will be on a floodlit stretch of track lai d d G ~~l at
the C.N. Exhibi t ion Grounds near the ,St anl.:;v Bar-racks, Locomot f.ve
6213, class U-2-g, built by Mont real Locomoti ve ~fork s in August ,
1942, has been select ed by a comnu.t.tce of the Upper Canada Rai Lway
Societ y headed by Mr . Jim Br-own , on behalf of the Toronto Board of
Control.
*Now, after Dany meet i ngs and much bicker i ng , it appears that con­
struction of the Nat ional Rai l ways new Toronto by-pass li ne has
beon given t he clear signal . The proposed t went y-five mile line
through Pickering, Markham o.nd Vaughan Townships, plans for which wo
re announced ear l y in 1959, has since been bogged down by a ser ­i es
of cLai.us and count er-ccLalms, and numcr-ous alternative schomcs we
re advanced by t hose vIho opposed the original layout. It woul d s
Lom, however, that there are no major di f f er ences between the
scheme as originally publ i ci zed and that r ecently approved by the
IlLt r opol i t an Planning Boar d .
The new r
ailway line (des cribed in the News Repor t for April 1959)
will leave tho present Oshawa Subdivi sion of the CNR noar Pi cker­
ing, Orrt , , swing northwest t.hrough Dunbart.on, pass by Thornhill
and Woodbr idge, andjoin thG Systems Br2Dpton Jubdivision betwoon
MaLt on and Brampt .on, Just west of t he p;)int ~!here the new line wi l l
cross the Nel~ark c t Subdivision, n new and modern freight cl as
sif i cation yard wi l l be construct ed. A more nor t herly alter­
nati ve pl an f or tho raf.Lway b e tvk(~ n Pickering and Hichmond Hi l l
VJQS advocated by a number: of muni ci.paL author i t ies and Citizens
Groups, but di d not have sufficiGnt advant ages over the CNR prop­os
al to influence the Board. I~ was claimed t hat a route through
tho Second Concess ion of Picker i ng Twp. would avoid disturbing the
r-csLdcnt.LaL devel opment of Dunbcr-t.on and Picker i ng Vi l l age, but
the: elm countered that t he r out e woul d be l~ mi les +onger and
Vl0 UlJ. cost an extra;ii2 mi l l ion, requ.i.r-Lng relocating part of Duf ­
fins Creek. Consequently, construction of the originally-pr oject­
ed :ine wi l l commence as Boon as possi ble.
In
addi t ion to providing the Toronto area with a new by-pass line a
nd a moder n freight marshal l i ng y~rd , it i s hopod by certain aut ­
hori t il:s that use of the route wi l l al low an augli18nted local pass­
enger service on the present railway lines to the Union Station in
the heart of the City. One Toronto newspaper envisions fast die­
sel -electric trains operat i ng atfrequent headways from Hami l t on
to Oshawa , Rai.Lway spoke smen have dccLar-cd this commut.er-scheme to be impr
acticable, but it would be more correct to say unremun­e
rat i ve, for local train oper~ t ion i n other par t s of the world
proves that it can be done if profi ts were sufficient l y ent i ci ng.
However , the r-aI Iways experience: in Toronto indicates otherwi s e. (Sec
Nows Repor t for December 1954, Ltem on tlTho Commuters11)•
NEXT MONTH: Amap of exi st i ng and proposed lines in Toronto Clretl.
c
c. B.. H Observations-1960 Page S-17
fl. TOnONTO DEVELOPMENTS -The City of Toronto is to be given a 6200
series Northern Type steam locomotive by the Canadian National
RailJaYs. The railway will give o,nd pny all costs of mov.ing the
350-ton, 100-foot locomotive to the site selected by the City aut­
horities. The Upper Canada R.:J.ilway Society has offered to keep
the locomotive clean, lhile th~ Young Mens Canadian Club may pay
part of the cost of Dounting it. Ibny sites have becm consideied
by the municipal offici,qls, but it now appears that the raOE; t l.:i.i.(,8-
ly location will be on n floodlit stretch of track laid dGV~l at
the C.N. Exhibition Grounds near the StaJJ_Ljv Barracks. Locomottve
6213, class U-2-g, built by I·10ntroal Locomotive ~Jorks in August,
1942, has been se18cted by a cOlnmittee of the Upper Canada Hailvvay
Society headed by Mr. Jim Brm-vD, on behalf of the Toronto Board of
Control.
1r now, <-lfter Dany meetings and much bickering, it appears that con­
struction of the National Railways new Toronto by-pass line has
heen given the clear signal. The proposed twenty-five mile line
through Pickering, Mt.-1.rkham and Vaughan Townships, plans for which
were announced early in 1959, has since been bogged down by a ser­
ios of clair;ls c..nd counter-clc:.ims, and nt..lmc;rous alternative schemes
were advanced by those who opposed tll.o original layout. It would
sLem, however, that there are no major differences between the
sehome as originally publicized and that recently approved by the
=lLtropolitan Planning Board.
The new railway line (described in the News Report for April 1959)
will leQve the present OshavTa Subdivision of the CNR near Pickc3r­
ing, Ont., swing northwest throu[h Dll.nb.::trton, pass by Thornhill
and Woodbridge, andjoin the Systems B~2Dp~on Jubdivision between r
1.;11ton and Brampton. Just west of the point where the now line w
ill crosS the Nomarkat SubdiviSion, n new and oodern freight
classification yard will be constructed. A more northerly alter­
native plan for the railway betVken Pick(~ring a.Y:ld Richmond Hill
was advocnted by a l1UJiiber of municipal authorities c::md Citizens
Groups, but did not have sufficient advantaees over the CNH prop­
osal to influence the Bonrd. It JE1.S clnimed that a route through
the Second Concession of Pickering Twp. would avoid disturbing the
rc..si::icmtial development of Dunb::~rton and Pickering Village, but
the CUR countered that the route would be l~ miles +onger and
wouli cost an extra iii 2 million, requiring relocating part of Duf­
fins Creek. Consequently, construction of the originally-project­
ed. 2.ine v:ill cor;1flwnco as soon as possible.
In addition to providing the Toronto nrea with a new by-pass line a
nd a modern freight marshalling yard, it is hoped by certain aut­
horitius that use of the route will allow an augmented local pnss­
enger service on the present railway lines to the Union Station in
the heart of the City. One Toronto newspaper envisions fast die­
sel-electric trains operating at frequent headways from Hamilton
to Oshavva. I-bilway spOkeSf:18n have declared this ilcommuter scheme!
to be impracticable, but it would be Elore correct to say unremun­
erative, for local train oper~tion in other parts of the world
proves that it can be done if profits were sufficiently enticing.
However, the railways experienc!2 in Toronto indicates otherwise.
(See Nows Report for December 1954, itelil ol1,lThe Commuters 11) •
NEXT MONTH: A map of existing and proposed lines in Toronto aren.

Demande en ligne