Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 108 1960

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 108 1960

crha ews
Report
P.O. BOX 22.
STATION ··B
MONTREAL 2 . QUEBEC
NUMBER 108
FEBRUARY
1960
***

( ROCKY MOUNTAINS NARROW GAUGE – A gasoline car of the Can­
adian
Pacifics Lake Louise Tramway, is pictured leaving the upper
terminal at the Chateau Lake Louise, in Alberta, for its 3.6l-mile
run down to the Canadian
Pacific Railway station, 800 feet lower in
altitude. The car was built at C.P.R. Angus Shops in 1925.
Photo Canadian Pacific Railway.
(
crha
ews Report
P.O. BOX 22.
STATION B
MONTREAL 2. QUEBEC
NUMBER 1 0 8
***
FEBRUARY 1960
ROCKY MOUNTAINS NARROW GAUGE – A gasoline car
of the Can­
adian Pacifics Lake Louise Tramway, is pictured leaving the upper
terminal at the Chateau Lake Louise, in Alberta, for its 3.6l-mile
run down to the Canadian Pacific Railway station, 800 feet lower in
altitude. The car was built at C.P.R. Angus Shops in 1925.
Photo Canadian Pacific Railway.
….,
c.
R.~..~ .d..-…..
N ews Repor t ~ 19LO flG-6£ 10
~~~~: .~~~
NOTICE OF .EETING:
The Regular Monthl y .l1e eting of the Cana.di a n Railroad
HistoricalAssociation will be held at the Hef~p ::i i:h ~_Y:<{,;:~ :rY J M~G iU Urriv ers itv, on
Wednesday, F e b r ua r y 10th, 1960, a t 8:l5 P ~·.L 1 J·e· l,,:, ,~n ,b :2 rs :nd ot,;er v : ::: ~t; :·T .s
will be the gues t s ofMr.Richard Permington, L;Lc0.r1:u., wlxo wiI: 51, ( ;/1 :-r e L:-:)::-,a ­
rys collection of railway books. This shouId be a very ir.tei es t in g m.E {; t.; _.., ~; a: d
allrnem ber s areurged tornake every effor t toa t tend, As usu al, guests VJiLt be
given a co r di al wel corne ,
Ent er i
ng McGill campus from Sherbrooke St re et thr ough the Roddick Gh;5 ~
theRedpathLibrar yis thebuilding ontheleftat the head.ofthe cen len roa d. arid
sid ewalk. Mr . StephenCheasley willbe attheout s irle dq c;r, toreceiveanddi rect
those att ending the rne e t ing, Those inte r ested i:rl i:tr,vb g th eir nam es propos ed for
mcm.b
ership should also rnerition this fact to Mr, Ch.ca sley, who is th e Cha i r m a.n
ofthe .LJlernber s hipCom m ittee ,and whowillar rangeto ~av e t he ir n am es pr opos ed.
:..;:c~:( *~ >:-: :.:: >::
THE ANNUAL ME~ E.TING nty, due to the en e r ge ti c effor ts of the new
—-_._————­
The Ann ual General Meeting ofthe rnerrrbers hip cornmittee, whilethe Roi I>
Canadian F.qilroad Historical Associati­way Division reported that rollin g stcck
on was held on January 13th, 1960. Rep ­as at December 31st , 1959, totalled two
orts of 1959 activities were given by the stearn loc om otives, one electri c locomo­
President, the Vice-President in his cap­tive, one railwa y official car, two elec­
acity as LibrarianandCustodian, the Tr­tric interur ban cars, one elect r i c subur>
easurer, the S ecretary, and the chairmen ban ca r, arid five electri c streetcars. Out­
of the Trip, Publicity, Membership and of-poc ket expe nse of the R r-Llway D ivision
Editorial committees, as well as the Ra­for pur chase, movern ent,and rnai ritenen c e
ilwayDivision. of rolE ng stock arnount ed to approxi mat>
Inhiscomments as President, Dr. ely $2, 2.00.00
Nicholls reviewed the notable progress
which characterized our activities in FolJ.owing the re ading of reports , the
1959, dwelling briefly on the work of se> rneeti ng prc ce cded to the election of (.1£­
ruring a site for the museum; he gav e i cers, The r4orr.ina ting Commit:tee s sl­
anoutline ofthevariousimportantstag­atewas rea-I, and t her e being no further
es attained during the year, lending em ­norrrinati on s f rorn the rnerrrber shi p or the
phas is to the Canadian Pacific Ra i Iway s floor, the IoIIow ing officers were declar­
offer of coopera tion in connection with ed as ele c ted for 1960:
the museum exhibits . PRESID E:N T: Dr . R.V.V . Nicholls,
The Treasurcr s report, which was VICE.-PRE SIDENT: Snnbor n S. Wo r t hen ,
auditedby MrsCbar les Via.u, C.A.,show­TREASUR.ER: i.StephenW.iIbr i dge ,
ed a
total revenue of $7,875.44 for 1959, SECRETARY: C.W.Kenneth Heard,
and total expenditures of $7,184.06, leav­DIHECTORS: R.G. Har r i e s ,
ing a balance of $691.38 which was tra­Orner S.A. Lavallee,
nsferred to surplus ac count . As a matter John Marjor i ba.nks , Jr.,
ofinteresttoourreaders, theEditorial Lo rneC.Perry.
Co mmittee s News Report budget had a Mr. Marjoribanks replaced Mr. William
deficit of $150.68, which supports your Pharoah, who r e linqui shed his duties due
Editors continuing appeal for new subs­to being appoint ed a Tr avellin g Auditor /
cribers to offsetthis expen s e , and to en ­by Cana dian N::>ticmal Railways , by w hom
(
able improvernents to be madein thepub­he has been em.ployed since graciuc.t hm.
lication without increasing subscription n e c e s s i ta t icg a l rno s t co r.tirruous abse n c e
fees. The cooperation ofall members and f r orn Id ,l C.tHcal.. ~:!T r P h8.:::02 h s e{f _ : ~5
subscribers is invited. Reports of other in hand liog m.uch of ric e corros poridsn …·.e
committeesbroughtoutthefactthatnew duringhls te:ln OYltheEE:ecutive, W2r e
regular members since June totalled twe-ppld ata auc c tileme e.t m g ,
(
New s R e It01 t -19.[. O _____________ –I;-.–;-.-..c6…::£::… _1~O
The Regular Monthly .I1eeting of the C;:)ll3.dian Railroad
Historical Association will be held at the Hef~p::il;h >:!::(2.J:Y, Jv1(GiU Univers~.ty, on
Wednesday, Febru8ry 10th, 1960, at 8:l5 p~,/i.. J ip l:,,.o;n-:l.-;ers :wd ot::er v::::~f;;:-r.s
will be the guests of Mr. Richard PennillgtO!l, L:b:c~.ri:H_, whD ..ill 51,,1:; :-r.e L.;)::-a.­
ry s collection of railway books. This sho~ld be R very ir;te::: cEiting m.ed.; _1 ~ aal
I3.ll1uembers are urged to {nake every effort to Clttend. As usual, guests vlE be
given a cordinl welco{ne.
Entering McGill campus from Sherbrooke Street through the Roddick G3t~s~
the Redpath LibrCl ry is the building on the left at the head. of the cenLeJ! road. ::tnd
sidewalk. Mr. Stephen Cheasley will be at the oatsir1c: ~lq::;r, to receive and direct
those attending the meeting. Those interested i:!lrl.lvi!lg their names prc1posed for
mcm.bership should also rnention this fact to 1vlr. Cheasley, who is the Chairman
of the ivlernbership Committee, and who will arrange to ~ave their n3.mes proposed.
THE ANNUAL MEETING
The Annual General Meeting of the
Canadian fi.qilroad Historical Associati­
on was held on January 13th, 1960. Rep­
orts of 1959 activities were given by the
President, the Vice-President in his cap­
acity as Librarian and Custodian, the Tr­
easurer, the Secretary, and the chairmen
of the Trip, Publicity. Membership and
Editorial committees, as well as the Ra­
ilway Division.
In his comments as President, Dr.
Nicholls reviewed the notable progress
which characterized our activities in
1959, dwelling briefly on the work of se­
ruring a site for the museUITI; he gave
an outline of the various important stag­
es attained during the year, lending CITI­
phasis to the Canadian P;:.cific R8ilway s
offer of cooperRtion in connection with
the museum exhibits.
The Trer-tsurer s report, which was
audited by Mr.Charles Viau, C.A., show­
ed a total revenue of $7,875.44 for 1959,
and total expenditures of $7,184.06, leav­
ing a balance of $ 691.38 which was tra­
nsferred to surplus account. As a matter
of interest to our readers, the Editorial
Co mITIittee s News Report budget had a
deficit of $ 150.68, which supports your
Editors continuing appeal for new subs­
cribers to offset this expense, and to en­
able improvements to be made in the pub­
lication without increasing subscription
fees. The cooperation of all members ;md
subscribers is invited. Reports of other
committees brought out the fact that new
regular members since June totalled twe-
nty, due to the energetjc efforts of the new
mernbership c way Division :;:epo:::-ted that rolling st::ldc
as at Decenlber 31st, 1959, totalled two
steam locomotives, one electric locomo­
tive, one railway official car, two elec­
tric interurban cars, one electric su(.u.r­
ban car, and five electric streetcars. Out­
of-pocket expense of the R,-ilway Division
for purc:hase, movernent,and mainter.. of rolhng stock arnounted to approxirnat­
ely $ 2,2.00.00
Following the reading of reports, the
~TIeeting r·roo~cded to the election of (off­
icers. The J~orr.inating Commit;tee s sl­
ate was re8
r
J., and ttwre being no further
nOlYlina.ti011s h-OLD t!.1e nlernbership or the
floor, the fullowing officers were declar­
ed as elected for 1960:
PRESIDENT: Dr. R.V.V. Nicholls,
VICE.-PRESIDENT: S~.nborn S. Worthen,
TREASUHER: A.Stephen W..l.lbridge,
SECRETARY: C.W.Kenneth Heard,
DIRECTORS: R.G. Harries,
Orner S.A. Lavallee,
John M;:,rjoribanks, Jr.,
Lorne C. Perry.
Mr. Marjoribanks replaced Mr. William
Pharoah, who reEnquished his duties due
to being appc.inh::rl a Travelling Auditnr
by Canadi.a.n N ro-::ional Railways, by whom
he has beEn erni)loyed since graduc.tiun,
necessitcd;Llg alrn,jst COT.lh!.lUOUS abs42~lce
from J/L()!ltreal. ~/1_Tr }..)h:::t:;:-08!1 s ~ff~_,·~t5
in handli.r.g iTIuch of t1:.e correspendS;:::-·.e
during .hIs te~ln ort th_E Executive, were
applauccJ ;j.t the rnetting.
1 , , I. ,
C.R.H.A. News ReE.0rt ­
The Honorary Officers for 1960 were
then elected, a s follows:
HONORARY PRESIDENT:
DonaldF. Angu s ,
HONORARY VICE-PRESIDb-::NTS:
N .R. Crump, President, Canadian
P acific Rai lwa y Company.
j
thur Duper ron , Che i r m ari &. Gener­
alM ..na ger, Niont1T ransp n Com.•
D
onald Gordon, President , Canad ian
N
ational Railways.
HONORARY L EG1,L C OUNSEL:
L eonar d l… Seton, a.c.,
HONORi….HY liUD ITOR :
Cha r Ie s
Viau, c.z..
During the ele ction of officers, the chair
wa s occupied by Mr . R.M. Binn s , and the
Chair m an of the Nominating Committee
was Mr . An thon y Cle gg. Following the
elections, sorn e projects for 1960 were
discus s ed. It was agreed that a dinner
could be scheduled for lvl;:>rch or Ap r il,
a
nd a Com m ittee will be appointed to
s
elect a suitable time and venue.
C.R.H.l:.. MUSEUM IS THE SUBJECT
OF Ji. NEW SPJ.. PER EDITORIid….
It was with considerable gratification
t
hat the Montreal members of the l~ ssoc­
i ati on read the editorial which we r epro­
duce below, which appe ar ed in the Mont­
real Daily Star, for Monday, J ~nu~.r y 18,
1
960. Let us glean som e sa tisfaction
from the Ia ct that the Star has always
been an outspoken advocate of cultural
a
nd edu cational projects for Morit real,
a
nd that it s efforts in informing the pub­
lic in such m a tter s hav e frequently be en
crowned with success. In any event, the
Lsso ciation appreciates the support of
this respected Moritrea.l newspaper. The
ed.i
tor ial is reprinted herewith in its en ­
tirety:
RI:..ILWil.Y I:vlUSEUM
—-~————­
IN THE La chine Museum and in the
basement of the Chateau de Rr-rn eza y,
there ar e reproductions of the Dorches­
t
er C;:>nada s first railway Ioc orriotive,
A
par t from these, theres nothing much
hereabouts to signify that this city was
1960
Pa.B~}.~
MEMBEHSH IP
Begi.rn:ing with this issue. the News
Re por t will carry the names of rrrerrrbe i-s
propos e d, and th ose elected to m ernber «
ship at each meeting. At the Jrnuar y
m e etin g, the following person was eIe ct­
ed to ReguIar Members hip in the As s oc ­
i.ation :
Mr. Cl.ROL C. S.fi.IT
The folbwing persons were propos­
ed forthefirst time, forRegularMem ­
b
ership in th e As s o ciation :
Mr. J ACK A . BEATTY,
Mr. Wj~HHEN Y. SOP E R (a b s ent)
The following person was proposed
for the first time,for JuniorMembership
in th e Ass o ciation :
M r .
ROBERT H.L!.LFY.llRD
;::; :-.: ;.:.( :{)::: :;: ~::: ;:.-: ;:::: ;:::
th e birthplace of Canadian railroa ding
back in 1836, or to trace its development
into the national hub of rail trans portat­
ion. This year the railway buffs who
m
ake up the Cana dian Rail r oad Hi s toric­
a
.I As so ciatton hope to get started on a
l
ong-planned proj ect, a national rail rnu>
seum ,
Over the years, its m ernber s have
built up the most extensive collection of
a
ntique rolling stockinCr-nada, from the
Vi cto r i an he yda y of steam and the van­
ished st reet railways to the ea rly years
of elect r i c motive power. jl1 of it, in­
cluding Sir Tv illiam Van Hor ne s pa lat ­
i
al private car and a steam engine from
the 1880s in operating condition. is sta­
shed away in odd spots until a prope r
di
splay a r ea. can be obtained.
The idea isnt merely to plant them
as a memorial in some park, wher e they
soon becorne rusted junk and a target
for vandalism by pranksters. Canadas
two rria j orvr.oads have been wary of pro­
viding old-etim e equipment because, in
the past , SOlTIe lovingly restored old loc­
omotives have degenerat ed into public
(contd pa ge 15)
(
C.R.H.A. News Report -1960
The Honorary Officers for 1960 were
then elected. as follows:
HONORARY PRESIDENT:
Donald F. Angus.
HONORARY VICE-PRESIDENTS:
N .R. Crump. President. Canadian
Pacific R8i1way Company.
j
thur Duperron. Chairman &. Gener­
al Mnager. lViont 1 Transp n Con!.
Donald Gordon, President, Canadi;:m
National Railways.
HONOR.(.~RY LEGilL COUNSEL:
Leonard ii .• Seton, Q.C ••
HONOR.t …. HY hUDITOR:
ChZlrles Viau, CJ ..
During the election of officers, the chair
was occupied by Mr. R.M. Binns. and the
Chairman of the N9minating Committee
was Mr. Anthony Clegg. Following the
elections, sorne projects for 1960 were
discussed. It was agreed that a dinner
could be scheduled for lvl;:>rch or April,
and a Committee will be appointed to
select il suitable time and venue.
C.R.H •. L: •• MUSEUM IS THE SUBJECT
OF A NEWSPilPER EDITORIAL
It was with considen.ble gratification
that the Montreal rnembers of the l~ssoc­
iation read the editorial which we repro­
duce below. which appeued in the Mont­
real Daily Star. for Monday. J ~nuqry 18.
1960. Let us glean some satisfaction
frorn the f::lct tInt the Star has always
been an outspoken advocate of cultural
and educational projects for IVlontreal,
and that its efforts in informing the pub­
lic in such matters have frequently been
crowned with success. In any event. the
Lssociation appreciates the support of
this respected lViontrea1 newspaper. The
editoricd is reprinted herewith in its en-
tirety:
R/~ILWil. Y !vlUSEUM
–liTTtTE-Lach~ Museum and in the
b$.sement of the Chateau de R;:>mezay,
there are reproductions of the Dorches­
ter. C;:>nada s first railway locornotive.
Apart from these. theres nothing much
hereabouts to signify that this city was
MEMBERSHIP
Begindng with this issue. the News
Heport will carry the names of .cnembe::·s
proposed, and those elected to rnenlbe:;:
ship at each Ineeting. At the Jpnuary
meeting. the following person was elec-t~
ed to Hegular Membership in the Assoc­
bticm:
Mr. G!~ROL C. S.hIT
The folJ:zJwing persons were propos­
ed for the first time, for Regular Mem­
bership in the Association:
Mr. JACK i …. BE.h. TTY.
Mr. Wj~RREN Y. SOPER (absent)
The following person was proposed
for the first time. for Junior Membership
in the Association:
Mr. ROBERT H.L..LFY.ll.RD
the birthplace of Canadian railroading
back in 1836, or to trace its development
into the national hub of rail transportat­
ion. This year the railway buffs Who
m
ake up the C;:.nadian Railroad Historic­
al.i,ssociation hope to get started on a
long-planned project. a national rail mu­
seum.
Over the years. its members have
built up the most extensive collection of
antique rolling stock in Cr>nada, froln the
Victorian hpyday of steam and the van­
ished street railways to the ea rly years
of electric motive power. .t~ll of it, in­
cluding Sir William Van Hornes palat­
ial private car and a steam engine from
the 1880s in operating condition. is sta­
shed away in odd spots until a proper
display area can be obtained.
The idea isnt merely to plant them
as a memorial in some park, where they
soon becom.e rusted junk and a target
for vandalism by pranksters. Canadas
two rnajor:r.Qads have been wary of pro­
viding old.,…tirue equipment because, in
the past, SOlne lovingly restored old loc­
omotives have degenerated into public
(contd page 15)
C.H.H.A. News R e port -1960
P age 12
where there was a carhous e and a loop,
-~:~-~~:KE-~~-:;:-~~-::M ~-:;—--
r

and a covered platform with covered pas­
by Orner S.b.• L avaIlee I sa geway from platform to hotel. At the
lower end of the line, Laggan {now Lake
————————————~
THOSE OF OUR READERS who have
visited L ·~ke Louise, Albe r ta, in the Can>
adian Rockies , are aware of the fact that
the Canadian p~ c ifi c R vilway station is
some four rn ile s distant from the Lako
proper, with its famed backdr op of the
Victoria Glacier. The station is a l s o
some ei ght hundred fe et lower in altitude.
Nowadays, busses take hotel guests
from the sta tiori to the Chateau Lwke Lou­
ise and D eerLodge,butthisis a cornpa1­
atively recent and le ss interesting rneans
of transportation a s far a s the r ailway
enthu siast is concerned, since the station
and hotel were once linked by a 42-inch
gauge tra rnwa.y, operated by the C r-na d>
i an Fcific Ra i lwa y, but now out of exis ­
t
ence for som e twenty-five years. The
r oad hed is still plainly to be se en, and
form s an interestin g hikingor bridle path
for visitors to the Lvke Louise resort
a re8. .
It was in 1912 that the ra i lwa y , s e ek­
ing rriore reliable and dependable means
of transportation than horse-drawn vehic­
les hitherto used between the station and
the chaletat the lake, envis ioned and con­
structed the Lake Louise Tramway. As
constructed, the t r am wa y extended offic­
ially from a point in Section 28, Town­
ship 28, R:>nge 16, west of the 5th Merid»
ian, to a point in Section 20, Township 28,
R.,nge 16, west of the 5th Meridian . The
line was opened in July 1912, and had a
main -line length of 3.61 miles. It start­
ed on the opposite side of the present
r
ailway station from the CPR main line,
curved shar ply in a sem i cir cle , crossing
the
Bow River , and started its steep as ­
cent of the foothills of the main range of
the Kocky lhountains. The line, in plan,
was in switchback fashion, with sharp
curves at the angle s {se e map}. Its upper
end was the CPH hotel at L nke Louise,
Louise sta tion}, the cars were turned on a
turnta b le.
Original r olling stock on this line in­
cluded two 28-foot open-bench ga s olerie
passenger cars, each seating 35 and wei­
ghing a bout t en tons. A l s o two freight
motor s using the same design of frame
as the passenger cars. All of this equip ­
r
nent was propelled by internal-combus­
tion engine s of the same type, a contemp­
orary account states, as those used in
touring autom obiles If. Like the prove r b­
i al Tooner ville Trolley, the cars rnet all
the trains at the station, including such
fa r-ned favourites of the pa s t rt s the Impe r
ri
al Limited and the Trans-Canada Lim­
ited. The passenger cars were CPR Nos.
40 and 4 1, while the freight cars were 48
and 49. All were delivered on July 31,
1912. These cars were all of the 4-2-0
wheel ar rangement.
After a year and a half of use , it was
deter rrriried that a third passeriger car
could be more useful than a second freight
motor; accordingly, on Apr il 20, 1914, No.
48 was rebuiltinto passenger car 42.
As far as can be as certained, the line
closed down in the winter season, its per­
iod of operation generally corresponding
wi th the open season for the CPR hotel at
L
ake Louise, roughly Ma y to September.
The line possessed no snowplow equip­
m ent, so that winter operation is unlikely
ever to have be en undertaken. Repairs
were rria de in the running shed at Lwke
Louise .
In 1925, the or i giria I equi pment was
supplem ented by two additio nal passenger
cars, closed vehicles this time, which
rriuc resembled street railway cars. Un­
like the original open-bench cars, the new
cars were double-trucked, and propelled
by Sterling Seabull gas oline engines
C.R.B.A. News Report -1960
Page 12
r
—;I:~-~~~KE-:~~;:-~~:-M ;~-;—–,
by Omer S.A. L;::vallee
————————————~
THOSE OF OUR READERS who have
visited L~ke Louise, Alberta, in the CRn­
adian Rockies, a re aware of the fact that
the Canadi;:m p~ cific Rdlway station is
some four rniles distant from the L proper, with its famed b;>_ckdrop of the
Victoria Glacier. The station is also
some eight hundred feet lower in altitude.
Nowadays, busses take hotel guests
from the shtion to the Chateau Lqke Lou­
ise and Deer Lodge, but this is a coxnpa r­
atively recent and less interesting !ueans
of transportation as far as the railway
enthusiast is concerned, since the station
and hotel were once linked by a 42 -inch
gauge trarnwCl.Y, operated by the C..,nad­
hn F;:.cific H;Jilway, but now out of exis­
tence for some twenty-five yea rs. The
rOAdbed is still plainly to be seen, and
forms an interesting hiking or bridle path
for visitors to the L-, ke Louise resort
areCl..
It was in 1912 that the railway, seek­
ing m.ore reliable and dependable means
of transportation than horse-drawn vehic­
les hitherto used between the station and
the chalet at the lake, envisioned and con­
structed the L;:1ke Louise Tramway. As
constructed, the tramway extended offic­
ially from a point in Section 28, Town­
ship 28, R;:.nge 16, west of the 5th Merid­
ian, to a point in Section 20, Township 28,
R-onge 16, west of the 5th Meridian. The
line was opened in July 1912, and had a
main-line length of 3.61 miles. It start­
ed on the opposite side of the present
railw;:ty station from the CPR main line,
curved sh::> rply in a semicircle, crossing
the Bow River, and started its steep as­
cent of the foothills of the main range of
the Kocky Nlountains. The line, in plan,
was in switchback fashion, with sharp
curves at the angles (see map). Its upper
end was the CPR hotel at L–tke Louise,
where there was a carhouse and a loop,
and a covered platform with covered pas.
sageway from platform to hotel. At the
lower end of the line, L;:oggan (now Lake
Louise station), the cars were turned on a
turntablE:
Original rolling stock on this line in­
cluded two 28-foot open-bench gasolene
passenger cars, each seating 35 and wei­
ghing a bout ten tons. Also two freight
motors using the same design of frame
as the passenger cars. All of this equip­
rnent was propelled by internal-combus­
tion engines of the same type, a contemp­
orary account states, as those used in
touring automobiles. Like the proverb­
ial Toonerville Trolley, the cars met all
the trains at the station, including such
famed favourites of the past a s the Impel
rial Limited and the Tr;:ms-Canada Lim­
ited. The passenger cars were CPR Nos.
40 and 41, while the freight cars were 48
and 49. All were delivered on July 31,
1912. These cars were all of the 4-2-0
wheel Rrrangement.
After a year Rnd a half of use, it was
determined th:=tt R third plssenger car
could be more useful than a second freight
motor; accordingly, on April 20, 1914, No.
48 was rebuilt into passenger car 42.
As far as can be ascertained, the line
closed down in the winter season, its per­
iod of operation generally corresponding
wi th the open season for the CPR hotel at
Lake Louise, roughly MElY to September.
The line possessed no snowplow equip­
ment. so that winter operation is unlikely
ever to have been undertaken. Repairs
were lur.tde in the running shed at Lke
Louise.
In 1925, the origina 1 equipment was
supplemented by two additional passenger
cars, closed vehicles this time, which
m]( resembled street rr.tilway cars. Un­
like the original open-bench cars, the new
cars were double-trucked, and propelled
by Sterling Seabull gasoline engines
C .R.B.A. News R eE,o r t -1960 P a ge 13
LAKE LOUISE TRAlviWAY
40 CLASS 42 GAUGE OPEN GASOLENE PASSENGER CAR
d r ivin g whee l s
___ I~ -1++ ~
13 8
18 lea din g wheels
I
24 9 ~ . _. ~ –..-. ._ – – – – _._,
.,………. >.V I > 1< > -I .C–. _
Built:� Canadian P acific Railway Co.,
Angus Shops, Montreal, 1912.
Seating capacity: 35 passengers.
Car floor is 3 6above rail level.
Seats are on 2 9 1 centres .
MOTORS:
Originally built with 60 hvp, 6-cylinder
Alco engines . Remodelled in 1913 with
66 h vp, 6-cylinder Pl e r c e e.Arrow motor.
Cars capable of 15 rnvp.h, and can negot­
.iat e grades up to 4%.
Scrapped in 193 1.
Sketch is approximately i scale.
OSAL. 21/1/60.
*)>:c>:,, ,:c* * 1r:
——=-~.
N PACIF~J-C~ N t~ ) 1
~-~~ I .~
-r-;::::
~
~
., ~i bl
~~
~
, ~ II
1111111
,Ii II ~
1.11
2

~4 2
f
,.
~a –;;.­
~

22
~

9 10­
LA K E LO.U_ISE TR A M WAY
——————————–­
-Roster of Rolling Stock.
40
41
42
4-2-0
If

Open

I f
bench psgr.car
II

If

If
Reo engine

If
Built .CP R , Angus , IVlon b cal,

11

19 1L:

11 ~ j

-lu s :::;ci� psg :::-. c ar
:,

C.R.B.A. News Report -1960
LAKE LOUISE TRAMWAY
40 CLASS 42 It GAUGE OPEN GASOLENE PASSENGER CAR
18 It leading wheels driving wheels
—-~~~~~~~~—————————-~~~——
—–13 81-+——-
·————24 9~U.——–.-.,——-…… -1
Built: Canadian Pacific Railway Co.,
Angus Shops, Montreal, 1912.
Seating capacity: 35 passengers.
Car floor is 36 .above rail level.
Seats are on 2 91 centres.
MOTORS:
Originally built with 60 h.p. 6-cylinder
A1co engine s. Remodelled in 1913 with
66 hep. 6-cylinder Pierce.,Axrow motor.
Cars capable of 15 m.p.h. and can negot­
_iate grades up to 4%.
Scrapped in 1931.
Sketch is approximately k scale.
OSAL. 21/1/60,
9 10~
—– ::::::::-J-C.ca. N,t~ ) I N PAC FIe ~
….-~.
~II· .~~ ~
~I1fti. ~
I
_~I II I
,ti!l~ >Ill III1II
1,1
2
~42
f .
.,.
~
22-
~
~9

Page 13
40
41
42
4-2-0 Open bench psgr.car Reo engine Built CPR, Angus, lllont~t;al, 1911.-:.
11

11
I

I

11

Rebuilt frolXl freight motor 48 in 1914.
48 4-2-0 Fl8.t freight car Re.o engine Built CPR, P .. ngus, Montreal, 191::
Rebuilt to open bench passenger car 42, 1914
49 II ,,:1 Reo engine Built CPR, Angus, Montreal, 19 J 2
50 B-o C1uscd psgr. car Sterling engine >l if 1925
51 II :1 If 11 11
All equipi,;,lcT;t taken Jf£ inventory November 1930, scrapped 1931.
C.R.H.A.
..__. ._ _ ._ News R eport -1960 P3.ge _~~_
CANADI.h.N P.h.CIFIC STE.h.M In this winter of 1959-60, the ha ppy hunt­�
LOCOMOTIVES IN RESERVE iI::. ~:~ 6( i.:rd [or the Canadian Pacific Rail-�
M!<:_Y s rem aining steampoweris SaintLuc
Yard at Montreal, where those engines vv· ~; ·ic:1.1 s ~ i J.l r em ain ~ ervi c e able on the East­
ern and .t…tlantic Regions, have Lar ge Iy a c c uzn uIa t ed, Ii visit by s orne members of
the Editorial staff .n Sunday, J:>nlJl.ary 24th, show ed e i ght y-eei ght locomotives at the
yard, withstacks covered and headlights boarded upfor the most par t, though a few
were in the roundhouse under steam. Al s o stored with the eighty-eight, was the As s ­
ociations engin e , CPR No.144, coupled and facing up squarely to No.28l9. For the
information of those who keep inform ed on such matters, we give below a list of the
engines at St.Luc onthat day. Before er rant enthus i a s ts f r orn other parts swiftly
converge on Montreal, we might caution thern that this situation is fluid, and can have
changed radicallybythetimethatthisNewsReportisinthehandsofthe rea ders:
Class 1.2: No.144.
DI0: Nos. 807, 870, 882,953,964, 1004, 1015, 1080, 1085, 1088, 1092, 1095.
———-G-l :-N os.•-22-0-O, 2206, 2214, 2224, 2237.
II G2: Nos. 2500, 2514, 2559, 25 99, 2629, 2659, 2664.
II G3: Nos. 2328, 2334, 2397, 2409, 2454, 2471.
G5: Nos. 1201, 1223, 1224, 1228, 1231, 1256, 1262, 1263, 1270.
HI: Nos. 2811, 2816, 2819, 2827, 2841, 2856, 2858.
M4: Nos.3462, 3504, 3507.
II N2: Nos. 3607,3610,3638,3642,3694,3759.
PI: Nos. 5102,5114,5118,5135,5 137,5145,5146,5147,5149, 5152, 6160,
5162,5163,5168,5170,5 171 ,5175,5183,5187,5214,5225.
P2: Nos. ·, 325, 5330, 5343, 53 70, 53 94, 5405, 5406, 5410, 5411, 5449, 5458.
II V4: No. 6933.
–List compiled by Bill McKe own,
The Aclass,ofcourse,isa4-4- 0, theDs are 4- 6- 0, theGsar e 4-6-2.theHsar e
4-6-4,theMs and Ns ar e 2-8-0,thePs are 2-8-2 andtheVis an 0-8-0.
::< ::.; ):-= ):~ ~: *;{:.:::.;:
!:AKE–.!:-S!.~!-~E_!g.t-.¥~~..!.(cont d)
ye ars of the LLT s operation. Mr. King
having s ix cylinders and 150 h or s epowe r , says thatthefrequency ofoperation was
capacity. The fuel capacitywas 34 Im per­as high a s thirty round-trips a day. The
ialgallons,andthecarsseated43,thou gh ca rsmetCPRtrains1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-13­
it is recorded that car 51 was tested with and 14, as well as passenger ext ras , Op­
a capacity load of 68 passengers and ba g­er ation of the line was carried out by a
g
age. The Cars weighed only 34,000 Ibs , telephone system linking the termini, but
Thesetwocarsar r ivedatLakeLouise on a f orm oftrain or der terrninal clearance
May27th, 1925; theywerelettered Can­was als o us ed. Fromthe same source,
adian Pacific as was the other equipment we learn that there was a passing-track
but in the interim, while they were en rou­about halfway up the line, which the up
te to the w est, it W8.S decided to r eletter t r a rn always tried to make in case the
them to Lake Louise Tramway, and ac­down trams brakes didnt hold! Yes,
cordingly, all equipment was changed, they had m any a wild ride on the L a k e
The Lake Louise Tramway cam e un­Louise Tramway.

derthejurisdiction oftheCanadian Pac ­Inthelatterye ars, theoldequipment
ific Railways Hotel Depar trnent, One of was kept a s standby rolling stock for un­
our Calgary m embers, Mr. W. R. Jones, usual crowds and tour gr oups .
interviewed Mr.FredKing,whowa s an S
ervice on this line passed withthe
operator a r ourid Lake Louise in the latter end of the s e ason of 1930. The cars were
rem oved from inventory in Noverrilier 1930.
C.R.H.A. News Report – 1960
———————-
CANADI.h..N PACIFIC STEi-1.M
LOCOMOT rYES rN RESERVE
In this winter of 1959-60, the happy hunt-
ir::.~:~ 5,:-i.:rd for the Canadian Pacific Rail-
w<:.y s remaining steam power is Saint Luc
Yard at lv1ontreal, where those engines w>·.i.(,.1.1 s~ill remain ~erviceable on the East­
ern and .t lantic Regions, have largeJy ac.:::ulllu·!.ated. li. visit by sorne members of
the Editorial staff .n Sunday, J~nl!lary 24th, showed eighty~eight locomotives at the
yard# with stacks covered and headlights boarded up for the most part~ though a few
were in the roundhouse under steam. l~lso stored with the eighty-eight, was the Ass­
ociations engine, CPR No.144, coupled and facing up squarely to No.2819. For the
information of those who keep informed on such matters, we give below a list of the
engines at St.Luc on that day. Before errant enthusiasts from other parts swiftly
converge on Montreal, we might caution thern that this situation is fluid, and can have
changmi radically by the time that this News Report is in the hands of the readers:
Class A2: No.144.

II
DI0: Nos. 807, 870,882,953,964, 1004, 1015, 1080, 1085
1
1088, 1092, 1095.
ill-: -N·Qs-.-ZW-O-, 22.0b., 2214, 2224, 2237.
II

G2: Nos. 2500, 2514, 2559, 2599, 2629, 2659, 2664.
G3: Nos. 2328,2334,2397,2409,2454,2471.

G5: Nos. 1201, 1223, 1224,1228, 1231, 1256, 1262, 1263, 1270.
HI: Nos. 2811, 2816, 2819, 2827, 2841, 2856, 2858.

M4: Nos. 3462, 3504, 3507.

N2: Nos. 3607,3610,3638,3642,3694,3759.
1/
PI: Nos. 5102, 5114, 5118, 5135, 5137, 5145,5146,5147,5149,5152
1
6160,
5162,5163,5168,5170,5171,5175,5183,5187,5214,5225.

P2: Nos. ,J25, 5330, 5343, 5-370, 5394, 5405, 5406, 5410, 5411, 5449, 5458.
V 4: No. 6933.
–List compiled by Bill McKeown.
The A class, of course, is a 4-4-0, the Ds are 4-6-0, the Gs are 4-6-2. the Hs are
4-6-4. the Ms and Ns are 2-8-0, the Ps are 2-8-2 and the V is an 0-8-0.
!:AKE~Q~l~~_TRA¥J.U·~ Y (cont d)
having ~ix cylinders and 150 llOl·sepo,ver.
capacity. The fuel capacity was 34 Imper­
ial gallons, and the cars seated 43, though
it is recorded that car 51 was tested with
a capacity load of 68 passengers and bag­
gage. The cars weighed only 34,000 Ibs.
These two cars arrived at Lake Louise on
May 27th, 1925; they were lettered Can­
adian Pacific as was the other equipment
but in the interim, while they were en rou­
te to the west, it was decided to reletter
them to Lake Louise Tramway, and ac­
cordingly, all equipment was changed.
The Lake Louise Tramway came un­
der the jurisdiction of the Canadian Pac­
ific Railways Hotel Department. One of
our Calgary members, Mr. W. R. Jones,
interviewed Wire Fred King, who was an
operator around Lake Louise in the latter
years of the LLT s operation. Mr. King
says that the frequency of operation was
as high as thirty round-trips a day. The
cars met CPR trains 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-13-
and 14, as well as passenger extrRS. Op­
eration of the line was carried out by a
tel
ephone system linking the termini, but
a fonn of train order terminal clearance
was also used. From the same source,
we learn that there was a passing-track
a bout halfway up the line, which the up
tram always tried to make in case the
down trams brakes didn t hold~ Yes,
they had many a wild ride on the La k e
Louise Tramway.
In the latter years, the old equip.ment
was kept as standby rolling stock for un­
usual crowds and tour groups.
Service on this line passed with the
end of the season of 1930. The cars were
removed from inventory in November 1930.
../
LEFT: Map showing loca tion of Lake
Loui se Tramway Jin relation to the
C
anadian Pa cific Railway mainlire.
BELOW: La rge scale map ofL.L.T•
showing road crossings and mile
pos ts.
~

.
I
.
(
I
,
,
I
j
Lake L.
t OI L a ggan
f-,tmdxin g.

Canadi an P a cifi c R a ilwa y Compan y
LAKE LOU ISE T R A M W A Y
P
lan := M ile 0.00 t o M ile 3 .61
A s constru cted, 1 9~2. Gauge : 3 6 •

I
I

I
I
c r oss in g

<,
-,

-,
-,
-,
Se ction
,
Se ction 28
,
N
*n ow Lake
s tat ion (CfpR).
-,
-,

28
M e r idi a n )

-,

1/8o
1
~

3/8

1
:iI
SCALE OF MILES. T O W
N
( Range 16, W e s t
Se ction 20 I
OSAL. 23 / X II / 5 9.
.:u. ki H
.~ ~ = lI lf ln g 0
I ~:e at Divi
JI <.
-, –

.. /
f-.t .
. ~ ~ *li~king Ho
I· (,(?reat Divi
. …..,
I –
i –

,.
.
(
Canadian Pacific Railway Company
LAKE LOUISE TRAMWAY
Plan~= Mile 0.00 to Mile 3.61
As constructed, 19 2. Gauge~ 3 6 ..
LAKE LOUISE
o
OWN
T 6 West
(Range 1 ,
1/8

1
j
3/8

SCALE OF MILES.
,

1
(
LEFT! Map showing location of Lake
L
ouise Tramway in relation to the
Canadian Pacific Railway mainlire.
BELOW ~ Large scale map of L~L. T •
showing road crossing,s and mile
po.sts.
*now Lake
station (C
R).
Section 28
N

­


Govt.
Road xi
I.

I
,
crossing

I
,
,
I
j
I
L
ake L.
, tOI Laggan
f,tJad xing.

Section 2A——————-+————————-Section 21 —~~~……I§r—-
OSAL. 23/XII/59.
C.R.H…l-. News Repor t -19._6_0 _
P:Ji~. ~5_
M USE UM E DITORIAL (cont d)
eye~~s:–Th~j-;-:;_;;C ia tion hopes to ac­
quire a tract of lewd close to r a il fa ciIit-­
ies, and to provide a building or buildin­
gs
where they can beproper 1y tencled and
sho
wn to th e public.
More power to them. Generally sp­
eaking, we a s C nrradi ans have be en pr etty
ca sual about the mementos of our past , be
it in architectu re or intransportation or
in any
thing else. The past centur y of our
national dev elopm ent ha s been vita llyin­
volved with r ai l tran s portat ion . A we ll
organized railmuseum inthe regionwh­
ere r
ail operations began is a worthwhile
p
roje ct iride ed,
~
~ ~.::: ~~{ ,~ ::c~: :ic ):~
THE 13 11 F UND •••••••
CANADLn.N RAILROAD HISTORICAL�
hS::;OC U ,.T ION�
———-_… ~-,..,………-~~ -.._….._————-­
News Re poi..-t N .) ~ 103
F e bruary 19(0 ,
Ed
itorial l…cIl1r e ss:
.,
p.a.Box 22, E: ~atioa B,
:tvlontreal 2., C ;:>:nada-
EDIT OR: Orn er S,A. Lava.Il ae,
P
UBL ISHE E : J ollD Saunders ,
CO:tvIMITT EE : L..nthony Clegg,
David R. Henderson,
F a ul R. lvkGee,
L
orne C. Per r y.
On th e inser ted photograph pa ge this month will be found a photograph
of one of ou r latest acquisitions –int erurban electric car No. 1311 of the Br ­
itish Colum bi a Electric Ra ilway Company, Lim ited, whi ch was purchased last
auturnnfrom Mr . Er nest Plant, of Horseshoe Bay, Br itis h CoIurn.bta, Those
of our read ers who are trolley or inter ur b an enthu siasts, and perhaps even.
th
ose whose interests do not necessarily embrace electric traction , will have
to agree that No.1311 is a very fine example of its type. The As sociation is
mu ch ind ebtedto Mr . Plant, a railway enthusias t of som e re puteinwestern
Canad a, in his own right, for cooperating with us s o that the A ssociation could
acqui
re this fine car, and ke ep it in Canad a.
No.1311isstillinBr iti s h-Columbia, beingstored atSquamis h, British
Colum bia, by the P ~cific Great E ~ st ern Railway. Much expense will be ent ­
a
iledinmovingitfromitspresent siteto our rn.useurnprojectnearMorrtrea I,
If any of our re ad ers feel that they would like to demon st rate their sur-por t of
the As sociation s museum policy in tangible form, a donation toward s the h ..md
to acqui r e &.: moveNo. 13 11 willbe sincerelyappreciat ed. IVl2.DYmembershav e
al
ready contributed generous ly. Others have promised similar suppo rt. The
nam
es of those rn ernber s who contributed to the pu rchase of our two Ottawa
ca rs, and of M&SC No.611, will som eda y appear in the appropr iate vehicles .
Per ha
ps you would like to beliste d as on e of the suppor ters of No .l311.
C
ontributions may be sent to the Treasurer of the Ass o ciatiori , P.O.Box 22,
Station Btl, Morit real 2, or to the und ers i gned at 7440 Durocher Avenue, Mon­
treal 15, C ana d a.
Thank you for your support. B ILL McKEOWN,
C HA IRMr
l.N, B eEf.{ #13 11 F UND .
THE BANQUET –Final arrangements have now been made for the ban­quet,
as announ ced on page 11, this issue. It will be held on Tue s­
day, March 1st, 1960, in La Sal le Canac1ienne /, ,findsor Stat i on res­
taurant. The dinner wi.Ll, start at 7:00 PM, but those who wish to
come early wi ll be admitted af ter 5:30 PM. Tickets, ~;~3 . 75 per p8r ­son, and i
nformation, may be obtained fromthe 3ecretary, Mr. Heard, Ap
artment 36, 3563 Universi ty St reet , Montreal , or l phone VI.5-9487.
(
C.R.H.i. News Report -1960
MUSEUM EDITORIAL (cont d)
eye;;;~s:–Th~J7;_;;_;;iation hopes to a c­
quire a tract of l;:wd close to rail facilitl..
ies, and to provide a building or buildin­
gs where they can be properlytencled and
shown to the public.
More power to them. GenerRlly sp­
eaking, We RS Cl.nadians h;::o.ve been pretty
casual about the .mementos of our past, be
it in architecture or in transportation or
in anyttling else. The past century of our
national development hB s been vitally in­
volved with rnil transportation. A well
organized rail luuseum in the region wh­
ere rail operations began is a worthwhile
project inJeed.
THE 1311 FUND •••••••
—————————–
CANADLHN RAILROAD HISTORICAL
———-… ~-,~ •.. —-.~~~ .. -.. ~———.–
News Repo:<:t N8~ 103
February 1960.
Editorial Lchlress:
P.O.
Box 22,. S~atioa B,
lvlontreal 2, C?nada-
EDITOR: Orner S,/,-. Lavallee,
PUBLISHEE: John Sl.unders,
C
OMMITTEE: I-nthony Clegg,
Da.vid R. Henderson,
Paul R. lvkGee,
Lorne C. Perry.
On the inserted photograph page this month will be found a photograph
of one of our latest acquisitions –interurban electric car No.1311 of the Br­
itish Columbia Electric Railway Company, Limited, which was purchased last
autum.n from Mr. Ernest Plant, of Horseshoe Bay, British Colwubia. Those
of our readers who are trolley or interurban enthusiasts, and perhaps even
those whose interests do not necessarily embrace electric traction, will have
to agree that No.13ll is a very fine example of its type. The Association is
much indebted to Mr. Plant, a railway enthusiast of some repute in western
Canada, in his own right, for cooperating with us so that the Association could
acquire this fine car, and keep it in Canada4
No.1311 is still in British-Columbia, being stored at Squarnish, British
Columbia, by the P;::.cific Great E;::.stern Railway. Much expense will be ent­
ailed in moving it from its present site to our mUSel;.I:-1 proj;~ct near }v1ontreal.
If any of our readers feel that they would like to demonstrate their sUFPort of
the Associations museum policy in tangible form, a donation towarcls the fund
to acquire &: move No.1311 will be sincerely appreciated. M2.Dy members have
already contributed generously. Others have promised similar support. The
names of those lUembers who contributed to the purchase of our two Ottawa
cars, and of M&SC No.6II, will someday appear in the appropriate vehicles.
Perhaps you would like to be listed as one of the supporters of No.l3ll.
Contributions may be sent to the Treasurer of the AI3S0C:i.e:,.t1.on. P.O.Box 22,
Station Btl, Nlontreal 2, or to the undersigned at 7440 Durocher Avenue, Mon­
treal 15, Canada
Thank you for your support. BILL McKEOWN,
CHAIRMrl..N. BCEI-( # 1311 FUND.
THE BANQUET –Final arrangements have now been made for the ban­
Guet as announced on page 11, this issue. It will be held on Tues­clay,
March 1st, 1960, In liLa Salle Canao ienne i, Tcfindsor Stat ion res­
taurant. The dinner VJill start at 7: 00 PM, but thO?8 who wish to
come early will be admitted after 5: 30 Plfl. Tickets, ~:p3. 75 per per­
son and information may be obtained from the Secretary, Mr. Heard,
Apa~tment 36, 3563 U;iversity Street, Montreal, or !phone VI.5-9487.
.~~~~l:! . A..!. . .__~ews Rer?rt -1960 Page 16
~::~~{~!2 .~;~. P}-,.~I£..~£.~~~::_~?_?1. O_E:~N.Q.!l:!E~~Ll~.J..~~~
Dcd.ng th e year 19 Yi. L12 c.o:l1ll;j2.D E;.cidc l.dlway scrapped no less than 220
locomotives, and disposed cth erwi.se of f c-ur rnore, all steam units. The accel er at ed
rate ofscra ppin g charac teriz ed the yea r hl which the C0111pany accepted its 10 0 0-::h
d
~ (;S 0J. Io corno ti ve, Unli ko tile con ; ,~rn } ) t) ;:? ;:U_ I,i,~U.onid sys t ern, however, C8!C8dfC:.n
Pa
cif k st:,;Irnakes f air Iy exten slve lis e c, its stearn Ioco m oti.ves , rrrariy of which have
a good arriount of usa ble mileage left. Par;:ldoxic2.11y, the year in which so m any en­
gioes er:ed n[ in th e scrap do ckwas also the year in which the Compa ny d ropp ed i ts
10:og·_·1. rrn c:do ollles f r orn historical pre s ervation projects , and four engines, happily
escaped th e fa te of
the rnajor i.ty, The fou r included a 4-4-0, a 4-4-4, a 2-10-4 and a
0-&-0 swicching engin e. The la st three were sold to interested individuals or gro~p s
in Car-ada or the United Statcs , while tn.;;; 4-4- 0, No.144, was pr e sented to our As .soc ~
iation 0 :1 Noverrib er 21st, 195 9. Of the f arncd Selkirk type 2-10 ~4 engines, only one
rem a ined at Dec ernber 31st,No.59J 5,the last steamlocomotivetobebuiltfora Can­
acEal railway. It is bein g h eld, with a nurnb er of others, at the request of ou r Assoc­
iatio
n, for possible inclusion in the A ssociations long-planned rrru s eurn project.
The en(..:ines di spos ed of -a r e-Liven be low, by c Iass :
1,.2: :No.144–to Canadian Hailroad Hi s tor i cal .s s o c n , M ontreal, Nov.1959.
D4: Nos . 417, 434.
DIO : Nos . 776, 80 2,806, 827,833,840,844, 847,852, 855,858,866,861, 891,892,
893, 903, 909, 9 13, 914, 9 15, 918, 923, 927, 93 1, 933, 936, 937, 939, 942, 945,
956,961 , 971 ,973,970,9&1, 983, 9 84~ 991, 992, 996, 1012, 101 9, 1022, 10 18,
1035, 1036, 1050, 1067, 1071, 1073, io7>3, 10 82, 1968, 11a2, 100 6, 1109, 1111•
Fl: No.2929 -to llPlea su re Island , near Boston , US),.,. June 1959.
G 1: Nos. 2207, 2223, 2226, 2233, 2 ;~36 .
HI: Nos. 2802. 2803, 2804, 2B14, 28 :<.s, 282 1, 2B23, 2826, 2833, 2836, 285 9.
G2: Nos . 2503 ~ 2505, 25 16, 2520, 2536, 25~)1 , 2555 , 255 8,2581, 2582,2585,2586,
l5 88 , 2597, 2604, 2595, 26 10. 2611, 2622,2627,2658,2662.
G3: Nc s , 23 l t> 23)6, 2365, 2415, 2420, 2460, 2466.
G4: Nos , 2710. 2 70 2~ 2703, 2707, 2714.
G5: ~os . 1232, 1241.
M4: Nos. 340 8,3415,3426,3427.3438, 3472, 3475, 3484, 34&9, 3505, 3519, 3528,
35 58.
N2: Nos. 3602,3614,3636,3637,3647,3649,3660,3666,3675, 3678, 3690, 3695,
3686,3688, 3713,3714,372.4.3734, 374,}, 3747.
PI: Nos. 51) 8, 5112,5113,5116, 5 125,5130, 5132,5138,5148,5153, 5208,5209,
521 2,5218,5219, 522 4,5226, 5237,52.43,5246,5247, 5251, 5252, 5257, 5250,
5261, 5262, 5264, 5250.
P2: Nos. 5349, 5354, 5357, 5364, 5365, 5366, 5369, 5390, 5397, 5403, 5404, 5409,5407,
5414, 5415, 5416, 5421, 5422, 5423, 543r), 5448, 5454, 5455, 5456, 5459, 54 61,
54 62, 5463, 54 64, 5465, 54 66.
R3: Nos. 5761, 57 es, 5788.
52: N o, 5808.

11: Nos. 593), 593 1, 5932, 5933. NOo5934 to City of Calgary, .!-ugust 1959.

U3: No. 6275 to Gode r i ch, Orrt ,; May 1959.

V4 : Nos . 6944, 6947.

V
5: Nos. 6963 , 6966, 6967.

Sl.op L ocomotive (I),·6-0); SL -6.

< : CANil.DIAN PACIFIC SCRi:..PS 220 ENGINES rN 1959
__ …… ~_n~~_ .. ..,. …. _. ___ · ___ … _ …. _…,,. …… ~o> …………. _…-._,,~, ,__,.~.<>,~.,,,,,,,, . .. ..oo;.~ ……….. -…—–___ _
rh::dng the year 19.:;9. L12 G.odlll.:jq:n E.cidc l.:::dlway scrapped no less than 220
locomotives, and disposed otherwise of fCur rnore, all steam units. The accelerated
rate of scrapping charad2Tbed tJ..e yecH in. vl.hi<::h the COfnp;:wy accepted its lOGO -:: h
d:
kse3. locornotiy(,. UnE;;-.c tile c;::nli·<,rJ:Y()t)Ii;:U. ji;:~U.onid sys1eill, however, C;:l!C80!2:n
Pdclfk 121;:.;1 makes fcdrly extensiil<:: Hse c.: its ste8.rn locmnotiv€f:, rnany of which have
a good arnount of usable mileage 102ft. Par;:ldoxic?Jly, the year in which so many en­
g~nes ended nI in the scrap dock was also the year in which the Company dropped jts
IOD8~·t •. : i.ITi Edoo:[~H?S s frorn historical preservation proj ects, and four engines, hafpi.1.y
escaped the fat<.2 of the IYlajority. The four included a 4-4~0, a 4-4-4, a 2-10-4 and a
0-6-0 swii:ching engine. The last three were sold to interested individuals or gro:lps
in Calada or the United St2.tes, whde th8 4-4-0, No.144, was presented to our Assoc-.
iation on Novelnber 21st, 1959. Of the fan-led Sen-irk type 2-l0~4 engines, only one
remained at Decerr.ber 31st, No.59]:>, the last steam locomotive to be built for a Can­
ad:a1 railway. It is being held, with a nmnber of others, at the request of our Assoc­
iation, for possible inclusion in the Associations long-planned iTIUSeUm project.
The en,.,.:ines Gis}Josed of ·;ne· Liven below, by chss:
1.2: :No.144–to Canadian Hailroad Historical .ssoc n, Montreal, Nov.1959.
D4: Nos. 417, 434.
DIO; Nos. 776,802,806. 827,833,840,844,847,852,855,858,866,861,891,892,
893,903,909,913,914.915,918,923,927,931,933,936, 937, 939, 942, 945,
956,961,911,973,976,951,983,984) 991, 992, 99(), 1012, 1019, 1022, 1018,
1 0 3 5, 1 03 6 , 1 05 0, 1 0 6 7, 1 0 7 1, 1 0 7 3, 10 7 >3, 1 0 82 , 1 9 68, 1 1 0 2, 1 0 0 6, 1 1 0 9, 1 1 1 1 •
Fl: No.2929 -to lfPleasure Island, near Boston, US},.,. June 1959.
G 1: Nos. 2207, 2223, 2226, 2233, 2d 6.
Hl: Nos. 2802.2803,2804,2814, 28}S, 2821, 2823, 2826, 2833, 2836, 2859.
G2: Nos. 2503~ 2505, 2516, 2520, 2536, 2.5~j 1, 2555, 2558, 2581, 2582, 2585, 2586,
l58e~ 2597, 2604, 2595, 2610. 2611, 2622, 2627,2658,2662.
G3: Nc.s T n 1 t, 23;6, 2365, 2415, 2420, 2460), 2466.
G4: Nc·S. Z710~ 27)2, 2703, 2707, 2714.
G5: ~os. 1232. 1241.
M4: Nos. 3408, 3415, 3426, 3427~ 3438, 3472, 3475, 3484, 34&9. 3505, 3519, 3528,
3558.
N2: Nos. 3612,3614,3636,3637,3647,3649,366.1,3666,3675, 3678, 3690, 3695,
3686,3688,3713,3714,372.4,3734,374,),3747.
PI: Nos. 51
/
)£3,5112,5113,5116,5125,5131),5132,5138,5148,5153. 5208,5209,
5212,5218,5219,5224,5226,5237, 5243, 5246,5247,5251,5252,5257,5250,
5261, 5262, 5264, 5250.
P2: Nos. 5349, 5354, 5357, 5364, 5365, 5366, 5369. 5390, 5397, 5403, 54()4, 5409,5407,
5414,5415,5416,5421,5422,5423,5430,5448,5454, 5455, 5456, 5459, 5461,
5462, 5463, 5464, 5465, 5466.
R3: Nos. 5761, 57ij5, 5783.
S2: No. 58()8.
11: Nos. 593),5931,5932,5933. No.5934 to City of Calgary, l-ugust 1959.
U3: No. 6275 to Goderich, Ont., May 1959.
V4:
Nos. 6944,6947.
VS: Nos. 6963, 6966. 6967.
Sl,op Locomotive (1)~6-)): SL-6.
~:NOTE: We hope to carry Ca;;di~:;:-Nafi~;;;a1 fig;-;;es for 1959, shortly.
C.R.H.A. Observations -1960 P a ge S-4
OBSERV LTIONS A column of notes and news, by .!~nthony Clegg••••
* The end of Canadian Pacific Railway s t earrilocomodveoperation inthe Toronto ar ea
tookplaceDecember31stlast, whenCP#54 11 oper at edfor thefinalrun atLarribton�
yard. Canadian Pacific offi cials have since arinourrced that all futur e train operation�
in that district will be performed by diesel power .�
* Followingthis,Torontojoinedthe gr owing ranksofcitiesandtownsdesiringtopr ­
eservearrrernerrtoofafast-disappearing er a intheIor m ofa s tea rnIocornotive, C ,) ~·l ~
troller WillimnDennison,whoissponsoringtheTorontobid,feels that one of Canada. s
major railway companies would b e willing to donate an outdated steam Iocornotive
for preservation and display in the citys waterfront pa r k.
,,< During the month of January, the Chicago &. North Western RaiIroad ordered $21�
million worth of new suburban railway equipment, including 116 double-deck coaches.�
* It has been reported that CNR electric locomotives, formerly used on the Que bec
Railway, have been sent to London, Ontario, for scrapping. Numbers 227 and 228 were
dismantled November 6th, 1959, while nurriber s 225 and 230 met the same fate a week
later.
>;, Peterborough, Ontario, became the ninth Ontario city to make use of the CNR s

piggybackserviceLaseinDecember, whentjdLrnunicipa Ii ty was pla ced on the rail­
ways network of lines served by highway-trailers-on-flat-cars.
:: Effective January 1st, 1960, new reduced rates were put into effect on the former
Northwest Communications System, now par t of the Canadian National Telegraph Sys­
tem. TheformerN.C.S.,builtduringthewarformi litar y purposes,consistsof mod­
erncommunicationfacilities servingtheAl a s ka Highwayand contiguousterritory.
* Which is the oldest passenger-carrying railway in the world? There is a new hol­
derofthattitlenow,forJanu.ar y5thsawthe end ofserviceontheSwansea &Mum­
bles Railway. op(>:rc..tillH 5~ miles of line between OysterulOuth, Murrib.Ies and Swansea
inthe southernpart of Wales, for mer Iy the worldsoldestpassengerrailservice.
Some 2)0 passengers bought ~p<;<:,i n 1 .1 i t -nlU t i o lcot s , and rriany hundreds more turned
out to witness the last trip on the line, which was opened by horse power in 1806.
Pa ssenge r traffic began on M,rch 25th, 1807. It is said that sails were tried in the
early 1070s, but they proved unsuccessful and stearn power was used from 1877 until
1929. Since that time, s ervice has been provided by a fleet of large, red, double-deck
passenger trams, picking up current by small pantagr aphs mounted on the roof.
FROM THE CRHA News Report of Ten Years l.go :
:::> The Delaware &. Hudson RR inaugurated the use of diesel-electric locomotives on
its trains numbers 7 and 1.3 between Montreal and ./.lbany, when train No.7 arrived in
Windsor Station on January 9th (1950) pulled by 1500 hp road switcher No.4!) 19.
~,,:,,:,
Canadian Nationa.l s locomotive No. 61 U4 is undergoing tests with Poppet Valve
Gear supplied by Dominion Engineering Limited.
**:: The iv1TC has placed one-man cars of the 1525 and 16 00 series on route N o.25
(Notre Dame-Cote St.Paul). One-man cars a r e also replacing two-man cars on route
7 (Mount Royal) in the evenings and on Su~d ays.
C.R.H • .t …. Observations -1960 Page S-4
o B S E R V i. T ION S A column of notes and news, by j~nthony Clegg ••••
* The end of Canadian Pacific Railway steiun locomol::ive operation in the Toronto area
took place December 31 st last, when CP #5411 ope]~ated for the final run at Lambton
yard. Canadian Pacific officictls have since announced that all future train operation
in that district will be performed by diesel power.
* Following this, Toronto joined the growing ranks of cities and towns desiring to pr­
eserve a meluento of a fast-disappearing era in the form of a steam locoluotive. CJ~·l~
troller William. Dennison, who is sponsoring the Toronto bid, feels that one of Canadas
major railway companies would be willing to donate an outdated steam locomotive
for preservation and display in the citys waterfront park.
,.~ During the month of January, the Chicago &. North Western Rrdlroad ordered $ 21
million worth of new suburban railway equipment, including 116 double-deck coaches.
* It has been reported that CNR electric locomotives, formerly used on the Quebec
Railway, have been sent to London, Ontario, for scrapping. Numbers 227 and 228 were
dismantled NovelTIber 6th, 1959, while nUlubers 225 and 230 met the same fate a week
later.
:0: Peterborough, Ontario, became the ninth Ontario city to make use of the CNR s
IIpigg
yback service late in December, when tj., L lTIunicipality was placed on the rail­
ways network of lines served by highway-trailers-on-£lat-cars.
* Effective January 1st, 1960, new reduced rates were put into effect on the former
Northwest Communications System, now part of the Canadian National Telegraph Sys­
tem. The former N.C.S., built during the war for military purposes, consists of mod­
ern communication facilities serving the ll.laska Highway and contiguous territory.
* Which is the oldest passenger-carrying railway in the world? There is a new hol­
der of that title now, for Janunry 5th saw the end of service on the Swansea & Mum­
bles Railway. op(>rdtillg S-t miles of line between Oystenllouth, MUfll.bles and Swansea
in the southe·rn part of Wales. formerly the world 5 oldest passenger rail service.
Some 2)0 passengers bought ~p<.:rin 1 .l.&t-1 uu tic.kcts, and many hundreds more turned
out to witness the last trip on the line, which was opened by horse power in 1806.
Pa ss engel traffic began on Ma reh 25th, 1 &07. It is said that sails were tried in the
early 1870s, but they proved unsuccessful and stea£n power was used from 1877 until
1929. Since that time, service has been provided by a fleet of large, red, double-deck
passenger trams, picking up current by small pantat,;raphs mounted on the roof.
FROM THE CRHA News Report of Ten Years :.go:
,:,,!<,~ The Delaware &. Hudson RR inaugurated the use of diesel-electric locomotives on
its trains numbers 7 and 8 between Montreal and ,::.lbany, when train No.7 arrived in
Windsor Station on January 9th (1950) pulled by 1500 hp road switcher No.4!) 19.
*:: Canadian N~tional s locomotive No. 61134 is undergoing tests with Poppet Valve
Gear supplied by Dominion Engineering Limited.
**.: The lviTC has placed one-man cars of the 1525 and 1601) series on route No.25
(Notre Dame-Cote St.Paul). One-man cars are also replacing two-man cars on route
7 (Mount Royal) in the evenings and on Su~days.
C.R.H.A ~ . Qh.s..exvations -1960
_ .. P~ge 5 -5
. ,-, ——…_,_._—_._—_.–_….._-_.•._._..——–~~–-
;;, A ll- s t e el, 60-ton mu ltiple unit cars will be us ed, es tablishing a veryfrequent ten­
minute service between the Model City and Montreal . Thu s was described the r a i l
s
ervice through Mount Royal Tun nel tb 2.. ~: the Cr-nadi an Norther n Railway p ln:nn (~(~ ~O
esta blis h as par t of the deveIoprn errt, oy tne reilwa y COlnp?n y, of its new T ,)
,, :!
Mount Ro yal . But that was 1914. As is known, the pla nned ra pid transit s c rvi ces ~ ~d
not mater ia.liz e and thetunnelhasnotbeenused toits ca paci ty,
Now,however , interestinra pidtransitinMorit r-eal generallyha s be en n /::-:!,.:: 2 (l,
and M ayor Rornuald Bou rque of Outrernorrt is forrrring a cornrnittee to s t …. ldy~;.~ ; ~ : ;: ..: C~
ibilities of greater use of the three-mile bore under Mount Royal.
An ambitiouspr oject has be enadva nc edbyt woOutr e montcitizens,John IN . L 0!lg
and
Sidne y D enman, consisting essentially of re placin g the present train ner vices
through the tunnel by ra pid-tran sit-type operation with more frequent stations and
newelect r i c rollingstock. Thiswouldinvolv e the pu r c haseof subwa y-typera pid
transit vehicles, high level platforms, Po new fare-collection pr o cedu re and bi -direc ­
tional CTC s i gnaIl.i ng, with rernot ev contro lIed crossovers, etc,; to increase the tun­
nel lines ca pacity from 6,000 to 40,0(1) pas sengers per peak hou r .
C
anadian National Railways spokes m en have declared the scherne practicable
but not economically attractive–but the fact that railwa y r e presentative s have dealt
s
eriously with the subject lends weight to the r urnou r that some such altera tion in
s
ervice is not beyond considera tion, A furth er Indi cation that the ra i Iw a y is progre s­
s
ing towards the ra pid-transit plan in pr inciple, is th e announ cement in late Decem­
b
er th at the CNR would not inc rea s e the commuters fares by 10% as au thorized by
~h
e BoardofTransportCom mis si oner s lastNovember6th (andasput intoeffect by
the CPR on J l.nuary 1st) until R modern me thod of fare-collection ha s be en inaugur­
ated, some time in the spring. A furth er incentive to the railwa y in cooperatin g in
this scheme could, of course, be the proje ct of eventuallyturning th e whole oper at>
ation over to the MTC dr a Met ropol.i t.sr; Rapid Tr ansitAgency- – – t hu s climbing out
of
the unw elc oni e cornrnuter business gr acefully and completely.
* It has been r eported that the former CNR Newfoundland steamer, S.S.Kyl e, has
be en sold to the Ar ctic Shipping Compan y for use as a sealer. The 230-foot long,
1,
055-ton vessel has be en operated in Newfoundland and coa stal wate r s as a passen­
ger andfreightcarrier for the pas t 45 years.
;;, From Fredericton, NB, corne s word that plans are being worked out for the joint
r
ail-highway use of the CNR brid ge ac ross the Sxirrt John River at that point. H is
pointed out that th e railway us es the span for only a few mluutfS ca ch day, while the
present highway bridge is ov ertax ed.
,~
The Mayor of Haile ybury, Ontario, is looking for an old Toronto streetcar, one of
100 s
entnorthin 1922tor eplacehomesandoff icesburned out aft e r adi sas t rou s fire.
T
hisactionisbeingtakenat the request ofMr . JohnR.Stevensof the Branfor d Elec ­
tric Rai Iw a y s trolle y museum at E r-s t H ,ven, Connecticut, who fe els that C few of
tj e c
ar bodies may have sur vived as tool shed s or chicken coops. Mr. Steven s is en­
ga
ged in the restoration of Toronto Railway car No. 17 l0, a Io r rn er convertible car,
and hi s request to Ho i Le yburyhasinviewthe pos s ibility thatasimilar carmayhave
sur vived from whi ch certain parts peculia r to conv ertible cars might be salvaged.
: .I~ new type snowm elter has been developed by the New York Central Railroad,
w
hich cons is ts of a surplus air c raft jet engin e mounted on a ca boos e. Pushed ahe ad
ofatrain,thejet blast s yardtrac ks andswit chesfreeofsnowfor100feet . What
ha pp
ens to the resulting water is not explained.
C. R.H~.A ~ . ___ , __________ ~. Q.,hsg_rvations -1960 P.3ge S-5
————–~——-=~=—~~—–
;;, All-steel, 60-ton multiple unit cars will be used, establishing a very frequent ten­
minute service between the Model City and Montreal. Thus was described the rail
service through Mount Royal Tunnel tb2..~: tile C?nadian Northern Railway plRnnN~ 10
establish as part of the develop,ner.t, by me r<.:dlway cOlnpany, of its new TD·f. ;£
Mount Royal. But that was 1914. As is krwwn, the planned rapid transit servises d~J.
not :..n?.terialize Rnd the tunnel has not been used to its capacity.
Now, however, interest in rapid transit in Montreal generally h:=.ts been F]f::!.:~2r:i.
and Iv1ayor ROlnuald Bourque of Outrernont is forlning a cornmittee to st,ldy ~i.,~ ;~:i:· .. : C~
ibilities of greater use of the three-mile bore under Mount Royal.
An ambitious project has been advRnced by two Outremont citizens, John IN. I.J0!lg
and Sidney Denman, consisting essentieJly of replacing the present train Ge:rYic~s
through the tunnel by rapid-trRnsit-type operation with a10re frequent stations and
new electric rolling stock. This would involve the purchase of subway-type rapid
transit vehicles, high level platforms, a new fare-collection procedure and bi-direc­
tional CTC signalling, with remote~controlled crossovers, etc., to increase the tun­
nellines cRpacity from 6,000 to 40,01)1) passengers per peak hour.
Canadian National Railways spokesmen have declared the schea1e practicable
but not econom.ically attractive–hut the fact that railway representatives have dealt
seriously with the subject lends weight to the nunour that som.e such alteration in
service is not beyond consideration • .A further indic2.tion that the r;=i1way is progres­
sing towards the rapid-transit plan in principle, is the announcea1ent in late Decem­
ber that the CNR would not increase the commuters fares by 10% as authorized by
~he Board of Transport Coma1issioners last November 6th (and as put into effect by
the CPR on J l.nuary 1 st) until a modern method of fare-collection has been inaugur­
ated, some time in the spring. A further incentive to the railway in cooperating in
this scheme could, of course, be the project of eventually turning the whole operat­
ation over to the MTC dr a Metropolibr~ R;;:.pid Transit Agency—thus climbing out
of the unwelcoLlle COHlnluter business gracefully and completely.
:< It has been reported that the former CNR Newfoundland steamer, S.S.Kyle, has
been sold to the Arctic Shipping COa1pany for use as a sealer. The 230-foot long,
1,055-ton vessel has been operated in Newfoundland and coastal waters as a passen­
ger and freight carrier for the past 45 years.
;;, From Fredericton, NB, COlnes word that plans are being worked out for the joint
rail-highway use of the CNR bridge across the S–tint John River at that point. H 1.S
pointed out that the railway uses the span for only a few minutes cac.h day, while the
present highway bridge is overtaxed.
,~ The Mayor of Haileybury, Ontario, is looking for an old Toronto streetcar, one of
100 sent north in 1922 to replace homes and offices burned out after a disastrous fire.
This action is being taken at the request of Mr. John R. Stevens of the Branford Elec­
tric Railways trolley museum at Er>st H~ven, Connecticut, who feels that C few of
tje car bodies may have survived as tool sheds or chicken coops. Mr. Stevens is en­
gaged in the restoration of Toronto Railway Car No.1710, a former convertible car,
and his request to H~ileybury has in view the possibility that a similar car may have
survived from which certain parts peculiar to convertible cars might be salvaged.
* j~ new type snowmelter has been developed by the New York Central Railroad,
which consists of a surplus aircraft jet e:1gine mounted on a caboose. Pushed ahead
of a train, the jet blasts yard tracks ,and switches free of snow for 100 feet. What
happens to the resulting water is not explained.
——–
C.R.H.A. Observations -1960 Page S-6
* Effective Mar c h l s t, a new system of zones, fares and ticketing will be i naugur at>
( ed on the CNR lines through Mount Royal Tunnel, Montreal. Under the new plan, wh­
ich features flash cards good for unlimited rides within the time limit –stations
on the Car tierv i lIe, IVlontreal Nord and St.Eustache lines will be g r ou p e d into seven
zones with a uniform rate between Montreal and all stations within each zone.
Zone 1, which includes all stations on the Val Royal-Cartierville Ii na, and up to
PieIXonthe LViontrealNordline,willusestripticketssimilartothoseused on t.he
MTC. Tickets will be collected before trains are boar d ed at these points, thus elim ­
inating m any of the peak-hour delays. Fencing and other necessary equi pment is
being installed at stations where this is necessary.
For com.muter travel, between Montreal and Zones II to VII, rnorrthl.y and w eekly
pass-type cars will be sold, valid for an unlimited number of rides within the area
and t irne limit shown thereon. There will be a different colour for each period. Fol­
lowing are a few sample fares at the new r ates, which incorporate the ten percent
increase awarded recently by the Board of Transport Cornmissioners for Canada:
Unlimited
Zone No. Montreal to:.,!v10!,;thly Pa~ Remarks
I Mount Royal, Pie IX &: Cartierville Not available 25~ p~;-t-;ip
$9.20 for 40-trip.
II A Ma Baie &: Montreal Nord $1 L10
III Roxboro 13.10
IV He Bigras & Ste.Dorothee 15.05
V Laval and St.Eustache 17.10
VI Pine Beach and Roger Beach 20.20 Sumrne r s e rvvorily
VII St.Joseph du Lac & Pte.Calumet 23.15

Weekly pass-type ~1!.rSs will cost approximately 30% of the monthly rate, while a uni­
form rate of $5.95 per month will be charged those qualifying for travel on students
tickets.
:.~
The Canadian Pacific announced early in January that their new ship, now being
built at Vickers-Armstrongs Limited, Newcastle-on-Tyne, will be named Empress
ofCana.da byMrs.J.G.Diefenbake:r,wife ofCanadasPrimeNlinister,onMClY10th
when the new v e s s e I i!: launched. The new F.1l1preSS of Canada, flagship of the fleet,
at 27,500 gross tons, will be the largest liner to sail into Nlontreal and will join the
sister ships, Empress of Britain and Empress of England in the St.Lawrence service
between Montreal and the United Kingdom in April, 1961. Smartly streamlined, fully
aiaI-conditioned and equipped with stabilizers, radar and other modern navigational
aids. the Empress of Canada; 650 feet long, with breadth of 86.6 feet, will carry 1060
passengers, 200 first and 860 tourist. at a service speed of 20 knots.
Sheltered decks and other appointments have been designed with an eye to regular
service on the North Atlantic but air-conditioning and two swimming pools m ake the
new Empress easily adaptable to cruising conditions in the tropics during the winte r
season. The Canadian theme will be carried out in decorations and art treatment in
a number of the public rooms of the new ship.
* During the next four years or so, the CNR proposes to spend some $ 40 million for
CTC or similar pushbutton dispatching systems on 4,000 miles of main line from VRn­
couver to Hnlifax and Sydney, NS. The company says that the programrne. star t ed
last year, is the biggest installation of its kind ever undertaken by a railroad.
(
C.R.H • .!:… Observations -1960 Page S-6
* Effective Mrtrch 1st, a new system of zones, fares and ticketing will be inaugurat­
ed on the CNR lines through Mount Royal Tunnel, Montreal. Under the new plan, wh­
ich features flash cards good for unlirnited rides within the time limit –stai;ions
on the Ca:dierville, IVlontreal Nord and St.Eustache lines will be group-::d into seven
zones with a uniform rate between 1Iiontreal and all stations within each zone.
Zone I, which includes all stations on the Val Royal-Cartierville En~, ard up to
Pie IX on the LViontreal Nord line, will use strip tickets similar to those us~d on t.he
MTC. Tickets will be collected before trains are boarded at these points, thus elim­
inating many of the peak-hour delays. Fencing and other necessary equiprnent is
being installed at stations where this is necessary.
For comrrluter travel, between Montreal and Zones II to VII, monthly and weekly
pass-type cars will be sold, valid for an unlimited number of rides within the area
and time lirnit shown thereon. There will be a different colour for each period. Fol­
lowing are a few sample fares at the new rates, which incorporate the ten percent
increase awarded recently by the Board of Transport Commissioners for Canada:
Zone No. Montreal to:
——–
I Mount Royal, Pie IX &: Cartierville
II A Ma Baie & Montreal Nord
III Roxboro
IV He Bigras &. Ste.Dorothee
V Laval and St.Eustn.che
VI Pine Beach and Roger Beach
VII St.J oseph du Lac &: Pte.Calumet
Unlimited
.!vlonthly Pa~
Not available
$ 11.10
13.10
15.05
17.10
20.20
23.15
Remarks
25~ p~;-t-;i P
$9.20 for 40-trip.
Smnmer serv.only

If
Weekly pass-type ~arss will cost approximately 30% of the monthly rate, while a uni­
form rate of $5.95 per month will be charged those qualifying for travel on students
tickets.
* The Canadian P:=tcific announced early in January that their new ship, now being
built at Vickers-Armstrongs Limited, Newcastle-on-Tyne, will be named Empress
of C:::lnada
lf
by Mrs.J .G. Diefenbaker, wife of C;lnada S Prime ilUnister, on May 10th
when the new vessel is b.nnched. The ucw F.nlpress of Canada, flagship of the fleet,
at 27,500 gross tons, will be the largest liner to sail into Montreal and will join the
sister ships, Empress of Britain and Em.press of England in the St.Lawrence service
between IViontreal and the United Kingdom in April, 1961. Smartly streamlined, fully
aial-conditioned and equipped with stabilizers. radar and other modern navigational
aids, the Empress of Canada, 650 feet long, with breadth of 86.6 feet, will carry 1060
passengers, 200 first and 860 tourist, at a service speed of 20 knots.
Sheltered decks and other appointments h?.ve been designed with an eye to regular
service on the North Atlantic but air-conditioning and two swimming pools make the
new Elnpress easily adaptable to cruising conditions in the tropics during the wjnter
season. The Canadian theme will be carried out in decorations and art treatment in
a number of the public rooms of the new ship.
* During the next four years or so, the CNR proposes to spend some $40 million for
eTC or similar pushbutton dispatching systems on 4,000 miles of main line from Van-
couver to H1..lifax and Sydney, NS. The company says that the programrne, started
last year, is the biggest installation of its kind ever undertaken by a railroad.
(~
This magnificent coach stunned the populace with its elegance. It carri ed

His Royal Highness, Edward, Prince of Wales, on his Canadian tour.

In 1960, the passenger is king. This modern air-conditioned coach was built to

CNR specifications by the Canadian Car Company Limited,
Montreal, Quebec.

CANADIAN DESIGN is always changing!
This magnificent coach stunned the populace with its elegance. It carried
His Royal Highness, Edward, Prince of Wales, on his Canadian tour.
In 1960, the passenger is king. This modern air-conditioned coach was built to
CNR specifications by the Canadian Car Company Limited, Montreal, Quebec.
CANADIAN DESIGN is always changing!
raElroad equEpment Es IeEr busÈness
The designing of railroad equipment is highly departmental
ized,
embracing everything from metallurgy to electronics-from motive
power to track-laying and track maintenance equipment-from wheel
journals and autcmatic couplings to the esthetics of dining-car déc
or.
Although procedures differ £rom department to department withi
n
the railways, in most cases the project engineer designs detail
s and
writes specifications, for components, materials and finishes,
theh ,
supervises construction of a prototype either in the Ccmpanys shops
or by a supplier. After building and testing of the prototype, contracts
are issued for supply, usually by an independent manufacturer.
In the case of passenger equipment, its the responsibility of the desig
n
team to make sure that every passemger mile is travelled in q
uiet,
smooth, air-conditioned œmfort, regardless of weather. Since the l
ife
of passenger equipment is measured in millions of miles of tro
uble-
free travel, every design detail must be carefully analyzed be
fore
manufacturing begins. The CNRs team responsible for passenger car
equipment are (1eft to right), J. J. Harris, B.Sc.(M.E.), M
echanical
Engineer, Car Department; E. P. Stemshorn, Assistant Chief of C
ar
Equipment, and M. B. Turnbull, Assistant Mechanical Engineer,
Cai=, Department.the raÈlroads dei.end
on the
desEen eneEneer
The railroads post-war story is probably Can-
adas most graphic example of the impact of
creative design engineering on an entire indus-
try. Five years wartime operation far beyond
normal capacity, under conditions of minimum
maintenapce, brought Canadian railroads in
1945 face to face with a grim prospect-a
badly-deteriorated complex of neglected road-
beds-ver-age rolling stock-out-of-date com-
munications and maintenance facilities.
To ccmplicate the problem, new competitive
elements endangered revenues. Airlines, high-
ways and pipelines were striving for larger
shares of transportation volume. The prospect
of building the St. Lawrence Seaway posed an
additional problem.
To meet the situation, Canadas railroads went
into a crash program to modernize their entire
transportation empire.
Quickly, the design engineer emerged as the
key figure, putting his skills, experience, and
knowledge to work on every engineering aspect
of the problem. One by one the various facets
were completed and put into service-dieseli-
zation of power units-electronic controls and
communications for more efficient train move-
ments, yard operations, car sorting, tracing and
freight handling-automated signalling systems
to improve scheduling-the development of
special equipment for piggyback-mechanized
track maintenance-quieter, safer, more com-rfortab|e passenger equipment-heated box-cars
-custom-designed rolling stock for automo-
biles; bulk handling of sugar, salt, chemicals,
pulpwood. These are only a few of the improve-
ments the design engineer contributed to the
gigantic modernization program. Other items
are in the development stage-designed to
make Canadian railroads second to none in
world standards of efficiency, economy, and
safety for passenger and freight movements.
Even as sentiment dictates that we deplore the passing of the iron
horse, the design engineer takes the attitude that the past is dead.
His interest lies in performance data-economy-power-perating
efficiency-economy oÏ maintenance. How many Canadians know
that the first application of the diesel engine to railroad motive power
was made by Canadian design engineers? In 1929, the CNRs No.
9000 turned the tide of railway modernization away frcm electrifica-
tion and toward dieselization-a trend that is evident today in rail-
roads all over the world. Above is Canadas first native locomotive
-built in Toronto in 1853. Below, a CNR giant diesel, built by the
Montreal Locomotive Works, beside Old No. 40, which ran between
Montreal and Portland, Me., on the Grand Trunk Western.
)
No country on earth can point to a more
dramatic period of growth than Canadas since
1939. In 20 years, gross national product in-
creased 476.8%-from $5.7 billion to $34.5
biuion. Populatîon has Încreased 55.3%.
Canadas railroads have found this staggering
expansion a mixed blessing. To keep pace, they
put their entire industrial empire under the de-
sign engineers close scrutiny-an enquiring,
uninhibited curiosity probing every engineering
and mechanical detail.
Around the skills of the design engineer revolve
decisions involving finance – marketing – pro-
duction-expansion-activities that build sound
and profitable enterprise. His wide knowledge
of materials – components -production pro-
cesses and finishes give him a vital influence
over purchasing. His specifications cover power
and transmission components – controls – in
many cases the production methods to be used.
But he has an ever-present need to keep up with
the increasing flow of information about new
materials-new finishe_s – new components –
new ways of using old products. Because of
this, he takes a keen interest in his technical
reading. Through the pages of Design Engi-
neering he finds the information he needs. He
reads carefully and methodically-because hes
interested in knowing about your products and
what they can do for him.
You can reach him every month – hold hîs
attention – through the pages of Design En-
gineering. Hell read your advertising thorough-
Iy – thoughtfully. To get your products speci-
fied in Canadian-designed original equipment,
get into Design Engineering!
)
1960
EDITORIAL 0UTLINE
the desËgn engËneer ls
marke-conscÈùus
Theres no ivory tower atmosphere in the
design engineers office. His approach to any
problem is-the customer is king-and as
a consequence, he spends a good deal o£ time
considering the needs of the market-place.
While basic laboratory research and experi-
ment play an important role in the world o£
industry, the design engineers task is relating
technical developments to the needs and
wants ot` the consumer. The vital fibre of
engineering design is woven around the
practical, down-to-earth problems of filling
the needs o£ the market with new products
to do the job better-faster-more efficiently
-more economically-automatically.
Naturaiiy, heS corist`àrit,i-y iooking for some-
thing that will help him` fulfill this £unction.
New ways of using common-place materials
-new components and controls-new fin-
ishes – new production techniques – these
are the elements of his job. He reads Design
Engineering regularly to find out about
YOUR products-and studies your adver-
tising carefully and thoughtfully.
A fuïl schedule in black and white in DE will
reach design engineers across Canada at a
cost of less than 2c per impression. We con-
sider this to be Canadas most effectïve ad-
vertising value.
(
JANUARY: ELECTRIC MOTOR DESIGN
A multi-page feature on standards, sizes, insulation and application.
FEBRUARY: BETTER DESIGN FOR THE DRAFTING ROOM
Upgrading the layout of the office, the use of equipment, the value
of the department.
MARCH: DESIGNING WITH COPPER AND BRASS
` Electrical advantages, workability, corrosion resistance, thermal
conductvity, joining, finishes.
MAY: DESIGN ENGINEERING SHOW PREVIEW
An outline of show in New Yo.rk, May 23-26.
JULY: HYDRAULIC AND PNEUMATIC DESIGN
Basic design data and application of equipment.
SEPTEMBER: MECHANICAL POWER TRANSMISSION
J An issue devoted to design and applicaticm.
NOVEMBER: PLASTICS FOR THE DESIGNER
Types, properties and use.
DECEMBER: DIRECTORY OF SUPPLIERS-1961
To get into original equipment get into
Desigh EngineeringA MACLEAN-HUNTER pUBLicATioN 481 University Avenue, Toronto 2, Ont.

Demande en ligne