Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 100 1959

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 100 1959

NEWS REPORT NO. 100
MAY 1959
1_-I
1949-
ONE HUN D RED T H ISS U E
-1959
CANADIAN RAlLROAD HISTORICAl ASSOCIAIION�
P.O. BOX 22. STATION B�
MONTREAL 2. QUEBEC�
With rail operation in Ottawa ceasing for good on April
30th, photos such as this one by Paul R. McGee, of OTC
car 826 in Somerset Street, framed in the front window
of OTC car 685, will become collectors items.
NEWS REPORT NO. 100
MAY 1959
1949-
ONE HUN D RED T H ISS U E
-1959
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAl ASSOCIATION
P.O. BOX 22. STATION B
MONTREAL 2. QUEBEC
With rail operation in Ottawa ceasing for good on April
30th, photos such as this one by Paul R. McGee, of OTC
car 826 in Somerset Street, framed in the front window
of OTC car 6$5, will become collectors items.
C.R.I-I.A. Ne ~~ Repor t – 1959 Pa~.._ 50
The r eg
ular May monthly meet i.ng o fnt.he Associa­
Notice of Meet ing I tion wi l l be heLd on Wednesday, .May 13t h, 1959,
__-1
in Room 203, Tr ansportation Bui lding, 159 Craig St r eet Jest,
Mont real , at 8:15 PM. This is a bus
iness meeting, at wh i ch the chai rmen of committees and ot her of ficers wi l l
report to the membershi p on the affairs of the Association.
Fol lowing
the transaction of business, an aucti on of r ai.Lway mater­
ial, including photogr aphs, folder s and other memorabi l ia, wil l be hel d, vlit h
the; proceeds going toward the LU1ih vay Di vi s ion. Those members who may posse
ss sui table surplus material are invited to Tphone the Editor , O.S.A. Laval
lee , at CI1..9-{5S22, who, as usual , wil l act as auct i oneer . V
alwable items wi l l be sold on behal f of private members, wi t h the Ass­
ociation taking 10% of the successfuL bid. NOW IS THE TIME to scan
your at~ic , den or basement? and bring it along on the 13th, bei ng sure
to advi se the auct i oneer in advance . . BfaI mater ial ,
r–·—-·-··-_…_­
I
TEE LIBRARY
Mr. S.S. Hort hen, the Custodi an, who also
acts as Librarian, wishes to remi nd the member s that
books in the AssociationTs col lection are available
for loan to members for one month, at 25¢ per volume.
The books are brought to a meeting, and col l ected at the
following meet ing. Many publicat ions are avai l ­abl e, and a call to
IVIr. Vlort hen, evenings, at RE.9- 0262 w
ill permi t him to br ing requested books to the -.
(
meeting ~ler e int erested members may pick them up.
Though the editor i al i s an editor Ts traditional privil­
I Editor ial I
ege, we keep our editor ial izi ng to a minimum, as we feel
that our readers would rat her we used t he space on C a n~
~——

adian railway doings, rat her than read opinions on con­
trover si al matt er s. .It has always been our Association Ys policyto i1cJ.Oi1
r at her t han t o aay, and i f we l ament the passLng of t he steam locomot­
ive or the trol ley car, we t ake st eps to preser ve suit able examples for the g
rati ficati on of those interested, rat her than make public outcrieS
in mat.tar-s VJb.ich we fee.l ar e not the province of ant i quarian societies.
This poli cy has earned for us a host of good fr iends thr oughout the
tranSpol tatt1n and allied industr i es in Canada; it is our sincer e wish
that our poILcLes and roJ.at i onships wi l l stay this way.
In
preparing this cent.ur-y issue, we feel some justificati on in
looking back at the road which has been travelled by the Associationfs
publ icat ions . As many of our r eader s ar e aware , the News Repor t was
launched on it s course in September 1949, with Al lan Toohey in the edit­
orial chair , and Rober t Joedicke doing the pr inti ng . Allan is presently
in the Union of South Afri ca ~ while Bob has been wor king in New York for
a number of years. The present edi torial incumbent took office in Jan­
uary, 1952.
Much material of refer ence value has, we feel , been contai ned with­
in these one hundred issues; vJC look forward to completing ten year s of News
R
epor~ with the Jul y-August 1959 issue, thanks to the support of oUr ever -wi
dening group of members and subscribers, in Canada and elsewhere.
(
C.l1.H.A. News Report -1959 Page
.. 50
J
The regular May monthly meeting of:;the Asso citr-
Notice of Meet in .. :_ tion will be held on Wednesday, May 13th, 1959,
_ in Room 203, Transportation Building, 159 Craig
Street West, Montreal, at 8:15 PM. This is a bus
iness meeting, at whicll the chairmen of committees and other officers
will report to the membership on the affairs of the Association.
Following the transaction of business, an auction of railway mater­
ial, including photographs, folders and other memorabilia, will be held,
vdth the proceeds going toward the .t?aihlJay Divif~ion.. Those members who
may possess suitable surplus material are invited to Tphone the Editor,
O.S.A .. Lavallee, at CI1..9-8822 , who, as usual, will act as auctioneer.
Val~able items will be sold on behalf of private members, with the Ass-
ociation taking 10% of the succe.ssful bid. NOW IS THE TIlVIE to scan
your attic, den or basement: and bring it along on the 13th, being sure
to advise the auctioneer in advance. _____________
8f0r material,
r···-·—–···—··——–
TEE LIBRARY·
lVfr. S~S. Horthen, the Custodian, who also
acts as Librarian, wishes to remind the members that
books in the AssociationTs collection are available f
or loan to members for one month, at 25¢ per volume. The b
ooks are brought to a meeting, and collected at
the following meeting. Many publications are avail­
able, and a call to IVIr. vIorthen, evenings, at RE.9-0262 w
ill permit him to bring requested books to the . m
eeting ~lere interested members may pick them up.
~
Though the editorial is an editorTs traditional privil-
Ed. itori .. al ege, we keep our editorializing to a minimum, as we fe81
that our readers would rather we used the space on Can~
adian railway doings, rather than read opinions on con­
troversial matters. It has alvlTays been our Association Y s policy to ildo
ll
rather than to 11sayi/, and if we lament the pa$13ing of the steam locomot­
ive or the trolley car, we take steps to preserve suitable examples for
the gratification of those interested, rather than make public outcrieS
in matt(~rs VJb.ich we feel are not the province of antiquarian societies.
Thi~ poljcy has earned for us a host of good friends throughout the
traDSpOI~att)n and allied industries in Canada; it is our sincere wish
that our poJici(~s and rel.ationships will stay this way.
In preparing thisiicentuYy,i issue, vie feel some justification in
looking back at the road which has been travelled by the AssociationTs
publications. As many of our readers are aware, the NevIS Report was l
aunched on its course in September 1949, with Allan Toohey in the edit­
oriEl.l chair, and Robert Joedicke doing the printing. Allan is presently
in the Union of South Africa~ while Bob has been working in New York for
a number of years. The present editorial incumbent took office in Jan­
uary, 1952.
Much material of reference vi.l.lue has, we feel, been contained with­
in the~se one hundred issues; vJC look forward to completing ten years of
News Repor~with the July-August 1959 issue, thanks to the support of oUr
ever-widening group of members and subscribers, in Canada and elsewhere.
C.ILH.A. _~ew s Report -1959 Page F.
THE RAILWAY STATIONS OF TORONTO
by Orner S.A. Lavallee.
Continuing our historical analysis of the railway
termini in Canadian cities and towns, which was begun
last autumn using the stations of Montreal as a topic,
we turn now to the city bf Toronto. The author is
indebted to Mr . Andr-ew Mer r i lees for supplying much
information, and. to Mr. C.VJ.K. Heard for assistance
in map r esearch.
lhB . .
–::I 1. e..eglnnJ.ngs.
The present Toronto Union Station, with its amal.
gamated railway facilities used by Canadian National and Canadian Pacif­
ic trains and their connections over other lines, belies the existence
of a diversified and picturesque collection of railway t erminals in that
city, which once lined the bayfront from Berkeley Street, on the east,·
to Queen s Whar f , at the foot of Bathurst Street.
Toronto did not open its first railway station until 1853; in May
of that year, the Ontario, ,3imcoe & Huron Union Railway opened its first
section from Tor ont o to Aur ora, Ontar i o. Not alone Canadas first rail­
way, it was also the first steam-operated line in all of Upper Canada,
though a horse-operated railway had existed since 1839 at Niagara. The )S&HURwas
built to the 56 gauge. created by Frovincial enactment two
years previously; the route out of Toronto was that followed today by the
Canadian National RaLLways Newmar-ket, Subdivision.
This first station was little more than a rudimentary wooden shelter,
affording passengers scant accomodation. Situated at the southeast cor­
ner of Bay and Front Streets, the platforms extended weslerly from Bay
Street nearly to Swords Hotel, later called the Queens. The OS&HUR
r an al ong the bayshore bank from this station, pre-empting the water lots
with great foresight, an action whi ch was later to cause much difficulty
with the Grand Trunk Railway of Canada. The running shed and yard of the
OS&.HUH was located on the west side of Brock Street (now Spadina Avenue),
and an office building and station was later erected here at which·trains
stopped, in-and out-bound. Following the present route of the CNR,
stations were located at an early date at Parkdale and at St. Clair Avenue. The
present CNR depot at Parkdale is a l ater structure, while that at St.
Clair survived untill about 1925, when it was replaced by the station
at Davenport Road. Thus did what was later called the Northern Railway
of Canada find its way into Toronto, and it remained Torontos only rail­
way for two-and-a-half years, its engines HLady Elginli, Toronto
il
and
JosephLne pulled trains in the open farmland in the hinterland of
Bathurst Street, wonders in an age of wonders.
The first interloper upon this pastoral scene was the Great West er n
Railway, whose branch from Hamilton to Toronto was completed in December,
l855~
The GVJF0 s path is that followed today by the CNR into Toronto
through lVlimi co and Sunnyside. Establishing its engine terminal west of
Bathurst St reet, where the Northern (OS&HUR) was intersected, the G
JR
continued on the l andward side of the Northern into its own station in
Front Street, west of the latters depot.
1-Swords Hotel was approximately where the new Royal
York extension is situated.
C .li… H.A.
.N evlS It e po.rt -l2.2.5L _____________ ..;;..P..;;;a;.Q,ge
rrHE RAILvJAY STATIONS OF TORONTO
by Omer S.A. Lavallee.
Continuing our historical analysis of the railway
termini in Canadian cities and towns, which vvas begun
last autumn using the stations of Montreal as a topic,
Vie turn now to the city of TOIonto. The author is
indebted to Mr. Andrew Merrilees for supplying much
information, and to Mr. C.VJ.K. Heard for assistance
in map research.
———..—
I
rPh B . .
G~
….
–=-L. e .. eglnnJ.ngs.
The present Toronto Union Station, with its amal …
gamated railway facilities used by Canadian National and Canadian Pacif­
ic trains and their connections over other lines, belies the existence
of a diversified and picturesque collection of railway terminals in that
city, which once lined the bayfront fr-om Berkeley Street, on the east,
to Queens Wharf, at the foot of Bathurst Street.
Toronto did not open its first railway station until 1853; in May
of that year, the Ontario, ,)imcoe & Huron Union Railway opened its first
section from Toronto to Aurora, Ontario. Not alone Canadas first rail­
way, it was also the first steam-operated line in all of Upper Canada,
though a horse-operated railway had existed since 1839 at Niagara. The
)S&HUR was built to the 56 gauge. created by Frovincial enactment tt-vo
years previously; the route out of Toronto was that followed today by the
Canadian National Hailways Nevvmarket Subdivision.
This first station was little more than a rudimentary wooden shelter,
affording passengers scant accomodation. Situated at the southeast cor­
ner of Bay and Front Streets, the platforms extended wesierly from Bay
Street nearly to Svvord! s Hotel, later called the Queen f s. The OS&HUR
ran along the bayshore bank from this station, pre-empting the water lots
with great foresight, an action which was later to cause much difficulty
with the Grand Trunk Hailway of Canada. The running shed and yard of the
OS&.HUH was located on the west side of Brock Street (now Spadina Avenue),
and an office building and station was later erected here at whichtrains
stopped~ in-and out-bound. Following the present route of the CNR,
stations were located at an early date at Parkdale and at St. Clair Avenue. The
present CNR depot at Parkdale is a later structure, while that at St.
Clair survived untill about 1925, Alhen it was replaced by the station
at Davenport Road. Thus did what was later called the Northern Railvray
of Canada find its way into Toronto, and it remained Torontos only rail­
way for two-and-a-half years, its engines Lady Elgin 11, Toronto 11 and
Josephine pulIce trains in the open farmland in the hinterland of
Bathurst Street, wonders in an age of wonders.
The first interloper upon this pastoral scene was the Great Western
Railway, whose branch from Hamilton to Toronto was completed in December,
18558 The mms path is that followed today by the CNR into Toronto
through lVlimico and Sunnyside. Establ.ishing its engine terminal west of
Bathurst Street, where the Northern (OS&HUR) was intersected, the GIrJR
continued on the landward side of the Northern into its own station in
Front Street, west of the latters depot.
1-Swords Hotel was approximately where the new Royal
York extension is situated.
.9_~ }(~Jl ~. A. H~~~ ::J-lt:port -C.._l….:9;..:5;…;9~ . , Page 52
_~ ,-r ._
The year 1856 was an eventful I :1
one for Tor ont o ; in that year , the G ! >. I,
Grand Trunk Hai lway of Canada opened 1 ~ . :::!
.Lnes westward and eastward from the I Y,<;;~ . ,:~ ,I
cit ¥, t he former to Guelph innJuly ,I c, t-.-I,…iJ.
1850, the latter t .o Oshawa in the I !~
following month. Ht h the NI .~ I -: TR D.ort hern :St
I -I x l.1 ona
and t he Great Western aLr-eady on the I j.j . >., •
scene , there was not much space avai I-! ~. I ..) ; ~-j
able, even for the august Grand Tr unk.i … l -:!.~~· : ·/l …. .._, __
Therefore, for a t ime , t he Eastern j – ·::::.,Y I J
Di vi s ion terminated at a stati on on , I
the ea st side of the Don, the route I ,I i ~
fO.lloWing the pri. esent CNH Oshawa SUb-I :1 ; ) \
. •• n ~ Tf tD t
o i.on , esi.va.s L 18 er:; lV l. Sl.O~ , 0 . : :::: ~
Guel ph , followed ?he Nor t.her-n Ln t o1 ~fi(KE ~ ff ;.;: ~.:::= . ;:=;:;;-; : ; l! ..[
Tor onto from a pot.rrt near Lansdolrme i.i

Avenue, paral lel ing it as far as I :1 _
~~~~~~~~~ ~~:n~~ ~a~hW~~t~ ~nt ~.~kl~·;~i I Jf: (~Wl .~: :=~; :~ :: ; J ~
and out to a stat ion at Queen!s Wharf.I . :.1 l;;,
Th . deeooot 1 .. .. r1 I ~
, nd·S,b t p ~ w~s .. ~. ta~n5rwO~~,::n ,~~~~ , ,; il JP l~
a . e vJeen j-J.ugus 0 0 1 _~L., ~ , . ,.18 I *,. ._..,_ _.._,,
t i.me early i n 1857, Gr and T l : ~. nk pa ss-I !~ lE …• .1 !I I,
;::J
c;
engels dest ined t.hrough lC:::ifS O from ! e~i = := ,: ::-:o~:q :;: ;: ;: r C -r -r ,
the Western Divi s i on to t hc Easter n ! . IIII :btNRC,.! 008cdl
••• ….. i IJPI( ; ~ : =:: ::-; ::-.;0:: ….: . ::::- . r.! ,SlJa •Dd.v
i.s Lon, wer-e car-r-Led ny omnibus f roq , j,i Hi l
the Qu een s Wharf to Don Station., arid I ::Uilit
ri ce versa. The omnibus service was I : ill ; ~1
offered by a man named ones, who caml . .,,) .~:.1 GWH Sta.J. §,:: . 0
from t he United Stat es . ;til -:t Il &:11* ~
.p 1.:. ,, )2./
, :, !, :! ) rock St.
Thus we picture t.he Toront o of 5RI,K o -r
0
:;= : -;Ol..l..(J NRC
oct.aber 1856, when Upper and Lower I .iiiL/… har vesi :· ~~~ WEan
ada were first linked by ra i l . The I !i: V )~.
GTH had two separate st atior:s, at the i ~ : I! Ii ~/ L_1 .
Don and at Queens vIhar f, Vll t.h pass-i 1. if;I~l .!SI : ::·- – 1- · : -..·.. ,~:: :-..-.. i -a :~H
engers bei.ngtomn.i.bus sed between the, ll:.tI I/~ E. -rH .. .:.1.-= .__,–_.__. fL,.l. ,
two st ations. The GWE and NEC al so .. ,. ! !! I ~.~i ~1~~~f s
h
ad seoarat.e stat i ons, bot h in Front : ! II 7.0 . ·.17:! Sta
t
J.. i: lr -.1,;1 t•
St ree • I ,I il ~ .1
~
TI I
I +.,
Lat e in 1856, the GTR sought t o : I
r-e ct Lfy its cumb e r ,som~ two -st a t ~on I /; ,/-. ,
arrangement , and, comlng to an lnt er-I I
IIim ar rangement wit h the Nor t hern, 11�
extended its line west .wardfromthe I ?/�
Don past the old gaol at the foot of I NRC Parkdaleo..f< >L­
Berkeley Street to Front Street , and ! ~,�
I / ~
al ong the south side of that thorough1 ~x T f
are into the Ii.orthern Hai lway s dep-I ~-f..)l<~c . 1.
x . ~ …….�
ot at Bay and Front Streets . For a I £/ IJI. ) �
few months another traf fic arrangement ,/ .;:,,K­
Nas in for ce, very much to the _…….,.-;x .­
dt· t
f t Grill:,) -,->…. •
e r l rnen. O· n~ :..~, <1-------_r..v , . . ,.., r
wher eby Lts fr-ei ght. was moved .,.- …… 1 STATIONS Of ;r TOnONrO
f
rom t he Queens Wharf to Bay. > ………~.0 k P jI:-86
Street over the Norther n , Dec.:..mber , 1 5.J
and in the Report of the Commission of Inquiry into the affai rs of the
l
,C.E.E.A. _________ N 8W::J-~.: port -C…_l..;9;..:5;…;9::.-.-___ . ___ _
T
he year 1856 was an eventful I ;1
one for Toronto; in that year, the G I . 11
Grand Trunk Hail way of Canada opened 1 ~ ,:.:.:1
_ines westward and eastward from the ! V<~IiL :~.:II
I <:) . f,..;.. :
city, the former to Guelph innJuly, I …c_..J.1 .. .
1856, the latter to Oshavla in the I i~
following month. lith the Northern . ~,r.-._.~.·I.! .~. GTR Don Stat
and the Great Western already on the I -~
scene, there was not much space avai14, ~~, ~-;:::~
_ .. , .. ~-,. ) -,
able, even for the august Grand Trunk.j /r-……. .
Therefore, for a time, the Eastern! :::::::~::::::I·~ .. ~.-·; . .~. .,.-. —
Division terminated at a station on !
the east side of the Don, the route i i i (
I
1 I
following the present CNU Oshawa Sub-:1 ; 1
division. The Uestern Division, to · ,,: / ~
Guel ph, followed the Northern into ! ~f)1K(~T:f :o..:.-::c:::=.-..:.o=::::::-.t
,
,:-[c:
Toronto from a point near Lansdowne . I
Avenue, paralleling it as far as I . II :i
Strachan Avenue, where it took off, j : I;! ~
~~~. S~~l,-~g t~h~ ~~~~~o~~e. !~eQ~~~; 1 !.e~~~rfl Jii#Vf, :_-:::::::::-:,7:::::::1::::( t.
Thl.S aepot. was a plaln WOOC~)l) shed, . I ~e.
a~?_pbet ~leen . ~~_ug~~~ 1856, ,a~~~J: ~~;me co _ I ioWi[ ._,–:1 ………. -;-… ,:1 .-~ ~
t_lL early l_ 18) 7, Grano. L ., … dK paws 1 .
engelS destined thlough TC::,iTSO from ! e~i -:::::..:= ::.:::.,=-:~::.,;.,::=::: r
the Viestern Division to the E:lstern ! ;1 II .I..! NRC (OS8cHU
Divis ion, Vlere carried by ctm i bus froni ·fV~t(7::.7=i -:;-::::-:::i:—:::JI ,Sta.
t~e Queens V/harf to. Don Stat,~on, and I :, ;! il d
Tlce versa. The omrnbus serVJ.ce was i ; iii !; \1
offered by a man named Jones, who caml §:i . I ;:11
0
GWn Sta.
from the United States. ~jl !I, g!!t
:1- )Bro ck St.
Thus we picture the Toronto of f)Ro(~K … ::–F–::-=- . -.: :j;<:) NRC
Octo ber 1856, when Upper and Lower i ,I ,i iii ~I /~ iilharves
Eal1ada. wer first linked hy rail. The I P : f/ ~
ill ! I . ……-; ..
GTH had two separate stations, at the I ,,~ : t. :: // L_. Don
and at Queens vlharf, with pass-I ,.;jl;I~~f engers being I?omnibus sed 11 between the lr:tIII,·<.f.fH ... ---.--+-=.-::::::-:;------tiQueen s
two stat ions. The C.WE and NEC also W.-d
I
. i.j I .~i Wharf
had separCJ.te stations, both in Front Ii ! j:f!1 Tf.! Sta.
Street. ) (._. ., i, ~ Ii
Late in 1856, the GTR sought to I _,fl r(~ctify its cumbersome two-station I l ,/-….
arrangement, and, coming to an inter-I . I
im arrangement with the Northern, II ,I )1
extended its line irJestvJard from the I ,j .
Don P;::J,st the old gaol at the foot of NRC Parkdale o~.(· I.
Berkeley Street to Front Street, and ! ~
along the south side of that thorough4 x
fare
into the Northern Hailways dep- ~.~~~
ot at Bay and Front Streets. For a I ./.). J
few ~lon~hs another tra!f~C ~rrcmgemen·ti ~,/.;J< ..
d
Nats ::-n .-0trcfe, t,,!erYGrJlmI~ uen 0 1e _I->-;:;-x
e rlmen 0 ne . -.~, whereby its freight VlaS moved .1, ….. ·1–STATIONS Oll. ;{ TOHONTO
from the Queens Wharf to Bay .,,~~0;t-1 56
Street over the Northern, .-:, .-.,….~_—:: ___ ~~D_e ………… c_e_m_b._e_r _____ :—o __ –::-~-:–
and in the Report of the Commission of Inquiry into the affairs of the
-.9 .R.H•~.. Ne
J~ .J.~ ~.J.>.o:ct -]22.2
Page ,57,
Grand Trunk Rai lway of Canada, which was made in 1860, much was made of�
the fact of Nor thern delay of traffic in transi t bet ween the G~R yards� at
~uee n f s Whar f and Bay St r8et ~�
Early in 1857, hOHever, the GTR bui lt its own line, goi ng east from�
t he Queen fs VIhar f , crossing the Nhe to the landwar d side at Bathurst St­�re
et, south of what JaS cal led tho Pr ince of 1iJalesf Walk. It pr oceeded�
thence along Front Street , joining the eastern line at Bay Street . In�
later years, the GTH extended its line in fr om Strachan to Bathurst ,�
beside t hat of t he Norther n Rai lway of Canada .�
II -The First Union Stati on Al l tr
ains of the NHC and the GTR used the Bay St r
eet depot of the Northern until May, 1858, at whi ch time the orig­
inal Grand T ru~k Rai lway Tor ont o station was opened. Of frame const ruc­
tion, it was situat ed £i f t y f eet we0t of Bay Street; the roof projected over the pl;;
.tform and was suppor ted by ornamental scrollwork posts. 3mall
but neat, it was consi der ed to be a sp.l.endi.d depot at the time of its
openi ng, housing two waiti ng rooms, lavat ories, a lunch room, a barber
shop, a ticket office, a baggage room and a telegraph of fice. During 1858 ~
the Northern station, the origi nal Toronto depot, was demol ished, and the
new station at York St reet became the UnionStation for the Grand Tr unk,
the Great Vlester.d and the Norther n rai 1<1aY8~
Before the er ection of this fLrst Union Station, the Nor thern Railway had a fra
me freight house standing Oli the shore just west of Peter St r eet
r
All local freight was handled at this building, thr ough which all trains
passed. Through fr eight was handled at tge Northern Hailway dock, where
the NitC elevator l at er st.ocd, The f r eight house was demolished when the
tracks were l at er r e~oved to the Esplanade . The Gr and Trunk s termi nal
at this per iod was at the Quoe:,,s V[harf) wit h locomotive and car shops, and
the fr eight house in a large frame bUil ding which also hous ed the passenger and ba
ggage faci l ities lln~ il the removal of these facilities to
t he first Union Station. In the yard at Queen s Whar f stood a roundhouse
which was burned down sev8ral years later and never rebuilt, the location
then being changed to John St reet .
In
the peri od between May 1858 and March 1866, the first Union Sta­
tion served the three railways entering Toronto, It was not long before i
ts faci l ities were found to be inadequate, however , and in the mi d-Six­t
ies, the Great Wester n Hailway prosecuted the construct i on of it s own T
oronto Terminal . Adead-end, four-track, ar ch- roof -trai nshed building, s
ituat ed at the north-east corner of Yonge St reet and the Esplanade, this
structure, a dist i nctive part of the skyl i ne of downt own Toronto, was
opened on March 5th, 1866. The wai ting room and passenger facilities weI,::
in a bui lding on the nor th side of the trai nshed. En route in and out of
the new terminal , the Great Wester n stopped its trains at the Uni on Sta­
tion, as an inter mediat e hal t . Atimetabl e for 1868 which the author
possesses shows the two stops for all trains, as Yorige St.r-eet. and Uri­
ion Station
l1 •
The Yonge Street station was used until the amalgamation of the
GVIU and GTE in August, 1882, when it reverted to use as a GTR
freight shed, final ly ending up as a fruj.t terminal . As such, it was d
estroyed by fi re in the summer of 1952 af ter eighty-six years us e.
In was not longe before the Northern Rai h vay emulated the GWR in mov
ing to a newt erminal . In 1868, the Northern completed it s so-called C
ity Hall Station, which was between Ii/est Market Street and Jarvis St reet,
on the Esplanade. The name derived fromthe stations location at the
. .9.R._H-._A-.;. ___________ N_e1rJs )~~.;J).ort -1959 Page ,57,
Grand Trunk Railway of Canada, which was made in 1860, much was made of
the fact of Northern delay of traffic in transit between the GmR yards
at ~ueenfs Wharf and Bay Str8et~
Early in 1857, however, the GTR built its own line, going east from
the Queen f s V-Jharf, crossing t.he Nhe to the landward side at Bathurst St­
reet, south of what was called tho Prince of vJales Walk. It proceeded
thence along Front Street, joining the eastern line at Bay Street. In
later years, the GTR extended its line in frol!1 Strachan to Bathurst,
beside that of the Northern Hailway of Cani~lda.
II -The First Union Station
All trains of the NnC and the GTR used the
Bay Street depot of the Northern until May, 1858, at which time the orig­
inal Grand T:.~u;:-~k Railway Toronto station vvas opened. Of frame construc­
tion, it was situated £ifty feet west of Bay Street; the roof projected
over the pla.tform and was supported by ornamental scrollwork posts. ,small
but neat, it wafI considAred to be a 3PJ_e~did depot at the time of its
opening, housing two waiting rooms, lavatories, a lunch room, a barber
shop, a ticket office, a baggage room and a telegraph office, During 1858,
the Northern station, the original Toronto depot, was demolished, and the
new station at Yurk Street became the UnionStation for the Grand Trunk,
the Great vlesteI.d and the Northern ra illTays qo
Be:fore the erection of this fiYst Union Station, the Northern Railway
had a frame freight house standing all the shore just west of Peter Street~
All local freight was handled at this building, through which all trains
passed. Through freight was handlRd at tge Northern Hailway dock, where
the NilC elevator later st()0d.~ The freight house was demolished when the
tracks were later re~oved to the Esplanade. The Grand Trunks terminal
at this period was at the Quee.:1 s Hharf.) with locomotive ~nd car shops,
and the freight house in a large frame building which also housed the
passenger and baggage facilities until the removal of these facilities to
the first Union Station. In the yard at Queens Wharf stood a roundhouse
which was burned down several years later and never rebuilt, the location
then being changed to John Street.
In the period between May 1858 and March 1866, the first Union Sta­
tion served the three rc1ilways entering Toronto. It was not long before
its facilities were found to be inadequate, however, and in the mid-Six­
ties, the Great Western Hailway prosecuted the construction of its own
Toronto Terminal. A dead-end, four-track, arch-roof-trainshed building,
situated at the north-east corner of Yonge Street and the Esplanade, this
structure, a distinctive part of the sJsyline of downtown Toronto, was
opened on March 5th, 1866. The vvaiting room and passenger facilities wer::
in a building on the north side of the trainshed. En route in and out of
the new terminal, the Great Western stopped its trains at the Union Sta­
tion, as an intermediate halt. A timetable for 1868 which the author .
possessl;s shows the two stops for all trains, as nYonge Street
l1
and nUn,
ion Station
l1
• The Yonge Street station was used until the amalgamation of t
he GVIU and GTH in August, 1882, when it reverted to use as a GTR
freight shed, finally ending up as a fruj.t terminal. As such, it was d
8stroyed by fire in the summer of 1952 after eighty-six years use.
In was not longe before the Northern Railway emulated the GWR in
moving to a new terminal. In 1868, the Northern completed its so-called
City Hall Station, Wll.ich was between vlest Market Street and Jarvis Street,
on the Esplanade. The name derived from the stations location at the
C. lt.E, A. News Ropor t ….::…. 19~…::5~9__ Paze 54
Q
r ear of t he then City Hal l -… now stil l standing as Saint Lawrence IVL.ll­ke
t, NHC tr ains aLso stopped brLefLy at the Union Station (nowa unLon: st ati on
no longer), at the outside platform, to entrain and detrain .
through passengels nnd cxpreS8 ., Anot.her-st op VJE1.S made at Brock St r eet ,
adjacent to the NRCs off i ces and shops.
We now move for ward to t ho year Hs71 when tVJQ signifi cant devel op­men
ts in Torontos t.er-mlri a Ls took place. It !vELS i n t his year that t he
loroht o & Nipissing RaiLway, snLd to be Ameri cas fir st publ ic nar-r-ow­
gauge r-ai Lway, opened .it s service int o Toronto, on Jul.y Lst, The T&N con
nected wi th the GI1l at Scarboro Junct i on, and a third rai l was uscd over the GTR int o
3, n evr st.atLon which was bui lt on the Espl anade between Ber k81ey and Parl
iament St reets, adjacent to the old plant of the Con­s
umers Gas Company (served by si dings of double-gauge) and the Gooder ­ham d
ist i l lery, the LItter owners of the Toronto & Nd.pi.asLng Railway.
In ld7l, also, the original Union Station was demol ished, that a new, l
arger, structure might be erected on the same si te, at Yor k and Fr ont
st r eets, Atemporary shed was built on the west side of Simcoe Street
to serve as a stat ion unt il the compl etion of the second Union Stati on.
Th
ese were the years of the conversion of the broad gauge over to standard. Until
the Tor onto & Ni.pi ssLng ar-r-Lved in 1871, al l railways enter i ng Toro
nto had been of the 56
1
gauge, estabdrisned by Provincial
Statute in 18-51. However, the alleged di rcumst ances which had led to
the adoption of this arbi trar y railway gauge had largely disappear ed and been f
orgot ten t.werit y years af ter enactment. In the late Si xties, the
Creat ~lestern , whcso traffi c was of a through nature to a great extent , en r
oute acr oss the southwestern peni nsul.a of Ontari o, destined to and frompo
int s in the United States, had placed a third rai l on its main line s, so
that standard gauge United States roll ing stock would be moved t
hrough, vJithout experis i ve and. time-consuming t.r-an s shi pmerrt i nto br oad­gauge ca
rs. The Grand Tr unk had shortly followed suit , and by 1871,
aft.er: the 1851 Law had be0J]. repealed, Canadian railways were busi ly
converting over t o t he 4 r8~ ,r gauge, now almost univer sal in the United St at
es. The Grand Trunk lines in the Tor onto area were largely changed in 1371,
the Great Vrestern in 1<572$ The Nort hern, due to financial c
ircumstances, did not adopted the standar-d gauge completely unti l 1831.
111 -The Second Union Stat i on On C
anadas sixt h bi rthday, Dominion Da y~
July 1st , 1873, Toronto s sGcone ,Tnion Stat i on Vias opened to the publ ic..
This repr0sented a great advance over the depot s used hitherto; it was
8xpansj.ve and ample for the traffic of the time, functional yet not
devoid of a certain summet ry of design lent to its by three tower s along
the south side ?f the trainshed, the cent re one car rying a cl ock. Tor­on
toni ans, al l b5, OOO of them, were proud of the second Union Station;
t hey had ).?ood reason to be. It was casi.Lv the most pretentious raaLwav te
rminal in Canada and was used by the Grcmd Trunk and also by the ncwf.y.. opened Tor
onto, Grey & Bruce Hailway, anot .her-361 gauge line which had
made it s entr ance into Toronto in 1873 by paralleling the Grand Tr unk
1:I.:ne in through what is now Vle.st Toronto (on the north side of the GTR) .~
t.herice bet.ween the GTR and NRC af ter Lansdowne Avenue, finally crossing
the GTR to the sout.h side of the rnul tipJ.e roadbed near St rachan Avenue. TG&B freight
trains continued on the old roadbed of the GTlt to Queens
VIllar f, by now acquired by t he TG&B. Passengor-t.rai.ns ran on their own
track along the south side of the GT-N.R.C r oadbed as far as Bathur st
Dt r eet , where the T (~~B went on GT rails by use of a third rail , int o
the new Uni on St ation.
(
C-· ,., }
.; A
• J. i… .!… .,
,
News Report .,. 1959 Page 54 .
. ~.~~~——————–~.~~~
recH~ of th~ then City Hall …… now still standing as Saint Lawrence IVllr­k
et. NHC trains alsQ stopped br>iefly at the Union Station (now a ifunion
station n~ longer)~ at the outside platform, to entrain and detrain
through passengers and express Anotb.er stop was made at Brock Street,
adjacent to the NRCs offices c!.nd shops.
We now move forv-rard to the year Hs7l when tvJO significant develop­
ments in Torontos terminDls took place. It was in this year that the
Torohto & Nipissing Railway, said to be Americas first public narrow­
gauge railway, opened it;:3 service into Toronto, on July l,;:.;t. The T&N
connected with the GTit Ei.t Scarboro Junction, and a third rail v~as used
over the GTR into 3, nOvl sta.tion which was built on the Esplanade between
Berkeley and Farliament Streets, adjacent to the old plant of the Con­sume
rs! Gas Company (served by sidings of double-gauge) and the Gooder­
ham distillery, the l.::ltt er owners of the Toronto & Nipis,sing Railway.
In Ij71, also, the original Union Station was demolished, that a new, lar
ger, structure might be erected on the same site, at York and Front
streetE3, A temporary shed was built on the west side of Simcoe Street·
to serve as a station until the completion of the second Union Station.
These were the years of the conversion of the broad gauge over to
standard.. Until t.he Toronto &; Nipis sing arti ved in l8?1, all railways
entering Toronto had be(C)n of the 5 6il gcmge, esGabiliished by Provincial
Statute in 1851. However, the alleged dircumstances which had led to
the adoption of this arbitrary raillJay gauge had largely disappeared and
been forgotten twenty years after enactment. In the late Sixties, the
CreatvJestern, whose traffic vIas of a through nature to a great extent,
en route across the southwGstern peninsula of Ontario, destined to and
from points in the United States, had placed a third rail on its main
lines, so that standard gauge United States rolling stock would be moved
through, without exp(~nsive and. timc;-consuming trc~nsshipment into broad­
gauge cars. The Grand Trunk had shortly followed suit, and by 1871,
after the 1851 Law had been repealed, Canadian railways were busily
converting over to the 4? 13k il gauge, now almost universal in the Unit ed
States. The Grand Trunk lines in the Toronto area were largely chap~ed
in 1871, the Great ~Jestern in 1<372$ The Northern, due to financi 1
circumstances, did not ad.opted the ;.:;tandard gauge completely until lajl.
111-The Second Union Station
On Canadas sixth birthday, Dominion DaJ~
July 1st, 1873, Torontos secone .. Tnion Station Vias opened to the public
This repr0sented a great advance OVGr the depots used hitherto; it was
expansj.ve and ample for the traffic of the time, functional yet not
devoid of a certain summetry of design lent to its by three towers along
the south side or the trainshed, the centre one carrying a clock. Tor­
ontonians, all 65,000 of them, were proud of the second Union Station;
they had good reason to be. It was eClsily the most pretentious raihvay
tcrmina.l in Canada and was used by the Grand Trunk and also by the now.1.y··
openod Toronto, Grey & Bruce Hailway, C).nother 3 f 6 1 gauge line which had made
its entrance into Toronto in 1873 by paralleling the Grand Trunk .
1:;:ne in through what is now Vle.st Toronto (on the north side of the GTR).~
thence betweon the GTR and NRC after IJansdowne Avenue, finally crossing
the GTR to the south side of the multipJ.e roadbed near Strachan Avenue,.
TG&B freight trains continued on the old roadbed of the GTH to Queens
1!!hD.rf, by now acquired by the TG&13. Passenger tredns ran on their OvID
track along the south side of the GT-NRC roadbed as far as Bathurst
Street, where the TG&:S went on GT rails by use of a third rail, into
the new Union Station.
C~ .~( •I-I •.Pi • N(;vJS J.uJor t -1959 Po.ge 55
~_._~_._————-_.•_———_. —~-­
Gr eat VJest erri and Norther n B.2ilway trai ns continued to use thei r own t
ermini , but 8F o p p e~ on the ~out h ,side of the new Uni on Stati on tra i~shed
. ,.T y st.at.Lori for t.ransf I 0 (. IY1S seriger an! ba O r? ) 0 .. S t.hey had Itas c.,. ~V(..A C~ .J… ~~ • eLl. . …… ..L •.f;.. I:..) _ . . ::J I Lt.L C. ~bt:_ . CA..0 i-:, , (::.L 1 ~. C-.U c.:
the first Union Station structure on the same site. At about this same time, the
GT occupi ed the D.Ye a east of Br-ock ,St r oot (3padina Avenue) for its eng
ine terminal , which consisted originall y of two roundhouses, side by s
ide, the ea st. cr-nmost one a compl et el y cover ed structure, wn LLe the other was
a conventional open-ct.ur-nt.abLe roundhouse, such as vie have to­day. T
he encl osed bui lding was dismantled in lat er years, and replaced
by a Br itish-t ype runni ng shed for locomotives, of the type sti ll to be
G(; cn at Brodeville, Orrt, , on the Canadian National Hai lways.
It should be here remar ked that the Toronto, Grey &Bruce, entering the
Union ;3tation, and the Ior-ont.o & Nipiss ing, using Lt s own Berkel ey
.~ Street Stati on a. shor t distance to the east, while bot h of the same
~. _ 1+2i ~ ~ a:.g e , neve~r ~~l jO_ye d a__ph~_S i cal conne ct i~n . between ~h~m; .
~~~< L, to R: OV,GT,TG&B,NHO. A-Berkeley St . -lor-ont.o &, Ndpi ss i.ng 11y .
K» ~ 1 B-Ci ty Hal. L Sta. -Norther n Hy. of Can ,
CV~<~ I C-Yonge Street -Grc,:xt. v1ester n Ry.
~~
.P arkda le l D-ynion E.>t .n . -GTE, T G&B i an~ Credit Val l.
o <~~ .. ._._.. _ .. .. _.__. ___L_ E ~ ...~.!..u..e e_n .s dhar f ~. I G:&B __~ :r_e ]. ght ... . ...._...
,
~ I
G1i~1.. I
I );1:::/–Jt» ,
i~~ :;;;:-::j:-:::::.::..,-I.-., v« C I!
I ~f.t–~::::.:::!::.:::……_ ; B A
I 1,. lQ,;~I-_., f::. -~ , ! 1 C · I.l>.
I ><;<. c-r: 1...... ·... rr-; I GT me
o
BCT D ~ .I ,
. GJR -c U T;:::~–::::- /.. -1 r& -, .lll )<- _ .....----- •.....::.
I.J…..J. rJ· 1 ~-~j(-r-L-.,…. -L–r~ ….r::.. ·. · ::;· -~~ –;- — · _ _.._–……-….. v< .....~ ..,....J~ . • • ­~ ---r ...................�
• ,J ,. .. J-..–r oJ.. ,-, ,.. ..t-r–r~ –T.:::t:…. .:J:. ,-J_ ~ .~.z…,. ill>;–< . -:~;;;;.--•.•,-... ~
-1 …, I 7 ( D ….~-+ i..:ill V ..J::4..,,, ~-;;:.-,.•­
….,.–., -…, ·f< 1...~T(: : .L:) ~ ,~ ---~· ltt :C ··-+--~+·:-:·.f--=±- .-·? · ......-4,.;
________________.>: —–:,::::c.~J–~; ,,-1 C——-.—U:..–,-~. –_. ~ , , -,/
TORONTO IERliIl~AJ,_o?._JN 1_~7 9.
.._–_._— –_._._—-_.
in any event, there was lit tle need for an interchange of traf fic as�
both railways were primar ily feeders for the Grand Trunk.�
C
rand Trunk nailway sidings served many whar ves betvJ8en Yonge St reet and
the ent.r ance to t he Don HiveI at Cher r y St reet . Many of them
had angles around buildings ~li ch were too sharp for locomot ives and c
ars to neGotiate and the answer was found in small turntables, over
which cars wer e individually handled, and spotted further out on the
wharves by means of hor sepower .
In o
ur account of t he rail way t erminals of Tor onto, we must novr . move
forward to tho year 1879. It was on September 19t h of that year,
thSltthe Credi t Val l ey Hailway operied its fi rst sect i.on, from Toront o to
Mitton. The Credit Valley (t he pr esent CPR route int o Toronto via Horn­
by; t ~31ingt o ~ and V.j~3 t Toronto ) came al ongsLde the double GT-T0&B roacl­
bE2Q,..0t what J.S now1Nest Toronto, then known as Carlton !.fest and lat er
Toront o Juncti on. Between Lansdowne Avenue and Parkdale, whe re the Cre­di t Val
ley Ry. legall y termi nated, wit h yard and roundhouse, ther e was
now a mult iple railvlay roadbed consisting from the north to the south
of the 56il gauge Northern RatLway , the 3!6
i1
&:auge Toront o, Grey & Bruce,
the st andard-gauge Grand Trunk, and the Credit Val ley. From Parkdale, Cr
edit Val l ey trains used Grand Tr unk rai1w int o the Union Station. ;i thin eight
een mont hs af ter the openi ng of the Credit Val ley, the No ~­
thern and TG&B changed to standar d.-gauge, arid Tor ont o was, once again, a one-g
auge railway centre.
c C) .~( .1-1 •. A • NG~vJS ~.uJort -1959 Page 5.5 —–~——________ . _____ • __ :.o…::.. ____ _
Great VJesterrl and. Northern Bailway train.s continued to use their own
termini, but stopped on the south side of the new Union Station trni~shed
as a way station II for transfer of passenger.s and bC:l.ggage, as they had at
the first Union Station structure on the same site. At about this same
time, the GT occupied the D.rea east of Brock Street (3padina Avenue) for
its engine terminal, ~lich consisted originally of two roundhouses, side
by side, the easternmost one a completely covered structure, v,rhile the
other was a conventional open-turntable roundhouse, ;:;uch as vIe have to­
day. The enclosed building was dismantled in later years, and replaced
by a British-type running shed for locomotives, of the type still to be
s(;en (J.t Bro ckville, Ont., on the Can2dian National [L:11 1 ways.
—.——.•. –~.
in any event, there v.Jas little need for an interchange of traffic as
both railways were p:cimarily feeders for the Grand Trunk.
Cr
and Trunk iVlilway sidings served many wharves between Yonge
~)treet and thc) entrance to the Don Hi ver at Cherry Street. Many of them
had ang;les around buildings which were too sharp for 10comotivGs and
cars to ne,zotiate and the ansv.Jer was found in SEl,,:lll turntables, over
which cars were individually handled, and spotted further out on the
wharves by means of horsepower.
In
our account of tl:18 railv>ray terminals of Toronto, we must no,/,[ .
move
forward to tho year 1879. It was on S()ptember 19th of that year,
·t.h~tthe Credit Valley Hailway opened its first .3ection, from Toronto to
Kt~~on. The Credit Valley (the present CPR route into Toronto via Horn­
hy{ .t~:)lingtor: and West Toronto) came alongside the double GT-TcyJ.,B roacl­
of,lq ;:it what lS now !Jest Toronto, then kno1[,11 a.s Carlton !Jest and later
Toronto Junction. Between Lansdowne Avenue and Parkdale, where the Cre­
dit Valley Ry. legally terminated, with yard and roundhouse, there was
now a mult,iplG railvlaY roadbed consisting from the north to the .south
of the 5! 6 il gauge NorthGrn Haillllay, the 3! 6;1 E.:auge Toronto, Grey & BrD.ce,
the standard-gauge G~and Trunk, and the CrGdit Valley. From Parkdale,
C
redit Valley trains used Grand Trunk railw into the Union Station. ;
ithin eighteen months after the opening of the Credit Valley, the No~­
thern and TG&B changed to standard-gaugG, and Toronto was, once again, a o
ne-gauge railway centre.
——– – – –
/:!
C•Tc.1-1• /1. •
Ne Vl~ It epo~t -1959Page 56
:-!..:.~——-,
The next st age in our account. i s August, 1882, when t he G~~ e)~t fest­er n Ra
ilway of Canada vras absorbed by t he Grand Trunk. Ihe GWRterminal at Yonge ,Street was
thereafter cl osed to pass enger traf fic, ana tra in~
transferred to the Uni on Stat i on. As we have seen, this ar ch-r 60f bui l ­
ding t.hen became a GTH freight shed, In 1833, the Canadi an Pacifics
s ubsLdOntari o & Quebec co mp.l eted its li ne fromPerth toLar-y Ra.i Lw a y
iJiest Toronto, cr ossLng Toront o on an alignment north of 1:1001 Street. Simu
ltaneously, the O&G absor bed both t he TC&B and Credit Val ley. 1;lit h
this change, a t rack r-oar-r-angomerrt took place at Je:::3t Toronto, whe re
TG&B trains wer e now brought acr-oas the GT tracks to the west side of the
GTR, using tIIG Credit Valley line from thence into Bat.hurst, ;3treet , now
become Canadian Pacific. The old TG&B roadbed into Parkdale,
between the GT and NRC now became disused, and that portion of it west of Lansdowne
Avenue onihy was retained for use as a switching line.
In laga, the Norther n Railway became a par t of the Grand Trunk, and the double ro
adbed f romLansdowne Avenue into the Union Station now b e~
came a singleline with service tr ack for indust rial sidings. However,
at t he Ioro nt.o end, duo mostly to insuf f i cient fa cLLf.t.L es at t he Union
Station, Northern- li ne tr ains conti nued to usa the old City Hal l station
unti l 1894, when additi ons to the Union Stat i on were al l but complet ed.
It VIas in 18 ~~l t.hat r enovation of t he H573 Union St atLon tW.S put in
hand IJ7 th8 Grand Trunk. Asecond trainshed was added to the sout h si de
of the first one, and a new office buildingerected in Fr ont St r eet, on .
the north side of tho or i ginal building. These extollsions were complet ­ed i n 1(59
5.
-r- . t Id(~ …, d 1r)r,7 C d J r> • t .r-ai .. d -­
~e
ween 00) an L _00 , ana lan l UC1I1C ralns comlng ln or epar ~-
ing via the line eastward fr om Toront o through Lea side, Agincourt and
Peterboro, had to run in rever so direct ion between Toronto Uni on and Dest T
oronto. Trains leaving Tor onto backed to West Toronto, then pro­
ceeded normal ly a cr-oss the Nor th Io ront.o line, while ar r ivingtrains did the same t
hing in reverse. In ].1:87, hovever , the Leaside-Don cutoff was built e
nabl ing normal operat ion for CPR trai ns into the east end of the Uni on St at ion,
still fol l owed to this day. About 1$90, the former Cre­
clit Valley Hai lway yard and shops at Par kdale was cl osed by the CPR, and
—————-_._—_._~_._–_. —,….-_.
VEST T O RO~rO jn 1 ~7 9
—•__• :..:- {!…~
JE.3T TOILQ..IDO ~2.,la a !+
. :;.;;.~.::::,..~
-, .
~{< , / , .,,( I
.Y: .
~ . ).~_. 7­
+H_H..t-r l;-t-H-rt– r-ti +t-f i~~ :~~ -(?
/ 7 )( .>,.. k/
(.. !, -, -, »;�
v)<, )-. �
. x>..V .
v-,-/x,.
Yx~-…..>.. iG
·x- ,,><·
x,<-;-::>:-
Xi <>
t.;; ,.,<7<
..,.,.
–~
a st.ar-t made on the) pr-es errt yar d and shops at Lambt.on, We s t Toronto .
., , l l~c r ~ d ) ~ b· 1 . .1,.t h( d
!. rom about. .,5;lU, Cancl .i.an 1.:,C1I1 C 0 t.ai.ner runru.ngnr-a.grr s over t e -r-an
Trur k from Toronto to Hami lton , and freight trains running to Hamilton h
ad to back fr om Jest Toront o to Bathurst St r eet , up the incline int o t
he CPt? Simcoe & Jell i ngton fr-oi.ght. shed (whose lea d. crossed al l tracks
(
. . . :>(~!
… C • fL • 1-1 • i1. • Ne:::!..,s ~tepo~t – 1959
,——————-
Page 56
The next stage in our account is AUGUst) 1882, when the Gten,t Jest­
ern Raihv:ay of Canada it.Jas absorbed by the Grand Trunk. The GWRterminaJ.,
at Yonge ,Street was thereafter closed to passenger traffic, ana trairi~
transferped to the Union Station. As we have seen, this arch-r60f buil~
ding theq became a GTH freight shed. In,18S3, the Canadian Pacifics
subsidiaxiy Ontario & Quebec H.ailway c()[ilpleted its line from Perth to
liiest Toronto, croEi~)ing To~ronto on an alignment north of i3100r Street. S
imultaneously, the O&G absol~bed both the: TG&B ,1nd Credit Valley. i;Jith
this change, a track rearrangement took place at He;.:.,t Toronto, where
TG&B trains were now broueht across the GT tracks to the west side of
the GTR, using the Crf~dit Valley line from thence into Bathurst :3treet,
now become Canadian Pacific. The old TG&B roadbed into Parkdale,
betvicen the GT and Nne noVv bocame disused, and that portion of it west
of Lansdowne Avenue onihy vvas retained for use as a switching line.
In 18SS, the Northern Railway became a part of the Grand Trunk, and
GDe double roadbed from Lansdowne Avenue into the Union Station now be~
came a single line with service track for industrial sidings. However,
at the Toro~lto end, duo mostly to insufficient f.~~cilities at the Union
Station, Northern-line trains continued to usa the old City Hall station
until 1894, when additions to the Union Station were all but completed.
It VIas in 1891 that renovation of the HS73 Union Station ,rlc1S put in
hand by thE:; Grand Trunk. A second trainshed vms added to the south side
of the first one, and a new office buildingerected in Front Street, on
the north side of the original building. These extensions were complet­
ed in 1(595.
Between 18g3 and 1887, Canadian Pacific trains coming in or depart­
ing via the line eastward from Toronto through Leaside, Agincourt and Pete
rboro, had to run in reverse direction between Toronto Union and Je
st Toronto. Trains leavi~g Toronto backed to West Toronto, then pro­
ceeded normally .lcross the North Toront;o line, while arriving trcdns did
the same thing in reverse. In 11:587, hOI,JOver, the Leaside-Don cutoff was
built enabling normal operation for CPR trains into the east end of the
Union 3t~tion, still followed to this day. About 1890, the former Cre­
dit VEllley Hailway yard and shops Elt Parkdale WElS closed by the CPH, and
——–,—-…. —–_. -.-~-,—.. ——-
JE,:::>T TOrtQE.:lO ~1}… Ht81+ .
(/;:~(?<;
cPlQ~~
–+—–…. ,.
———-
a ~:rtdj:t made on the) present yard and. shops at Lambton, West Toronto.
From about 1896, Canadian P:,cific obtained runningnrights over the Grand
~ru~k from Toronto to Hamilton, and freight trains running to Hamilton
had to back from West Toronto to Bathurst Street, up the incline into
the CPE Simcoe & VJellington frcdght shed (whose lead crossed all tracks
C. i-(•FI •j~ •
News Re£or t – 1959 Fage 57
of the GTH near the foot of Tecurnseth Street), change the yard engine for
a road engine, th~n off down the incline with a flyi ng start for Hamil­
Gonl Needless to say, things were not as compli cated at the Bathurst Street manual
interl ocki ng as they arc today….. This cumbersome a
rrangement was elimina.tGd in 1910, when the Obico- Canpa cutof f opened.
In 1906, the Canadiah Nort her n b ecam~ the last new r ailway to ent er Toront o, when the line
in fr om Oshawa was br-ought; down the Don valley
under the Canadian Paci f i c near the Don Valley Bri ck Works. Ayar d and en
gine t ermi nal was bui l t her-o , but Canadi an Nor-t.hcr-n passenger trains
continued in 0T13r Gretnd Trunk rails to the Union St ation.
In
1912, Canadian Pacifi c star te& to use its then-exist i ng North Toront o
stat i on as an alternate terminal to trw Union Depot, and initial::
lv, one overnight Tor onto-Montreal train ori ginated and termi nated ther e.
is change proving succ essf ul , the CPR decided to build a newer and 1areer s
tat ion, incorporatingit in a general scheme of track elevat ion
of t.h e Leaside-West Toront onl i ne . The old station was situated on t he
west sLde of Yonge Str eet . but the new bu i Ldi.ng was er ected on the east sode, and,poss
essed four pl atforms. It was opened to the publ i c on Juno IJ+t
h, 1916, and was bui.Lt suffi cient l y Lar-go to aLl.ow for it s use by the
Canadi.an Northern Rai.Lway , as wel l , who wer-e p.l.anni.ng a permanent entran­
ce int o Toronto at thi s time. Canadian Pacific used the stati on exten­
sively from its inception, being served by overnight lor-cnt o-Nont.r-eaj.
t.r-ains via Peter bor o, the overnight Toronto-Ot tD.wa ser vi ces dI:Ud.eau
il
and
1IYo1k
1l
in each diroction, and local tra ins to Lindsay, to reeswater via
,streetsvi l le and to Owen Sound vi.a Bolton. Ultimat ely, the Canadian
.Jor thar ns plans for a nor th Tor onto terminal were negated by it s int es-
rati on into the Canadian National system; Canadian Pacific trains contin­
ued to use this terminal for many ye ars, but by the ear l y Thirties, al l s
ervice was concent rated once agai n at Union Station.
About 1910, it became obvious that the enlarged 1873 Union Station
Vias becoming inadequate once a,gai n for larger t.r-a i.ns and mor e numerous s
ervices . Plans wc)re La Ld before ~Jorl d. Jar I to build a new station between Y
ork and Bay Streets, and to utili ze an elevated appr oach to the
new stat ion, crossing al l of the nort h- south str eets at grade separat ion. T
oronto bar bour was bGginning to take shapo at thi s time, the bayfront
bank v.JClS being fi lled in and new str eets cr eated. The Explanade of the 185
0s and 1$60s was now ful ly hal f -a-mile inland in places and complet e­
ly obl iterated in it s central section by rai lway tracks.
1nn1915 , construction was started on the new, thi rd Uni on Station. As the
building rose, so did the hopes of Torontonians that the now s o~e­
what anti quated and Victor ian 1$73 station would soon be replaced by a
[structure mor e in kee ping wi th the city whi.ch had by now become second in Canada
in point of population. The new bu .i.Ld i.ng wa sa r-oomy structur e , it s g
reat pillared facade fronting Front St reet. Though it was completed in 1920,
it was not opGned unt il 1927, due to delay in the completi on of the e
levated approach tracks . Finall y, after seven year s del ay, and
~~~ll~lacki~g _the elev~t e ~.~ppr o~~h (~ te~pora~y ~?~-~e~~l ~~ains~ed hav­
H l[, bt,en bui Lt mn t he Lnt.erLml , It was opened oy HL , f.oYCl1 Hi.ghness,
:r~dvJD.rd , Prince of li.Jales, on August 6t h, 1927. In a ceremony which con­sumed onl y e
leven minutes , the Prince and his ent our age cut a ribbon
opening the station, went to the Canadi an National wicke ts and received
the f i rst t i cket issued; he t hen went t o t he Canadian Pacific side and
did the same. Final ly, he unlocked the doors with a golden key and dec
lared the stat ion open to the publ i c. Al l of thi s was done to the accompaniment of ch
oirs singing ilGod Save the Ki ng
l1 ,
and ULand of Hope
News Report -1959 Fag~ 57
of the GTR near the foot of Tecumseth Street), change the yard engine for
a road engine, then off down the incline with a flying start for Hamil­
-anI Needless to say, things were not as complicated at the Bathurst
Street manual interlo eking as they arc today ••••• This curnbersome
arrangement was elimina.ted in 1910, when the Obico-Canpacutoff opened.
In 1906, the Canadiab Norther,n becam3 the last new railway to enter
Toronto, when the line in from o.shawa vlaS brought down the Don valley
under the C~nadian Pacific near the Dbn Valley Brick Works. A yard and
engine terminal was built h(;r8 ,but Canadian No:cthern passenger trains
continued i.n over Grand Trunk rails to the Union Station.
In 1912, Canadian Pacific started to use its then-existing North
Toronto station as an alternate terminal to the Union Depot, and initial::
]. , one overnight Toronto-Montreal train originated and terminated there.
is change proving successful, the CPR decided to build a newer and
lareer station, incorporating it in a general scheme of track elevation
of ·the Leaside-West Torontonline. The old station was situated on the
west side of Yonge Street. but the new building was erected on the east
sode, and ,possessed four platforms. It was opened to the public on June
14th, 1916, and was bU.il t suffic iently lar[e to allow for its use by the
CanD.dian Northern Hailway, as well, who WerE) plc:mning a permanent entran­
ce into Toronto at this time. Canadian Pacific used the station exten­
sively from its inception, being served by overnight Toronto-Montreal
trc.:lns via Peterboro, the overnight Toronto-OttD.wa services dHideau
1t
and
nYork
li
in each direction, and local trains to Lindsay, to Teeswater via
,streetsvi.lle and to O,,len Sound ViGl Bolton. Ultimately, the Canadian
Jortherns plans for a north Toronto terminal were negated by its intes-
ration into the Canadian National system; Canadian Pacific trains contin­
ued to use this terminal for many years, but by the early Thirties, all
service was concentrated once again at Union Station.
About
1910, it became obvious that the enlarged 1873 Union Station
was becoming inadequate once again for larger trains and more numerous
services. Plans were laid before ~orld War I to build a new station
between York and Bay Streets, and to utilize an elevated approach to the
new station, crossing all of the north-south streets at grade separation.
Toronto harbour was. beginning to t[J.ke shape at this time, the bayfront
b~~k was being filled in a~d ne~ streets.cre~ted •. ~he Explanade of the
IJ)Os and 1860s was now fully half-a-mlle lnland 1n places and complete­
ly obliterated in its central section by railway tracks.
Inn1915, construction was started on the new, third Union Station.
As the building rose, so did the hopes of Torontonians that the now so~e­
That antiquated and Victorian 1873 station would soon be replaced by a i:3tru.cture more
in keeping with the city I,rhich had by now become second in
Canada in pOint of population. The new bui.lding was a roomy structure,
its great pi.llared facade fronting Front Street. Though it was completed
in 19~20, it vms not opened until 1927, due to delay in the completion of
the elevated approach tracks. Finally, after seven years delay, and
still lacking the elevated approach (a temporary low-level trainshed hav­
ing: been built mn the interim), it was opened by His I{oyal Highness, .
:q;dvlD.rd, Prince of ii-1ales, on Augus t 6th, 1927. In a ceremony whi ch con­
surned only eleven minutes, the Prince and his entourage cut a ribbon
opening the station, went to the Canadian National wickets and received
the first ticket issued; he then went to the Canadian Pacific side and
did the same. Finally, he unlocked the doors with a golden key and
declared the station open to the public. All of this was done to the
q;ccompaniment of choirs singing nGod Save the Kingil, and llLand of Hope
r: n B.A. Page 58
and Gl.ory;
On August 10t h, 1927, trai ns began using the n evr stati on whi ch, -iJi th the pos
tal annex, occupied the whole bl ock on the south side of Fr ont , bet ween
Yor k and Bay Street s. In the ensuing peri od, the present high­l ev
el appr oach and trainshed v,rag completed. The 1[573 Union St.at Lon was d
ismantled fort.hwi.t.h and, symboli c of the power-of the new age, the tal l
clock t ower of the old de po~, nnich once had claimed pre-emi nence in Can­a
da, was brought down by a chain wr apped around. it s base, and pul led by
~
Canadi an National 2-10-2 type steamlocomotive.
The link with the past remains today in the form of a plaque which is moun
ted at the east end of the columned facade of the present Union ,S
tati on, commemor -a t Inr;, for those who care to pause momentari ly to read
the Lns cr-LptLcn, the departure of the engi.ne ilToront o
il
for Aurora, on
1.12 y Lot.h , H~5J , with.in yar ds of the or iginal s t at.Lon sit e.
0000000 00 00 000 00 00 00 0 0 02 C 00 ~ )00000 0 0 00000 0 0000 0 0 0 0000C
6
o
t jf rp
.L _
I
n.;·:~li l T r:, n
,
_
pec
1
.r.
T
or
-. -l lr
~-J
r ( )n , ) .~~ <: r T
.LK
0:
c v ,3 .
r r
• ,
.!-1
0
j
b …J.LJU a ….,(-,1 0 .1
11
0
~e
une
o conch ing par t of whi ch was schedul ed to be 0
I c,nrr,:,od
, Cl ~ 0
~
_
t hl
..J
c
~

1.
c
)
U

…….
JJ
I
11
. ~
b
c
ca
c; _
rrJed l
_
-l t [l
_c
D.t 1�
o. . . ,-1
1

..
l
~)
~
~

, _ GJ•L 0
6 for t he mont h of June, inst ead. 0 60
0 0 0 0 00 0 0 00 0 000 00 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0000 0 00 0 0 000 00 0 00 0000 0 0 0 00 0 0
._ -­
OUR COVER PHO~O GFU. PH :
Our cover this month marks the passing of str
eet rai lway servi ce from the st reets of Canadas capi tal . On Thursday, A
pril 30th, regular servi ce will cease on the remaining rail
route, liP; i1., BHITANHIA, aft er cdght y-nine years rail service. The pi
ctur e was taken on an Association excur sion in OTC car 685
in December, 1957, as the car was west bound on ,somer(3et Street. T
he mot or man, OTC Chief Instruct or McBurney, is reflect ed in the
rear – vimr! mi r ror . The photograph was taken by Paul McGee, one of our membe
r-s whose pi ctures S110I a r emarkabl e t alent for originalit y•
..J
Montreal North passes•••••
MTC 1J10NTHEAL NOHTH AND MILLEN ROUTES REPLACED
~—-
One week bef ore the scheduled abandonment date of May 3r d, Mont real
Transpor tati on Comrnission placed busses on the Mi l len and Mont real Nord
car routes, pending permanent bus rout e changes to take effect May 3r d, wh
i ch need not be det a.iled here. The advancement on the original ly sch­edul ed d
ate was evident l y br ought about by t he Ci ty of Mont real s desi re to st
art roadwork on Mi l len in the vicinity of the CNR under pass, until
lat ely used by the streetcars only.
.
The int eresting and pict ur esqueline to Montreal Nord, opened orig­
inally by the Mont real. Park & Island .llailway in 1896, with it s si.ngle
track privB.te-right-of-v,my, was the scene of five outings by the A s soc~
iation in its concl uding weeks of operat ion, using, with one exception, c
ars in the MTC-CIlHA Hi stori cal Gollection. On ,sunday, Apri l 12t h, MTC 1339 was used. Sund
ay, April 19t h, saw MTC1[501 in operati on; both of the
se cars were making their fi rst tri ps since being assigned to the mus­
C.R.H.A. News Jeport – 1959
~~~~~———————–~~–
Page 58
and Glo ry 11.
On August 10th, 1927, trains began using the neVI station VJhich, -v1ith
the postal annex, occupied the whole block on the south side of Front,
between York and Bay Streets. In the ensuing period, the present high­
level approach and trainshed walt1 completed. The 1[573 Union ,station was dismantled
forthwith and, symbolic of the povJer of the now ago, the tall
clock tower of the old depo~, nnich once had claimed pre-eminence in Can­
ada 1 was brought down by a chain wrapPf:)d around its base, and pulled by
~ Canadian National 2-10-2 type stearn locomotive.
The
link with the past remC:J.ins today in the form of a plaque which
is mounted at the east end of the columned facade of the present Union
,Station, commemorating, for those who care to pause momentarily to read
the inscription~ the departure of the (~nGine IIToronto
iY
for Aurora, on
May 16th, la53, within yards of the original station site.
00000
0000000000000000000C00C
1
GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC
6 0
6 i1T:JlJj::~~;IJ;3~1, a pD.[,cr t~l Olner 3
9
A Lavallee, the 0 6
coneJx·.i.i:ng part of vih:Lch iAlas scheduled to be 0
6 carried in this issue, will be carried in that 0
6 for the month of June, instead. 0
6 0
00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000006
OUR
COVER PHCY;OGHAPH:
Our cover this month marks the passing of
street railway service from the streets of Canadas capital. On
Thursday, April 30th, regular service will cease on the remaining ra
il route, JAil: BHITANHIA, after cdghty-nine years! r8.il ser,!,ice.
The picture was tCi.ken on an Associ[rtion excursion in OTC car 685 in
December, 1957, as the car vms westbound on ,Somer~3et Street.
The motorman, OTC Chief Instructor McBurney, is reflected in the
rear-vielt! mirror. The photograph was taken by Paul McGee, one of
our members who~)e pictures ~)hoi,J a remarkable talent for originality.
Montreal North passes •••••
MTC HONTHEAL NOHTH AND MILLE~N HOUTES REPLACED
One week
before the scheduled abandonment date of May 3rd, Montreal
Transportation Comrnission placed busses on the Millen E:.nd Montreal Nord
car routes, pending permanent bus route changes to take effect May 3rd,
vhich need not be dcta.iled here. The advancement on the originally sch­
eduled date was evidently brought about by the City of Montreals desire
to start roadwork on Millen in the vicinity of the CNR underpass, until
lately used by the streetcars only.
The
interesting and picturesque line to Hontreal Nord, opened orig­i
nally by the Ii10ntreal Park &, Island [=?,ailway in 1896, with its sin8;le .
track priv8.te–ri.ght-of-,pJay, was the scene of five outings by the Assoc­i
ation in its concluding weeks of operation, using, with one exception, ca
rs in the r,1TC-CnHA Historical Gollection. On ,sunday, April 12th, MTC
1339 was used. Sunday, April 19th, saw MTC 1801 in operation; both of
these cars were making their first trips since being assigned to the mus-
_____________. ~U..:.. v~=f~~
i~
. :..,_,
HmTs lcopor-t -1959
r:> , 0 59
J $ … … ., .~J ;t/ 😮
Gum collection. 11 ni ght tri p vra s hastily organi zed for Ihurs day , April
2Jrd,
wh eri a rumour circulated that t.h e rail service might di sconti n ue
-,bat evening. and our op(:m car No. s, VJd.S used on that tr i p, wh i ch lef t ouv
i Ll.e – -r,)·o p c./i :10.1 r-et.ur-ned ,:, t 11 00 prr TJ!.1 rl
-Pl ::1 <:, phot.ogr-a phs ·() 11
• L-.. lJ ~. . …… .L .l .l – …. .l .J.. …-.J. ~ .__l.e . C.-l. J . __ • 1 1.. , .J. 3_ J .L. ….. v .t) J. t…,. C)
,-1, t e-1(. )) -I ;· lr-.! T, o 1 1 . ., 1 j 1:; r-,:1· : ~ ,,,. f t r (.) .r>·t 11 .,
1,le1e d …,n CtI0. V),J.,::, ,·Ia.::> , ,…..1. J.u ,,1..1.., .. ) q l~.J ..,-,C ct v. J.I I -:..l c 11 v ~p :, oJ. ro ey
out
n g, t.l -, le ll t.h ,,
. 1(.
. hot C
)CJ
P
… ;J ·
,
,c.

i)
..,
-.
.
, , ,., C
J.n
t.h ~
)
1
.l..
~
rlOr 1
t y.
1 .101 b p. I, : ,1
,11
C .l
~C
.)

uJ dO .l1(, d 1,,0

.. C
. ..G 1 1 hI t he da t f [ 11 ) 1 1·· v C ~ I.:, : , Q ·,:i , v …. he
e
26th
,L·J.na _, Y, wnen no c:;cC o; .. J.J.U . 0 1.,u l d u L U1l Vic, ot:;; .1.0 1 …..unua y, v _ ,
t .h…. , t r;c ,l , 1.-::>1 ( 1 . (:) 1 ·r .,. I V, i i}·J ., . 1· 1… ,~ I .n · , c..d
v,! J ee 11
1:,-
we.e 11. ~ …. _I. J on, . cav Ll[, J.U llJ._…_C lrl ul Hj LlorUL .g, UO ca r
l
~ ) ~) ( )(:i (;l-y · h . p c, ¥·.:,n l a at.t .ended .I ( -j 11r) but t he a ft.c r-n oon t r i ns
it t:… 1….,.. ~ .-. t …. _ lJ ~_.l ~ .. t.j J:) t:.~ – 1…1 ……,. ,~.(. – • 1.J . ,1.. ~. ~. ) .I .1. . LJ …… C-L v .,…. . 1.,. . ., 1-
u sin G No ~8 on one rou nd trip to Ahunt sic, then No. 1046, our ever -popular
s
uburba.n car for the rest of the after noon, exper ien ced much bett er att­
endan ce .
C
losing of the Montr eal North sectionof t.ho lVITC ra il linoE3wi ll
h ave the ef fect of contain ing the museum col lecti on entirel y wi thin the
Youv i .lle rrop,,r ty, unti l such ti.me as the Associ.ati on can have it s own
~
–. .. y,,~:; -I- . n r• I -f.) -. -; ,. .~_ .. LT( _-..~ :-… • t. c: -, rJ -t : ( ~l,..l I.:, 1 ) _J -:1 — — -1 · ..-:::,1 —C · +·,c
O}·CC(..c rona..1.. rac riir.y, LO,vOile.,] J. 1 P.Lc;J ..I1,,,t 0 iave pC.l J.O(.A.J.Cc;,….. vis a.ts
t.o v 1 –! ~ n…. ··· r • th .., C(yl ~ C ·I- .( . ,1, t jr l t.h e .r ···I- ·n ~ r; t.hee-, l lp
L .LO..li J…, .J., l:~ •• 1..,1.:..0[; d! 1,:; ..>lJ.l.,,!.b.l., dv V,.,J.J.Cl.l,l..,lC 0 ,ll.:. j. l v e …t1b 1n v co … C­
tion can be taken out upon the yard tracks for operat ional demonst ration
and phoLogr-aphs , It i ~) c:~ ~U3 0 hopod t o have tr ol ley cxcur-si.oris in conv en­
.. ., 1 ,_, r 1 .,.J,. . C~ ..·ti ··~ …r;ll, , p ..: . . C 1·… .1 … ,._, Y D c, n t
LlO l1c..L tol
j
U1
L
)1l10 lG or… ld!.;; u..!, ,_ ,-,1 J_ ~_.. e , d.na ) e -1l0 .::> ( :.monap ,l.ne ~ lU-Or1nlJ.e~
soctions, before service ceases on thos e parts on June 2gth and September
/ ; 11 ~n n oct J vcl T
v v , J.. -, V .r-…….. v ~ .. . 1, J•­
T
t
le l o)r9
~. –
L
l.l..
~
1-1 pt

a
ol p
….
c

1
1
0
~nry

_
e
u
Q]~ ·
1. . / 1 C..J. -.J
Srr i 117
-1) t:.:
·
.. . r:.~
~
e
1
;=:j~lWa;-T :Lme-table-. Cha nge s 1
marke d by many re ductions in service on
fj Y 1 )6 10. C O
.. p~ LL -, . ,J ,J ;; 10vv-pcJ.ss enge r-traf fic branch lines, on
_ _______________. ._ _-1
both major r Di J. vielYS . E fi~ct i ve Apr il
26th, al l pas s (m g
er service was removed
from t he lines l i s t ed he reunder :
gL~ !_ ,. _._ _Xli.9 I~Ii~_..E~)I;:,!J~1. -Kingst on –3har bot Lake, Ont (Kin.s s ton :Sub. );
L
c, )~ ·· -., , ·, · 1; ,:1 TJ , ..· .i·n 1 .t c-o TV .(e
l ,
.[:1 1 n b ). Ii) 0 B
c,c,,-J V…. c; c.:,,· j,OU ,.,. ..JC o y- L .uyg Cl. eo, llano O)10W.i cd:e OU . , Ja .. 1 .Lv J. ·,~ -.O .LsS-re
, . IT ,, b .:) , nL ,t k (T r, , ) t h
OVE!J.rl, ];ian. ,jjClp:ln i:.a 0U ·. ) j lleg1na -,)vougn on, ,)as . yvan ,:>uo. ; ,o:> oug. ­
t on -V/cybur n,
~)ask . (Ki ::.:;bc;y ,c:;ub.); Perdue-Ho sctown Jet. , 3clSk (Hose tovm Sub);
c h ·.. .,1 C . ,-C (…,1 b
o
i
j
n
0 0Ut_ ~l o can-~ ocan lty, b ~ oean ou .
C~Ji{lf!..I A~-lY-il~Jg N [E~__}J.f-II.:.:JJ}J3 -lIorris-Somerset, Man. ; Emer s on-Sprague,r/[an. ;
Eus :co(:)l l ·-.frozt ol.l.-.Yo ~~kccn-Ptr ker v iew, Sasle. ; Hoss Jet . -Wr oxt on, Sa.sk. ;
; – 1 1; (: (.1 C C- Tf, ~ • T.I·rt j J ·t B r Vlr • P , I-.rlO l~Pr~ ,
..l..i…,,L,cc:)-ll(;u,:,,)hl , l l,-~n ~ , L .Jney c -ranao.l, lan. , or vagc-ct-..ctl r1e ­J
Alom3 .,: ~, I1iJ.n. ; Grc,enwEl.y ·-Del.ora ine, 1;1an. ; Br andon Jet . -Neepaw[:.l, Man. ;
I·I;
-,11boro···Beul ah, Man. ; MO O E3(~ J aliJ-Dunbl ane , Sask e j l:ilD.wer·-Mai n Cent r E:l , Sask . ;
Hiverhurst -C8ntral Butt e, 3ask . ; Esto ~·J. Uh :L te Be c1r ~ ~3as k 0; Es ton-K i nder s­
(; j Cl ~ j-r
C
ln…. V
l
·].··lJ·1
.J (;i· Cl::-) r D(0I 61.)Jr-~~Cl( -c) , l)rl n -e�
1,
t ·1:), :, ., ..,., ,. ( ….k· · IT 1, . I:l..,· ~ f. l bpr i C …. 1-· . p r ~ 🙂 13·ttl f ~d�
1
1-, 3 sk ill ,. V1o .. •i cJ.. r C-L_l J)c
,
·l~ , C: ~~ ,IfI . l -:-… ~-, l, __ I;.~· : .I.o1J. c..:.dU~ I..,;c –

./l t ll , .. ~Jd k _ c· Al ­
) 1,:;1 , I dUC,-Oc1,.dOOu , 0a,)_ ~ , .LOv,u ~) -l .Ln cc..1. ~ ~ ,J, tJ c,,-,:.> . . ) D1t.i:;,G.r-· a .i. v 0 .• ,
3~sk. ; Bat tl eford Jct. -Ca r rut hors, Susk. ; Al l i ance-Camrose-Vegr evi l le,� .C·
1 C . rl ,1d l ·l. r . . . ,),, 1 D·–, ·!:) •., r , .,,~ It · ·�Al t . a 3
elml 0 ..:),; -. 01 1 (:;.1.. , ,1 veJ.• , 11 1. .1…·· ,,1.1,:; 0 loCl -~)l ccZL.cJ.U, h. a. !
-·o n·[·j. · N .-13
P -Y
en r r A–T J .. V . R b B. 1 Al
lLL~.~:….:~j.LL__j.~_._!:i;.~.:~..:.(~!;.·L.J.~..!l!.::-.uU S y,-a rr 1ea (1, .t a ..;~l ~..!:..; ~
Pr nctical ly all of the lines list ed we re served by mi xed tr ains, and in sl l
case~ ir~0 ~ul~r froi vht servtcp ~i l l cont j nuec I >::> , . ..L. .. t:;l ~ V. . v ~ ._ 1..) _ J ~ – ~ ._ _ …J •• •
(.
_….-._-,_..•-.-….__..—-,—­
(
~
l:.J
d1LOly S ft
v
···
~~
….
L ;
~r
_
1
1 ~
~
1~
. ._
rOln
.
J

t.., ….
~~
of L J
~

~t1et~~
… L
le

Ct E.) ,
~ 1,r0l.:, e Our
_1.
Dl
_

_J~
c
110n

~ e

..::,)
c
0 .J. :,l -lJ o.. ~oJ
Ik . Kemp, was evidentl y overvrhelmed by the se rvice remova ls,
as we have no cont
ribut i on fromhim this month. Consequently,
t
he deta ile~ comme ntary on train cha nges i s omi tted this t ime.
(.
( :- ..
J $ … l. .~.l It .l.l 0
Hmls noport -1959 ______________ ~r….;·: eum collection. A night trip was hastily organized for Thursday, April
23rd, when a rumour circulated that th(~ rail service might discontinue
-,hat evening, and oar 0Ixm car No. (5, was used on that trip, 1,Jttich left
Ol)vill
o
.,4-300 pil5 1.
1
ret-Trrd ~;lt 11-00 pr,T [jT-lny +1::;,c11 r:hotoOraphs ~ . _ C-1. LJ t .. J. J. v, _ …….. 1.1 -t. • .-J. C . C J __ • 1.. 1.. • oJ. j_ .L:;-J.. U r) 1 b .
. .-.. 1. t-l?. )1–
1
:-~.,( ,r. ~.ll . ,11 1+-.;, ,:1· .0°/0> Cj-tr (..) .0·t 11
Iele a·~n e..10. v!.. 1. ,., ,.,Cl..:::;, L,l.~, 1, (.) .. 1..; ql~J..C Cc u.J..ll~rCllv }P_ oJ. ro ey O t tl-(
,.1 t·h ·h .,. -~–l C· )Ylp 1 .. , r ,-0.–,,,,. ·th~~ t u
lng, l..JULll de p _oIJO[::,LC,.:i ler,:) Ir:e~ .. Uy .. ,.0 .11e3.lJ.::> l.n e Ja.l.J10r1 y.
G • 1 • 1 1 h p th., d~ r ..) . f f .,. 1 .. ~c, 1,-, •• • V ,1 c, ,,,,1-:. , Q . ,.1 :, T tho 26th
.LL1a __ y, 1jL … ~n ,.J .. Q,C C-,-.. l.L,.< 0I,,~ld,,_LCJll i.e,., St.~v ... 01 uUl1,c.J, J. - _ ,
~hree trips were held; one, leaving Youvillc in the morning, used car
i .. 2 r()( ( ·,,·1 _. -,-n), .–, 10 n,tt· d d 1- oj C 1., 1 • of· th fr- t· ~.
/{ A,/,~ lll_.y l,l~.t f.t,; jJtjop – c< en e . VfL.,. ,,11P, OUv .e a vE.~rnoon ,11PS, u
::::i.nC IJo ~ 8 on one round trip to Ahunt E;ic, then No .10/+6, our ever·~popular
suburban car for the rest of the afternoon, experienced much better att­
endance.
Closing of the IlIontrea.l North section of the MTC rail lines will
have the effect of containing the museum collection entirely within the
You,rj lle r.~r()p,rty, until such time as the Association can have its 011/11
~-, ._ ·I·~ .. :, t· n r, I f J …. -; ~ .-. or l.~( p -.,:. Y .-t . c ., rJ c …….. ~ -1-1 ,_.. _J , –• ~. ) c: 1 —c ..• +-C
01C-,-,–,_ lO.,o . ..L .,-,…l.~.LCji. LO,I/~VC,c7) 1…, p.Lc;,nn,., vO .avE. pe.Ll.OC.J.C,-,._ v.L,:>lv . ..)
t
v 1 –!~) r1-·-yr· ·t1~,,, C··11
y·r
,·.·, ,.,-·r,· ,11 t··1 ·tl-~ ·I-~ .. I-}, °11p
o lOXV1 … .J..t:, ,41..<.]: ..L .. ,1
6
-iLl.; ,:;,UcL.t!,b.l., dv W.1J.U .. Jl .. ne 0 ,.1.1. lemb 1n v1e co .. _~c-
tion can be taken out upon the yard tracks for operational demonstration
and photographs. It iE3 D.~U30 hDped to have trolley excur~3ions in conven~
.. , 1 -, ,…, t-n I .-lr
l -,
C -·,t 1 ,-,-n,r; 1 ] ,1 p ..: .. ~ 1) 1 ….. , Y R t
lOl1c… (o}.t1
r
)!l1env A .. 1..(.) c1 .. :. ._,-,,1, J_~ .. e, ana ap.Lnedu-. e or1nLl.8~ -o,scrnon
sections, before service ceases on those parts on June 2Sth and September
~~11 ~p0nac~)1Jcl1T
vu., J..-V.r– v_ … I.J.
1
;;:;lwa;~rimetablc Chan,;es -1
fj 1 )6 1oc:o
.. prl.L t_ , -•. /)7
——.. -.. _._—.-…… ——_._-.
from the lines listed hereunder:
The 1959 Spring timetable changes are
marked by many reductions in service on
10
1 n1CQ rr I t Pfi b 111Ylp<
-.. IIJ~·.t.,.t,::>,.:Jenbe. ~ rc,–,,, … _C ranc .. J_L~;:), on
both major rE~:LJ.ldays. Effecti VB April
26th, all paSS(3nger service was removed
C;;!ADli,N PACIFIC HAILJAY -Yin0
c
ton Sh3.rbo-l-Take Ont (Yhwton 3ub ).
-L···::;:5-~-·~-·~-.-,-:::-)-TT··T-f …. ;::·:-T;-_:;:;—i-·.·t ~ KI·-· -(~ … c··::·l·~l··~·~ t ). 1-;:-=>: B .:
c,-,,J,v….c;J.C .. ·hOC!·/ .. .:lc .. y-L.Clyga e.::>, 1 an. OflOW.i d:<:e uU)., Jah.LV].~re-O.LSS-
• T I : ., ,., b 1:) , .L , t 0 k ( T r,,) ., t h
eVE!1.n, han. ,1laVlnKa 0U.); lleg1na-,)ougn on, ,)as. yvan .JUO.; ,,:) oug_-
ton-V/cyburn; ~)ask. (Ki::;bc;y Sub.); Perdue-Ho setown J ct., Sask (Hosetown Sub);
h ~-~l e rc (QI n b
00Ut_ ,:).Locan-0.ocan :Lty, D !..J oean ,::;u .).
C~l:!l~}~JA~-1Y~.LIQNAJ~_}J.~_II.:.:Jj}JS -i,Iorris-,Somerset, Man.; Emerson-Sprague, Man. ;
nus ~;ell–{roxtor}-, Yo~~ktcn-Plrkerview, Sask.; Hoss J ct. -Wroxton, Sask.;
~;i.llili [u[:.;-H():~{!;son, Han,,; Hartney J ct-Brandon, Man.; Portage·-la-Prairie­
AlonE3.::~, T-1D.n.; GrcoemJE.y· .. Deloraine, Man.; Brandon J ct. -Necpawe Man.;
IIEll1boro·Beulah, Man.; Moose JavJ-Dunblane, Sa:3k~; l:i1.3.v.rer·-Main Centro, Sask.;
Hiverhurst-C8ntral Butt e Sask. i Esto~J.,~·Ihite Bear 9 ~3ask.; EE3ton-Kinders-
1 –
Q. k . .. J .. r,. 1<, C<,ir• D Jr-r, LT· ·lc-,·:-,,tl-:-k· ll. , Al
O}, !..JdS ,arljlan~vdl l,on, , . .1C!.,C>; •• , 1 ecu._c .• :>–HCl.I1u~,vilCd 1, ,.)c;,.:) ., rlnce –
bert~Paddockwood, Sask.; Young-Prince Albert, Sask~; Biggar-Battlaford,
S~sk.; Battleford Jct.-Carruthers, Sask.; Alliance-C~mrose-Vegreville,
Alta~; Camrose-Tofield, Alta.; Alix-Red Deer-Brazeau, Alta.;
Pr~ctically all of the lines listed were served by mixed trains, and in
E~ll cases, irregular freif:ht s ervl. c;;:) will cont inue.
(
EditorS Note: Our regular compiler of timetable changes,
Mr.
Kemp, was evidently overvThelmed by the service removals, as
we have no contribution from him this month. Consequently,
the detaile~ commentary on train changes is omitted this time.
C.R.H.A. News RSQor t -1959� Page 60

e Canadian National Rai lways tied up all steam loco-NOTES
Arm NEWS mot i ves runni ng out of Montr eal dur i ng the mont h of
———– —Apr il . Those sti l l available for service ar e beingby
the Edi t or stored in tallow at Turcot rOlmdhouse. Dieseliz­
at i on included even the suburban services, and for
the first time, the X-l a-a class 4-6-4 suburban engines have be
en repl aced on the Montreal -Dor val run by diesels.
e� Conve
rsely, Canadian Pacifi c is sti l l running a fair amount of steam pow
er on its suburbantrains, freight traasfers and wayfreight s in and
around the Mont real terminals. G2, G3 and G5 class 4-6-2s, PI and P2 class 2
-8- 2s, N3 cl ass 2-8-0s and Hl class 4-6-4s can be seen regul­ar
ly, though no esti mat e can be made as to how long this situat i on can
be expected to continue.
e� Fo
ur 0-6- 0 type tender engines were recently·retired f romser vi ce at
the Turcot VIorks of the Canadian Car Company, They have been sent to
Hamilt on to be cut up for scrap. All wer e bui lt by the Canadian Loco
motive Company at Ki ngst on.
e� Following cessation of electri c ra.l.Lway servi ce in Ottawa, a newspaper re
port says that the Ottawa Tr ansportati on Commission wil l preser ve f i ve
str eet cars pr obabl y at the new aTC headquar t ers to be bui l t i n St. L
aurent Boulevard. The five cars include an SaO-class car, a horse
car (already preserved), a sand car, former ly a Royal Mai l car, a gr in­d
er which was once a single-truck passenger car, and a sweeper. Of
the remaining equi pment , two sweepers have been sold to the Cornwall
Str eet Rai.Lway , and the balance, inclu.ding thi r ty-nine passenger cars
of the 800 class, have been sold to scrap deal ers. One of the thirty­ni ne, car 859, has been
offered for sale to the Associati on b¥ the
scrap deal er, Baker Brothers (fromwhom car 696 was Durchased), for 4176.25; it is
~r obable tha~ the Associ ati on wi ll accept this offer.
_.__._–_ _ __._ _.._—_ _._–_._ _ ———_.._-._——– – – — -­
As Ottawa s trams bowout, the Association writes a posthumous •• •••
-,
Ottawa, Sat urday, May 2nd, 1959•
. -PE LATE�
-i NDUVI. ~~ T\.4~ARN , and.
Gent l emen:�
,r- 1
h blAOti,.n. T111QJ:vtl-.,:) A.~_ t 1~S I~ .
HoN •
.l. t, r ~Op~R , I.� On a warm July day in
v:II ,{KEN Y. . ,:)
j.;J
,d ,l.·…
the year 1870, it s newswor thi ness� ove
rshadowed only by the Franco-Prussi an�


~Jar , a tiny four-wheeled hor-se–dr-awn streetcar open­�
ed servi ce on the Ottawa Cit y Passenger Rai lway. Today, nearly eig
hty-nine years Int er, under an over-cast. sky, more than a dozen pass­enger and work car s of the
successor Ottawa Ir-anspor-tat.Lon Commission
paraded solemnly in single file, dr aped in bl ack, fromthe new Geor ge
Loop to Holland Junction. The atmosphere was decor ous, the pace funer­
eal –al l in all , a fitting requiem for the streetcar in Ottawa, styled
by many t o be Canada f s trol ley capit al, principally because of the ccn-:
tri buti ons you gentlemen mqde to an industry whose activities, unfortun­
atel y, are LargeLy taken for granted by the publi c at large.
L
eading the processi on was one of the or i ginal O.C.P.R. horsecar s, No .
L~
, now, alas, minus its flanged wheels and horsecar pedestals. Then came a
flat car, No .14, upon which drum majorettes cavorted for the
amusement of a quiescent mult itude. This was foll owed by No.6, a former pa
ssenger car and then by No.423, a sand car, whi ch once carried the H
oyal Hai l fromthe central Post Of fice to the railway stations. Other
News Report – 1959 _ t Page 60
e Can
adian National Raihmys tied up all steam loco-
NOTES AND NEWS motives running out of Montreal during the month of
————–April. Those still available for service are being
by the Editor stored in tallow at Turcot roundhouse. Dieseliz-
ation included even the suburban services, and for
the first time, the X-IO-a class 4-6-4 suburban
engines have been replaced on the Montreal-Dorval run by diesels.
e
Conversely, Canadian Pacific is still running a fair amount of steam power on i
ts suburban trains, freight transfers and wayfreights in and
around the Montreal terminals. G2, G3 and G5 class 4-6-2s, PI and P2 cl
ass 2-$-2s, N3 class 2-$-Os and Hl class 4-6-4s can be seen regul­
arly, though no estimate can be made as to how long this situation can
be expected to continue.
e
Four 0-6-0 type tender engines were recently retired from service at
the Turcot Works of the Canad5an Car C~mpanyo They have been sent to Hamil
ton to be cut up for s~rap. All were built by the Canadian L
ocomotive Company at Kingston.
e Following cessation of electric rai.h1ay service in Ottawa, a newspaper r
eport says that the Ottawa Transportation Commission will preserve
five streetcars probably at the new OTC headquarters to be built in
St. Laurent Boulevard. The five cars include an COO-class car, a horse
car (already preserved), a sand car, formerly a Royal Mail tar, a grin­
der which was once a single-truck passenger car, and a sweeper. Of
the remaining equipment, two sweepers have been sold to the Cormvall
Street Railway, and the balance, inclu.ding thirty-nine passenger cars of
the $00 class, have been sold to scrap dealers. One of the thirty­
nine, car $59, has been offered for sale to the Association b¥ the
scrap dealer, Baker Brothers (from whom car 696 was Durchased), for
<,p176. 25 ~ it is probable that-the Association vill accept this offer.
_ .. _—_._._ .. _-_ … _—-_ .. _ …. _—_. __ ._———–.———-~-
writes a posthumous ••• ,.
Ottawa, Saturday, May 2nd, 1959.
Gentlemen:
On a warm July day in
the year 1$70, its newsworthiness
overshadowed only by the Franco-Prussian
War, a tiny four-wheeled horse-dralrffi streetcar open­
ed service on the Ottawa City Passenger Railway. Today, nearly
eighty-nine years later, under an overcast sky, more than a dozen pass­
enger and work cars of the successor Ottawa Tran,sportation Commission
paraded solemnly in single file, draped in black, from the new George
Loop to Holland Junction. The atmosphere was decorous, the pace funer­
eal –all in all, a fitting requiem for the streetcar in Ottawa, styled
by many to be Canadas trolley capital, principally because of the con-
tributions you gentlemen mqde to an industry whose activities, unfortun­
ately, are ID .. rgely taken for granted by the public at large.
Leading the procession was one of the original O.C.P.R. horsecars, N
o. Lf-, now, alas, minus its flanged wheels and horsecar pedestals. Then came a
flat car, No.14, upon which drum majorettes cavorted for the
amusement of a quiescent multitude. This was followed by No.6, a former
passenger car and then by No.423, a sand car, which once carried the
Hoyal Hail from the central Post Office to the railway stations. Other
Fage 61
(MEMO TO
AHEARN & SOPElt. -Cont TO.) work equipment , –two sweepers and a
line car, and a number of passenger cars of the 800 series, completed the
procession. A bus, evidently intended to be a part of the proces sion, cont
ribut ed some comic rel ief as far as the unswer ving rai lway protagon­i
sts present were concerned. Ri di ng in the passenger cars were the Mayor
and corpor-at. Lon of Ottawa, the Transportation Commissi oner s and ot her holders of d
igni fied rank in the OTC, and superannuated employees repres­
enting thei r brotherhood. All of the cars were draped in bl ack crepe,
and many car r i ed signs wi th or i ginal ins cript io ns ~ A nice touch, we thought, was
the name of the vet eran motorman in char ge of each car, carried on a sign on the
front dash. All in all , gentlemen, it was very wel l carried
out under the di rection of Mr. W.K. Bangs, Dir ect or of Saf ety and Claims for the
Ottawa Transport at i on Commissi on.
It wa.s a far-cry from June 24th, 1891 , when the Han. Mr. Ahearn T s f
ive-year-old son threw the switch which pdiac ed t he el ect r i c cars in oper­at ion for the
first ti me. We rather regr ett ed the omission of the names of Ahear n and Soper fr
om the processi on it self, but many Ottawans, pursu­ing the latte
r-day fad of chasing an elusive wil l -o -the-wi sp cal l ed
moder-nLaat.Lon 1 (–not, we hasten to add, necessari ly synonymous with
l1progresf311l , will not forget the par t which you both played in giving comf or table
publi c tr anspor tation to Canadians everywhere. Nor were the
members of our Association unconsci ous of this fact.
One of the passenger cars, No.859, was reser ved for the members of
the Canadian Railr oad Histori cal Association, and their friends, headed
by Honour ar y President Donald F. Angus and his wife. Our Pr esident , Dr. H.V.V. N
ichol ls, !ITaS absent due to family il l ness. The deLegat es in No.
()59 came, for the most part , from points out side Ottawa, such as Hont real , (2uebec and many point s in
the east er n United States. One lone delegate even fo
und hi s way from Toronto, in Upper Canada; not even a Torontonian, he, rather an ex
patriat e Aust.r-y.li an ;
As the procession reached Holland Junction, resist or gr ids smoki ng
fr om the slow pace, the cars returned to Cobourg Barn. Car 859 separated
fr-om the returning cars, to take our members on t.he of ficial last tr ip
over the Bri tannia line. It was too bad to see thi s line go, in operat­
ion, as you vTil l undoubtedly recal l , since. May 24t h, 1900, in the reign of Her Lat e Maj esty Queen V
ictoria, when the Ottawa Electr i c Hailway opened
street railway ser vi ce to the once-popular park.
When No.S59 retur ned to Cobourg Bar n, the last car to car ry pa ssen­gers in Ot
tawa, the power was shut off on passenger servi ce for the la st
t Lme , The horse car was haul ed away t o its stor age place , not by hor s es , but rat h
er unceremoniouslybut not unki ndly, by a mot or truck. You wi ll be ple
ased to know t hat No.859 wi l l be preserved by our Associat ion, to
take its place besi de No.696, already acqui red by us. At least six of
the ot her car s vd11 remain, whi le two sweepers have been sold to the Cor n­waIL St
reet Rail.way, Light. &, Power Company.
Someone h
as said that there is a place for everything, and the pla ce f
or most streetcars today is apparently in museums. So be it . As custod­ians of
history, we wi l l look after the durable remains of the Ot tawa B
lectric Railway, in a manner befitting one of Canada1s pioneer electric
railway systems. V
ery r espectful l y,
THE CANADIAN HAILROADHISTOHICAL ASSOCN DELEGATI ON,
…………. PH.:LGSENI AT OTTAWA, SA.TURDAY, MAY SECOND, A.D . 1959.
(
..,;.f.-:;.,.;;.I;,..;L .:….;;B..;;,..~ :.,.;.1i.;.:;, ..;,.. ___________ ..;;.N;,..::.L::ws Jet:; po rt -1959
Page 61
(
MEMO TO AHEARN & SOPEll -Cont T d) work equipment, –two sweepers and a
line car, and a number of passenger cars of the 600 series, completed the
procession. A bus, evidently intended to be a part of the procession,
contributed some comic relief as far as the unswerving railway protagon­
ists present were concerned. Hiding in the passenger cars were the Mayor
and corpora.tion of Ottawa, the Trc:msportation Commissioners and other
holders of dignified rank in the OTC, and superannuated employees repres­
enting their brotherhood. All of the cars WBro draped in black crepe,
and many carried signs with original inscriptions~ A nice touch, we thought,
was the name of the veteran motorman in charge of each car, carried on a
sign on the front dash. All in all, gentlemen, it was very well carried
out under the direction of Mr. VI.K. Bangs, Director of Safety and Claims
for the Ottawa Transportation Commission.
It was a far cry from June 24th, 1891, when the Hon. Mr. Ahearns
five-year-old son threw the switch which p&a-eed the electric cars in oper­
ation for the first time. We rather regretted the omission of the names
of Ahearn and Soper from the procession itqelf, but many Ottawans, pursu­
ing the latter-day fad of chasing an elusive will-o-the-wisp called
,imodernization 1 ( __ not, we hasten to add, necessarily synonymous with
ilprogresslll, will not forget the part which you both played in giving
comfortable public transportation to Canadians everywhere. Nor were the
members of our Association unconscious of this fact.
One of the I)CJ.ssenger cars, lJo.859, was re.served for the members of
Glie Canadian Railroad Historical Association, and their friends, headed
by Eonourary President Donald F. Angus and his wife. Our President, Dr.
}C. V . V. Nicholls ,IITaS absent due to family illness.. The del(:)gates in No ..
()59 u.me, for the most part, from points outside Ottawa, such as Montreal,
Quebec and many poirrts in the eastern United States. One lone delegate .
even found his way from Toronto, in Upper Canada; not even a Torontonian,
he, rather an expatriate 11Austrylian
l1

As the procession reached Holland Junction, resistor grids smoking
from the slow pace, the cars returned to Cobourg Barn. Car 859 separated
fror:1 the returning cars, to take our members on tl1E: official last trip
over the Britannia line. It was too bad to SGe this line go, in operat­
:Lon, as you will undoubtedly recall, since May 24th, 1900, in the reign of
Her Late Majesty Queen Victoria, when the Ottawa Electric Hailway opened
street railway service to the once-popular park.
Jhen No.859 returned to Cobourg Barn, the last car to carry passen­
gers in Ottawa, the povwr was shut off on passenger service for the last·
;~j.me. The horse car was hauled away to its storage place, not by horses,
but rather unceremoniously but not unkindly, by a motor truck. You will
be pleased to know that No.S59 will be preserved by our Association, to
take its place beside ]Jo.696, already acquired by us. At least six of
tLe d:lther cars will remain, while two sweepers have been sold to the Corn­
vitlJ.l Street Hailway, Lig:ht &, Power Company.
Someone has
said that there is a place for everything, and the place·
for most streetcars today is apparently in museums. So be it. As custod­
ians of history, we will look after the durable remains of the Ottawa
~lectric Hailway, in a manner befitting one of Canadas pioneer electric
railway systems.
. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Very respectfully,
THE CA)JADIAN HAILROAD HISTOHICAL ASSOC T N DELEGATION,
PEI~SENT AT OTTAWA, SA.TURDAY, MAY SECOND, A.D. 1959.

Demande en ligne