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Canadian Rail 101 1959

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Canadian Rail 101 1959

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I
JUNE 1959
—- -_._–,–,- –_.-,.._
CANADIANRAILROAD HISTORICALASSOCIATION
INCORPORATED.
P.O . BOX 22. STATION B
MONTREAL 2 . Q UEB EC
The regular June monthly meeti ng wi l l be Notice of
Meetingl held at the Projecti on Room of the Canadian Nat i onal HailJqays,
884 St . James Street West, Mont.r
eaL, on Wednesday, June 10th, 1959 at 8:15 PM.
It is hoped to arrange i3. pr ogramme of 16mm sound moving p
ictur es for that occasion, whe n we will be the guests of our member, Mr. L
orne C. Perry and the C.N.H. Member s are in
vit ed to attend, and, as usual , a cordial welcome wi l l be
extended to guest s.
UNIVERSITY GRADUATION FOR FOUR ~lli~m ERS
Asso ci ation News I
The mont h of May saw four members of the Ass­ociat ion r
eceive their Bachel or s degrees. FREDERI CK
FOHBES ANGUS, graduati ng fr om McGi l l Universi ty with
-,
t.l.o degree of Bachel or of Elect ri cal Engi neering.
NIl. Angus
is the son of the A
ssociati ons Honourary President .
CLIYFOHD ST
EPHEN CBEASLEY, also graduating fr om McGil l Univer ­
s
ity wit h the degree of Bachel or of Arts, int ends to continue
hi s
studies in the fi el d of Law.
CHARLES WILLI
AM KENNETH HEARD, another graduat e of McGi l l Univer­
sity, degree of Bachel or of Art s wit h Second Class Honour s in
Economics and Pilil i t i cal Science , wi l l continue toward his
Master s degree.
Mr. Heard is Recor di ng Secr etar y of the
Associat i on.
vHLLI
AM LEONARD PHAROAH, graduating fr om Sir Geor ge Wi l l iams
Col lege, wi th the degr ee of Bachel or of Commer ce, has al ready
joined Canadi an Nat i onal RalLways on a permanent basis. Mr .
P
haroah is the Associati on s Corr esponding Secr et ar y.
The Edi
tor and hi s Co~mitt e e offer their sincer e congrat ul ati ons . It
would appear that the Associat i ons fut ure is in good hands .
As a m
atter of interest our President, Dr. R.V.V. Nicholl s, him­self a Pro
fessor of Chemistry at McGil l Uni.v ersi.t y, was Marshal of the
Convo cation at that ceremony whi ch took pl ace at McGi ll on Fr i day, May 29th, at which the three McGi l l Uni versity degrees were granted.
Tll,c,; LxecutLve Commi t tee is considering a mi dsummer activit y in the
10:::::1 of an At, Home after noon tea on the car Saskat. cncwan, somet ime
d.lU·L:.i:c; the; mont h of July. The car, a gift to the Association by the . C
anadian Pacif i c li.ai lway, is presently stored at the plant of the Dom­i
nion Bridge Company at Lachine, Que. This will afford the membership in gene
ral a .chance to Lnspect. what many consider to be our most imp; ressive possessi on. Detai l s wi l l be mai led separately early in July.
(
( .
–, -,– ——,
l_—–<
JUNE 1959
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
INCORPORATED.
Notice of Meeting l
I
P.o. BOX 22. STATION B
MONTREAL 2. QUEBEC
The regular June monthly meeting will be
held at the Projection Room of the Canadian
National Ha ilJ,qays, 884 St. James Street West,
Tvlontreal, on Wednesday, ,June 10th, 1959 at 8
:15 PM. It is hoped to arrange a programme of 16mm sound
moving pictures for that occasion, when I,ve will be the guests
of our member, lVIr. Lorne C. Perry and the C.N.R. Members are
invited to a ttend, and, a s usual, a cordial welcome will be
extended to guests.
UNIVERSITY GRADUATION FOn FOUR IvlEMBERS
The month of May saw four members of the Ass­oci
ation receive their Bachelors degrees.
F
REDERICK FORBES ANGUS, graduating from McGill University with
t,b:.: degree of Bachelor of Electrical Engineering. Mr. Angus
is the son of the Associations Honourary President.
CLI~FORD STEPHEN CBEASLEY, also graduating from f.kGill Uni ver­
sity with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, intends to continue
his studies in the field of Law.
CHARLES WILLIAM KENNETH HEARD, another graduate of McGill Univer­
sity, degree of Bachelor of Arts with Second Class Honours in
Economics and Pihlitical Science, will continue toward his
Masters degree. Mr .. Heard is Recording Secretary of the
Association.
WILLIAlVI LEONARD PHAROAH, graduating from Sir George liJilliams f
College, with the degree of Bachelor of Commerce, has already
joined Canadian National Railvmys on a permanent basis. Mr.
Pharoah is the Associations Corresponding Secretary.
The Editor and his Com.mittee offer their sincere congratulations, It
would appear that the Associations future is in good hands.
As a matter of interest our President, Dr. R.V.V. Nicholls, him­
self a Professor of Chemistry at McGill Univer.sity, was Marshal of the
Convocation at that ceremony which took place at McGill on Friday,
May 29th, at which the three McGill University degrees were granted~
rh.s ~~xecutive Committee is conSidering a midsummer activity in the
form of an ilAt Hornell afternoon tea on the car 1JSaskat chewan
l1
, sometime
d.lu:LJE~ t,11.8 month of July, The car 1 a gift to the Asso ciation by the . Cana
dian Pacific l1ailway, is presently .stored at the plant of the Dom­
inion Bridge Company at Lachine, Que. This will afford the membership
in general a fhance to in;3pect what many consider to be our most imp;
ressive possession. Details will be mailed separately early in July.
.:
C.R.E .A.
~

News ReEor t – 1959 Page 63
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTOHICAL
. A330CIATION
Establ ished 1932•.
Incorporated 1941.
Edi t or ial Addr ess : P.O. Box 22, St at i on
IYBlI,
Montreal 2, Canada.
Editor: Omer S.A. Lavallee,
Deputy ~ditor : F.A. Kemp,
Asst. :Gdi tor : iV.L. Pharoah,
Publisher: John Saunders,
Co~nitte e: Anthony Clegg,
Lorne Perry.
News Repor t No. 101,
June 1959
Once
our Museum Project
r-ilEJv1BEllSHI P
In view of the planned ex
tension of our activities into the
museum field, present l y under active nego
tiat i on, the President wishes to
enlarge the Regul ar Membershi p wi thin
the Montreal area , and has i nvit ed t he members to scek
out friends who may
have interests in this fiel d, and who may t
hus be suitabl e prospects for admis
sion into the As s ociation ~
A special invitation is ext ended to
those of our r eaders who may reside in
t he Morrt .r-oal, arGa, but who have not yet
become Regular Member s of the As ~o ciat­
ion. ~ ogula r Membershi p f ee is ~3 .00
per year, and at t endance at two consec­
utive meetings, one to be introduced
and proposed, the second to be admitted,
is normally requi r ed.
is under way, there wi l l be many interest­
ing and grat if yi ng t asks which the members wi l l be abl e to undertake to make the
project interesting and successful. Those interested are
cor di al l y invited to contact any member of the Exe cutive ~ or any member of
the Associat i on, or wri t e to our post office box for details.
Our twelft h rol ling stock acqui si t i on, Ottawa Railway Di v
ision I� Transportation Commission car No.859, was made du
ring the month of May, fol l owing complete aban- do
nment of all rail ser vice in the city of Ott awa, by the former
Ottawa Electric Railway, on Apri l 30th, 1959. No.859 was the car whi.ch
carried the members in the fi nal procession on May 2nd, 195
9, and which af terwards made the last passenger tr i p to Britannia
and return. This car was purchased from Baker Brother s &Company Lim­i t ed
~~f
~the sum of @176.25, through the cooperation of the President of
tllat firm, Mr . E.M. Gl at t . The pri ce was the same pricethat the scrap
fir mpaid the OTC on a tender bid for the cars.
Through the cooperation of the Ot tawa Transportation Commissi on , No.S59 h
as been held at Cobourg Barn p8nding arrangements to move it to
Montreal in the near future. Also stor ed at Sobourg are other items
intended for preservation including car No.854, grinder No.6, sand car
No.423, and sweeper No. A-2. All other items, including passenger and
work equi pment , are being dismantled at time of vrri t ing by Boul evar d
Demolishers of Hull, Quebec. Tower Car No. 25 was sol d by the OTC to
the Branfor d Elect r i c Railway Association of Short Beach, Conn., USA,
and has al ready been moved to that museum property.
No. 859 was se
lected prior to abandonment because of its good mech­
anical conditi on. It is coincidental that the number will duplicate MTC No.859,
presently in semi-dismantled state .i.n Mont.r-eeL Youville shops,
but being held as a long-t erm r estoration proj ect by the Rai lway Division.
Our other Ott awa Car, No.696, is still stored in the property of the
Canada Cement Company at Hull. This will also be moved to Montreal . befo
re the winter .
(
,C.R.H.A.
,:It., ,
NewB Report – 1959 Page 6,2
9!UJADIAN RAILROAD HISTOHICAL
AS~:30CIATION
—-.-;;.;;,..::-;;.~.=;.;;..;;;;;.;;..;;;.;…——
Established 1932.
Incorporated 1941.
Editorial Address:
P.O. Box 22, Station 8,
Montreal 2, Canada.
Editor: Omer S.A. Lavallee,
Deputy ~ditor: F.A. Kemp,
Asst. :Gditor: W.L~ Pharoah,
Publisher: John Saunders,
Co~nittee: Anthony Clegg,
Lorne Perry.
News Report No. 101,
June 1959
MEMBEHSHIP
~ -.
In view of the planned
extension of our activities into the
museum field, presently under active
negotiation, the President wishes to
enlaree the Regular Membership within
the Montreal area, and has invited the
members to ::,tek out friends who may
have interests in this field, and who
may thus be suitable prospects for
admission into the Association~
A special invitation is extended to
thOSE; of our readers who may reside in
the MOEt:roal are::a, but who have not yet
be come :n,egular Members of the Associat­
ion. 2eg~lar Membership fee is $3.00
per year, and attendance at two consec­
utive meetings, one to be introduced
and proposed, the second to be admitted,
is normally required.
Once our Museum Project is under way, there will be many interest­j.ng and g
ratifying tasks which the members will be able to undertake to make the
project interesting and successful. Those interested are
cordially invited to contact any member of the Executive, or any member
of the Association, or write to our post office box for details.
~
Our twelfth rolling stock acquisition, Ottawa
_R, a
ilway DiViSiO, n Transportation Cormnission car No.859, was made
during the month of May, following complete aban- ,
donment of all rail service in the city of Ottawa,
by the:: former Ottawa Electric Railway, on April 30th, 1959. No.859 was
the carI]hich carried the members in the final procession on May 2nd,
1959 and which afterwaIds made the last passenger trip to Britannia and
return.-This car was purchased from Baker Brothers & Company Lim­i
ted ~~*.the sum of $176.25, through the cooperation of the President of
toot firm, VIr. E.M. Glatt.. The price was the:: same price that the scrap
firm paid the OTC on a tender bid for the cars.
Through the cooperation of the Ottawa Tran.::;portation Commission, N
o.S59 has been held at Cobourg Barn p8nding arrangements to move it to
Montreal in the near future. Also stored at So bourg are other items i
ntended for preservation including car No./354, grinder No.6, sand car N
o.423, and sweeper No. A-2. All other items, including passenger and
work equipment, are being dismantled at time of vvriting by Boulevard
Demolishers of Hull, Quebec. Tower Car No.25 was sold by the OTC to
the Branford Electric Railway Association of Short Beach, Conn., USA,
and has already been moved to that museum property.
No. 859 was selected prior to abandonment because of its good mech­
anical condition. It is coincidental that the number will duplicate MTC
No.859, presently in semi-dismantled state in l!Iontreal Youville shops, but
being held as a long-term restoration project by the Railway Division.
Our other Ottawa Car, No.696, is still stored in the property of the
Canada Cement Company at Hull. This will also be moved to Montreal, be
fore the winter.
II
Page 64.
C
. HY .A ~
.NeJ.~ )lep9!i: -1959
…… —. .. . -..-.–A system reorganization of the
3
y~) t. em Heorganiz,::ltior: of Op~r~ting ~dm~ni~,~r~t~_on o~ ~ts Opera;t ~ng
~
r~ rnent by Canadlan Pacl f l c Depart~G n ~ lS belng underta~ en
D
epc< i.J- -, Ih n d. P. f. R· 1
. . —–J by tole uana aan a ca: lC L Cl L_vvay.
_
.~ -…-. .–.. The prLnci.paL effect of this
rGJ:::-·t:;;J.:-lizati on wi l l be the complet e el imi nati on of of f ices at the Di stri ct
level , and the di sappearance of t he position or General Super i ntendent.
The present orga
nization of the C.P. R.Y s Operating Depart ment dates
fromshortly af ter World War II, and replaced a former ar rangement where­
by the rail syst emwas divided int o East er n and Wester n Lines. Presently,
Canadi.an Paci f i c has three Regions, with headquarters in Tor ont o, Winni :
Deg and Vancouver for Easter nj Prairie and Pacif ic Regi ons respectively.
The Easter n Regi on includes four Dist r icts, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ont­ar io
and Algoma, and subsidiary Dominion Atlantic Rai lway, Quebec Central
H
~.J. i lway , Grand. HiveI Railway, Lake Er ie & Norther n Rai lway and the Bay
1 Fundy and Great Lakes st eamer services. Pr air ie Regi on includes i.:
::mi toba, Saskatchewan and Alberta Distr i ct s , whi lethe Pacifi c Regi on
embr -a ces the British Columbia Distr i ct rail servi ces , the Esqui malt &
Nanaimo Railway, the Br iti sh Col umbia Coast Ser vi ce and the Brit ish Col umbi a L
ake & IHver Service.
The new reorg
anization wi l l see the Eastern l ~ egion cut in two,.into
a new At lantic and an Eastern Region; the present Pr airie Regi on wi l l shr ink to
include Manitoba and Saskat chewan only, while an enlarged Paci f i c Hegi on
Will take in the Al bertaDist rict. Certain rail subdiv­isi ons wi l l c
hange administrati on in the Nontreal area and in sout hern Saskat chewan,
while the headquarters af t.lre Brownvi l le Divisi on, now at
Brownvi l le Junction, Maine, wi l l move to Saint John, N.B.
The complet e text of the PresidentYs ci rcular gi ving effect to thi s change
is given as fol lows:
Cana
dian Paci fic Rail way C om p~ny ,�
Office of the President . Mont real , May 20, 1959.­
Ef fect ive July 1st, 1959, re-organization of admi ni st rati on of the
Oper ating Depart ment wi l l take place. The present eight distr i cts w
hich merge into three Regi ons wi l l be replaced by f our Regions, repor
ting to System headquartersmand exercising supervisi on over the Ope
rating Divisions and ,SubsLdLar i.es, The headquar t ers and jur­
isdiction of each of the four Regions wi l l be as foll ows :
ATLANTIC REGION EAS
TERN REGI ON­ He
Cl.dlJ

uar ter s.IIONTREAL Headquar ter s-! ORONTO
Br ownvil le Di visi on (with head-Smiths Fal ls Divisi on (excludi ng quar
ters at Saint John) the M&O Subdivi sion fr om Hurdman
Uoodstock Division East and the Winchester Subdiv­
FarnhamDi Vision ision fr omGrovehi l l to Vaudreui l .
Montreal Ter mi nals Divisi on Trenton Divisi on L
aurentian Di.vision (includinp the London Divisi on
M&O Subd ivisi on fr omHurdman Bruce Division East and the Winc
hester Sub­Tor onto Terminals Divi si on div
ision fr om Gr ovehil l to Sudbury Di vision Vaudr
euil ) Schreiber.Divi si on D
omini on At lant ic Hai hvay Canadian Pacifi c Electr i c Lines Bay of Fundy
Steamship Ser vi ce Great Lakes Steamshi ps Q
uebec Central Railway
(cont i nued page 71 )
(
· C. R. T~ _ A ~
-SYote: ~eOrg~niz~;i;n ;r op~r~ting–
Department, by Canadian Pacific
. -. –. -. …. …. -, ….. –.~.
Page 64.
A system reorganization of the
administration of its Operating Deoar
tgent is being undertaken
by· the Canadian Pacific Raill,vay • T
he princlpal effect of this
reorGnnization will be the complete
level, and the disappearance of the
elimination of offices at the Dist~ict
position of General Superintendent.
The
present organization of the C.P.R.s Operating Department dates
from shortly after World War II, and replaced a former arrangement where-
by the rail system was divided into Eastern and Western Lines. Presently,
CEmadian Pacific has three Regions, with headquarters in Toronto, Winni:
Deg and Vancouver for Eastern, Prairie and Pacific Regions respectively. The Ea
stern Region includes four Districts, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ont­
ario and Algoma, and subsidiary Dominion Atlantic Railway) Quebec Central H
:c.d.lway, Grand. Hiver Railway, Lake Erie & Northern Railway and the Bay
,i Fundy and Great Lakes steamer services. Prairie Region includes
I:anit.oba, Saskatchewan and Alberta illistricts, while the Pacific Region
ernbraces the British Columbia District rail services, the Esquimalt &
Nanaimo Railway, the British Columbia Coast Service and the British
Columbia Lake & Hiver Service.
The new reorganization will see the Eastern }cegion cut in two,. into a new Atl
antic and an Eastern Region; the present Prairie Region will
shrink to include Manitoba and Saskatchewan only, while an enlarged Pac
ific Hegion -will take in the Alberta Jistrict. Certain rail subdi v­
isions will change administration in the Nontreal area and in southern
Saskatchewan, while the headquarters of the Brownville Division, now at
Brownville Junction,lVIaine, will move to Saint John, N.B.
T
he complete text of the Presidents circular giving effect to this
change is given as follows:
Canadian Pacific Railway Compilny,
Office of the President. Montreal, May 20, 1959.
Effective July 1st, 1959, re-organization of administration of the
Operating Department will take place. The present eight districts
which merge into three Regions will be replaced by four Regions,
reporting to System headquartersm and exercising supervision over
the Operating Divisions and Subsidiaries. The headquarters and jur­
isdiction of each of the four Regions will be as follows:
ATLANTIC REGION
HeCldauarters-IIONTREAL
.,
Brownville Division (with head-qua
rters at Saint John)
Hoodstock Division
Farnham Division
Montreal Terminals Division
Laurentian Di.vision (includi~ the
M&O Subdivision from Hurdman Ea
st and the Winchester Sub­
division from Grovehill to
Vaudreuil)
Dominion Atlantic Hailway
Bay of Fundy Steamship Service
Quebec Central Railway
EASTEHN REGION
Headquarters-!ORONTO
Smiths Falls Division (excluding
the M&O Subdivision from Hurdman
East and the Winchester Subdiv­
ision from Grovehill to Vaudreuil.
Trenton Division
London Division
Bruce Division
Toronto Terminals Division
Sudbury Division
Schreiber.Division
Canadian Pacific Electric Lines
Great Lakes Steamships
(continued page 71)
,

·C •F?. H•A:.-!.!–_ News Report -1959 __~§B.§-.E5-
Fourth i nstalment of . ..
The Story of TurmeIs­
.• •by Orner S. Lava llee­
:rE} ~ , CC:c, TUIif,NEL­
The longest r-aiLway tunnel in Cariada is Cans.dian Paci fic­ R
ailway s Connaught Tunnel under Mount Sir Donald in the Selkirk Range­ of
the Canadian Rocky Mountains .­
One
of the conditions of the entry of Br i t ish Columbia into

~, :13 C[,n:dian Confederat i on in 1871, was the construction of a transcon­
! , ;l! ;ii: .~ i-:: 1 r-al Iway to connect that provLnce vii t h i t s sister provinces on
t,b/j ~3 as tern Canadian seaboa rd. As t.he Seventies passed by vii thout any app
r-e cLabLe attempt on the par t o f the Ot.tawa government , the infant
p~ovince t 8 threat s of secession glBW louder and louder and pr ompted the
ro.rmett on of the Canadt an Pacif i c RB.n:way, byprivate capital, in 1881.
The s
tory of the Canadian Pnci f i c RaLLway is t.orr wel l known
to be retold he re, but as it was e s~entiaI t hat t he line be completed
wit hin as short a time as possibl e , li t t l e attention wa s gi ven to ex-
t- t.unne

i
I
em
t h
. J.ne was, a: pu
tJ
nu
Ld L
y,
lid
rape
d II
ensrve
… ~
l ng
d
<•• e
I t
lC over
the Hocky Mount ains. After th e line had establ i shed i tsalf and had its: fut
ure prosperity assured by the development of the Pacifio coa st, the
at.t.erit.Lon of the Company wae br ought to bear on the important subject of
grC1,de reduc tion and reelignment . Two of the sections of line to· be affected by
this decision, and of wrn.ch I am sure you have al l hear-d,
were t he Lj.% grade , the rBig Hill , down the valley of the Kicking Hor se Rivor
fromHector to Field B. C., and the pr ecipi tous and avalanche­
ridden route over Roger s Pass, a~ t he summit of the Selkirks . Let us
take the lat ter first.
The S
elkirk Range which confronted the bui l der s of the
C.P .R. presented itself e:lZlen more formidably than had the Rocky Mount ai n
summit at Hector. The line, located up the Beaver River was, and sti l l is, one
of the most inspiring rai lway trips to be made in Canada. Just
west of SodaI Creek is a very high br idge spanning a foaming ca scade,
whence one of t.he most beaut i ful prospect s of the v11101e journey is to
be obtained. For this reason, it is known as rrSurprise Creek. Anot her
bridge on this line, originally fabricated of timber and 270 feet high, is
at Stoney Creek. The original railway was built fr om the Beaver
River , up Bear Creek, over Rogers Pass, 4,300 feet above sea level, and
dovm the west slope in a ser ies of rever se curves and loops, by way of
Glacier Creek, Ross Creek and the Illecillewaet Ri ver. The plague of
this line was the avalanche, and for purposes of protect ion, there was
an aggregate of four-and-a-half miles of snowshed on the line over the
pass .
To gi
ve some idea of the magni t ude and f orce of snow slides,
it is worth ment i oning that some of tho sl i de s have been known to-cx­cecd a milli on
tons, tr avelling down the moun tainside at a speed of a mi
le a minute; Even the uninit:l.atcd wi l l agree that this state of af­f
airs could hardly be left to remain on a main line r-at Iway: and , shortly
after the turn of the century, steps, in the form of a pr ojected five m
ile tunne l, were taken to remedy the situation.
Although thB Company fully realized the immenseness of the­
under-t.aki ng, they were in a burry , and one of the st ipulations of the­
contract , as a consequence, was the compl etion of the tunnel within­
three-and-a-half yea r s. The construction of the Selldrk Tunne1 (as it­
(
· C .I-t.H.A.
~–
Fourth instalment of •••
The Story of Tunnels
••• by Orner S. Lavallee
The longest ralhray tunnel in Can.s-da is Canadie,n Pacific
Raihray t s Connaught Tunne,l under Mount Sir Donald in the Selkirk Range
of the Canadian Rockv Mountains.
,)
One of the conditions of the entry of British Columbia into
~,:1,3 C[,rcdian Confederation in 1871, v,ms the constructian of a transcon­
,;l})j:-:i~ 1 railway to connect that provirlCe vli th its sister provinces an
t,rvj eastern Canadian seaboard. As the Seventies passed by wi thout any
a~]preeiable attempt on the part of the Ottavla government, the infant
p~ovincets threats of secession 51~W louder and louder and prompted the
form2,tion of the Canadian Pac ifie RB.tIway, by private capital, in 1881.
The story of the Canadian Pncific Rl.ilway is too-well known
to be retold here, but e.s it was essentiaI thnt the line be completed
within as short a time as possible, little attention was giv~n to ex­t
ensive tunnelling [lnd the line vms, tIT put it mildly, draped over
t
he Hocky Iv1ountains. After the line had established itself and had its:
future prosperity assured by the development of the Pacifie coast, the
attention of the Company was brought to bear on the important subject of
grC1,de reductlon and re/llignment. Two of the sections of line to be
affected by this deCiSion, and of vihich I am sure you hewe all he,~rd,
we re the h.-% grec,de, the Big Hi 11, down the valley of the Kickine; Horse
River from Hector to Field B. C., and the precipitous and avalanche­
ridden route over R03ers Pass, at the summit of the Selkirks. Let us
take the latter first.
The Se lkirk Range which confronted tl:i.e builders of the
C.P.R. presented itself ellren more formidably than had the Ro-cky Nountain
summit at Hector. Ihe line, located up the Beaver River was, and still
is, one of the most inspiring railway trips to be made in Canada. Just
vest of Sedar Creek is a very high bridge spanning a foaming cascade,
wheDce one of the mast beautiful prospects of the whole journey is to
be obtained. For this reason, i t-is imo1tm as Surprise II Creek. Another
bridge on this line, originally fabricated of timber and 270 feet high,
is at Stoney Creek. The orie;inal raihJaY vIas built from the Beaver
River, up Bear Creek, over Rogers Pass, 4,300 feet above ~ea level, and
dovm the west slope in a series of reverse curves aDd loop-s, by way of
Glacier Creek, Ross Creek and the Illecillewaet River. The plague of
this line was the avalanche, and for purposes of protection, there was
an aggregate of four-and-a-half miles of snowshed on the line over the
pass.
To give some idea of the magnitude and force of snaw slides,
it is worth mentioning that some of thE) slides have been known to ex­
ceed a million tons, travelllng dOltln the mountainside at a speed of a
m
ile a minute! Even the uninitiated will agree that this state of af­
fairs could hardly be left to remain on a main line railvmy and, shortly
after the turn of the century, steps, in the form of a projected five
mile tunnel, were taken to remedy the situation.
Although tbe Company fully realized the immenseness of the
undertaldng, they were in a burry , and one of the stipulat10ns of the
contract, as a consequence, was the completion of the tunnel within
three-and-a-half years. The construction of tbB Selkirk Tunnel (as itr
,C .R.H .A. _ _ _____–=-Pa~ 66
-~-
News Report -1959 =
was or iginally known) was characterized by the use of a smal l pi oneer
bore of service tunn el, similar to that used, in the Si mplon pr oject , at
a di stance of about 50 feet fr om the centre li ne of the pr o jected main
t.
unne L, at intervals of about 1,500 feet , cross headings wer-e cut to
the line of the main tunnel and thus, instead of but two working faces,
th
ere VIere quite a number upon which the workmen were empl oyed at all
-~. J~:Q~8 8 :!
Ihr-o ugh use of t.b Ls pl an, the cont ract or s were enabled to
f Lnl.sh the work about one year ahead of t i me, and they received a sub­
stantial bonus for doi ne; so. Con structi on was commericed in Septembe r
1?i 3
:J,::Jd the pi oneer bores wore drilled for t.wo mi les: from ea ch end uf
t :r1h i:Jnn ol an a line fi f ty feet to the north of the cerrtre line of the
n:J ~i .n r,:c;;,{rl1s L on the eastern section, and fi fty feet south of the cen tre
L .P B 01 the main tunnel from the weste rn end.
The
pre sent summit , ncar- the weet. portal of the Connaugh t, is
at an elevation of 3,19] feot, To the observer, it wouId seem that this
26,517-foo t (5 mi les, 39 ya rds) tunnel was a rat her expensive ef for t to
b
rirg the sumrtit. only 539 feet lower J pa.r-t. Lcu La r-Ly in v Lew of the fact:
t he..t t rw r :.ll 1,1J3 p~ ;:,a d (-; .las not reduced . Rl) ·in v ,·-;r · ~ the old li ne was short ­
e
ned by fr:t1LC···C:i.!lI·.·-G.··ha1f mi les and the enowaheds previoufuly mentioned
viF, ; S (]jslJCY.,;:-; 8 d ·,,, I i:.}} In addi tion to this, the ol d linels demise car ried
w
it:!:! it sorne ~~ ..6J: r3.c C:J ees of curvat u r e , the equivalent of more than
seven comp Lot.o c~Y8h; s . The oLd line al so contained several very large
br i
dges, aillO::lg th8ln &. stee l arch of 338-foot span, and a vi adu ct 14 0
fe
et high . It may a Ls o be obse rved t.ha t snow condi t i ons are extreme ,
[),veragin3 more tha n 400 inches annually.
Good ve
ntila t i on for the Connaught Tunnel was mo-st essent i al
and it was secured by the installation at the west port a l of twcr large
c
entrifugal blower fan s, each dri ven by a 500 hor sepower di esel engine
arid e
ach capable of delivering over 100, 000 cub ic feet · of free ai r pe r
minute .
The
first t r a in through the Connaught, ot.her than work t r ains,
was
on December6th, 1916. It wa s Ext ra 3869 West, engineer Rutherford ,
c
ondu ct.or Cormi e r, with 14 loads, 20 empties and the official car
Ohamp La Ln !; 918 t ons exclusive of t he of f i c ial car which was oc cupied
by D. C,
Coleman, at that ti me Assi stant General ]1anager . Thetrain
entered the east por t al at 21 :0lK and left the west por tal at 21:49K,
req
uiring 48 minutes to make the pa ssage. Thi s train cou ld not make
comp l ete pass age wos t by tho new ma in line , as the old main line was
still in place west of Gl acier station, blocking it. The por t ion crf
the o
ld line in the way of the nelV alignment wa B removed on December
d
ll
9th, and the first tr ai n, No. 1, the llImperial Li mite-with engine 569
and twelve cars, and engine 3846 assi st i ng, passed Gast por t a ] at 14:19K
and Hest port a l 16 minutes la ter. In 1920, st eps were taken to·have
the tunnel complet ely lirJGd and t.his wor k was finished in 1925.
! HE c._:p.._._fi—.-..e ;p~C f:~~I:_.TJEJ.E~LS,
rlE;: itt: :.:~ tll now to the other interep,ting section of,t he improve­
merrt p
rogra::-, on t he C.P.R. ma Ln linG, t.he 4% 8rade which was threadeEt
t.O~t1W 1J,s)r arl:-l. caut.Loue Iy by trains descen ding tr-om t he Continent al
D:1.T ::~d 8 t o FIe Ld, B. C~ , in the sorse of the Kickln5 Horse River, rrh e
aso
crrt of thi s gradc const i tuted as much of a problem as the descent-,
t J.ev].xH3 on. occa sion re quiring four locomotive s regu la rly. Ihe special
tr
ain for the accomodatiol1 of the Duke and Duch ess of Cornwall and York
was originally known) was characterized by the use of a small pioneer
bore 0:[ service tunnel, similar to that used in the S1.mplon project, at
a distance 01 about 50 feet from the centre line of the projected main
i~urmel. at intervals of about 1,500 feet, cross headings Jere cut to­
the line of the main tunnel and thus, instead of but two working faces,
there VTere quite a number upon which the workmen were employ-ed at all
Through use of tois plan, the contractors vrere enabled to
finlsh the work about one year ahead 01 time
9
and they-received a sub­
stantial bonus for doinG so. Construction lrms commenced in September
~L?13 a:Jd the pioneer bores wore drilled for tvJO miles from each end oi
t:nr.; tJ:nnol on a line fifty feet to the north of the centre line of the
)1;~1.i.:n tC;;lll1€ r on the eastern section, and flfty feet s-outh of the centre
L.Ee af the main tunne 1 from the vc stern end.
T
he pre sent summit, near the Ive st portal of the Connaught, is
at an elevation of 3,19] fect. To the observer, it would seem that this
26,517-foot (5 miles, 39 yards) tunnel was a rather expensive effort to
brirg the sumMit only 539 feet lower, partj.Qu~arly in view of the factr
thp.t-th8 r:J.IU:l3 g;:>adG das not reduced. FL:),tinVHr~ the old line was short.­
enE·,J. by f(ll..;.:r,·c~nl.·.–B.·half mi Ie s and the Sr..ovlBheds previouiHy mentioned
vif,;(; (Jj8pC-V:;;:~8d -,};:·11
o
In adc.:Utlon to this, the old lines demise carried
wi t~l it 8(111( ~~ ~6J: rJcc:;r8es of curvature, the equlvalent of more than
seven complRte c~.rc,i>:;s. The old line also contained severalvery large
bridge s, amo::1g th8ln E, stee l arch of 338-foot span, and a viadu.ct 140
feet high. It may c:dso be observed th[:l,t snoVl conditions are extreme,
(
o,v(3ragln3 more than 400 inches annually.
Good v
entilation for the Connaught Tunnel was mo-st essential
and it was secured by the installation at the west portal of two large
cGntrifugal blower fans, each driven by a 500 horsepower diesel engine
and each capable of delivering over 100,000 cubic feet-of free air per
m
inute.
The first train through the C011naught, othe:;: than vlOrk trains,
vras on D
ecember 6th, 1916. It was Extra 3869 West, engineer Rutherford,
condv.ctor Cormier, with 14 loads, 20 empties and the official car
n
Champlain; 918 tons exclusive of the official car which was occupied
by D. C, Coleman, at that time Assistant General Manager. The train
entered the east portal at 21:01K and left the west portal at 21:49K,
r
equlring lj·8 minutes to make the passage. This train could not-make
complete passage iicst by the new main line, as the old main line was
still in place west of Glacier station, blo6king it. The portion of
the old line in the way of the nmv alignment was removed on December
9th, and the first train, No.1, the Imperial Limite-d with engine 569
and twelve cars, and engine 3846 aSSisting, passed east portar at 14:19K
and Hest portal 16 minutes later. In 1920, steps were taken to have
the tunnel completely-liD_Gd and this vlOrk vms finished in 1925.
·;ryttL.:::rflJ: now to the other intere2,tlng section of, the improve­
me:;1f; progra::-, on t.he C. P. R. ma in linG, the 4% grade which was threadee::
t.O:::t1~01J.S J.J arl:-1 cE.:.utiously oy trains descend:Lng from the Continental
Djv!de ~oFi6Id, B. C., in the gorse of the Kicking Horse River, The
8-f::<,;ent of this Grade const-i tuted as much of a problem as the descent:,
tl(v.J.n~3 on occasj_on requiring four locomotives rEgularry. The special
train for the accomodatlol1 of the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York
——-
C. R. J:L~ h._~
News R~o rt -12~9 Page 67
in 1901, consisting of ton cars, wa s pul l ed oy five locomotives. For
the security of descendi ng trains, safety tracks were pr ovi ded at inter,.;.
vals and the swi tches we re normally set for these tracks. The switch­
tender stationed at each of these switches would not throw the rails in
line for the main line unless he received a wh i st Ie signal from t he
train engineer . This signal ..las to indicate that the train was under
control and thatit was in order to permi t its passage down the grade ,
In spite of these precaut ions, the li ne became notorious for runaways
and , as one veteran engineer put it, if a train got out of o orrtroI an
t he higher sect i on of t ho hi 11, it wouldn t t at.oj» untilit wa s i n Field
yard or upside down in the K:i.ckir:.g Horae , safety-tracks or no safety…
t.r-ac ks ,
Upon surveying t he r: ~>;n (:? fi)::tr means of improvement, it became
obvious to those in cha r gc c;t :::1<-: YlJfJcations that the distance between
the Divide and Field wc uLd ),,:d:, 9 ~::r ,: I, a longer and less pr eci pi t ous:
grade t
han the existing ~ 3 ~1.
It was at t.his t ,;, t,1
1
J.,t -(: 1<3 bo Ld suggestion was made to
lene;then t he mai n line by f o,!.::, miLe 8 by means of the construction uf
two spi ra l tunnels. In thi s vldY, the grade would be reduced from 4.5%
to2.2%compensa:ted. The Spiral Tunne l s we-re completed in 1908,
The Upper tunnel, or tunnel No, 1, is 3, 255 feet in length and
turns through 291
0
of curvature as it de scends 54 feet. The Lower tun­
nel (Tunnel No. 2 ) is 2,922 feet in lengt h and turns through 217
0
Whi l e
dropping fifty feet. Bot h tunnels are on an act ual gr ade o~ 1. 6% which
is equivalent to the compensated 2.2% of the whole line. The upper
tunnel lie s under Cathedral Mount ai n , and the lower under Mount Ogden.
The new line requires only: 36% of the motive p owe r employed on t he
old line. Hector Station, at the top of the spiral s , is 5,219 fee~
above sea level and Field, at the foot of the incline, is at an al t i tmde
of 4,501 feet.
THE e.ROCKVILLE T~!1~l:
Alittlecloserto Mont r eal er s , byvirtueofitsclaimtobe
Canadas pioneer , the ttunne T~ under-t he t.own of BrockvilIe, Ontario
deserve s not to be neglected . (For a fuller account of this tunnel,
C.F. Ne.ws~ort , July;…August 1958 -Ed . ) This tunnel, which is about
a third of a mi le in length, runs under the citypr oper , on the Canadian
Pacific Railway spur tot he wharf. This bore wa s built bYthe Brock­
ville and Ott.awa RaI Lway and was opened for serv i ce on the last day crf Dece
mber, 1860. The tunnel is equipped vrith door s to keep out the frost
in the wj.nter time, though they ar e left open dUTing the summer. Though
ithasbeenclaimed.thatthe Brockvi l letunnelis the onl y oneinthe
world wi t h doors, the aut.hor knows of at least one other suoequipped,
that at Wolfe I s Cove, Quebec City, wh f.ch i s on t he CPR line from Cadorna
to the ocean docks. This tunnel is a little over a mile in length.
THE IvlOUNT ROYAL TUNNEL
In t he hear t of Mont r eal , lies t he south end of t he Mount
Roy
al Tunnel whi ch is familiar to a considerable number of lv!ont r ea l Ilo
rking people as the poi nt of exodus from do wntown every evening t.CJ
tfue same degree as it is their means of entry each morning.
Proposed as earIy as the first decade of the present cen­
tury, surveying wor-k for t he construction of a 16,315-foot tunnel under
(
in 1901, consisting of ten cars, was pulled oy five locomotives. For
the security of de scending trains, safety tracks were provided a it inter..;.
vals and the switches were normally set for these tracks. The switcrr­
tender stationed at each of these switches would not: throw the rails in
line for the main line unless-he received a llhistle sj .. gnal from the
train engineer. This Signal was to indicate that the train was under
control-and that it was-in order to permit its passage down the grade.
In spite of these precautions, the line became notorious-for runaways­
and, as-one veteran engineer put it, if a traln got out of contro): an
the higher> section of tho hi 11, it woulcLn t t: stOp~ unti r it vmS in Fie ld
yard or upside down in the Kicki1:.g Horae, sarety-tracks or no-safety:­
tracks.
Upon
surveying the r:)<.::nr:: fir.1P moans of improvement, i t becam~
obvious to those in chargG nf ~h~ relocations that the distance between
the Divide and Field would ~0t p8~1~~ a longer and less precipitou&
grade than the existing ~.~~-
It was at trlis t; ,;,. :,i1cl,,t (,::1(; ;)oId suggestion was made to~
lengthen tho main line by fo!! .. : m::i,le 8 by means of the construction of
two spiral tunne Is. In this vray, the grade would be reduced fr-om 4.5%
to 2.2% compensated. The Spiral Tunnels were completed in 1908.
The Upper tunnel, 0-1 tunnel No-. 1, is 3,255 feet in length and
turns through 2910 of curvature as it descends 54 feet. The Lower tun­
nel (Tunnel No.2) is 2,922 feet in length and turns through 217,0 while
dropping fifty feet. Both tunnels are on an actual grade o~ 1.6% which
is equivalent to the compensated 2.2% of the whole line. The upper
t unno 1 lie sunder Ca thedral ~,fountain, and the lower under Mount Ogden.
Tho nevV line requires only 36% of the motive power employed on the
old line. Hector Station, at the top of the spirals, is 5,219 feet.
above sea level and Field, at the foot of the incline, is at-an altitmde
of 4,501 feet.
~HE gROCKVILLE T~M~b
A little closer to Montrealers, by virtue of its claim to be
Canadas pioneer, the tiu:mn:e r ullIder the toy-m of Brockv·i lIe, Ontario
deserves not to be neglected. (For a fuller account of this tunnel,
C.F. :tl~,ws~ort, July:…August 1958 -Ed.) This tunnel, which is about
a third of a mile in length, runs under the city proper, on the Canadian
Pacific Railway spur to the wharf. This bore was built by, the Brock­
ville and Ott€l.wa Railway and was opened for service on the last day crf
December, 1860. The tunnel is equipped with doors to keep out the frost
in the wlnter time, though they are left open during the summer. Though
it has been claimed. that the Brockville tunnel is the only one in the
world with doors, the ~ut~qr knows of at least one other so equipped,
that at Wolfe IS Cove, Q,uebec City, vihich is on the CPR line from Cadorna
tuthe ocean docks. This tunnel is a little over a mile in length.
TIDG HOUNT ROYAL TUNNEL
In the heart of Montreal, lies the south end of the Nount
Royal Tunnel which is fl3..miliar to a considerable number of 1Y!ontreal
I-Torking people as the point of exodus from downtown every evening .o­
the same degree as it is their means of entry each morning.
Proposed as ~arly as the first decade of the present cen­
tury, surveying I-Tork for the construction of a 16,315-fooit tunne 1 under
~ Q tr f..
_u _
~•._-:. ~_! -2:.:_.–:-:.-!-. _ Newa ReQQJt -1959 Pal2 G 6B.-.
Mount Royal began in earnest late in 1911. This wa s under the direction
of the Canadian Northern l-fontrea1 Tunne1 & Iferr.1i nal Company whi.ch was
i
ncorporated by letter s pat.errt on the 12th of August , 1911, to build a
t.unne1 arid
accompanyt .ng terminals, et.c ,.; for the Canadi an Nor-t.ne rn Rail­
way Syst em at Montreal . Excavation began at the we st por tal in June
1912 and i;,t the eaat port a l shortly af ter. First to be constructed VIaS
a smal l piLot tunnel arid this bore was complet ed a year-and-a-half later,
t.he head:Ll1g3 meeti nc; on December 10, 1913. 1flork immediately proceeded to
widen the tunnel to ·its pr e s ent apecLf Lc at.Lon u , 22 I x 30 I and thi s was
fi nished in Febr ua
ry 1916. Iher-e is a par-t.Ia I J5 n ing t h roughout and this w
as car ried out bTDe cember of the same year ; af ter el ect rical eqUipme
nt had been installed, the fi rst electr ical l y-prope l ledtrai n ran
through the tunnel on the 22nd 0f Ap:ril , 1917. Use of the tunne l was
approved by the Boar d of Hall 1,:<:7 Jcmrr.i s r,::cners on October 4, 1918 and t.he f
1rnt regula r pa s sEmger !~ !. t; , 1:1 8::,cd through t he bore on t he fo l l ow­
ing O
ctobe r 22nd.
W
l1en t.he t.unno1 was becd ng constructed , i t should be obse rved
that the centr e li ne s of the he a~in3 s illBt wi thin le ss than an inch.
F
rom the outset 9 six Cal ~ad i :-G .l. Gcrc..Ib>l ELect r-Lc locomotive s we re used,
a
nd t.heae were La t.er-suppl ement ed by t.wo muLttp Le unit cars whi ch have
si n
ce been scrapped; they were ca rs 15903 and 15904. Af ter the Tunnel
Terminal at the Morrt.r-ea I end was enla rp;ed. and preparat ion made to con­
struct the present Cent r al Sta t Lon t e rmi na L, this equipment was suppl e­
mented bv nine
Engl ish Electri c Co. elect ric locomoti ves obt ained from
the l
Jiontr cal Harbour Commis sion. All of this equipment oper ated on a
2
400-volt di rect current .
Owing
to this unconvent ional voltage, replacement par ts for
the locomoti ve motors wer e quite diff i cult to obt a in and the use of th e
locomot ives was
9 for a time, supplement ed by di.e De1-(~ lectric switching locomotives.
In 1951 and 195 2, three additional electr i c engine s and
eiGhteen muLt.j pLo-eun l t elect r ic cars were added to the service and the
u
se of the diesel -elect ri c engines were pract i cally dispensed with.
T
he Mourrt Roya l tunnel is double – t racked thr oughout
and, in gener al, the tr acks arc lai d in a si ngle tunnel , but , ther e are twin tub cs at e
ach end for a short distance. The bore is per fectl y
st r
e.:1_ght except for a ;:;11g11.t curve about an eighth o-f a mile inside the
cast portal , between that point and Grot to, where c ro~ s overs are locat ed
to fac LU.tate the handling of tra ins in and out of the terminal. (Pr e s­
ently, wor-k 1s in progr ess to eliminate the tviln tube s at the tunnel s
east end. and, at tho same ti me, to el i mi nate Grotto by mOVi ng the cross­
ove rs t.o t, poi nt out side the tunne l mout.h, -Ed. )
CON CUJ~ IOE
In a survey of tunnel l ing such as the foregoi ng, it is of
C~8 C impossibl e to gi ve amp le justice to tho whole subject. Af t er com­
plating the paper, the aut hor noted, among many other tunnel ling works, that
he 11.8/1 l1cgle cted to menti on the Apenni ne Tunne1 in Italy whi ch ha s
replaced the Sa
int-Gotthard Tunnel as the second. longest in use, the
Americ a~ Cascade Tunnel and other Rocky Mount a in tunnels, the 1I1Orld
famous Jungf rau Railway tunnel in SWitze rland, the highe st in the wor Ld ,
and, possibly of most inter e st , our Canadian St. Clai r tunnel betwe en
Sarnia and Port Huron.
I
have al so ref r ained from enteri ng int o the sub ject of un de r­
ground rapi dl. tr ansi t, as that is 2, fic1d in i tse If. To sumup, I hope
(
Mount Royal began in earnest late in 1911. This vIas under the direction
of the Canadian Northern Montrea.l Tunnel & 1Terr:1inal Company which TaS:­
:l,ncorporated by lett.ers pateJJt on the 12th of August, 1911, to bulld a
tunnel end aceompanying terminals, etc., for the Canadian NortYlern Rail­
wa.y System at Montreal. Excavation began at the west portal in June
1912 and i~t the eaDt portal shortly after. First to be constructed vms a
small pilot tunnel and this bore was completed a year-and-a-half later,
the head:l11gr:.l mcetinc; on December 10, 1913. Irlork immediately praceeded to
widen the tunnel to its present specificatinTIs, 221 x 30
1
and this was
finished in FJtruary 1916. rEhere is a par-i:ial I1n1ng throughout and
this was carried out bT December of thB same year; after electrical
equipment had been installed, the flrst electrically-propelled tra1n ran
through t.he tunnel on the 22nd (,:0 Ap:>:>il, 1917. Use 01 the tunnel was
approved by the Board of Raih:<=1,7 Jcmr:r:i8L~cncrs on October 4, 1918 and
the first regular passengertr~i~ passed through the bore on the follow­
ing October 22nd.
Wl1E::n the t.unnc 1 was b8ing constructed, it should be observed
that the centre lines of the h8a~in3s ilre~ within less than an inch.
From the outset 9 six Car::adi:i::. Gc,J},,-.rEd Electrlc locomotive s were used,
and theEJe were later supplem~nted by two multiple unit cars vlhich have
since beeD scrapped; they were cars 15903 and 15904. After the Tunner
Terminal at the Montreal end was enlarp;ed and preparation made too con­
struct the l-JrE. sent Central Station te nilina1, this equipment was supple­
mented bv nine English Elactric Co. electric locomotives obtained from
the IVIontrcal Harb~;ur Commission. All of this equipment operated on a
2400-volt direct current.
Ow
ing to this unconventional voltage, replacement parts for
the locomotive motors were quito difficult to obtain and the use of the
locomotives was, for a time, supplemented by diefOlel-electric switching
locomotives. In 1951 and 1952, three additlona1 electric engines and
eiGhteen ml .. lltiplo-uni t electric cars were added to the service and the
use of the diesel-electric engines were practically dispeYlsed with.
Tho I:Ioun.t
Royal tunnel is double-tracked throughout
and, in general, the traoks are laid in a single tunnel, but, thero are
tVllll tubes at eHch end for a short distance. The bore is perfectly
stralght oxcept for a Eil1ght curve about aYl eighth o-f a mile inside the
east pOlto.1, b6tWf,en that point and Grotto, where crossovers are located
to faci:Litate the handling of trains in and out of the terminal. (Pres­
ently, work is in progress to eliminate the twin tubes at the tunnels
east end and,::tt tho same time, to eliminate Grotto by moving the cross­
overs to n point outside the tunnel mouth. -Ed. )
CONCLU~IOE
In a survey of tunnelling such as the foregoing, it is of
C~8C im:possible to give amplo justice to the whole subject. After com­
pleting trw paper, the author noted, among many other tunnelling works,
that rIG h[~ .. (l nog1e cted to mention the Apennine Tunne 1 in Italy which has
replaced the Saint-Gotthard Tunnel as the second longest in uso, the
America~ Cascade Iunnel and other Rocky Mountain tunnels, the world
famous Jungfrau Hailway tunnel in SWitzerland, the highest in the vwrld,
and, possibly of most interest, our Canadian St. Clair tunnol between
S
arnia and Port Huron.
I
have also refrained from entering into the subject of under­
ground rapidl. transit, as that is a field in itself. To sum up, I hope
­
r:_R-H.A.
__ _ _ ;;;;..w_J_[(.~:.l-Page -..:N….e_sJ)ort 1959
th
at this account will be of interest and use. Unlike other branches of engi
neer i ng, such as bridges and buildings, wher e the works of designers
and bui lders li ve on to impress the pUblic, there is no single visual
impression to be gai ned f roma tunnel, indeed, it is seldom even possi ble to
see both portals at once. Consequently, we must rely on written acc
ounts for our impress ions, and it is in an attempt to outli ne the met hods and
progress i n thi s par ticular field, t hat this paper has been wri t t e
n.
OSAL. 1949.
THE EXCURSION TO BANCROFT SUNDAY,
MAY lOT~ ~ 1959
IN
ACCORD WITH THE POLICY of Lt s Trip Committee, the Assoc i ation
likes to take advantage of its special train movement s on excursions
to explore the railway byways , rat her than the mainlines. We have a
lways found that our passenger s seem to pr efer the secondary lines,
where photographi c possi bilities abound, as evidenced amply by the
thousands of photographs which our passengers have t aken on CRHA trips
in the course of the ten years in which suchtrips have been sponsored.
Such an
excursion waS the one held over Canadian Nati onal lines on S
unday, May 10th, 1959, from Bel leville to Bancrof t, Ontari o and r
eturn, largel y over li nes of the former Central Ontario Rai lway. Thi s was
the fi rst steam trip ever undert aken by the As sociation whi ch did
not or igi nate in Mont real . In this way, we wer-e rel ying upon the
suppor t of our many members and friends who resi de outside of our head
quarters city to make the trip a success, and it must be sai d that
they responded admirably. Upwards of 170 passenger s partici pated,
along with several iioff i ci al mot.or-cader-s! , who gener ously and volunt ­
arily paid a partial fare to avoi d t he stigma whi ch has come to be
at t ached to non-supporting participants. The tr i p was ar r anged by
the Tr i p Committ ee consisting of Wi l l i am D~ McKeown and A.S.Walbri clge.
The Association cooperated with the Upper Canada Rai lway Society
of Toronto, to the extent that the UCRS provided the lunch counter car
service in the train. This car was manncd by those UCRS members who a
re also members of the Ontario El ectric Hai l way Historical Associat­ion of R
ockwood, Ontario. The lunch counter car did a satisfactory
business, we are pleased to say, in spite of 21t ernat i ve eating facil ­i
ties at Bancr of t, where the tr ain laid over fer an hour.
The tr
ain cons isted of six cars; a baggage car, three pass enger
coaches, a lunch counter car and another coach, in that order. The m
otive power was provi ded by two locomot ives, emulating our ver y succ­
essful excursion of Mar ch, 1958. The engines used on this occasi on w
ere Canadian National Hailways iJo.90, a 2-6-0 and No.2649, a 2-3- 0 .
As is usual on our tr i ps, the Nati onal systems Bel levil le Di vi si on off i ci
als spared no effort to gi ve us a clean and resplendent train.
T
he t rain started from Bellevi l l e sharp on t ime at 7: 45 AM, and
the passengers, provided as usual witll a printGd leaflet explaining
the territory through which our excursion was being operated, prepar­ed
themselves for t he 198-mile round trip. The f i rst phot o stop was
at Foxbor o wher-e the train made a r-un-epast over a br idge f or the
benefit of acti on photographer s , Qui te a long wait ensued at Anson Junct i
cin, due to a report that some ot her passengers were on their
(
. _C….;.._R…;._l-1…; ._A.;…..-_________ N . …;;.e_w.;….s_n…;e…1;p~0…;r_t~-_1;;;;.9.::;.._~5~9_……_-________ …;;P…;;a~g:l..e~_?9
that th~s account will be of interest and use_ Unlike other branches of
engineering, such as bridges and buildings, where the works of designers
and builders live on to impress the public, there is no single visual i
mpression to be gained from a tunnel, indeed, it is seldom even possible
to see both portals at once. Consequently, we must rely on written
accounts for our impressions, and it is in an attempt to outline the metho
ds and progress in this particular field, that this paper has been
written.
THE EXCURSION TO BANCROFT
SUNDAY, MAY lOT~) 1959
OSAL. 1949.
IN
ACCORD WITH THE POLICY of it,s Trip Committee, the Association
likes to take advantage of its special train movements on excursions
to explore the railway byways, rather than the main lines. We have
always found that our passengers seem to prefer the secondary lines,
where photographic possibilities abound, as evidenced amply by the
thousands of photographs which our passengers have taken on CRHA trips
in the course of the ten years in which such trips have been sponsored.
Such an excursion waS the one held over Canadian National lines
on Sunday, May 10th, 1959, from Belleville to Bancroft, Ontario and
return, largely over lines of the former Central Ontario Railway. This
was the first steam trip ever undertaken by the Association which did
not originate in Montreal. In this way, we were relying upon the
support of our many members and friends who reside outside of our head
quarters city to make the trip a success, and it must be said that
they responded admirably. Upwards of 170 passengers participated,
along with several official motorcaders if, who generously and volunt­
arily paid a partial fare to avoid the stigma which has come to be
attached to non-supporting participants. The trip was arranged by
the 11ip Committee consisting of VVilliam D~ McKeown and A.S.Walbriclge.
The Association cooperated with the Upper Canada Railway Society
of Toronto, to the extent that the UCRS provided the lunch counter car
service in the train. This car was manned by those UCRS members who are al
so members of the Ontario Electric Hailway Historical Associat­
ion of Rockwood, Ontario. The lunch counter car did a satisfactory
business, we are pleased to say, in spite of 2lternative eating facil­
ities at Bancroft, where the train laid over fer an hour.
The train consisted of six cars; a baggage car, three passenger
coaches, a lunch counter car and another coach, in that order. The moti
ve power was provided by two locomotives, emulating our very succ­
essful excursion of March, 1958. The engines used on this occasion
were Canadian National Hailways No.90, a 2-6-0 and No.2649, a 2-3-0.
As is usual on our trips, the National systems Belleville Division o
fficials spared no effort to give us a clean and resplendent train.
The train started from Belleville sharp on time at 7:45 AM, and
the passengers, provided as usual wit}l a printed leaflet explaining
the territory through which our excursion was being operated, prepar­
ed themselves for the 198-mile round trip. The first photo stop was
at Foxboro 1,oJher8 the train made a 1irun-past n over a bridge for the
benefit of action photographers, Quite a long wait ensued at Anson
Junction, due to a report that some other passengers were on their
..-­
C. l: l. II•i~ •

——:;.-~—-
N_e…..w_S_n ~e…..l2or t – 1959 Page 70
1
Excur s i on t o Bancr oft (contf d) way
from Bel l evi l l e by qutomobile. Ther e w
as a stop at Marmora, where our r.~ngine s took wat er , and sever ­al
others between stations on the way north, where our route took us
through Eldor ado, Bannockburn, Gi l mour and Det.Lor, Mo st of these were
ilrun-past
d
st ops , and judgi ng fromthe first result.s of photographs
whi ch we have examined, the tr ouble which the Commi t tee took to sel­ect
the photo stops on a pi l ot tr ip earlier this spring on the regul ­ar m
ixed trai n, was wel l worth the trouble.
Northward, the train stopped only brief l y at Bancroft, then pro­
ceeded 2.8 mi les nort h to the wye wit h the former Irondale, Bancrof t
&Ottawa Railway, at York River. Here the train was turned, and it t hen
returned t o Bancr oft f or t he l ayover.
On the southwa:bd journey, stops we r -e made at Sparrow Lake, Ormsby Juncti o
n, Marmora and Anson. From Anson, our route deviated fromthe
northbound trip in that the trai n followed the Moira Ri ver and Trent
Canal into Trenton. The town wye in Trenton was used to t urn the train whi ch r
eturned t.o Trent on Juncti on, thence along the main Ior-ont.o-Hon­
treal line to Bel levi l le. The CNR train No.6 fol l OWing closely behind,
no time was lost.
The run from Bel levi l le to Anson had been over the Grand Junct i on Ha
ilw2.y sect i.cn of the Midl and Rai lway of Canada, that from Anson to York
EivEH and return to Trenton over the former Central Ontar i o Rai l ­w
ay, whi le the port i on from Trenton Junction to Bel levi l le was over
the former Grand Tr unk Hai lway. All of these li nes are now incor por­a
ted in Canadian Nati onal Rai lways.
It shou
ld be noted that among t.he participants in our tr ip was a
crew tr-om the Nati onal F:Ll m Boar~d_o.f_C.anada _,_under the_dir:ecti on of
Mr-, T.D. Macartney-Fi lgate; this crew was making a document ary 16 mm
filmf or television rel ease on the subject of the steam locomot i ve.
Our passenger s carne f r om t he Hont real and Io r-ont.o ar eas, and live had
many friends from the United States. Repr esenting Canadi an National Hai lways w
ere Messrs, J.A. Lomas, AssLst. an t ~)uperint endent , and L. N. Gi
lchrist , Ci t y Passenger Agent, both of Bel levi l le. The tr ain vms
in charge of Conduct or Dorah, while the other member s of the crew
incl uded Trai nmen Doyl e and Stichomb, engi nemen Guest and McQuaid on No
.90, and Mort imer and Bridger on No.2649. The man most responsible for t.he ar
rangements, thr ough whom the Assoei ation deal t with the Can­a
dian National , our very good fr iend NIr. Jules G. Leduc, Special Pass­
enger Hepres ~ ntat ive in Mont r eal , unfortunat ely, was not present.
I
I
Fol l owing the arr ival at Bel levil le, the passengers dispersed
rather qui ckly, either by the two evening tr ains, cast.bound and west­bound,
or by automobi le, to meet again on our Fall Fol iage weekend
I
, which will be hel d t his year on Saturday and Sunday, October 3rd and
l 4t h . Se E) J__ut__ _ _l ~.~o__he_nt
PHOTOGli.APFL3 WANTED: Those of our readers who att ended t he Bancroft
field tri p over Canadian National Rai lways, are invited to send
print s of what they consider to be their better photographs, to be
included in the Ar chives of t he Associat i on as a permanent r ecor d. The pict ur es shou
ld be identified with location and name of photo ~
grapher. Any si ze pictures wi l l be very welcome for this purpose. Thank you.
(
. _C_. __ j~_.~T_!._i_~~~ ______ ~ ______ ~~I_N_e_w_s __ n~e~B_o_r_t~,_-__ ~1~9~5_9_, ______________________ P_a_~~g_e~7~0
I
Excursion to Bancroft (contfd)
way from Belleville by qutomobile.
There v-JaS a stop at Marmora, where our (~ngines took water, and sever …
al others between stations on the way north, w]1ere our route took us
through Eldorado, Banno ckburn, Gilmour t.lnd Detlor. Mo f:3t of the se were
1Irun-past 11 stops, and judging from the first resu1t.s of photographs
which we have examined, the trouble which the Committee took to se1-
t:: ct the photo stops on a pilot trip earlier this sp:r.~ing on the regul­
ar mixed train, was well worth the trouble.
Northward, the train stopped
ceeded 2.8 miles north to the wye
& Ottawa Railway, at York River~
then returned to Bancroft for the
only briefly at Bancroft, then pro­
with the former Irondale; Bancroft
Here the train was turned, and it
layover.
On the southwa:bd journey, stops were made at Sparrow Lake, Ormsby
Junction, Marmora and Anson. From Anson, our route deviated from the
northbound trip in that the train followed the Moira River and Trent
Canal into Trenton. The town vrye in Trenton was used to t urn the train
which returned ;-,0 Trenton Junction, thence along the main Toronto-Mon­
treal line to Belleville. The CNR train No.6 following closely behind,
no time was lost.
The run from Belleville to Anson had been over the Grand Junction
Hai11JlT2.y Eiection of the Midland Railway of Canada, that from Anson to
York i-liver and return to Trenton over the former Central Ontario Rail­
way, while the portion from Trenton Junction to Belleville was over
the former Grand Trunk Railway. All of these lines are now incorpor­
ated in Can-adian National Railways.
It should be noted that among -the participants in our trip was a
crew fr0171. the National Film Board of Canada.,-Llnder the directi-on of
Mr. T.D. Macartney-Filgate; this crew was making a documentary 16 rhm
film for television release on the subject of the steam locomotive.
Our passengers camE-: from the Hontreal and foronto areas, and we had
many friends from the United States. Representing Canadian National
Hailways were Messrs, J.A. Lomas~ jh-)sis-l~ant Superintendent, and L.N.
Gilchrist , City Passenger Agent, both of Belleville. The train vias
in charge of Conductor Doran, while the other members of the crew
included Trainmen Doyle and Stichomb, engirtemen Guest and McQuaid on
No.90, and Mortimer and Bridger on No.2649. The man most responsible
for th(a arrangement s, through whom the Asso eiation dealt with the Can­
adian National, our very good friend NIr. Jules G. Leduc, Special Pass­
enger Hepres~ntative in Montreal, unfortunately, was not present.
I Following the arrival at Belleville, the passengers dispersed
I
rather quickly, either by the two evening trains, eastbound and west­
bound, or by automobile, to meet again on our Fall Foliage weekend
which will be held this year on Saturday and Sunday, October 3rd and
l 4th. SC-3e y_O_u __ t_h_e_n_t_t ______________________ -.-______ …….
PHOTOG11AHL3 WANTED: Tho se of our readers who attended the Bancroft
field trip over Canadian National Hailvlays, are invited to send
prints of what they consider to be their better photographs, to be
included in the Archives of the Association as a permanent fecord.
The pictures should be identified with location and name of photo~
[rapher.Any size pictures will be very welcome for this purpose. Thank
you.
C.It.H.A. News Re£or t – 1959 Page 71
CPR Re~r g anizat ion (cont i nued fr om page 64)
PHAIHIE HEGION PACIFIC HEGION
H.ea1quarter s-ItJINNI PEG HeadquartElr,1?-VANCOUVER
Fort Wil l iam Terminals Division Merti ci ne Hat Division
Kenora Di vi sion Lethbridge Divi si on (excl udi ng the Winni p
eg Terminals Divi s ion Al.tawan and Not.ukeu .subdivi s ions) Po
rtage Di vision Calgary Divisi on
Brandon Di.visi on Edmonton Di vi sion Hegi na Di visi on Reve
lstoke Divi s i on Moose Jaw Divisi on (incl uJing V
ancouver Divisi on
the Al tawan and Notukeu Kootenay-Divi s i on� S
ubdivisions) Ket tle Val l ey Division�
Saskatoon Divisi on r:; ~ : (J ; .:L;)alt & Nanaimo Hail way�
;~~ , o, ~.ak e & Ri ver Service�
BoL. ~oa st Steamship Service.�
11 11
(Signed) N.R. Crump
President .
11
Divisi on Superi nt endents wi l l report direct to Herional General Managers . A
dministrative offices wil l thus be removed fr om North Bay, Ont . , Moose
Jaw, Sask . , and Cal ~ary , Alta. , as well as at Brownvil le Jct., Maine.
The Ope
rating Depar t ment reorganizati on is not expected to have much
effect on t he organization of ot her departments .
00000000000
SOME l~i!EN T Y THEBE YEAHS AGO, the Association
THE ASSOC IAT ION t S~ erected a hist oric site marker near the town
~
HISTOHIC SITE MARKER J of Laprai r ie, on the opposi t e shore of the Sa
int Lawrence River from Montreal .
The marker, er ected
beside Highway 9a, the old Lacol le Road, about I! mi
les from Laprai rie (see map), marks a crossing of the roadbed of Canad
as first railway, the Champlain &Saint Lawr ence Rai l Hoad, which was op
ened between Laprairie and St . .Johns , (~ue . ?fi July 21st, 1836. The tr ack was ab
andoned about 1852, after the terminus of the l ine had been
r~lOved t o IfIof fat Y s I~ lancl , or ;y-··, L . Uf .
;::iout h Montreal as ~t was t hen l if ! -(0 :+ ~{~ III ~t .
called, but th~ roadbed is sti l l IiI 1 Ii CNQ sm,IDJ .
c~
~ arly to ~ b.e seen ~ ome 1
07,
y~
ars i..: .:,. =:::~:..-:j1…._….. _… . illMhl/~1_
arter the I emoval of the r-ai.Ls , … .r – .c}. :~ : :: :-=-:-==- . <:: ~ --;?..:~. ~::~~ ..,1:-;:-_-. --:
I Ij l- ~ -­
jI! .• o j- . . .;-, ST.Jot/I.J)
The marker i t self consists of ~ V\ -IX ) I; • I.:.
a piece of railway rail set upright \ \ :I 1
in a concrete bas e, vtith a cast-~ .–.tt+i–I+rH+–H-h; S ~ .S~.l:.. i
~ron pl~te bo~t~~ ~6 t he ~op ?ear –
\ II. 1« ~b I~5~ ~ —~
ang an a.ns cr-apt a.on, After t.werrt y-I h~.c..,,,,,c -I f . / Ih6HIIJAI
t.h tl k -./, –II/.-or /,HI&IIIIii1 1
II .r ee years , .ie mar e1 J,S now scm-j .; C: {.:-q.• I . 9A
eWh~t rus~e~ though physical.Ly in l ;I! W~A~r : 9 . C~ tIA \
gooc condi t .i.cn, A coat of paLrrt I I! I /._ C0({ (TlflRKtRt q
would go a long itJay t oward helping I\…: I 4 MII)S£I1A ::
to preserve it and make it, as iI) I ~ vl?i . , TolMCLr1
wel l , more conspicuous and presen-1– . -T ~ ..—— ­
tabl e.
C.H.H.A. News Report -1959
CPH Reorganization (continued from page 64)
Pl1AIHIE HEGION
Rea iquarters-ItJINNIPEG
PACIFIC HEGION
Headquarters-VANCOUVEH
i
Merticine Hat Division Page
71
Fort William Terminals Division
Kenora Division Lethbridge Division (excluding the
Winnipeg Terminals Division
Portage Division
Brandon Division
Hegina Division
Moose Jaw Division (incluJing
the Altawan and Notukeu
Subdivisions)
Saskatoon Division
(Signed) Al
tc1wcm and Notukeu .subdivisions)
Calgary Livision
Edmonton Division
Revelstoke Division
Vancouver Division
Kootenay-Division
Kettle Valley Division
:C~~cj;,:L:;alt & Nanaimo Haihvay
;~~, (~. :,al~e & River Service
B.L. ~oast Steamship Service.
11
N .R. Crur1p
President.
D
ivision Superintendents will report direct to Rerional General Managers.
Administrative offices will thus be removed from North Bay, Ont., Moose J
avv, Sask., and Calc;ary, Alta., as well as at Brownville J ct., Maine.
( The Operating Department reorganization is not expected to have much
effect on the organization of other departments.
THE ASSOCIATIONS 1
HISTORIC SITE MARKER I
00000000000
SOIlIE l~i!ENTY THHEIC YEAHS AGO, the Association
erected a historic site marker near the town
of Laprairie, on the opposite shore of the
Saint Lawrence River from Montreal.
The marker, erected beside Highway 9a, the old Lacolle Hoad, about
l~ miles from Laprairie (see map), marks a crossing of the roadbed of
Canadas first rail1;lray, the Champlain & Saint Lawrence Rail Hoad, which
was opened between Laprairie and St. Johns, Que. 90 July 21st, 1836. The
track ~1as abandoned about 1852, after the terminus of the line had been
moved to IJioffat Y s Island, or–.. ,
;South Montreal, ,as it was then I( ! -10 5j:i~{l,IlP.lf~
m:~~~h~~:~~:;:i~:;~~t i~::H~~s ~,~! 1·;~:~~~!~ioc;.:.:~:OJ<:i~~!i~
The marker itself cons:Lsts of 1 .. \ I; • k.
a piece of railway rail set upright \\ ii, II
in a concrete base, iith a cast–~,\—-ttH-++rh-I-H-h< c..!,S~_l.:. ___ , _ i
iron plate bolted to the top bear- f?\ I; 1l?JbI~5i. ~i —$>
ing an inscription. After twenty-1
1
h4–.:,I!f: 1,1, Ii . / \H.16HIIJI
three years the marker ~s now ~om-j i ; ~,~~: I !!1I&lIt i1i,. 19A
ewh~t rus~e~ though physJ. call! In ! I I. W,Mf I 9 , C~tIA I
gOOd. condltlon •. A coat of palnt 1 I! I! CNIt fr1-flRK,/t1
would go a long way toward helping I I. : ,1. to preserve it and make it, as . IlL I i ~vB.. : To lA~oLI1
well, more conspicuous and presen-1— t-,.——-
table.
~ C.R.H.A.­ News Re£ort -1959 Pag ~ ..1.2:.-.
The inscription appearing on the marker i s as f ol l ows :
·———– ——·–··————·r——·——-·–…—-_..–.-…..——————-_.__.· 1
CHAMPLAIN and SAI NT LAVVRENCE HAI L liOAD

ICI UNE TRAVERSE CHOSSING HERE

DU PREMIER CHEMI N OF THE FIRST

DE FEn. AU CANADA RAI LROAD I N CANADA

1836­ 1836
E
RECTED BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
JOHN LOYE,
PRESIDENT.

_ _ __0_.—–_.-­.__.._ _..__._ _ ._._. .._ ._….
For the benef i t of those who would li ke to see the marker when
p
assing in the neighbourhood of Laprai rie, we showherewith a smal l
sket ch map
of its location; the mapis not to scale.

Anoth
er C&St L monllffient, th o ~gh a stone one, exi st s at St.Johns,Que. on the
site of the old rai1l1ay wharf on the Richel ieu River . This one
was erected in 1936 by Ca.nadian Nat i onal Itai lways.
00000 00000000000­ 00000
( ..
liTHE RAILWAY STATIONS OF TORONTOH (p.51 of May issue)
A
CORHECTION.
The
thi rd paragraph of the story on Toroht o1s s tat ion~ appear i ng on page 51, M
ay i ssue of the News Repor t , contained an unfortun­
ate tr anspositi on of information. St.Clai r stati on exists today,
while it is that at Davenport which was torn down in 1925. The
statement shoul d r ead: /I ••••• stations wer e l ocated at an early
date at Parkdale and Davenport. The present CNR station at Park­dale is
a later struct ur e, while that at Davenport survived unt il
about 1925, when it was replaced by the station at St.Clair Ave.I1
11 CHEMIN DE FER DE LA BONNE SAINTE-ANNEll Blect ric Rai lway Histol:l
A 16-page, photo-offset ,
bili ngual history of the former Montmorency Divisi on of the Quebec Rail­way,
Light &Power Company. This publication, wi th over forty photo­graphs, all -ti
me equi pment roster, diagrams and maps, is nowavailable
fr om the Association, Box 22, St ation B, Mont r eal 2, Canada, at
50¢ per copy, Please encl ose 5¢ in addi t ion for handli ng and mai li ng. Gr oups .w
ishi n& t o order this p~bl icat ion in quantity, maY,do so for . the pr l ce
of ~20 .00 for 50 caples. You are urged to obt aln your copy now; when
present suppl ies are exhausted, this wi l l not be repr i nted.
No.4, an 0-4-0ST locomot ive belonging to the N
OTES AND N,1~ a­ Si nger Manufacturi ng Company and used by that
Company at its pl ant at St.Johns, Que. haS been sold to a
scrap dealer in Ibervi l le, Que. , and was mo
ved ther e at the beginning of ~fuy .
e During the month of May, al l regular ser vi ces on the Domihion Atl anti c
(
~ C.R.H.A. News Report -1959
The inscription appearing on the marker is as follows;
r———-·——————·r—–·——-·–···—·–.–.. -.. -.. ————-. –.—1
CHAMPLAIN and SAINT LA.VfRENCE HAIL HOAD
ICI UNE THAVEHSE
DU PREMIER CHE1VIIN DE F
EE AU CANADA
CROSSING HERE
OF THE FIRST
HAILROAD IN CAIADA
EHECTED BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTOHICAL ASSOCIATION
JOHN LOYE, PRESIDENT.
——————–_. __ .. _–_._—_._–_ .. _-….
Pagq.:iL
For the benefit of those who would like to see the marker when pas
sing in the neighbourhood of Laprairie, we show herewith a small
sketch map of its location; the map is not to scale.
Another C&StL monument, tho).lgh a stone one, exists at St.Johns,Que.
on the site of the old railliay wharf on the Richelieu River. This one
was erected in 1936 by Ca.nadian National Railways,
00000 00000000000 00000
.•. _————————————-
liTHE RAILWAY STATIONS OF TORONTO!! (p.51 of May issue)
A CORRECTION.
The
third paragraph of the story on Torohtols station~ appearing
on page 51, J.1C:lY issue of the News Heport, contained an unfortun­
ate transposition of information. St.Cla.ir station exists today,
while it is that at Davenport which was torn down in 1925. The
statement should read: II ••••• stations were located at an early 1
date at Parkdale and Davenport. The present CNR station at Park-I
dale is a later structure, while that at Davenport survived until ,
a b
out 1925, when it wa s re pIa ced by t._h_e_ _s_t_a_t __ i_o_n_a_t_S_t_._c_+_a_i_r_A_v_e_._
1
_1
_j,
11 CHEMIN DE FER DE LA BONNE SAINTE-ANNElI Electric Railway HistorJC
A 16-page~ photo-offset,
bilingual history of the former Montmorency Division of the Quebec Rail­
way, Light & Power Company. This publication, with over forty photo­
graphs, all-time equipment roster, diagrams and maps, is now available
from the Association, Box 22, Station H, Montreal 2, Canada, at -50¢ per copy, Pl
ease enclose 5¢ in addition for handling and mailing. Groups
wishin& to order this p~blication in quantity, maY,do so for _
tho price of ~f)20.00 for 50 coples. You are urged to obtaln your copy
now; when present supplies are exhausted, this will not be reprinted.
NEVIS I a
was moved there at the
No.4, an 0-4-0ST locomotive belonging to the
Singer Manufacturing Company and used by that
Company at its plant at St.Johns, Que. has been s
old to a scrap dealer in Iberville, Que., and
beginning of May.
9 During the month of May, all regular services on the Domihion Atlantic

if ,,
C.R ~ I-I.A . News Re£or t – 1959 Page 73
Rai lway we
re dieselized. At the end of the month, one steam loco­
mot i ve was in servi ce at Windsor , N.S. It is anti cipated that three
steamlocomotives wi l l be retained, out of service, at Kent vi l le, for
emergency use.
, E
ffective mi dnight, May 31st, 1959 and until the autumn, Canadian
Nati onal Rai lways Cent ral Regi on services wi l l be compl etely diesel­
i zed. Steam locomotives ar e st i l l stored at many t erminal s for use
in emergency, but under normal circumst anc es, al l regular and extra tr
ains will be hauled by di esel locomot ives.
e Canadian Pacific Rai l way engi ne No. 29, 4-4-0 l1AII class st eamlocomot­
ive regularly assigned for service on the Minto Subdi vi si on between Chipman a
nd Nor t on, New Brunswi ck, has been taken to McAdam for re­
painting and fitt ing with artif icial diamond stack to take part in
a civic anni versary at Caribou, Maine, on July 1st, 1959. Caribou is 1
9.5 mil es fr om Aroostook, NB, on the Ar oost ook Sub. , which ex­tends inte
Maine as far as Presque Isle. No.29 will be under steam
at the observance, following whi ch it wil l be retur ned to Chipman for fur-ther:
ser vi ce. One of the other two 4-4- 0 engines working wi th
No.29, engine No.144, is expe cted to be removed from ser vi ce per man­
ently in November, when major repai rs come due . Nos.29 and 144 were b
oth bui lt by the Canadian Pacific Railway at Mont real in 1887 and 188
6, respectively. The third engine, No ~136 , built by Rogers in
1883, ho],ds th8 recor d for longevit y of service by a steam lo comotiv~
in Cana d 3 ~ having been in continuous oper at i cn for ssventy-six years.
e The
Pres:_c.3::1t of Canadi an Nat i onal Rai.Lways , IVIr 0 Donald Gor don, recently advi.sed
the Hailway Commi ttee of trw House of Commons that
the Nat ijjjJll systemexpect s to have its diesel ization programme com­pl
eted by the end of 1960, at whi ch time appr oximately ~480 ,00 0 ,000 .
will have been spent on this type of mot ive power.
e The Boa
rd of Transport Commissioners for Canada inst ructed Canadian r
ailways on May 7t h, to place reflective paint markings on the si des
of boxcars for a twenty-month tr ial peri od. The Board oi der applies to all new b
oxcars purchased between May 1st, 1959 and December 31, 19
60, plus an equal number of preserrt boxcars. Eight y percent of the c
ost wi l l be bor ne by the Gover nment s grade crossing fund, whi le the balance wil l be met by the rai lw
ays. The cost is estimated to
a~oun t t o about ~8 .0 0 per car. Suitable desi gns wi l l be submi t ted.
e Canadian N
ational Railways has introduced a new innovati on in sl eep­ing car t
ravel on its iiSuper – Conti nentalil travel l ing bet.ween Mont real and To
ront o, and Vancouver. The newaccomodation is a tour ist class roomett e car, and it wi l l be
marshal led next to a tourist lounge car
in eachtranscoht inent al train. Encl osed tourist class space is thus
offered at substant ial ly lower pr i ces to the travel l er.
e E
ffective May 18t h, Canadian Pacific discontinued mixed train servi ce over the
fol l owi ng Manitoba Dist rict lines: Glenboro Subdivision fr
om Winnipeg to Souris; LaRi viere Subdivisi on fromWinnipeg to La­HivLere: Carman 3ubdivisi on fr om Elm Cr eek
to Pl.uri C
r
)lJlpe ~ Gretna
Subdi.vi .ai.on f :com Rosenfeld to Gretna; Eat.evan Subdi.fj.t;i c,nfrom Sour i s to Es
t evan; Arcola Subdivision fromSouris to Arcola ~
T~~I TlqPS I N ~lONTHEAL : Two troll ey tr i ps wi l l be run over the C
artiervi lle, No.17 route of t .h e Montr eal Tr ans port ation Commissi on, which is to be d
isconti nued on Sunday, June 28th. The first trip wi l l be Sund
ay, June 7th, the ot her on the 27th or 28th.
(
:,
.iI
C.R~H.A. News Report – 1959 Page 73
Railway were dieselized. At the-end of the month, one steam loco­
motive was in service at Windsor, N.S. It is anticipated that three
steam locomotives will be retained, out of service, at Kentville, for
emergency use •

Effective midnight, May 31st, 1959 and until the autumn, Canadian
National Hailways Central Region services will be completely diesel­
ized. Steam locomotives are still stored at many terminals for use
in emergency, but under normal circumstances, all regular and extra
trains will be hauled by diesel locomotives.
e
Canadian Pacific Railway engine No.29, 4-4-0 HAil class steam locomot­
ive regularly assigned for service on the Minto Subdivision between
Chipman and Norton, New Brunswick, has been taken to McAdam for re­
painting and fitting with artificial diamond stack to take part in
a civic anniversary at Caribou, Maine, on July 1st, 1959. Caribou
is 19.5 miles from Aroostook, NB, on the Aroostook Sub., which ex­
tends into 11aine as far as Presque Isle. No. 29 will be under steam
at the observance, following which it will be returned to Chipman f
or furth8:c service. One of the other two 4-4-0 engines working with
No.29, engine No.144, is expected to be removed from service perman­
ently in November, when major repairs come due. Nos.29 and 144 were
both built by the Canadian Pacific Railway-at Montreal in 1887 and
1886, respectively. The third engine, No~136, built by Rogers in
1883, h0J_~s th8 record for longevity of service by a steam locomotiv~
in Canad3, having been in continuous operation for ssventy-six years.
e The Pres-;_d3::1t of Canadi~n National HailVJays, lVIr. Donald Gordon,
recently :l.dvised the Hailway Committee of t.lw HOLlse of Commons that
the Nati)Jlal system expects to have its dieselization programme com­
pleted by the end of 1960, at which time approximately $480,000,000.
will have been spent on this type of motive power.
e The Boa
rd of Transport Corn.missioners for Canada instructed Canadian
railways on May 7th, to place reflective paint markings on the sides
of boxcars for a twenty-month trial period. The Board aider applies
to all new boxcars purchased between May Ist,1959 and December 31,
1960, plus an equal number of present boxcars. Eighty percent of the
cost will be borne by t.he Government r s grade crossing fund, while
the balance will be met by the railways. The cost is estimated to
amount to about J8.00 per car. Suitable designs will be submitted.
e Canadian National Railways has introduced a new innovation in sleep­
ing ca.r travel on its llSuper-Continental
l1
travelling between Montreal
and Toronto, and Vancouver. The new accomodation is a tourist class
roomette car, and it will be marshalled next to a tourist lounge car
in each transcohtinental train. Enclosed tourist class space is thus
offered at substantially lower prices to the traveller~
e Effective May 18th, Canadian Pacific discontinued mixed train service
over the following Manitoba District lines: Glenboro Subdivision
from Winnipeg to Souris; LaRiviere Subdivision from Winnipeg to La­
Hi viere: Carman Subdivision from Elm Creek to Plu:] Cr)lJlpe ~ Gretna
Subdivi~:!jO~l f:com TIosenfeld to Gretna; Estevan Subdi_f L;ic,n from Souris
to Estevan; Arcola Subdivision from Souris to Arcola.
T
l!-0LLEX Tf!JPS IN ~1ONTREAL: Two trolley trips will be run over the
Cartierville, No.17 route of the Montreal Transportation Commission,
which is to be discontinued on Sunday, June 28th. The first trip will
be Sunday, June 7th, the other on the 27th or 28th.

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