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Canadian Rail 099 1959

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Canadian Rail 099 1959


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i fJE(:.[S REFOHT NO .99 . J

r APRIL
19 5~
I
I–_
WI L
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
INCORPORATED.
P. O . BOX 22, STATION B
MONTREAL 2, QUEBEC
The retul ar monthly meet ing of the Canad i an
r- -l-i(-)-~-~ c e –Of Meeting I
Rai lroad Hi st or i cal Asso c ~at iun wj,l l take
L_.,_. • I p.lace on i)t;,;Cjy,pday !p,-,i l SH l J9 )) at
(} ..~ ~<. .... · !.)T ,~ • ~-~ v ~~; J. l:: (~ .-T. ::.· ; .~~ v .~ ? 1.,~ 1:,,, ; .. ~) -1.r~�­
u . …. 5 1 .-1 1 11 -~O ()Ll 2u2, lodt JeaJ. Ir-anspor-t at.Lon
Commi.s si.ori Bui lding, 159 Cr aig S tn~e t 1.Iest , Lont.r-eal. , Ii/hile it is
heped to obtai n a speaker for this meeting, the entertainment had
not been discl osed at the time of our print i ng deadline.
00000000000000
Agood gather i ng of member s and friends wer e
r j c-0 l J:~~C-l
pr esent at the closing excur si on on the Queboc
L~~
C],~~ lOn l~
-St e.Anne-St.Joachim electric servi ce of the Can
adian National Hailways, on Sunday, March l ~th .
Dota. ils of this excur si on ar e gi ven in a wr ite-up beginning on page 33
of this issue. Eighty-one par t icipants went to Cuebec for this trip,
somo of our Unite
d Statc:)s fr i ends coming from as far distant as Tovra ,

_
1

chl cr 11and IrlG.

anaI }
.
j S con
• .1.10
C J11
,
lr:1
be.

J. Ct. t
1
1
.. :..-l.L 0.. ._I..
10r-Lll.j T: ,rCTqc I or… , ..T J
~~J:i~–:: ;_, J,;.t. U ~
BELLEVILLE-13ANC~O FT
:.:..__J. .:..JJ.~~
The Trip Committee advises us that
quite a number of reservations have al ready been received for this tr
ip, givi ng an early indi cation of a probable successful outing. D
etai l s have been car ried previously in the News Report , but they are
stiJ.l avai l able by writing to: Trip Committee, Canadian Hai lroad I-list­or le
nl Asso ci ation, Box 22, Station B, Mont r eal 2, Canada. It is to
be not cd specially that thi s trip will featur e DOUBLE-HE.ADED_~T IL~IvI
I.JOC () r,!OT IVE ,~ , a 2-6-0 and a 2-8-0. Connections will be rnade at Bel.l evil le
for Toront o and IJIont r eal , and point s beyond.
lEOLLEY TRIPS
Now that the weather has moderated somewhat , the Rai Lway
Division are consi dering tr olley trips once again. Since this wi l l be
the last year for tr ol ley trips in Mont real , unless and until the Assoc­iati on obt
ains it s own facilit y for oDer ation, it is su~geste d t hat
memuors interest ed take advantage of these final tr ips for riding and
phct.o
graphi ng Nont r eal f s t.r-anspor-t.atLon equipment. Member s in the
Creat.er I,Iont r eal area wi ll be cir culated ,separately on t.hose trips. Th
ose outside of Mont real who wish to be advised should advise us by p
ostcar d .
— —.—- – ­
irCHEUlIN DE FER DE LA J30N Ni~ .SAE rTE AENK -Bi l ingual 1
6-page il lustrated history of the Montmorency Divisi on of the
QRL&P CO. 43 phot ographs, roster, car and locomoti ve pl
ans, tr ack diagram. Copi es may be obt ained from t he
Association, Box 22 Stat i on 13, I;Ioht rual 2. –50¢
(
APRIL ~
_ _~ ____ J
CANA.DIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAl ASSOCIATION
I NCO RPORA.TED.
P.o. BOX 22, STATION B
MONTREAL 2, QUEBEC
The re
[ular monthly meeting of the Canadian
Railroad Historical Assoc!atiun wi.11 ta~G
I)]
-1ct on i,l
o
i-1Y1PU;l
a··y
!pril 8-!ll ]9
r
..-::. 8t
~ c._ – ~ v·….. – …) ,.( …. . _ ……. _ . V J.? ~.) ./, c~
8::: 5 Hi in Hoom 202, l.1ontreal Tr2.nspnrtation
CCrnmission Building, 159 Craig Street l,Iest, IJontreal. Hhile it is
hoped to obtain a speaker for this meeting, the entertainmont had
not been disclosed at the time of our printing deadline.
OOooOOooOOoQOO
~:OCiation N~W~
A good gathering of mombers and friends were
present at the closing excursion on the Queboc
-Ste.Anne-St.Joachim eloctric service of the
C d .
~J t 1 ;/ .. , c. d -.,. 1 ] r:: f-]
,ana·l.an l a J.ono.. LD.J .. LVlays, on wun.ay, i,Jarcn .J., .1.
Deta.ils of this 8:{Ccursion are given in a write-up
beginning on page 33
of this issue. Eighty-one participants went to (uebec for this trip,
SOLW of oU.r United State:) s friends coming from as far distant as Iowa,
J is cons in, vhchigan and Indiana.
The
Trip Committee advises us
that quite a number of reservations have already been received for this
trip, giving an early indication of a probable successful outing.
Details have been carried previously in the News Report, but they are
still available by writing to: Trip Committee, Canadian Railroad I-list­
olic,:ll Associe,tion, Box 22, Station B, IIontreal 2, Canada. It is to
be not(Jd specially that this trip will feature DOUBLE-HE.ADED ~TE~M
J…JO.Q.OqOTIVE,~,a 2-6-0 and a 2-8-0. Connections will be ma.de at Belleville
for Toronto and r!Iontreal, and points beyond.
lEOLLEY TRIPS
Now that the weath
er has moderated somewhat, the Railway
Division are considering trolley trips once again. Since this will be
the last year for trolley trips in Montreal, unless and until the Assoc­
i
ation obtains its own facility for operation, it is suggested that
mcmb,:::rs interested take advantage of these final trips for riding and
pho
togr[q.!lling Ilontreal T s tran,sportation equipment. I·lembers in the
Grea.ter Montreal area will be circulated ,separat.oly on these trips.
1~ose outside of Montreal who wish to be advised should advise us by
postcard.
——.. —–
CHEMIN DE FER DE LA BONNlC SAINTE ARNEu -Bilingual 16-pa
ge illustrated history of the Nontmorency Divi.sion
of the QRL&P CO. 43 photographs, roster, car and locomotive pl
ans, track diagram. Copies may be obtained from the
Association, Box 22i Station B, Montreal 2. –50¢
.
r. _nB.A.
…o.—=.:N:.::;w.:::R.:::.por t e.:,,;s–=.:eJ:::.- 1959

•• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
by O.S.A. Lavallee
lI-Ei; GAUG:U: REVISION ON

F;.U NCE EmfAHD I SLA ~rD ,�
The Province of Prince Edward I sland i s
<-.-, is uni que in Canada in that i t has never
been served by more than one public rail­way in its t
ransportation hi story. It is also int er est ing to the rai l­way st.udcrrt due t o
the f act t hat, NowfoundLand excepted, it once pos~) ­
esaed Canadafs longest narrow-gauge railway networ-k,
~
;he1tTl the Br itish Nort h American provinces considered confeclr:::rat ion in
thc er.r Ly 1860s, Charl ottetown, then and now the Is]and c>J~ ,j.td l ,
was cl.o locale of one of the organizational confer-ences V:~llr;h L , , (>k
r r I) f .1 . -,. , , ,.., 1P 1 .
p.l.a ce
(
l uuq. . 1I1J.S act not.wi.t rs t andi.ng, rrtnc e 1:,( ;,(1:0 C:;Ul iF . I. a party to the oriei nal Confedera t ion on July Ls t, ~.bb 7 , In.. (, mai.nt.aLned
an existence as a separate British Crown Colony until 1873, w}~e n i nt er­nal economi c f
actors caused the Islander s to aoply for admi ssion into the
Domini on of Canada. ­
At
thi s
pnrLod, the narr-ow-gauge r ai Iway was comi.ng into the pi ctur e C
anada entered the field early, st arting both the Toronto &Nipi ssing,
and the Toront o, Grey Be Bruce railways in l8?1. Ind.eed, the Tor onto &
Nipissing claims the di stinction of being the fi rst nar r ow-gauge publ i c r
ailway in Nort h Amer ica. The advantage of economy of cost in constr­uct i on has alw
ays been advanced successfully for smal l-gange rai.lways, and it is only
natural that, when the public aut hori t ies of a separate
Pri.ncc .LCdvmrd Island deci ded that their col ony needed an int ernal
r-a i.Lway nct.wor k , whi ch would never be physi cal l y connected wi t h t he mainl
and, they would throw in their lot with the nar row-gauge.
All of these ear
ly Canadi an narrow-gauge lines were bui lt to the
3T6if gauge wi dth, and the Prince Edwar-d I sland Hai lway was no excepti on.
Government-owned from the beginning, it was original ly under the ad­min
istration of t he colonial govermnent at Charlot t etown. After confed­
eration with Canada in 1873, the Pri nce Edward Island Railway was ad­mi.n
i.stered by the Canadi an Government at Ottawa as part of the Govern­morrt r a
lihway system. Jhen the Canadi an Government Hailways became a pa
rt of elle Canadi an Nat i onaL Rai lways in 1918, the syst em became the
Lsl.and Di.vision of the C.N. Fl. . In the for-t.y-fLve years between the
opening of the initial porti on of the P.E.I.H. and the end of VJor l d Tdar I
j
the railway had bui lt up an island-wide service. Extending fr om Ti g­nish
in the west to Sour i s in the east, branch lines extended to the
ca pit al, Charlottetown, and to many other coast al points (see mQp,p.36).
In the summer-of 1918, however, it Has decided that a limi ted ext­
ensi on of standard-gauge operat ion should be made, so as to obviat e the
need for int erchange from s tandard-gau~e equipment to the fer ry at Tor ­
mentine, then fromferry to narrow-fauge at Cape Tr aver se, P.E .I. (now B
orden). Accordingly, starting in August, 19l 5, construction went ahead on
the double-gauging of the branch from Cape Traverse to Emerald Jct., .
and fr om Charl ottetown, via Royalty Jct .. and Emerald Jct ., to Sumrnersi de. The wor k was hal
ted wit h the advent of wi.nt.er-in December 1918, but . resumed
in IIay, 1919, and was compl eted in August of that year. In all, 60
.27 mil es of m~ in li ne track, plus sidi ngs, were laid wi th the 4 f 8!~
gauge thi r d rai l . The 3
1
6if gauge track hrid been a mi xture of 50-and 56
-pound rail , whi le the rai ls used in the double-gauging were 67!- lb.
rails rolled for the Imperial Russ ian Gover nment in 1917, but never
del ivered because of the Revolut i on.
(
~C~.~H~.~H~.~A~. __________ ~ ________ ~N~ew~s_. ~R~e~p~0~r~t~-~1~9~5~9~ ______________ . ____ ~P~age 35
r-
I. TEi; GAUC}ii: HEVISION ON
I FJINCE EDWARD ISLAND,
~————————~
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
by O.S.A. Lavallee
The Province of Prince Edward Island is is un
ique in Canada in that it has never
been served by more than one public rail­
way in its transportation history. It is also interesting to the rail­way
~3tu.dent due to the fact th::l.t, NevT~~oundland eXGepted, it once POSE3-
eS~3ed Cel.nada f s longest narrow-gauge railway net!ork.
~;helITl the British North American provinces considered cOGferlr::;ration in
the 82rly Id60
Ts,
Charlottetown, then and now the IsJ~nd cnrital,
vm.s cl.e locale of one of the organizational conferen::
r
-?) v:~llr:h -l.,:(,k:
pJ.ace (ld64). This fact notwithstanding, Prince Ed~~r1 JRJail~ ~as not
a party to the orir::inal Confederation on JuJ y 1st, [.667 lrLl(, n;25.ntained an e
xistence as a separate British Crown Colony u~til 1873, w}~erl inter­
nal economic factors caused the Islanders to apply for admission into
the Dominion of Canada.
~ { t 1 . . 4 th . 1 .. h
ftc, ,1lS p:erJ,oc, e narrow-gauge raJ, vmy was comu]£; lnto t e plcture C
anada entered the field early, starting both the Toronto & Nipissing,
and the Toronto, Grey & Bruce railways in 1871. Indeed, the Toronto &
Nipissing claims the distinction of being the first narrow-gauge public
rcdlway in North AmE)rica. The advClnta.ge of economy of cost in cnnstr­u
cti.on has always been advanced successfully for small-gaL~ge rai.lways, and
it is only natural that, when the public authorities of a separate
F:ri.nce~CdVard Island decided that their colony needed an internal
raibvay notvvork, which would never be physically connected with the
mainland, they would throw in their lot with the narrow-gauge.
A
ll of these early Canadian narrow-gauge linGS were built to the
3! 6 iI gauge width, and the Prince Edvmrd Island Hailway was no exception.
Government-owned from the beginning, it was originally under the ad­mini
strD.tion of the colonial government at Charlottetov·m. After confed­
eration with Canada in 1873, the Prince Edvvard Island Railway was ad­
nd.rlist(Ted by the Canadian Government at Ottawa as part of the Govern­
l11(,nt jaiiliway system. Jhen the Canadian Government Hailways became a
pc,,~::; of the C;anC1dian Nc,tional Railways in 1918, the system became the
Island D~vision of the C.N.R. In the forty-five years between the
opening of the initial portion of the P.E.I.R. and the end of vlorld VJar
I, the railway had bui.lt up an island-wide service. Extending from Tig­
nisIl in the west to Souris in the east, branch lines extended to the
capital, Charlottetown, and to many other coastal points (see ffiap,p.36).
In the summer of 1918, however, it vJaS decided that a limited ext­
ension of standard-gauge operation should be made, so as to obviate the
need for interchange from standard-gau~e equipment to the ferry at Tor­
mentine, then from ferry to narrow-gauge at Cape Traverse, P.E.I. (now
Borden). Accordingly, starting in August, 1918, construction went ahead on
the double-gauging of the branch from Cape Traverse to Emerald Jct., .
and from Charlottetown, via Royalty Jct~ and Emerald Jet., to Summerside.
The work was halted with the advent of winter in December 1918, but . resumed
in [Jay, 1919, and was completed in August of that year. In all,
60.27 miles of m~in line track, plus sidings, were laid with the 4T8!~
gauge third rail. The 3 y 6 il gauge crack b.D.cl. been a mixture of 50-and . 56-pound ra
il, while the rails used in the double-gauging were 67!-lb.
rails rolled for the Imperial Russian Government in 1917, but never
delivered because of the Revolution.
• •
n ~~_ . I-I 4 A,I)
.—~~ .~.. –…
EeyJs .ReJ) ();Ct. -:.. J.959…. .. _. _. _… .,…. FL1F,:: .. ~
In the three- railing operation, the main track had to be centered on i t s
roadbed in accordance with t he heavier standar d-gauge equipment ~
necessitating a shi f t of 7! in the old track centre for the 42
11
gaug~ .
l~lso , the heavier rails were only placed for standar d-gauge equipment, leavi ng
the lighterm interior rai l , for the nar-r-ow-gauge Q T~e 67ft-pound rai
ls were five inches high, while the inn er rail was only a lit-.t.!.8 mor e
than four inches high, and the di f ference was overcome by shimmi Eg u:;?
t he i nt er i or r ail t o the height of the outer rail s . This was neve: a v
ery satisf actory ar ra.ngement, and was responsible for many d c~r0.ilm8nt s
while in effect .
Ultimate
ly, the third rail was extended on the westerr,. t:i!c: I; ; tile Island,
to the end of the track at Tigni sh, meaning C,}}El. t, ;.~ :~, rJ.; lC~ ~E· () ·gaug e
–I—–…..-.——–.—-._..–,-I­
. … -r-, ­
/ ….,.
, -.
i ! I
. 1
~
I
——–.J.~/C./~;-c,··,! (
./ ,. J I ~—– ··- l —·-..-..-­
/ :{~~f IT ;GNISH

–·——·-··——–·-·—-·
.

( l, . 1.J.)
I
Hap of the
PBIl{1Jf;lp EDv{ARD ISL.A1:m BAILWAY
//..,~~ /(~ -j ~J3ERT ON�
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r/ /./ . ~ iFj\ ~�
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, s. > >, ~ ~: /f <;:::::: ~ .~--
🙂 . (I,::: ,) -..,.: ,-, – …..-, — . .) ,
\ … , (/ SUMMERSIDE lr-;,~ L. ,-..r- …….-…. –._ . . F,LMHLA ……. ,�
_L-(I -: – -~ I I
\ :Sc–.J -., :,,:. ony .Ja: ~1_, Emerald J;;F-:~::i··. ;c~,~:-Harm
\! . ,1 – >:~~,.r J:a~ HUlif~r.ERS-~t~~.~::· · >I-O

.)< 1_ ...:. , ~~~ .. _..~~ _OUNT ,j e~11 ARr r -SOURI S
dPT~IlTT :~ ~, CAPE TEAVE~SE – JO~TE_~ · .~ :../ ;IRoyalty J~,;.OitARI~S~/,
f .GH,NE -::,-,_ …… lBORDEN) lfj ( TCNN x-…. t: –
Ii -….; ~ .::::,!,. –; ,/-,lV}…. c:JL-rt-. Mo~taie ,Jet. .
rJ . · ..:::~ ..~.: :. ···t: · …r-..–. ..-.::-:::::;-…. J..r<~, . . .~~ . <, , . -<,-J../ / n·: .r.) lVlONTAGU, :m .... I
~~::.?C~E TOBMENTI NE =.<>/ V-~ (/)
~
., …… .> . /c::—<.-I f,JJ
~_..<. ,; L 1 ~I C-= .c:._MURRAY H.A1TIOTJR
,~~~.;~; _/-,~~~:==~; , . -/1;:;<-._-~ :-=I~
..x,…….. ………, t-…._. ,/ /-.t>/,!I
–,- — ;,,:., -,,._-.. / ,,/ ,
·-···..·
::.-.
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~
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…..
-,
/ ../
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1
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,
./
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~~ -.~ . I ,._…~.-)f
__ _
2
_ _. .__~._._.. ,./ I
car s could be s ent ~ via car ferry, direct fr om the mainland to al l poi
nts west of, and includi ng, Charlot tet own. During this period , trans­fer c
ars were used so as to enable mi xed gauge trains to be run . One
end of a standard-gauge flat car was equipped with two dr-awbar sockets
one in the regul ar positi on for standard-gauge equi pment, the other 7k~
to one si de and 6
11
l ower , for t he 42!l-gauge cars. Ihn dr -awbar: ~ fa st ened wi t h a p
in, coul d be placed in either socket , as needs di~t~te d . In or der
to use these transfer cars , C!. certain amount of c:)nsistency vms
necessary in layi ng the third rail, and the rule wa ~ made t o place it
on the north, or right hand side of the track, looking we3t. The usual di
fficulties took place at wyes, where switches had to be placed in one le
g, to al l ow the narrow-gauge equipment to pass from ono side of the
In the three-railing operation, the main track had to be centered
on its roadbed in accordance with the heavier standard-gauge equipment; nec8f3s
itating a shift of 7~1I in the old track centre for the 4211 gauge.
l;.lso, the heavier rails were only placed for standard-gauge equipment, l
eaving thE) lighterm interior rail, for the narrov[ …. gauge ~ T~e 67~ … pound
rails were five inches high, while the inner rail ,,las only a lit-,t.l .. 8 more
than four inches high, and the difference was overcome by shimmir:g u:;?
the interior rail to the height of the outer rails. This was neve: a
very satisfactory arrangement, and vvas responsible for many der0.ilments
while in effect.
Ultimately, the third rail was extended on the west err,. ::icc: r;; tIle
Islc:l.lld, to the end of the track at Tigni,sh, mr3aning ;::,ha. t, : ::J.:l(~l!~(!·gduge
————–_ .. __ ._——_._–_. _ .. —–, -.–
I I
I
—-~—-.—.. —-..• —… —-
I Map of the
PHHiflE?P EDvrARD I SL.A;tm FAILWAY
cars could be sent. via car ferry, direct from the mainland to all
points west of, and including, Charlottetown. During ttlis period, trans-·
fer cars were used so as to enable mixed gauge trains to be run. One­
end of a standard-gauge flat car vIas equipped with two drawbar sockets
one in the regular position for standard-gauge equipment, the other 7~h
to one side and 6
11
lower, for thE. 42n … gauge cars. Thf, d:cawbar, fastened w
ith a pin, could be placed in either socket, as needs di~t~ted. In
order to U$e these transfer cars, D. certain amount of c::Jnsistency was
necessary in laying the third rail, and the rule wa~ m~Je to place it
on the north, or right hand side of the track, lookIng we3t~ The usual
difficulties took place at wyes, where switches had to be placed in one
leg, to allow the narrow-gauge eqUipment t.o pass from ono side of the
v
Cole. B. A. News RCQor t -19 59 1· . ~1 7 .-:~ :1(
s tandard-ga uge t r a ck , t o t he ot h er. I n t ere s ting: photogra phs exi st show­
i ng t he dQubl e-g
auge tracka ge at diff er ent points .
T
his dual gauge per sisted for fi ve years, In 1923 however , pc.s ~ , ~:_b l y
unJert he impetus of the new, en.Lar-gcd, Canad i.an National n,a11ways FI _,l~ ~
agement, it wa s decided to restrict the lines west of Char lottetowi: ~o
standard-gauge oper ation only, and accor-di.ngl.y, on August Llth, 1 ~; t: :. 1
nar-r-owpgauge oper-at.Lon ceased on all track TJVC~s t of Royal t y .Junct.Lo» 1
as foll ows:
, on q~
Roy aLty Jet. -Tignish ••••••••• .L 7 <-,.L rni Les •
Emeral d Jct . -Bor den ••• ~ ••• • • • 12.1J.
11
Dual gauge was mai nt ai ned bet ween Charlottetovm and Royalty ,kt :/ ,?6
miles, to enable access to Charlottet o:m by nar-r-ow-rauge trai ns coming
fr o~ the east, or Sour i s, directi on.
Th
ree years elapsed bef or e any more standardization was und ertaken.
Howe
ver, on August 22nd, 1926, the great er part of the remainder of the
syst em itla S changed over from narrow-gauge to st andard-gauge, vvi tbout a
dual-gauge int erval, as had previ ously been the ca se. Preparati ons had
been made in advan ce, and the cha nge was made i n one day on the follow­ing
lines :
Roy
alty Jct . -Sour is •••••••••• 75. 08 mil es. l;lount St ewar t J
et . -Geor get ovm 24 .10 fl
Mont ague J et . -Mont ague ••••••• 6 .50 II
This lef t the branch fr om Har mony Jct. tlO Elmir a, 9.90 mil es, and thi s
was cha
nged over about ten days af ter the other por t i on, abo ut August
30t h, 192
6. Narrow-gauge roll ing stock lef t isolated was minimal , but
that which remained was taken to Char l ottetown loaded on sr,arlu.Eird-:;Cluge
fl
at cars.
The rem
ainin,gsegment of line, fromChar lottetown to Mur-r-ay Har bour,
3
T6
lt
47.70 miles, remain ed gauge for some years. !hi le t:.herR hac: been
no cmgi neer ing d
ifficulties on the remainder of the syst em, th te; lWl:rray
Har-b our: line left Char l ottetown over the Hillsbor ough Br idge I Up cJ.
whi.ch severe wei.ght. rest ri ctions were in ef fect. It should be n : :-v~d
her,_: that the Mur ray Harbour br anch was afcessible onLy vLa the? l-I5.L.s­
borough Bridge at th is time, the branch fr om Hourrt Stewart t o Ver-non
via Lake Ver de being built only in the earl y 1930s. For some ti~e , it
vas tl.lOught tl;Clt the Hur ray ,Har bour line ~ou ld . nev~~r be changed over,
but flnally, lD the month of August , 1930 , th lS Ilne too, pa s sed out
of existence, Leavi.ng the nar -r-ow-g auge only a memor y on Prin ce Edward
I
sland .
As the last tra
in pul led into Char-Lott.et.own, the onLy Lnt.er-e st.ed pe
rsons pr esent toviitness the occasion wer-e the lat e Hober t it. Br-own
of our AssocLat.Lon, t hen on a business trip in P.E.I . , and the Canaot.an
Nati onal Rai lways I const able at Char -Lot t et.own , The 42~ in ch gauge L.Vl~ S
on only 200 mi les acr oss the Gulf of Sainte Lawr-ence in NewfoundLand,
where more than 700 mi les of C.N.H. and pr i vat.eLy-owncd nar-r-ow-gaug«
net
l? r~ is th~ l argest ~n North Amer-Lca , and shows every pr omi se of
remalnlng so lor some tlme to come.
M-If any reader possesses the exa ct date of ser vice cess­
ation, the aut hor would appreciate huving it for his
r ecords .
_C_._it_· ._!-_1 .,-A~. _-.. ________ N;:.=.e.;…vv..;;;s_H;..;ce::..Jp;;…0::..;r;;…t-=–_—=1::..:9-)~~9~ _____ ~_–_ l.j 0~- :5 /
standard-gauge track, to the other. Interesting photographs exist ~3how­
ing the dQuble-gauge trackage at different points.
This riual gauge persisted for five years. In 1923 however, p0Rsibly
, th . tnt 1 dC . ~.. . 1)·1
unuer . e lmpo us or . )no new, (::;n arge, ane:.!.:U:l.n jatlona .. hen waTs rn:,.l~.~
agement, it was decided to restrict the linos west of Charlottetowi~ ~o
standard-faugs operation only, and accordingly, on Au~ust 11th, 1:I)i
narrowpgauge opera.tion ceased on all track wost of Hoyalty Junct1r,~; 1
as follows:
R
Oyal ty J ct. … Tignish •••••••••
Emerald Jct. -Borden ••• ~ ••••••
109<-91 miles.
12.11 11
Dual gauge was lnaintained between Charlottetovm and Royalty Jc:t ~, :),?6
miles, to enable access to Charlotteto;m by narrow-rauge trains coming
fro~ the east, or SouriS, direction.
Three years elapsed before,any more s6andardization was undertaken.
However, on August 22nd, 1926, the greater part of the remainder of the
sy,stem was changed over from narrow-gauge to standard-gauge, viithout a
dual-gauge interval, as had previously been the case. Preparations had
been made in advance, and the change was made in one day on the follow­
ing lines:
Royalty Jet. -Souris ••••••••••
Mount Stevart J ct. -Georgetown
Montague Jet. -Montague •••••••
75.08 miles.
24.10 11
6.50 if
This left the branch from Harmony J ct. f:Jo Elw.ira, 9.90 miles, and this
was changed over about ten days after the other portion, about August
30th, 1926. Narrow-gau[~e rolling stock left isolated vlas minimal, but
that which remained was taken to Charlott etown loaded on sl,ardard-:;auge
fl
at cars.
The remaining segment of line, fro[:1 Charlottetown to lll.,r:cay Hdrhour,
47.70 miles, remained 3 T 6
1t
gauge for some years. cThile t,hore haci. [Jeen
no engineering difficulties on the remainder of the system, tl18 Ml~rray
Hclibour line left Charlottetown over the Hillsborough Bridge I uj)(l.
which severe weight restrictions were in effect. It should be n~~~d
h;:;rl.: that the Murray Harbour branch was afcessible only Vi,l the Hi.J.~1.3-
borough Bridge at this time, the branch from bIount Stewart to Verr~(1n
via Lake Verde being built only in the early 1930s. For some ti~e,it
,Jas thought that the I,Iurray Harbour line ~ould l1ev(;r be changed over,
but finally, in the month of August, 1930 , this line too, passed out
of existence, leaving the narrow-gauge only a memory on Prince Edward
Island.
As the last train pulled into Charlottetown, the oilly interesLed
persons present towitness the occa[3ion V,lere the late Hobert rl.. Brovffi
of
our Association, then on a business trip in P.b.I., and the Can0.6,i.an
National Hailways T constable at CharlottetoAIn. The 42~inch gauge l:;.vl~s
on only 200 miles acrO:3S the Gulf of Sainte LaVJTenCe in NewfoundlaYld.
p
where more than 700 miles of C. N. n.. and privately-owned narrow…:gau[u:,
network is the largest in North America, and shovvs every promise of
remaining so for some time to come.
i-If any reader possesses the exact date of service cess­
ation, the author would appreciate having it for his
records.
~
L e.<.. 1 i •./i • N(:l\TsHepor t : J;.959
1 ,. ,
~fL _
LES ADIEUX •••••••
TEHMIJ>lATION OF SEHVICE ON SAINTE-ANNE-DE-BEAUPRE
ELECTInc HAIUJAY MARKED BY THE ASSOCIATION.

Near-Ly fifty-nine years of electric railway service bet .wcen eluabe c,
Montmorency Falls, Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupro and St.Joachim were termin­at ed at
2:00 AM, Monday, Mar ch Lot.h , 1959, vrhcn t he l ast elect r i c p2.SS­engel
tra i n ar r i ved at Saint e Anne from St .Joa chi m, aftor having made t he t
hrough run over the l i ne as train h3, Leavi.ng luebo c c,t 11: 59 PM, Su
nday, Mar ch 15t h.
The light s were turned out in the plat forms of the St .Paul St reet
stat i on in ;·2uebec for the last time, ending a ser vice whi ch had begun as
as t eam r ai.Lway , the f.:uebec, Montmorency & Char levoix Hai Lway , i n 18:::59,
only to undergo el ect r ification in 1900. ViJhile Canadian Nati onal l1ai lwrJy5
wi l l c
ontinue to operate the Montmorency Subdivisi on as a part of its
diesel -ser ved rout e bet.ween Quebe c and Mur-r-ay Bay, Que. , and wil l scr ve
many of the principal stations formerl.y used by the electr ic trai ns, the
passing of the electric service mar ks t ho r eal end of the (IChemin de
Fer do La Bonne Sai nte Ann e as t he Lnhabi.tant.s of the coa st of Beaupre
havo corne t o know it.
A. hist ory of the re.ihvay is descr ibed in detail in the bilingual
publ.Lcat.LonvEhem.i.n de For de l a Bonne Sainte-Anne il whi ch is noticed
elsewhere in this issue .
An
official obser vance of the cessat i on of ser vi ce was made by the
(/
Canadian Fi.ai+r oad Historical Association ,5 char t ered t r ain, which l ef t Qtwbec
shortly af ter 1:00 PMon Sunday, Mar ch 15t h, and returned about
5:00 PM. The Committee of oper at i on for t he) Associati on cons i s t cd of
H
assIS. C.vJ.Kenneth Heard, Leonard A. Seton, Jean-Marie Lecler c, and Omor
S. -A. Lavallee. Mr . Charles E. S2int Laurent, Ass t, Superintendent , Can­
adian Nati onal Hai l ways and formerly Superintendent of the Montmorency
Divis i on of the quobec Hailway, Light &Power Company was in charge of
t he train movement , whi le the crew consist ed of Conductor O.L.Lemieux,
Brakeman vJ. Cote, and Motorman A. Babi neau.
A r emarkabl y good t urnout of members and f r iends was made on t his
occasion. Seventy-nine pass engers were carried, comi ng from Quebec, Troi s
Ri vier
es, Mont real and Toronto. Guests from the Uni ted States included
delegationsfromthe trolley Imlseums at Kennebunkpor t, Me. , Br anfor d anri
-~ jarehouse Poi nt , Conn. Others came from Now York and Bos t on. Par ticul­
ar ly g l~at ify ing t o the commi t tee wa s the fact that some of our Uni t ed
St ates passenger s cane fr om as far af ield as Iowa, Wi s cons in, Indianaand
Mi chLgan, l-lomber-s of the Executi ve Committee present, besides Messrs. Hear d, Seton
and Lavallee on t he Committee, included Dr . R. V•V•Ni cholls,
our Pr esident , accompani ed by his wife and daughters, Mr . S.S. Hor t lwn,
tr L 1)1 h T1 S . , .(. D 11 r-r k n
c
R T el
and lLr. d. . ia roa . le uper-Lnt.enderrt 0: rto , a.ng ot oc , 1;11. • .l(. LJ arx ,
wa s a
lso along, casting a critical , if pr emature, eye on the two units
of our trai n, which the Association hopes to pres erve in the rolling
stock col lection. The tr ain was made up of No.40l , the dean of the ele c~
tr i c int erurban cars, whi ch has beon in continuous service since 1902. . No.40l pul
led combination baggage-passenger car No. l05, formerly QRL&PCo ,
No. l Ob, wh
i ch has been running on this line since 1889. Just before leaving -duebecs anc
ient St.Paul Stat i on, we hnd our images pre served fo ~
posterity by a pho tographer fr om L!Act i on Cat.ho.l.i.que, a lar ge Quebec,
French- language daily newspaper. ( t 43)
. . con l nuea on page
LES ADIEUX •••••••
TEHlvIINATION OF SEHVICE ON SAINTE-ANNE-DE-BEAUPRE
ELECTRIC HAILHAY HARKED BY THE ASSOCIATION.
Nearly fifty-nine years of electric railway service betwoen Quebec, Montmorency
Falls, Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupre and St.Joachim were termin­
ated at 2:00 AM, Nonday, March 16th, 1959, lJhon the last electric pass­
enger train arrived at Sainte Anne from St.Joachim, after having made·
the through run over the line as train ltS, leaving -~uebec e.t 11: 59 PM,
Sunday, March 15th.
The
lights were turned out in the platfoTIos of the St.Paul Street
station in c2uebec for the last time, ending a service which had begun as
a steam ra:i.lvmy, the (;;uebec, Montmorency & Charlevoix Hai lvfay, in lSrs9,
only to undergo electrification in 1900. ~Jl1ile Canadian National l1ailwf-lys
will continue to operate the Montmorency Subdivision as a part of its
diesel-served route betv~een Quebec and Murra.y Bay, Que., and will serVE;
many of the principal stations formerly used by the electric trciins, the
passing of the electric service marks the real end of the Chemin de
Fer de la Bonne Sainte Anne
1V
as the inhabitants of the coast of Beaupre
have come to know it.
A. history of the rr:.ilway is described in detail in the bilin,F(ual pub
lic.:l.tion liBhemin de For de la Bonne Sainte-Annen lhich is noticed
elsewhere in this issue •
./ An official observance of the cessation of service was made by the
Canadian RaL1-road Historical Association ,5 chartered train, which left
QtW bee shortly after 1: 00 PM on Sunday, March 15th, and returned about
5: 00 Pf.1. The Committee of operation for the Association consist~::d of
HassIs. C. vI. Kenneth Heard, Leonard A. Seton, J(~an-II/[arie Leclerc, and 011101
S.-A. Lavallee. Mr. Charles E. Saint Laurent, Asst. Superintendent, Can~
adian National Hailways and formerly Superintendent of the Montmorency
Division of the quebec Hailway, Light & Power Company was in charge of
the train movement, while the crew consisted of Conductor O.L.Lemieux, Brakeman
vT. Cote, and Motorman A. Babineau.
A r
emarkably good turnout of members and friends was made on this
occasion. Seventy-nine passengers were carried, coming from Quebec, Trois
Rivieres, Montreal and Toronto. Guests from the United States included
delegations from the trolley museums at Kennebunkport, Me., Branford anu
·,iarehouse Point, Conn, Others came from NeVJ York and Boston. Particul­
arly gl~atifying to the committee ,lI,1as the fact that some of our Unitod
States passengers cane from as far afield as Iowa, Wisconsin, Indiana·and
Nichigan. r,lembers of the Executive Committee present, besides Messrs.
Heard, Seton and Lavallee on th(:) Committee, included Dr. R. V • V • Nicholls,
our President, accompanied by his wife and daughters, ]1r. S. S, Jorthen,
and Ilr.U.L. Pharoah. The Superintendent of Rolling Stock, UrI. R • .ILC1.J.r~,
was also along, casting a critical, if premature, eye on the two units
of our train., which the Association hopes to preserve in the rolling
stock collection. The train was made up of ]Jo.40l, the 9.ean of the clec~
tric interurban cars, which has boen in continuous service since 1902~ .
No.40l pulled combination baggage-passenger car No.l05, formerly QRL&PCo No.lOb, which has been running on this line since 1889. Just before l
eaving .~uebecfs ancient St.Paul Station, we had our images preserved fc~
posterity by a photographer from ilL Action Catholique 11, a large Quebec,
French-language daily newspaper. ( t 43) . . COnlnU
ea on page
News Renort -J~~9~ _
_____-=.:.Pa::::.;;f1:e 39
CoR, HtA
t
T~i rd i nstalment o£ •••
T,he Story of Iunne Is
by Orner S. A. LavGllee
§lIJl:f~JN ~TJNNE L
No di scourse on the sub ject of tunnelling, no mat ter how
short such a work might be, could conceivably be comp Lct.e 1iUlO·U.:, dwel ­li ng f
or a moment on the great Simplon Tunnel, that gatevray of iil-:,ernat ­
lone.I 11:,.11 tr affi c , leading from the Rhone Valley in Sw:Lt zer la c.::l to the val l ey
of Ant i gori o and the northern plai ns of Ital y.
I have no doubt that many readers have heard of this huge
engl.nee r-Lng project , an undertaking of some twelve and-a-qu.arter mil es in
length, through whi ch in a p re ~·wa r and compara ti.ve ly peac:eful era, thoss d
iminutive European tr ains with the intriguing names such as the
fljmploll·,Ori ent Express and many others, passed unobtr-us tve Ly t hrough t he j.nner r
ecesses of an Alpine mountain range of an a-ver.s.ge 7,OOO….foot
height .
Tr
ains require something over twenty minut es to ef f ect the
passage of the tunnel , which lies und.er the pass of the same name, whose hist ori
cal significance dates from pre- Roman times. Let us dweLI for a
brief space on the use of the Simplon Pass before the coming of the
r-a i lvI2,y .
The use of the pass as an ar tery of commercial and military
sig:r:jficance is mcnt.aoned in incomplete records of the ti me of the
vJulld State II, the Roman Empire. Nothing more than a path ~ and a nar r ow
(�
one at that , its importance as an avenue of communi cat ion between the Gau
ls and the Italian peninsula at tained considerable proport l ons by the
Thi rteenth Century, fo-llovri ng the Swiss War of Independence inst igated by
the inhabitants of the cantons of Uri, Schwyz and Nidwal den in a solemn oath tak
en in the glade of the R{itli, in the year 1291. O:Ld chronicles of thi s
per i od tell us of the exi stence of a ho-spice which i s stil l to be
seon
e
This hospice is situated at an alt i tude of 6565 feet
9
just south
of the highest poi nt in the pass. To the Emperor Napoleon must go
credit for the exp l oi tati on of the Simplon Pass Road as one of the h i gh~
ways of Europe, and , incident ally, as a means for hi s own ends . The con
struction of the modern road was begun Ln 1801 and t ook 4~ years . It
is reco rded that the first coach travelled over the pass in Oct ober 1805.
In 1847, Switzer land sawits fi r st railway operation and, a sho
rt ten years later, the first ser ious suggestion to tunnel the Simp­
Ion was made. This was followed by many o-ther proposal s including sug­gest
ions for rack railwayS, inc lined p lanes, funicul ars and -the like.
In 1889, a confer ence of Swiss and Italian gove rnment officials part i c­ip
ated in a meet ing at Berne wh l ch laid the first conc rete propo-sals for
the construction of the Simplon Tunnel . In 1890, another conference was
held by inter ested part ies and several cont ract ing firms wer-e i nvited to­p
arti cipate. The findi ngs of the conference were exami ned by a Swiss
government commission consisting of several civiJ; engi neer s of not abl e r eput
e.
The t unnel pr oposa l , whLch , incidental ly, waE estimated to
cost almost 70 mi l l ion Swiss francs, was approved by the commissi on.
The const ruct ion contract was concluded in 1893, followed bT atreaty
wi th Italy on November 25th, 1895, known as the Si mplon Agreement •.
Simultaneously, the Jura-Simplon Rai lway obtained a 99-year
(
lfews Ren 0 rt -J:2.5~9::….-________ …,….,……:P:..:a:::.Jp;:..:.7:.:::.e–=–3.:::.9 __
Tl:.ird instalment o-f, ••
The Story of Tunnels
by Orner S. A. LavE-1l1ee
No discourse on the subject of tunnelling, no matter how
short such a Vlork might be, could conceivably be complete wi tl101XG dwel­
llng for a moment on the great Simplon Tunnel, that gateway ai ii:l~ernat­
iOIJL-:.l 18,i1 traffic, leading from the Rhone Valley in Swltzerlac:i to the
vd.l1ey of Antigo-rio and the northern plains of Italy.
I have no doubt that many readers have heard of this huge
er:glnee~::ing project, an undertaking of s-ome twelve and-a-quarter miles
in length? through which in a pre~·war and compB,ra tive ly pe8.oeful era,
thoss diminutlve European trains with the lntriguing names such as the
c;JmploYJ~,Orient Express and many others, passed unobtrU:3ively through the
j_nner recesses of an Alpine mountain range of an a-verc-ge 7 ,OOO-foot
height.
Trains require something over twenty minutes to effect the
passage of the tunnel, which lies under the pass of the same name, who-se
lii
sto-rical significance dates from pre-Roman times, Let us dwell for a
brj_cf space on the use of the Simplon Pass before the coming 01 the
r·aihre,y.
T
he use of the pass as an artery of commercial and military
sJ.gr:J.ficance is mentmoned in incomplete records of the time of the
V[urld State, the Roman Empire. Nothing more than a path~ an one at that, its importance as an avenue of communication between the
Gauls and the Italian peninsula attalned considerable p-roportlons by the
Thirteenth Century, fo-llowing the Sltliss War of Independence instigated by
the inhabitants of the cantons of Uri, Schwyz and Nidwalden in a solemn
oa th taken in t-he glade of the R{itli, in the year 1291. Old chronic Ie s
of t
his period tell UB of the existence 01 a ho-spice which is still ta
be SeODe This hospice is 81 tua ted at an altitude of 6565 feet 9 just
s
outh of the highest point in the pass. Ta the Emperor Napoleon must ga
credit for the exploi ts,tion of the Simplon Pass Road as one of the high­
ways of Europe, and, inCidentally, as a means for his own ends. The
construction of the modern road was begun in 1801 and toak A·~ years. It
is recorded that. the first coach travelled over the pass in October 1805.
In 1
847, Switzerland saw its first railway-operation and, a
s
hort ten years later, the first serious suggestion to tunnel the Simp­
Ion was made. This was followed by many other proposals including sug­
ge stions for rack railwaYs, inc lined planes, funiculars and ~the like,
ln 1
889, a conference 01 Swiss and Italian govE;rnment officials partic­
ipated in a meeting at Berne v1hich laid the first concrete propoBals for
the construction of the Simplon Tunnel. In 1890, another conference was
held by· illterested parties and se-veral contract1ng firms were invited to­
participate. The findings of tbe conference vere examined by a Swiss­
government commission consisting of several civi~ engineers of notable
repute.
T
he tunnel proposal, vThich, incidentally, wa13 estimated to
cost almost 70 million Swiss francs, was approved by the commission.
T
he constructlan contract was concluded in 1893, followed bY a treaty
wi tIl Italy on November 25th, 1895, known as the Simplon Agreement e.
Simultaneously, the Jura-Simplon Rallvmy-obtalned a 99-ye-ar
9.=.! :~ _._AL _ . __~,_, __ .__-.–tJC;:8 EC DO ~ -1959 P::;,rG lj·o
conces sion from the Italian government for the exploitation of that
por t i cn of the line in Ital i an ter r it ory. Shortly af terward, tile, Jura­
Simp .l on F:£.,ih:e,y W:3,8 pur-ohased by the f)wi ss Government who took over the
lin<2
l
s o b ~llga ti on s in respect of the Dimp:Lon IunneL,
Con st.r-ucbi.on wa s stD:…,-t,e1 i n October ::898
0
We , in a modern
world, cannot oppreciate t.he V DDt. r JC S,] of t ly> pr-o ject, wh ich pr e sented
itse lf to t
he coriatr-uctoa-o of the t.unncL, NODe of the tunnels th en in
exi et.ence 8V,:? Yl appz-oa chcd the p ropu s c ,:~ f:::mp lon in Lengt.h, Indeed , the
10
1lr;s st structure t hen j_n e xLat.ence 1[vElS the Sa int Gotthard t unnel, 9:t;­
ml Le s .i.ong , of V,ll!-ch de ht.~7C ~r:okcn ~Y, e ii :L0 1.1s :Ly ~ The new t unnel was to
be o :le~qnaY0e r aged.n [1 8 ~: O :.Je; aDd i:;; ;:n Jf:.]:u:; oJY1fineer s dc:, si ned to look
.. t.l cs .• • J., ..,t ~ ( r-{ v: q., ,., -i-(….. .l ,;. L d 1 ,,1 – n . ·r , , r t tl .
b a CK (I ll he: crJn:::i l.ltC d . J D c)_ I.. 1.1 ~ ,o .l..~,; . ) I..: .~,L, . U. c;L~ ) u. .c, c.(y:;J[j8 n , l.el r erit.h
usLa sm m1J ~; t huvE. ~)i?(,:m c~ ; . t.o : _:CI ; .j. dr:: .i::c;:,lt; (j,s g2P f:: , t o say the
le8.]
+; U,S they corrr.crnplat.ed :,)),) t,b :.(lbT3 t-: :,:, ·l , :~ (; l X: hum-in l:!,V::-; s and con­
s
t.r-u ct.Lcna I reve:(SE8 i t had (;):-3t f as Ii t; L-lVS .:::3811. 1-1O,v::nr t;Y ~ the exper ­
i (
::r;<.; (; C; :~ 11 c;d in J. ts cons tr uction was i CV cl~lllc)),)} (; and neceosar-y precautions
wo
i-o t eJc<-:n 1.11 t he bui lcli:.1g of the 8i lr..plc:Q to pYE.vont a recur-r-en ee of
engineering err ors.
1h8 met.h
od of c onat.r-uct.Lcn whl.ch was adopted involved t he
bori ng of a sma L.. subeLdi.. a :::-y t unne L of a SEcondary na.t.ur-e, pa.ral 1e l wi t h
th
3 proposed me-i n tunnel, and cor-n e ct.ed v.lith the latter work.lngs by t
i…..ansve r·se headinr;s. It vr[ts de3tined t o-be U 8 80. as a service t.unne L and
wa s al s o pl anned to be
used in the pruvlsion of adequate ventilation at
t he
working faceD
Powo
r-ruL f 8,L: s we r e instal led for this purpose. The subsi d­
i
ary bore also served as a Gondult for the VIatel pipes whi ch ca rried
water under pr-esaur-e to the wcrki.ngs where:t was used to drive a newly
invent.ed rotary hyd:rauli c dril l which had been devi sed by one of the
engineers j Her r Br andt , La st. Ly, the serv ice t urne1 was to act as a
dra i nage system if, as was likely, any un d er5roL:;,lt~ springs or other
S OUl; 8 S of water wer-e encountered. This subsidiary tunnel had a se ct ion
6
it
of10 by 8
1
u ~ The mai n t unnel as Del the original specifications
9
11
was Lo r-,ave a sect ion 0.1: l Lj, by 181 ~i! and the axes of the mai n and
subsidiary t.unne Ls vvere 8it uated 55 91f ~ distant from one another.
Ev entu~l ly , when the need ar ose, it was expected ~o widen
the secondary tunnel i.nto anot her tunnel and the contract st ipu l a ted
t
hat the request for the compl et ion of the second tunnel be made wi t hi n
four Yllar S of the com
plet i on of the first tunnel. Geological estimates of ·
.:,ho types of rock to be encounter ed pr oved to be of littl e va lue, as
they were b
ased on geologists knowledge of the rock formation in the
Saint Got
thard bor e.
The gr eate st
trouble of all, however , was expe rienced from
springs whi ch, ordinarily tr oub le some in wor-k of th is nature, compl i cat ­
-I
ed ma tt.ers by t he fact t hat. t hey wer-e hot Sp :~illgS . hough their presence
was auspe ct.ed, it was thought tha t the maximum t.empe r-a t.ur-e encountered,
w
ould be ar ound 101° F. and pipel i ne s wer-e laid. in the service tunnel
f or t}~ie purpose of spr aying the rock face and passi ng ventilating air
through other wa ter sprays to cool it . It may be ment.ioned Bere that the
cont ract ca lled for the temperat ures to be kept as low as 77 F. The
springs far exceeded in heat , the temperatur es expected and, in the fall
of 1902 , a peak of 131
0
was encount er-ed !hich rendered the installation
of a reftigerat i on system an abs~lutG neces sity .
The
headings from t.he north and south por tal s were corrtLnu­
al ly comi ng int o contact with underground wa t.er-pool s and, at one poi nt,
(
concession from the Italian government for the exploitation of t.hat
pOLor,iOl1 of the line in Italian territory. Shortly afterward, tile: Jura­
Simp.lon :=-:[,ih:8y W(3,S purchased by the fwiss Government who-took over the
lint;O t s ():)llgations in respect of the Simpl.on rmmel.
COYlstruction llaS sta:i.,e1 in October ::898 irs 9 in a modern
world, cannot ctppYBelate t.l1l:; VD,f:) t.,:nc S i3 ,yf tly ]YC8jec t which pre sented i
tself to the const:::L:ctU13 of Ghe tunr.:s·l .• None of the tunnels then in
exister.ce E;v·m approaoh,,,;d tl1C propusc:~ f· :.mplon in length3 Tl1deecl, the
loncrsst structure thr::n :1.nexistence was th(:) Saint Gotthard tunnel, 9-
41 <..j
rr,ile~ :l.ong) ~)f V,ll:L?h we ~lc.,VU ~p;?kcn~;:(·~~.J?1.181Y0 The new t~,nncl vms to
be oYle~quarter agciJ.n [:1 s ,].0;.18 ar0 (:-;;:D J.T.::,hc; ;:3YlEUleers deslrud to lauk
back on the const.Cu(; ti In of tn-:o SLUlt U[)L~~Ln~cd 101 Sr:.2)UTe en1~hu.sia8n.: rm.Jc3t hl)vs ~)f>:m r:L-j,np(c(:~;. to :: ~;c,l;·;·j.d;:.::c:,,-(l;=; (I3g::<:0:, to say the
le8,;:::t. 1:1.13 they c()n~/smr.·latsd:,J],::: JGE-.2clb
T
:3 l~·~·l.::,:::; :iT hl<.Ji1d,n b.v-ss and con ...
st(ucticuaJ. reve:(SE 8 It had (; ):3t, 8.3 -, …… ] L:1.S c;3S11. :-1Ui,Yf.:nrE;r 9 the exper-
1
c.;:r;cc.; {j :i11Gd in J. ts conGtruct,ior~ Wi-LS iC.l,SlluC));}e ct.i:Jd ()G::er3sary precautions
we lC teJct,:D 1.11 the bui 10.1:.1g 0-1 the Cllrrplc:n to prEvont a recurrence of
engineering crro~s.
1he method of construe-sian which was adopted involved the
boring of a small, 8uDsid.la:::-y tunnel of a secondary l18ture, parallel with
th3 proposed main tunnel, and c01TIected v-rith the latter viOrklngs by
ti.anSVelse headings. It 1:m_8 de3tlned to be U8GU as a service tunDe 1 and
was also planned to be used in the pruvision of adequate ventilation at
t
he work1ng face~
PovlCrful faLlS oJere installed for this purpose. I:rhe subsid­
iary bore also served as a ,conduit for the water pipes which carried
water under pressure to the workings where !t was used to drive a newly
invented rotary hyd:raulic drl11 which had been devised by one 01 the
engineeps j Herr BranelL. Las-ely) the service tu~nt.l was to-aot as a
drainage system if, as vms likely, any undersro1.;a~g springs or other
sou1.;es of water were encountered. This subsidiary tunne 1 had a section
of 10! 6 by 8
1
j-II The ma:~n tunnel as tier the original specifications
was to I-lave a section Cl.t lL.j·; 9
11
by 1S
t
.~.! and the axes-of the main and
subsidiary tunnels were situated 55 911distant from one another.
E-ventu},lly, when the need arose, it was expected ,to widen
the secondary tunnel i.nto anothEr tunnel and the contract stipulated
that the request for the oompletion of the second tunnel be made within
fOUL years of the completion of the first tunnel. Geological estimates
of·.:,he types of rock to be encountered proved to be of little value:, as
tlwy were be..sed on geologists I knowledge of the rook formation in the
Saint Gotthard bore.
The 3reatest trouble of all, however, was experienced from
springs Thich, ordinarily troublesome in wOYls-. of this nature, complioat-
-I
ed mattbIS by the fact that they were hot sp2illgs, hough their presence
WB,S suspected., it vms thought that the maximum tF.::mperatuys encountered.
would be around 1070 F. and pipelines were laid. in the service tunnel
for tbe purpose of spraying the rock face and passing ventilating :-J.ir
thr
ough other water sprays to cool it. It may be mentioned. Bere that the
contract called for the temperatures to be kept as low as 77 F. The
springs far exceeded in heat, the temperatures expected and, in the fall
of 1902, a peak of 1310 was el1Gounte:ced vThieh rendered the installation
of a reftigeration system an absolute necessity.
T
he headings from the north and south portals were continu­
ally-coming into contact with underground water pools and, at one point,
9, R. II~.J.. News ~l~ t -:..1:25-2 Pa n; ~, 41 –
some Lj~ ,4 00 mete r s (about 14, 000 f eet) from the southe rn end of t he t un­
nel, wa te r f Lowed a t t he r-a t e of 3 , 000 ga l l on s 12.Q !..-_m i n :!d t~ . This near l y
DUt. t he who Le pr oject on the shel f . However , the volume soen dimini shed
and. d
rainagE:: was aided by the 1 111 145 grade of the southern secti on . In
Mc.y of 1904, a. nEW inrush of water on the north side, at the rat e of
50G gal lcm s per mtnut.e, coinc i ded wlth 8 mountain sli de at the power st
ation, thus put ti ng the intake 01J.t of eommi ss ion. Powerfu.l pumpi ng
and vorrt l Lat Lng mach f.ner-y thus became 1-:11e and the wor k on the northern
heading wa s abandoned.
The
nor thern heading had pas sed the summi t of the tunnel.
Thus it vTi l l be app:roeci s ted that the v:at,er enoountered had now to be
pumped uQ t o the summi t of t he bor-e ~ as r.her-e WBS yet no na t ur-a L out let
available t o the sout h. The mount ain sllde caused such damage to the
pu
mping machi ne ry that it wa s doetne d advt aab Le t o suspend operat ions
from the nor t h. Steel doors were then er-ect.ed In the ma in and subs Ld…
iary t.unneI s; thes e doors we re set in concr-e t.e and the water was al lowed
to accumulate be tween them and the headi nga in both tunne Is.
Work pr oceeded apace in the sout hern heading, with cons i der­
abletroubl o fromthe spr i ngs. At one point , wa ter , at a temperature of
11S
o,
gushed into the .;TO rkh;(.)s and at a rate of 2, 000,000 gall ons a day
a
ndit was necessar y to construct a gal le r y into the subsidiary tunnel
for the especial purpose of al l OWing this wa ter to drain away. The duct
through which the hot wat er ran had to be cove red in wi thtimber to pre ­
v
ent unnecessary liee.tine; of the a.t .mosphe r-e whlch.had al ready become
ju
st about as hot as the workmen could bear ; When this la st event occur­
red, there remai ned only about 800 feet of rock between the two headi ngs
and, as the excavation pr og ressed tbward the pr eVi ous ly abandfuned nor th­
ern he,cUnc-;, temperatures became higher and higher . On February 2St h,
190
5, the dr i ll s broke through into the vmter -flooded nor thern heading
and the wa ter rushed through the opening.
By t
his time, the t.empe r-a.t.uz-e had risen to such an extent
that a day had to be allowed to permi t the tunnel to cool enough to al l ow
an insp
ecting party of engineers to vi ew the connecting hol e . Even at
t .ha
t , t.wo of the par ty were over come by the exces sive heat, and later
died from t.he effects of the heat combined wi th car bon monoxide poisoni ng. How
ever, cornmun ication was thus estab l ished af ter nearly 2, 400 worktng
da
ys. The completion of the tunne1 required almost a y!ear and on the
2Sth of January, 1906, the first passenger trai n pa ssed through the Simp­
lon Iunne1; regular service through the 12 mi le 668 yard bor e commenced
t he
follOWing June.
Almost immediately, it was pr oposed by the Engineering Dep~
ar-t.morrt of t.he Swi ss Feder-a I Rai l ways to proceed with the en largement of
the second tunnel, poiriti ng out that tr af fic reqUir ements would demand
its use sooner or later. Astart on thi s endeavour wa s not made until
t h…~ fall of 1912, but the first World vial put a st op to opera t ions fr om
t
he north end in Ju l y 1918 , whi le work in the southern sect ion h~d come
ta a st andstil l in ])Iar ch 1917. At th is time, only 1,900 yards remained to
be complet ed. Work was resumed. in December 1919 and was completed
t.wo ye,
-trs Le.t.e r , on the 4th of December 1921. FoLl.owf.ng the opening of
the f)..r st bore in 1906, steam mot ive powe r was used. for the trains until
the electrical eqUipment had been installed in 1907.
As completed , the SimploJ;l Tunnel carrie s the mai n Geneva­
Mi l an raib qay line through Mont e Leone, 11,684 feet in height . The
northe rn portal is located at the Vill age of Br igue in the canton of
Va La ls in Svvi tzerland, and the southern ent rance is at Ise LLe , in Italy.
(
sOIDe 1.1,400 meters (about 14,000 feet) from the southern end of the tun­
nel, water floTed at the rate of 3,000 gallons l22.L_minllte. This nearly
Dut the whole project on the shelf~ However, the volume soen diminished
and droinap:;e was aided by the 1 111 145 grade of the southern section.
In l.fc 500 gallons per minute, coinc1ded with a. mountain slide at the pOvier
station, thus putting the intake 01Jt of commission. Pov,rerful pumping
and ventilating machinery· thus became idle and the work on the northern
heading was abandoned.
The northern heading hEJ .. d passed the summit of the tunnel.
Thu:: it viill be appreciated that the v;at,er enoountered had now to be
pumped uQ to the summit of the bore, as T,11ere wC:~s yet no natural outlet
available to the south. The mountain slIde caused such damage to the
pumping m from the north. Steel doors were tbol1 erecT,sd ln the main and subsld. …
iary tunnels; these doors were set in co~orete and the water was allowed
to accumulate betwee,n them and the heC:cdings in both tunne Is.
Work proceeded apace in the southern heading, with consider­
able troublo from the springs. At one point, water, at a temperature of
1150~ gushed into the workings and at a rate of 2,000,000 gallons a day
and it itTaS necessary to construct a gallery into the subsldiary tunnel
for the especial purpose of allowing this water to drain away. The duct
through which the hot water ran had to be covered in with timber ta pre­
vent unnecessary heating of tbe Ettmosphere wb.ich. had already became
just about as hot as the workmen could bear .. · When this last event occur­
red, there remained only about 800 feet of rock between the two headings
and, a:=.l the eXC8.va tion progre ssed toward the previously abandcimed north­
ern hs,,:c11ng, temperatures became hiGher and higher. On February 25th,
1
905, the drills broke throuGh into the water-flooded northern heading
and the w·g,ter rushed through the opening.
By
this time, the temperatlxre had. risen to such an extent
that a day he,d to be allowed to permit the tunnel to cool enough to allow
an inspecting party of engineers tD view the connecting hole. Even at
t
hat. two· of the party were overcome by the excessive heat, and later
died from t11e effects of the heat combined with carbon monoxide poisoning.
HO·~lever, communication was thus established after nearly 2,400 vwrking
days. The completion of the tunne 1 required almost a y!ear and on the
25th o~ January, 1906, the first passenger train passed through the Simp­
Ion Tunrre 1; regular service through the 12 mi Ie 668 yard bore commenced
the following June.
Almost immediately, it W8,S proposed by tbe EnGineerinG Dep­
a
rtmcnt of the Swiss Federal Railways to proceed iti th the enlargement o-f
the second tunnel, pointing out that traffic requirements would demand
its use sooner or later. A start on this endeavour was not made until
th,,~ fall of 1912, but the first Vorld vvar put a stop to operations from
the north end in July 1918, while itTork in the southern section h~d come
to a standstill in lIarch 1917. At this time, only 1,900 yards remained
to be completed. Work was resumed in December 1919 and was completed
two yeHrs le,ter, on the 4th of December 1921. Following the opening of
the n.rst bore in 1906, steam rnotlvG power vms used for the trains until
the electrical eqUipment had been installed in 1907.
As completed, the Simplou Tunnel carries the main Geneva­
IUlan railway line through Nonte Leone, 11,684 feet in height. The
northern Dortal is located at the Village of Brigue in the canton of
Valais in-Switzerland, aDd the southern entrance is at Iselle, in Italy.
c.S. IT.A•
..:::.:;…!.—–
_
News Reoo
___-.—,.,….
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_

.-
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QC:;9
·
· -….-..,.; · ·-· ~..-…__ 4___–..-..-……._…~_…,,__
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L!-2
_ -. .-.- -.4-· ··-, ·
.
-· ~_~..
Just beyond Iselle, the line pa sse s through the only spi ral tunnel on the
Simplon route, the Cairasca Tunnel . This structure has the dii?t inct ­
ion of being the longest tunnel of its type in the wor ld. The di f fer ­
ence in altitude between the nor th and south por tal s of the Cairasca is
307 feet, It is 1 mi le LJ-560 feet in length. None of t he seven spi ral tunne
ls on the Saint Gott hard Railway i2, more than one mi l e in length
and none makes a greater ascent t han 118 feet .
THE L~T SC HBERG Tm~NEL
Huch of t he space inl~ Lis story has been devoted t o t he sub­
ject of Alpine tunnels. I feel, huwever, that I cannot leave the geo­
graphi cal area wi thout a 1cur-sor-y g:i_2..Clce at the remaining lengthy passage in the S
wiss Alps, the L8tschbs YG Iu nne l., on. the Berne-L8tschberg- Simpl on R
ailway and its at tendant consLr-uctt.cnaL dlflf i cul t ies,
The r
oute of the B- L-S RaI Lway includes no less than thirty­
four tunnels in its rout e from ThuD, in the Bernese Alps, to Brigue in
the Rhone va lley , wher e connecti on is made wit h the Fede ral Rai lvlays
line through the Simplon Tunnel.
On
its r out e up t he northern sJope , we f ind an open spiral
employed to raise the line some 1,800 f eet in nineteen and-a-hal f miles . There i s a pa
th over t he pass above t he t unnel. Thi s Gemmi Pa ss road
was made jointly by the cantons of Eerne and Va lais between the years
1737-17LJ-0, but the rai lway now off ers t.he traveller to the Rhone valley
a much more comfortabl e and expeditious means 01 transpolf;t.
The tunnel begins about a mile-and-a-hal f south of Kander­
steg station and continues for ni ne miles and fifty-five yards through
to the LChschent al at Goppenstein, a wild Al pine valley af ter which
tunnel and rai lway are named. In long tunnel ling such as this, it is
always the lmexpected which haypens, as we have seen. In the L8tschberg,
suprise and tragedy wer-e combined in a sLng.Le accident.. Exc avatton of
the t.unneL began in Octobe r 1906. The northern heading had pr oceeded
about three miles from the por tal on the 2LJ-th of July, 1908 when , without
the slightest vmrn:tng, a dynamite charge burst through into a deep· fis­
sure beLow the floor of a river va lley above the tunnel. The worki ngs we
re immediately flooded and d e b ~c:l.s filled the bor e for mo-re than a mi l e back, Of the twent y
-five men at fork at the face , on ly one lived to tell
the tale, and the maj (1r~ t y oIT! the eq
1
x i..p m.
ont
was lost . After thi s tragic
occur rence, work was suspended. It was perf40t ly clear to the engineer s t hat
to o .ttem~)t to 0lear away the obstruction b:ml PY000oiJ., W$,o -to 1Y1V r.t, e
further disaster.
Finally , after much consutt.at.Lon, it Has decided that the
only fe asLb Le method was to abandon the worki ng a for about t wo mi l es
back of the disaster ar ea and, using t.he remaining mile of tunnel, bend].
its cours in such a Hays as to strike far east of the danger a.r-ea , Both
north and south headings were diverted and their meeti ng , With an error
o~
but eighteen inches, speaks eloquently for modern engineering and
surveying techni que.
A worldTs record for bor i ng was established by drivi ng 1,013
feet of the tunnels length through limestone in a singl e month. The h
eadings met on March 31st, 1911, the masonry lini ng was fi nished in
April, 1912, and in mid-July, 1913, the tunnel was opened faD tr affic
and with it, the whole of the L8tschberg Railway. By reason of the d
lver-eLon mentioned, the tunnels length was inereaselft from eight and five
-eighth miles as planned., to ni ne and one-eithth miles. It is thus
(
C.B.F.A.
..::.:;..;!..—-o.__–
Just beyond Iselle, the line passes through the only spiral tunnel on
the Simplon route, the Cairasca Tunnel. This structure has the di$tinct­
ion of being the long<;st tunnel of its type in the world. The differ­
ence in altitude bet
1
/Jeen the north and south portals of the Oairasca is
307 feet, It is 1 mile LJ·560 feet in length. None of the seven spiral
tunnels on the Saint Gotthard Railway i2, more than one mile in length
and none makes a greater ascent than 118 feet.
T
HE L~TSOHBERG lL~1~L
Huch of the space in1~Lis story has been devoted to the sub­
ject of Alpine tunnels. I feel, r.uit,r:;ver, :that I cannot leave the geo­
graphical area without a cUIsory g:12,(l(;8 at the remaining lengthy passage
in the Swiss Alps, the L8tschberS .Im[]?l~ on. the Berne-U:ltschberg-Simplon
Rai hray and i ts attendant con8Lr1.~.c t,J.cYl..:11 diflficultie s.
The route of the B-L·-S Haih-ray inc ludes no less than thirty­
four tunnels in its route from ThUD.! in the Bernese Alps, to Brigue in
the Rhone v:al1ey, vhere connection is made with the Federal Raihrays
line through the Simplon Tunnel.
On its route up the northern sJop1.~, we find an open spiral
employed to raise the line some 1,800 feet in nineteen and-a-half miles. T
here is e. path over the pass above the tunnel. 111is Gemmi Pass road
was made jointly by the cantons of Berne and Valais between the years
l737-l7lj·0, but the railway now offers the traveller to the Rhone valley
a much more comfortable and expeditious means 01 transpo!l?t.
T
he tunnel begins about a mile-and-a-half south of Kander­
steg station and continues for nine miles and fifty-five yards through
to the L(jtschental at Goppenstein, a wild Alpine valley after which
tunnel and railway are named. In long tunnelling such as this, it is
alwayS the 1.mexpected which happens, as ,, suprise a,nd tragedy vrere comblned in a s1n§le accident. Excavat:i.on of
the tun.nel began in OctobEr 1906. The northern heading had proceeded
about three miles from the portal orJ. the 2l.j·th of July, 1908 when, without
the slightest warning, a d.ynamite charge burst through into a deep fis­
sure be 101.< the floor of a rive r valley above the tunne 1. The workings
were immediately flooded and cl2b:cls filled. the bore for more than a mile
back. Of the twenty-five men at icrk at the face, only one lived to tell
the tale, and the major1ty o~ the equtpmont was lost. After this tragiC
occurrence, work was suspended. It was perf~0tly clear to the engineers
that to o.ttem~)t to olear awaythe obstruction b;m1 prOOAOtl, wa.~ to hWlte
further disaster.
Finally, after much consultation, it vms decided tb..at the
only fee,sib16 method was to abandon the worlcings for about two miles
back of the disaste r area and, us ing the remaining mi Ie 01 tunne 1, bend};
its cours in such a walP as to strike far east of the danger area
e
Both
north and south headings were diverted and their meeting, with an error
o£ but eighteen inches, speaks elo~uently for modern engineering and
surveying technique •
. A
world T s record for boring was established by driving 1,013
feet of the tunnels length through limestone in a single month •. The
headings met on March 31st, 1911, the masonry lining was finished in
April, 1912, and 1n mid-July, 1913, the tunn<31 was opened fOD traff1c
and wi th it, the whole of the L8tschberg Rai lway·. By reason of the
diversion mentioned, the tunnels length was inBrease~ from eight and
five-eightb miles as planned, to nine and one-eithth miles. It 1s thus
C. R. H.A.L _ _ News Revert -195
0
/
Page 43
one of Swi t ze r-Land 1s three longe st bore s, The highest l eve 1 of the
L8tschberg Hailway is at tai ned at 4,077 feet above sea level, in the mid
dle of the tunne l.
I should like to cont inue my descr iption of the Alpine ra il­w
ays , but I regret that space, and possibly the pat i ence of our readers w
ill not permit . I shall go on, theref ore, to describe a few o£ our Canadi an
tunnelling efforts.
(to
be cant l

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–000000000- ­
—� – — – – -._———–~ -.—– – – –I
R696_ CAH • FUND .t…….-. _

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! i Contributors to the Fund wi ll be inter­
es t cd to know t hat this car was obtaLned by the Asso c­
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i n negotiation, and expense in purchasing and mov ing
!
the car. It has been gi ven a t emporary home at Hull, Q
ue. by ou f friends i n the Canada Cement Company, and
will be moved to Mont real sometime thi s vear. The car
vvas purchased for J300.00, and a further)1+00.00 was
expended t o move i t t o Hul l . The expense covered not
only the move, but careful di smantli ng of underbody
parts and disconnecting electr ical wi~ ing so that the
trucks could be removed. Towar-d tho,nOO. 00 expended so far, the Fund ra
ised the sum of i i~4l5. 00, and we con­
sider this to be an excel lent and encouragi ng response. T
he balance wi l l be made up, ultLmaceLy , fr om trips and ot h
er money-raising pr ojects, but there may be some
I other readers who have not as yet cont ri but ed who would l i ke
to be con sidered as Ln on this project. Their
I� contributions, large or smal l , wil l be much appreciat­ed, and wi ll
be acknowledged by the under signed. It is
hoped to carr y a pict ure of No .. 696 in t.h e May News Hep
ort . Thank you al l agai n for your suppor t .
O
rner S.A. Laval lee,
Trusto8, 696 Co.r Fund.
_ J
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f;>n
.bO fiD I E:U~{ ••••• (cont i nued)
—-_._- -Movement of our train bet ween Quebec ari d
Limoilou being wi thin yard li mi t s and by signal indicati on, we r ecei ved
our first train order s at Limoi l ou:
Term
inal Cl earance Form B.
Trai n Order , Form 19Y, No .16 Eiwum 401 nUN PSGR EXTRA
LINOILOU TO MOlJT110FLEHCY FALLS .•.• /
Train Order, Form 19Ft ·[fo.309 TUT:.:; TABLE NO. TWENTY FOUR.
24 I S EFFECTIVE AT TiW NOUGHT ONE 201 AM MONDAY MAHCIl 16TH
….. 1
Wi t h this aQthor i t y, No.401s ~l ito fl ags wer e put up, and we proceeCed
eastwar d on the double track towards the Falls.
T
hose of the passenger s who had been well acqua inted VIi t h the Li.ne o
ver the years found this to be a rat her nostalgi c occasion. With No. 401
ls
hor n sounding for the many cr os sings in tho suburban ar ea of
(
C.R.H.A.
one
of Switzerland1s three longest bores. The highest level of the
L8tschberg Hailway is attained at 4,077 feet above sea level, in the
middle of the turme 1.
I should like to continue my description of the Alpine rail­
ways, but I regret that space, and possibly the patience of our readers
will not pennit. I shall go OD, therefore, to describe a few of our
Canadian tunnelling efforts.
(to be continued)
–000000000–
I
I
—–_._–,
I
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I
I
Contributors to the Fund will be inter­
(~stccl to knovv that this car was obt~ained by the Assoc­i
ation, in spite of a considerable 2illount of difficulty
in negotiation, and expense in purchaiing and moving
the car. It has been given a temporary home at Hull,
Que. by oui friends in the Canada Cemont Company, and
will be moved to Montreal sometime this vear. The car
was purchased for iP300.00, and a further :;400.00 was
expended to move it to Hull. The expense covered not
only the move, but careful dismantling of underbody
parts and disconnecting electrical wi~ing so that the
trucks could be removed.. Toward tho. )700.00 expended so fa
r, the Fund raised the sum ofi;~415.00, and we con­
sider this to be an excellent an~ encouraging response. The
balance will be made up, ultimately, from trips and
other money-raising projects, but there may be some
other readers who have not as yet contributed who would
like to be considered as VYiniY on th.is project. Their
contributions, large or small, will be much appreciat­
ed, and will be acknowledged by the underSigned. It is
h.op<: Report. Thank you all again for your support.
Orner S.A.
Lavallee,
Tru.stoe, 696 CG.r Fund.
I
I
I
!——–
====================================J
tiD II~U~{ …… (continued)
—-.—–r·l1ovement of our train betvJeen. Quebe C clnd_
Limoilou being within yard limits and by signal indication, we received
our first train orders at Limoilou:
Term
inal Clearance Form B.
Train Order, Form 19Y, No .16 iIEi.JGIIfE 401 RUN PSGR EXTHA
LIMOILOU TO MONTllOFtEHCY FALLS;I
Train Order, Form 19H No. 309 i!TIlL~ TABLE NO. TVJENTY FOUR.
24 IS EFFl~CTIV £:; AT TliW NOUGHT ONE 201 AM MONDAY MAHCII
16TH ….. II
With this authority, No.401s ~lite flags were put up, and we procee~ed
eastward on the double track towards the Falls.
Those of the passengers who had beem well acquainted with the line:;
over the years found this to be a rather nostalgic occasion. With No. 40
1s horn sounding for the many crossings in tho suburban area of
(: ,r,> d . A. _____~e_s_e..cport ~~ 1959N..;:;.w..;;;.H..;;;.
Quebec, the familiar local halts al ong the line flashed by –Mauf i l s ,
M
aiz(Jrets, De Sa.Laber-r-y .. Monument , Giffard –. Guests of the Asso ciation
for part of the trip were the wif e and family of the Asst. Super intendent ,
Mr . ::3t. Laurent, as wel l as a few regular passengers who had mistaken our
special for the regular L: 00 PM train to St . -Joa chi m,
Soon
vIe were maki ng our caref ul way through Vill age Mont.mor-e ncy , No,­
t]
-r Cl t 1, •1c-. ~ c-C i: P c •-t 1-•C .i., v
y ,
-i (>; l F r 1 (1 .1••~.
401 ) .owang or 11l:-many CIO ..h ) lrl
o 🙂
.in .nrs c.I .t).,..ca .Ly ·_enJ1··vanac..J.( .1
community. All too soon , it aeemcd, VlO (hc,) up at t he Fal l s stat:Lon whi le
Mr . St . Laurent went in to confer, over th,) telephone ~ wi t h the t .r-a!n dis­
patcher. After a short wait, the conduct or emerged with a further Ter­min
al Clearance Form B, and three more train orders, one al l owing us to
run as passenger extra to St .Joachim, a se cond gi vi ng us a meet wi th.
. N 33 ( ,.. .~ L 1:4J .i., r L j.•. . ,., IJ·; h:o j-c> t h·; _1 .1 .C – 1 ~ ir V> I
t r-a m L o, ~<.:J. r )-,) aG J Ll c~l>.:lf1. ,-, c. L C-1 Cl CLltJ m.i Q lone I arm. J_.:1r r ea.L en c
pr-ot ect i.on or der aut.hor LzLng the opsr-at.or-at JTontmorency Fal ls to hold
al l trains f ollowing us until 2:30 ~M .
11r: f0 •.. ..; nr:, ] 11(:.et -l-i n IT r-. J )ii f ..,(··.l i;Ir ~ ·…Y -v rOll ( y I? 11 S l.r,-., cro C sed t.h e
J-0 ~S J_ i.: /. v_L.~ .:: . co:> LJ_ ~ 6 l..:l .vC-j -. ..&… … r s.: . … ,J . l t)) I.. J… ….. ., _ .•. ~, Jil t..:; • .J v. ·1 1: .»
lei ·t C, e f:) j 0 1 1, 1,,(.:. -;:,1 -: 1.– 7 (:) -PY , ,~,n ~ -; J e, ·tt, ::> Lat. . …r,Y
on m (l1u n~ y c._V, .. ,,~ _ , .L__ .1. 0 d H·L .., .,., 0 ..J_ .~ J. ….c.c J.n ..c .. c; e VJl D.·.r
Lands ca pc _ E~(; s cnat.el rIll ,~pll z: t l : v .., : d: ie ~ _.. lhe +. aLl. }1rc ._.V I·· l1J1
u 0 …. . eft );..,J ..;…-::1 ./ _. .. LL 1.:.-……. :: . . . .A. _ ,• ..J., ~, …… .._ ~.l .,-.)_–..1. …… , t;:. vet ..-.1. 1-.-1. . , -_……..
spire of LAngn Galdien new dn~inat sQ ~he l ands cape –Laber ge, Dufournel,
Pet it Pr e, Va:!Ln, Hi viere Cazeau , L emoi.ne …~; 401 1s horn soundedaga i n for
tho cross i ngs in Chat eau Hicb er . 111e Li.t.tLe halt at Chateau Vi l lage v:a f.3
pas s ed and soon we stopped to take si di ng at Chateau Richer . This stat ­
ion, like those at Giffard, the two Montmorencys, Boischatel and L1Ange
Gardien, is one of the larger structures, as contrasted with the tiny
shelter-halts along the li ne, which ar e being served for the la sttime
toda y.
After a short wait , i n which marry pl ct.ur-es were t aken of the station
with it s gi ngerbread Dame-board, car ~5 4 drewup fulf i ll i ng the schedul e
of. t.r-a i,n ,. Much.L _ fj_ ;-n las 1)8
11
. 0 t.hi-LS …m…. J , a nd ….1 v.,.L t he .LI 0 ….c.t. 33 41 . ~ . -••• ,,1 ! .J. _ ,~. oet C.l. . . co 1 .i. 1.. pa ss0 enger s)J ) ,;
were on board arain and our tra::n unde r-war. -~. Lefr-anco i s, Vi s it atioIl,
Baker Tnn , n i.viere~ d GsClden3.-; soon t hc spires of the Basi.l i.ca of StCj.
Anne
could be scen over a spur in the hi 113ide and a few minutes lat e]., P
assenger Extra 401 East ar r i ved at the impress i ve stone station. V-JE:;
cont i nued through to Ste.Anne Stati on , ~ mi l e further on, wher e more
train orders awa i.ted us. Some of the passengers left us here to spend
theirtime photogr a phing car 405, twi n to our 401 , and visiting the car hou
se, while we went five mi les fur ther to St . J oachi m, the end of the e
lect r i c line. Thesnowblew upinsquallygus tsasourspeciallef t
Ste.Annets , pa ssed through the new OItunnelt1 under the recently-completed
hi ghwa
y. J Beaupre, Donohue, al l were left behin4 . The lit tle h
alt of Queyl u s warned us of our imminent arrival at St . Joachim , wher e
trai n 35 lLYD.a wa iting to leave at :3:05 PM . CNH diesel 10;~5, on an extra we
st, a1;30 wait ed beyond t ho plat form. No .401 was wyed briskly whil e the
photographer s , both movi ng picture and st i l l camera devotees, took
advantage of the occasion.
In order to afford as much ti rno as poss ible for the visitors to f,ee
the shrine at Sainte-Anno, and to visi t the railway faci l ities , our spec­
ial wast ed no time at St. Joachi m, and departure took place just ten mi n­
utesaf ter arr i val , ahead oftrain35. ReturningtoSte. Anne, we spent.
( –
a hal f hour, and during this ti.me we were passed bot h by train 35 a n~
by Ext.ra 1025 West ~ About 3: 45 PM, we too , left the St e.Anne Church ;::,ta t ~
ion, bidding our official far ewell to the Loculit.ywhi ch had given impet ,
us to the elect ric rai lway. About t.his t. Lrne, VJe pass ed through a sleet
storm of shor t duration, whi.ch di s solved some of the red ink used on the
Ad i.eu sign, which t he Committee had placed on the rear of the train.
(
_C~._R~.~t~~T.~A~. ____________________ ~N~e_w~s~_r_te~pc .. o~r~t __ ~_.~1~9~ .. ~5~9 ______________________ ~P~uk~_~~
Quebec, the familiar local halts along the line flashed by –Maufils,
Maiz(:;rets, DeSalaberry,-Monument, Giffard –. Guests of the Asso ciation
for part of the trip were the wife and family of the Asst, Superintendent,
NIr. ,(3t. Laurent, as well as a few regular passengers who had mistaken our
speciEil for the regular 1: 00 PM train to St & ~roacbim.
Soon VIe were::; making our careful way through Villago Montmor(mcy, No <
401 blowing for the many crossings in this typically French-Canadj.?~
cOlrJlYl1..mity. All too soon, it .seemed) Vle ChClJ up at the Falls station while
fJIr. St. Laurent went in to confer, over the telephone ~ with the tra5.n dis~
patcher. After a short wait, the conductor emerged with a further Ter­
minal Clearance Form B, and three more train orders, one allowing us to
run as passenger extra to St.Joachim, a second giving us a meet with
train No.3 3 (car iI-54) at Cl::.wtoP.u Hi cher, tht:) third the familLlr drear c:lnd
protection
i1
order authorizing tbe operD.tor at llontmorcncy Falls to hold
all trains following us until 2:30 !M.
IOSJ
Il
r
fO ln 11 r:e~t+inn ~Tr,v ·r···-·l TIr~-YYOI1Cy 1lj s ,.,,–, ·C·V.O· cse
rl
th
O
– -~ f.~ I. V_ . .!. .::; • .1. <...:; .. u __ 6 (tfvcA..o,l .. ..l.. _1-1.: .... : •. .,.1 l)J.I...J_ ... ,_, ; _ J.I-, JIJf;:; _l J IV. :l ; .....
I ·t . e f:-l j lA 1,1 ( ie r ., 1 r- , 1 -, n -(,YO -n . ,–i J -. ttl 1 – t . +. {
lon mOl::!n~y t._Vc .. , J.:; _,::lL,.0 cl nJ:, … :.0!-J..: _~ J,. .. C .. C J.n .. c , .. cc e VTlE,-,r
1
r; nd cJ.p ~.,~ E~ .. ; e v,, ·t· E,I rIll,~ p 1 1., h .: ~ .. ~ :, V .. , (J,., 1~ er __ . lhe -f. ~ 11 I }lU,A r: 1.~
u 0 …. c-.; ., f If, (-, ( ,. . . ~ .. d k1 . n ·t··· . t· P l ., d s ,.,. 1 L baY r~ D ,.p ~1
,:) p..l,r8 0., .tl.nc~, ~rcd. Q lp.n n W (jn.l •. J. J (,0.,0 _ cen Cccp8 –3. ,-:.., gc , U.1.0Ul L 8.1. ~
Pet it Pre, Va] in, Hivier8 Caz82u} Lemoi.iH3 .. ; 401
1 s
horn sounded agJ.i.n for
the crossing:3 in Ctlateau Hi.cber. Th8 l:i,ttle halt at Chateau Village v:af3
passed and soon we stopped to take siding at Chateau Richer. This stat­
ion, like those at Giffard, the two ~~ntmorencys, Boischatel and L1Ange
Gardien, is one of the larger structures, as contrasted with the tiny
shelter-halts along the line, which are being served for the last time
today.
After a short wait, in which maEY picturc;3 were taken of the station
with its gingerbread name-board, car 454 drew up fulfilling the schedule
of. trln 33 nl![~lCll ..l.-]·;-n )a 1,)(,:11 0, 1-(I;S m.o<:>t r-lrJ <:;0(1 ·the p·aCen0el~C c..t. f·L __ ~.~ IV U 1... ..•. _ ....... /_J. _, ~.-L. ... ~ .... J , eLl __ ..-~J. it· 00 EJ )..)
were on board acain and onr tra::n und,-:r wa:!. -~ LE~francois, Visitation,
Baker Inn, ni.viere-desChiens, .. ~; coon the spires of the Basilica of Ste.·
Anne
could be seen over a spur in tho hjll::.;ide and a few minutes latel,
Pass,:;nger Extra 401 East ,:uTived at the iillpressive stone station. WE;
continued through to Ste.Anne Station, ~ mile further on, where more
train orders awaited us. Some of the passengers left us here to spend
their time photographing car 405, twin to our 401, and visiting the car
house, 1tJhile we went five miles further to St. Joachim, the end of the
electric line. The snow blew up in squally gusts as our special 18ft
3te. Anne t s, passed through the new,ltunnel
l
under the recently-completed
highway. Beaupre, Donohue, all were left behin4. The little
halt of Queylus warned us of our imminent arrival at St.Joachim, where
train 35 vfD.8 wa.iting to leav(; at 3:05 PM. CNH dieE3el 10;~5, on an extra
west, al~30 waited beyond the:) platform. No. 401 vms wyed briskly while
the photographers, both moving picture and still camera devotees, took
advantage of the occasion.
In order to afford as nmch time as possible for the visitors to see
the shrine at Sainte-Anne, and to visit the railway facilities, our spec­
ial wasted no time at St.Joachim, and departure took place just ten min­
utes after arrival, ahead of train 35. Heturning to StE;. Anne, we spent
( _ a
half hour, and during this time we were passed both by train 35 ac~
by E:;:tra 1025 West. About 3: 45 PM, we too, li3ft the Ste. Anne Church ;::)ta.t~
ion, bidding our official farew(~ll to the loculity which had given imp8t,~
us to the electric railvJay. About tb.is time, we passed through a sl.eet
storm of short duration, Thich dissolved some of the red ink used on the
liAdieu
li
sign, vThich the Committee had placed on the rear of the train.
L
f:·f?H.A.
News Jeport -1959
~
A NADI AN RAILROAD HISTOllCAL
The ink ran down the sign, and Mr . Seton ,
ASSOCIATION with grim propriet y, remarked that it
looked l i ke the stigmata of the Godd Sai nt
News Report No. 99 Anne s Railway. Apri l ,
1959.
.1e met train 32 , car 451, on our vmy
Bditor: Omer S.A. Lavallee back at Chat.cau Hi cher . Stops for photo·,
Deputy Edit or : F.A. Kemp, graphs were ~ad e at Boischatel , on t he
Asst . ~ditor ; W. L.Pharoah b~ ~f~c . . ont~~J.~
nor 0 l cV
J and at ~G nt F . J1~r…..-~.,Jnr-.v… .L ~. c.:)……. atM1.. • ….~ .L ~ . – )

Publ ishing: Jno.Saunder s, Falls s t at.Lon , At the latter pc.:;nt; , Cf:F
pass enger s climbed the long st.a.l.r vray ::0
Editorial Address : the powerhouse t o get aerial vi.eW3 of ~
Box 22, Stat i on B, Morrt.r-eaL station, the vvye and our train, rJ.01JV FClS ,~)
2, Canada. engel Extra 401 West , since St.Joachiffi.
Once again, the stations of the suburban
district were covered, and at Limoi l ou, your Editor help~d to remove the
extra flags from No.401 for the last time. on the Montmorencv Subdivision. (,luebe c
was reached shortly after :; ~ 00 PIv1~ and ami d t he gener-aL melee of
depart ur e from Quebec on C~ F.E.• t.r-a:.n ;11 :;5~ a f ew di.a-Jrar-ds t ook pictures
of No. ~.Ol bei ng tur ned and runni ng around car 105. The Committee wai t ed unt
il t{le la st of the passenger s had l eft j t hen turned and made t heir way
to Palais Stat i on andtrain il155 f or Mont r eam, where a hear-ty di ni ng car
dinner bolstered spirits whi ch had :3agged badly in the concl uding minutes
of the farmvel l to the Chem.i.n de Fer de la Bonne Saint e Anne1.
Six hour s later, Deput y Editor For ster A. Kemp made
the last regular run over the line. Here is his account •• ~.�
( THE LAST RUN OF LE pI TI T TRAlli! DE SA I :tiJTE~ .Mmln II
Flashl:mlbs illuminated the swi rling s
nowflakes and whitened plat f orms of Quebecls St ePaul station shortly before midn ight
on Sunday, March
15th, as photographers and reporter s rec orded the departure of the
last train from the station. Several gr oups of people stood near the doorways of car
lTo. 454, which was to make the last run as tra in #48 ~ Others sat in the warm interior
of the car, awa i t ing the fateful moment of 11:59 PM, when the car would clatter through
the stub switches of the yard and rumble over the br idge to Limoilou for the last time.
The
lively conversation of the passengers gave the run an atmosphere more of a wake
than
of a funeral as they recalled year s of riding the red cars which have connected the
Ancient Capital with the ~e aupre coast for sixtyyears. A cl earance was obtained at
Limoilou, and then the car sped on through Giff ard, Eeauport and Montmorency, pausing
briefly to deposit some of the forty passengers who rode the last trip. Snow swir l ed
round the windows, o
bscuring the light s which shone acr os s the snow~ Wheels rumbled E, 8
we crossed the Mont morency p and the wh ite~ess rose up again as the front pl owbi t Leto
the drifts. Boischatel, LfAnge Ga.rdt en, Chat eau Richer, Ste,.Anne; Ihe great grey ] 8,8. ·
ilica was only dimly visible through the blustery night. .At Ste.Anne St acic.n, a L.Qort
distance beyond, Car 405 which had spent most of the winter as a spare car standing en
a
siding at Ste.Anne, was lighted up and made to pl ow its way across the yards to be
coupled to 454.
Only a few passengers remained as N01,!-1-54 towed its darkened companion acros s the
1I7hi tened plains, past Beaupre Vi llage and. the mill at Donohue, to the v,ye Vigcri.rous
strokes of the broom cleared the si.,itch point s as lire paused at each junction of tllb ..Tye o
finally backing into St,,~oachim station at 1:25 AM (28 minutes late) The last tV10
It sta.ying passengers detrained, exchanging a few last words with the crew and leaving
eight others to re~urn wi th the c ar~
Five mi nut es sufficed. for last-minute farewells (most of the younger men were to
be laid off) and to obtain a clearanee as Train No.l05. which left St.Joachim at ~:JOAM
~ANADIAN RAILROAD HISTOJICAL
ASSOCIATION
News Report No.99
April, 1959.
Editor: Orner S.A. Lavallee
Deputy £ditor: F.A. Kemp,
Asst. Editor; W.L.Pharoah
Publishing: Jno.Saunders,
Editorial Address:
Box 22, Station B, Montreal
2, Canada. The ink
ran down the sign, and Mr. Seton,
with grim propriety, remarked that it
looked like the stigmata of the Godd Saint
Annes Hailway ..
We nwt train 32, car 451, on our way
back at Chateau Richer. Stops for photo~
graphs were ~ade at BOischatel, on the
by-; (-1 {jO at Mon(-::oriI ClT and at lVIC;YlL-rr rr:::n (,r
…… …l… -c::……….. ..• 1.. .I-j.~ • ….~ 1. J, ~ ., ,,!. 1:,,) _.J -.; J
Flls ct-cl 0[ ,~t f-he, lao-tel rc,; YC (-,he …… ~, .. _ 0 ,,:{. 1. …. 1. vl1 u ~-!._._~1, .. , _ ..
passengers climbed the long stairH,:ij ::C
the powerhouse to get aerial vj.ew~ of ~~2
station, the wye and our train, now Pass~
engel Extra 401 West, since St.Joachi~.
Once again, the stations of the suburban
district were covered, and at Limoilou, your Editor help~d to remove the
extrD, flags from No.l+OI for the last tiJ:Yle~ on the Montmorency Subdivision.
c;uebec was reached shortly after :j~OO PM? and amid the general melee of
departure from iiuebec on C e P ,E,. trD.i_n l/155, a few die-oards took pictures
of No.~,Ol being turned and runnLng iEou,nd car 105. The Committee waitf:)d
until t~e last of the passengers had left} then turned and made their way
to Palais Station and train ?/l55 for Montream, where a hE,arty dining car
dinner bolstered spirits which had ~3agged badly in the concluding minutes
of the farmvell to the IIChemin de Fer de 1a Donne Sainte Anne it.
Six hours later, Deputy Editor Forster A. Kemp made
the last regular run over the line. Hore is his account •• ~.
( THE LAST ;aUlr OF IILE plTIT TRAIlif DE SAI~TE~.,:~,.nN.E)il
Flashbulbs illuminated the swirling
snowflakes and whitened platforms of Q,uebec1s St~Paul station shortly before midnight
on Sunday, March 15th, as photographers and reporters recorded the departure of the
last train from the station. Several groups of p~ople stood near the doorways of car
lTo.454, which was to make the last run as train #1.+8~ Others sat in the warm interior
of the car, avmi ting the fateful moment of ll! 59 PM, when the car would clatter through
the stub switches of the yard and rumble over the bridge to Limoilou for the last time.
The lively conversation of the passengers gave the run an atmosphere more of a wake
than of a funeral as they recalled years of riding the red cars which have connected the
Ancient Capital with the Bea.upre coast for sixtyyears1l A clearance was obtained at
Limoilou, and then the car sped on through Giffard, :Beauport and Montmorency. pausing
briefly to deposit some of the forty passengers who rode the last trip. Snow swlrled
round the windows, obscuring the light s which shone across the snow~ Wheels rumbled [,8
we crossed the Montmorency ~ and the whi te;:J.ess rose up again as the front plow bi t i.r~to
the drifts. BOischatel, LtAnge Gardien, Chateau RicheI~ Ste .. Anne; r:Lhe great grey Ras.·
ilica was only dimly visible through the blustery night. .At Ste.Anne Staticm, a Lhort
di stance beyond, Car 405 which had spent most of the winter as a spare car stared,ing en
a siding at Ste.Anne, was lighted up and made to plow its way across the yards to be
coupled to 454.
Only a few p~ssengers remained as No.).J-54 towed it s darkened companion across the
1ft.rhi tened plains. past Beaupre village and, the mill at Donobue, to the ltlye Vigourl)us
strokes of the broom cleared the switch points as 1ftre paused at each junction of th8 TY80
,finally backing into St,,~oachim station at 1: 25 AM (28 minutes late). The last tVIO
staying
ll
passengers detrained, exchanging a few last words with the crew and leaving
eight others to return with the car
Five minutes sufficed. for last~·minute fare1ftJells (most of the younger men were to
be laid off) and to obtain a clearanee as Train No.105. which left St.Joachim at ~:JOAM
n, _ -, t,
.
for St e.Anne. A brief pause ~t Ste.Anne Station mar ked the end of re ~11ar passenger
se
rvice by elect ric cars on Lhe Montmorency 8u odj Yis iou. ~rh :l t3 fl ags l>101e pu tup and
Ex
tra West 454 moved out t cwar d Q,uelJee;., lhe LntcrIor lights WAre put ou t, and hearl­
light and trolley , f ormed our only LlLumtnat Lon a s Vl d rol l ed, ghostlike, through
the.snowy night. St ops wer e made only at Pa quet , Gi f fard and Iri.moi lou to det ra i n 80
1
18
of the Last r i.de r a, Finfll1y ~ the car wheels rumbl ed over thl) St Charles River or id~e0
and clat t er ed into St.Paul St e.tiOll yards, cOIni ng to a halt with (to qu ote a Nontreal
etaIll edltor Lal 0 11 the same sub j eot ) a last compressecl- a ir f.:1gn!i and. the mot crms.n c:-:Ylll
conductor ,ent to heck off duty for the last ti me, leavi ng th, sn) around Les pI t i.t s trains de Saint e–Anne !! ~
_,.-:I1i ~ .:.~ }: ) {ll 1J
00000000- 00000
000
—,—–,———_._- -,
NOTICE TO REGULAR I:1:f~ I
3 .E~ . ~~ S
.. ._…—_.. __-……….­
In accordance with thp Con-
it d r-, -R 1 .1 f t r,.
stJ. uc i.on an dy -Laws, eg1.L.ar llGm) CHi:) o i ,nc~ i .. ~ S :,)C ·.Iac ~
ion in C~o o J. st.andLng are hereby not i f i ed t h O;lt i ; j1. t:,
r-o ~E)l ~~t ~ . L .~ l~ . 1,? ~~ .. y ._}.: ~ h ..~) ~ C I ~ ;~ ~;~ f~~ I .,.~~. :;. _.~ uj, … • •
n
be h eLd on Jcdn esday ~ Apr rr.. oL~ .l ,L):1, -, :..:.1l,.lllt I. ,.
he~ e in, a mot ion v,ril l be in ~rodur: r:; cl for t !,.le ~·() n:::: !. d ;.; r .­
f
at.Lori of thc n/lee+-l·n · -amcndi.ns TYe) ··) co}..·., · . L ,r on B
c…. .J ~, C J .x c: V Cl} el l ..;… ( ..L .Lg .r c..1. C.l~J · ,::.i. L ,)l ~ ~ ….. ~ lJ (-:-: J.I. L ,
ot t.h o y Laws (1 Ln Jl:; r–Jo–,,: ; (~ I : ~r i : 1:Q3rl COIrJOI:1I Cl� ot .he.r
•_• .J VIJ ~:J .L_ … J J C)p – .. …. . .:…_. . .L _Cl _ . ,.. ~ j cd _U . i
per t i nent se ctions, respecting tIle prop0s21 and admi s s ­ion of
new members into the Association.
I
By order of t he Execut ive Conllili ttes ,
C til K71J
l:imu lT C: f P})
(
I
. , . J..J d,l.; l .r. u .uiL c , Secretar y
l, _
i Ie Toronto al ready has a by-ipa ss route f or hi ghway
NOTES AND NIlIlS traff ic, and soonit wi 11 have one for railway
—— –_.— ._—, t.raffLc also. The 33-mi lo route is par t of a cam-
by Forster Kemp, pr-ehensLve plan for Canadian National Rai lwnys /;
I Toront o Ter minal s area, which also includes a .
hump-r etarder clas sif i cat i on yar d of t he l at est
d?si gn.
T
~e by-pass li118 wi~~ l ea~e the Oshawa S~bdivis ion a t mi leage
31/+ ( fr -orn Mo nt.r-ea.l) between }-l ckc3YJ.ng and Port Un i.cn, and pass to the
north of the city, cr os sing the Uxbr Ldge , Beaverton a nd Newmarket Sub­
d Lv l s Lous , and joining the Bramp t.on Subdi.vi si.on at !ilI;:d.ton. The line
fro:u Ltori to Geo r getown wil l be double-tra cked arid trains wi ll use U,s
Mi.Lt.on :3ubcli v i sLori fr om Geo r getown to Bur l ington, VrvlP-Jce they may pr­
ceed wes twar d or sout hward. The yard is to be lo ca~ ? (l at the north~: 3~
ani,le of the cr ossing with the Newmar-k et Su.bdivision (Tor onto-Bar r L :),
e
Rollowing are the names of eight sleoping cars reC8!llJy acqui rerl by the
Canadian Pacific Hai lway f rom the New York Central Hc:Li J:-o :tcl:
r: 1~1 .)
HYC name becomes CPR nClme NYC name becomes , .II
Fall Brook East view Ca s cade [iO,un A:.vITi
ci
3.J.8
f I ~3 k 1 .– . C cs r-d L~ B·,,l—.,.· r:­
SJ

.n
6
,l 11&:, L r oo 1-0 1.UI L,V J. L~ I) ,a,.:oc.:J, e ,..tne ), -, ,) Y.•,c. ~._:�
Plum Brook Hi ver View Cascado Mist Cl cv(CJ,,.,:J.I)

Babbl ing Br ook Seaview Ca scade Run Riverdule 1
The nViow
iY
cars arefinished in flut ed stainlesssteel. CPR has 9.pr..:1i cd
Tuscan Red let tering boards, wit h yellow let ter i ng, and a narrowr8J
stri.pe bel ow t he windows . flDal e
li
cars ar e red, wi t h yellow let terirlg&
(

• l~ .;.:.~;…:.:…, _–_______ ..-. ___ …;Ic;.,Je,;;..· v_J..:.s_H(}por.:.:~-=_)::.:.,~9.;;:.5,,,,9 ______ _
T), ,r,

….. -,–… ……..:–,~-.~., .. —. –
for Ste.Anne. A brief pause lit Ste~Anne Station marked the end of regular passenger
service by electric cars ort Lhe MC)utmo:r.encY Sut)(iJvisinl1& Ihite flags lore putup and
Extra West 454 moved out towaT.(l OJue1Je::;, 111, :i.ntoXior lights WAre plJ,t out, and head­
light and trolley formed OUT only Hll.lJnlnation as WI: 1olled, ghostlike,_ through
the. snowy night. Stops vere made only at Paqilet, Giffard and l,imo:i lou to detrain 80
1
18
of the last riders.. FiM.lly; the car wheels rumbled over th!~ St. Charles River brid.~e
and cla.ttered into St.Paul Station yarcls, coming to a halt ,vith (to quote a IIHcntreal
Sta.r
ll
ed:,c0rlal 011 the same SIJbj,~ct) tla. last compressecl-air s.gl)fl and. the moturli1;,0. ,:..:ld
conductor Volent to neok o:£f dllty for the last time. leaving the sn)rfla~0s to ;J.,,;L;:i.
around Illes :pI tits trains de Salnte~Ann0n
00000000-00000000
–,–_._,-_.-
-_._–_. __ . ….,
NOTICE TO REGULAR r:IEILBE3S
In accordance w1th the Con­
stitution and By-Lavvs, Regular TtlsmberE3 of t.he; A.s:;cjac·~
ion in good standing are here by notified th::1 t, ;j 1, thi3
rcgul(1.r monthly meet ing of the Assn cLa,t:,LoDv;ll,it,:::, :: :~i to
be held on Wednesday,. Apr:::.l 8th, 1959) a::. ::l;:-.i.l:~LC ,~,;(]
herein, a motion v,rill be jJltrodu.r:r:;cl for the ()jI::::~.d;r·~
ation of tho Meeting, amending PaY2sralh 2, S~~~jun B,
O
t the·· ,113y 1a,·rc rlCOI})crJ,:-cO>(1 ln JitlE:>Jo;c·;r~ll~r.i; :)I~ c+her
• _ • .J VIJ~:J .L_ :,J. vU,..,. … _, . .1. Gl,.L_ ……. .I. j (.:.;tl_l.J _vi
pertinent sections, respecting the prcp0221 and admiss­
ion of new members into tho Association.
By order of the Executive Co~aittee,
C
tJ KIJNTu IT ~ iD
• If. J~ .~. [./. !·J..LJ.d .. ~i. , Secretary
r———————-~1
I I e Toronto already has a by-pac,s route for highway
NOTES AND Nli:V1S tra:rfic, and soon it will have one for railway
—————-~-, tr::lffic also~ The 33-mils route is part of a com-
by Forster Kemp, pr<:.~hensi ve plan for Canadian Na.tional Railways!:
I Toronto Terminals aroa, which also includes a .
hlunp-retarder classification yard of the latest
design. The by-pass 1ir13 wi~~ lea~e the Oshawa S~b1ivision at ~ilea.ge
314 (from Montreal) between ~lckarlng and Port Unlcn~ and pass to the
north of the city, crossing the Uxbridge, Beavertcn and Newmarket Sub­
divisions, Clnd joining the Brampton Subdivi~~ion at lill;:-l.Lton. The line
fro:n l.ton to Georgetovln will be double-tra.cked arid trains will use 1):18
rl1ilton Jubcli vision from Georgetown to Burlington, W··,I,t) ce they may pp:.­
e8sel wastwa.rd or southward. The yard is to be loca~?(l at the nort~~:3t
an[;le of the cross ing with the Newm::xket Sl.l,bdi visj on (Toronto-Barri~:),
e :B~ollovJing D.re t,he nc~m8S of~ eig;ht slc)oping C;-J.l~S 1~eC8!J.t~~I.y acqlJ..ired. l;~/ t}~Jf.
Canadian Pacific Hailway from the New York CentralHc:LiJ:::-o,Stcl;
NYC name
Fall Brook
Singing Brook
Plum Brook
Babbling Brook
becomes CPR na.me
Eastview
MountviE~w
HiveI View
Seavi(~w
NYC name
C
tlscade Faun
Cas c.J,de L::me
Cascade Mist
Cascade Hun
becomes
(,rn.)
.. ,II,.
j~: ITl 1:3. J.~ e
B.t,~) u .k:r ~(-~= .. (;
C 1. () T (~J .(t, .::: ~ _ (~;
R i verdal,:)
The nView
li
cars are finished in fluted sta.inless steel. CPR has 9.py.;licd
Tuscan Red lettering boards, with yellow lettering, and a na.rrow r8J
stri.pe below the windo1rJs. iiDale
il
cars are red, with yellow lettering6
C.R . B.A . News Re~o~ ~ I .i(: · :i.;~~C
-_….,….•. -.–. ……——-,—-……….~._ ._—-_ . . .. . ,._ .-,.-.._-.•.. -…., . -, ~ .. . .~ …–?59 _,_,__…__ .,. .. »,­
SUPPLEI1ENT TO NOTICE OF MEETING

-_ ._ . ~ ;.. . -. ——. __…_-~—-_..­-­__.­.._-­
As we r eached page 47 i n pr e par i ng this
month s News Re por t , t he Pre sid ent cal led us
to say that the s peaker f or t he Apr i l. moot i ng
I
I
I
I
w
~ l~~ b ~, Hr_. ~ol! n V J?,s ~ wo ~d ~ o ~ t l? ~ .; D op a:t~:l r, n ~; 1
0 1 1,L an..s po r t at.Lon llG0ea l ch J . Can ad Lan N dt,Jl j nd, .
Ra t Lway s ~ who wJ11 add r-e s s t he As soci ation on
t he topic , Ru s e Lan HLdlway s I . .
I
I
!
_______ ,
-Edlt.or-,
.• • .•_
I
._. __~oi
e Ni neteen s Le epi .n g cars have b een purcha.s ed by Canadi .an 1]i.< T !.) ~J; :, i , :~ , i .1,
wa ys f r om the Noy! York Centra l Ha i l r. oc..
d. •
11: (,:: C3.r 3 CCDT, , .J.n
roomett e s each
an r e I) ]·j p,l,..·,·t . · i­ I!l · , : -· ~ ; _ c r , :r ,
• –. j CL . .J. U C t. . -. •.. 1…_.e….(:)1_ i .f, .; {:-11J.wl .4 1) . : , 0 ( , .) l.~ , ,,,, ~~ ~ , _ ….: •.: / ~ _ . :. , . .L r_ ) . , . 1 9
c ..;::1:: :: – <: ~
.,. .Y ,. j.­. _ ~
.J L.1. .1. •::. ~ …
t.ra caa b.Le S t8 p S and f our ~vi h e ,::; ~~ t.ruck.. J :i l I ~Y I ; V.r ! :>, :: () r:(~ F: J:;.~./ ;,lir l Wh ::..t c
CO.l
~
our s ch pm TIt,(–IT . ~ T (
,J
. ~ ..; 1 . . 🙂 .. J. , .) C , _~ ~ ·
. II t . \TV C J- ; ,Q
I n 10n r ea.L . .,. .LlGUI, C .-
c. -I n -r 1 ( ,,1
l…1 :> l
. -1 ~-. r ,­-: . 1
[ U .d ..C .f, ..,1
.. ,: f .. ;, –, :­
.. _ _ . -, . ~ . ., · ., ,1
··
~ ,rij · I ~ ·I ·~·,J · l· · t }f · ~ ~ –
~
• . .:, C, ,.. , ~ . ,.J ,,,.,, ,;
! ::.1 , .1 p (~ c,;il 1-
~
.. _ ~ _ -, I-…i ,,-. . • __ , ~, _/ J
I
· . , ~ r.l 0 .c. ~ ! 1 1I 1
0. c,L) 1 0 _,-.(,0 , 0 .
NYC name
h e comes eN ~-~~·· I ~ /: ·~ ~:. d l }r~:,; : , :~? 1…: r~l.. : l;. ~ (.~ t: , C::U: S eN No i and
_______. –…._ _ .•.–.._..,._ ._ . _ ._ .._. ~ _ _ .. .. _ .,_…_. _-. . _, _~ ~ .•~ •….-. _ ._r _ _ •.•._ _ _ , …..-­-…. _ , -…:.YJ. ap~§:. __
Camina da Bay
Dor cas ;:3J Y
Sandy Hook B2Y
20 5:2
2(;11:
205!.r
,
I
VD.l /l l cl :1.. ~ !( ~ J.l . e s ( 1 ~) C~ ;:(. : :: (; }3;I·:l
/(1 Br-Ll.Lant .j ( ~ ~~ f:: ~ l t f 0. V Y ;.:i C E.q
f,, ca r …. ,; ~ r I T, rae s n v
V a.!.. -… . . LJ .1…1.:;: I (..}.€ t …. ~-; u L Gt ..
~
C-, 6 2
2063
2064
..::1] ,Jo.lbf-)rt
VaL ;j Gan
Vulma r ie
(
ir-aver-se Bay
G
ardiner s Bay Hunt
ingdon Bay
S
odus Bay
Ca s co Ba y
Dor c
he s ter Bay
Three-IJIil e Bay
2055 2056 2057 2058 2059 2060 2061
Ii E.t ~ Cote C h fl. ;_ :;, ;. v C n~ . Bay
7 ~ 1 C01 1t t.T; tn , .J oY …. L ~ Y
V U _l. I … .l v …1 ~ J . . . … L JCA.
Cal d 1 Amour ITLJJ~ cl er Bay V
al d lEspoir Delaware Ba y
Va
ld Or j Ha verst r aw Ba y
Val -Dou
cet ISan ~ r an c isc o Bay
V
alhalla I
2065 2066
2067
2068
20 69
2070
Valmont
Valois
V
alparaiso V
alr oy
V
alrit a
V
al St . Pa trice
Some e x i s t i ng cars bea r i ng name s in t he I1Va l il ser ies have been r-onaned
and others ha ve been r e designa t ed a s co aches , wi th numb ers in the 43003,
~
Ih e l a s t s t eam 10 cflmot i ve on the Ont.ari.o No r t hland Ra i Lway , No 2()() > a
1+-6-0 , wi l l
, 1 .
or r a I n an be
di.sp l.ayed i n
1 • t
arG.:1 1j ;1.lCn owes Le e
Par k j.n
h f i.t
mu c 0 , J. ; 3
Nort.h Bay ,
1
CiJ. ! < ..opmerrt On
tar io , a.,s ,:J. EJC;;,}-
h 1 ,
to t e , ,~)cCJ rJ ) , :, J ,v t:~,
u s e as an i n et .runent of r a pi d a nd higll C:3;Y1C i t y t .r-ancpor-t ati.or. ,
e The London Ra
ilway Commi s s ion has de (;i.d (vI to ret a i n t h e 2 5~, n !:L lc I,()(,·ic·11
& P
…1­(.. .L , J C1 R ) ~ ! -v-: r ..:} • co C p 1;…. 1) rr .1. ….. ~ , r 1-~ I Y1 ~ . , -.; .,-.-, T 1+ .: , · .~ ·. r f _
01 v .JL.an.. ,y .l ClJ._L.Vld J , anu. l,:) _:> e ,..1.., ..:; , ,,)E,,, n,·. J,) t,:; C,).,OD,J.·.B. . . 1., C­~ :: :-
t
~
tI l 11. r . ~ r ; , h 1. • .,,, i . _ . ~ -1 h n . … .-J , • . C; , .>_
a J.ng 1 8 a.ne , rno v Oillld.LS SlOn i a s iJ ill -,1.1…. llCl Q,);oJn 1, , ; (0; , d (). Q l ., ~_ a ! l ~ -L
.- naI ts -r ·Cp …. +­~ 1 ~. c…… p t l . . i1 T . •C.,-, ,.-.c::. · r· ···r.I ,.-,-; ·; ,l C, r (l {~ · L r- 1 -; 1 ~:
l
O_~ c.:.l. ,;:l O ._l. ~l vO pLn C I1 d 0~ 1e la.. way J.,r a ~ ~ P , ) ( v , ,, J . l l , . ~.v~ .) 1 it . .. ~ .. …L•• • , .·. • ,
e An Lmpo r-t. a n t; change has been ma de i n t he tin:ct c.b10 f ,:.I CO : ~ ;j ( :, o : ~ j ) £l ~ ~ – – !f !

~ l ·t . ~ , ·b1., ~ ro t M +­1 r n t t -,., ( ~ ..: ~ ~ ,: …. y … .. ., . , , ( . ,1 ;-0 )
r d..L­S 0 .L,l ,OGI _ C? l . wo lonv r e0, r: an u po~ , a . ~ . l d l .OllIT,.J : , .J_ ,:, ,l. , u , . {: ; ~ .L •.J , ~ ~ .
ar
r out E) 21. ~ iI I I I H lJ and 1 n IvI j Jp l: j,T ,J ,D b j h (,.. .­,. t- . j -Y l 1 – Y –,·r
.• 1.;:. .1 :.­ 0 ….~.. l M_ J .J.LJ .L · +v ….1 1 … 1.. ,…J l. .LJ h V J.. I…. ~ , ~ .. ….. .. . . : It .; • • d . …. . t­…… t. .. ~.~ .: .•; 1 .f• • • • L·l __ .. L ~…:>~_ ..,
of way f r om Youvi l l e Shops . Orig i na l l y pla Drl. f2 d lc;J. _::=j; ·;p t,;-; int~·,:-,
~
, ,.11 b I Tff .. rl r • ,
Cll,lngeov er to ous opera tlon WL .. e ma ce JJ.li:!.Y ..~r _ . W:1:U3 L; .::.: …·.U
tt>,?
. . •
lC: ~ ~ :1 8
i nt ention of trw Cit v
J
of Hont rea l to c () m ~ U: t ~~ t:l>. r (),~~ d. v~ : 1 -v C ll. ~; :i.: ; > ; : ~ .
(. Avenue , and to wi d8Y1 Blvd. Henr i -Bourassa by appropr iat j.;-;.g U ) U :3:0rn .
t r a ck r e s er va t i on .
e Pa
sseng er
1 h · a so a ve
,s ervi ce on t he Ni agar a , St . Cc:rth::1.rines & Tor ont.o FV?:l1I.2y vJ.Ll l d d b
.0 th ,. .. ~ M:· r) (kt-h l,r ,)C .,. } .. J , ~ n ~ -1~ p
en e el.ore V l S a p p e ,~. r s . al ell -0 0 .. .. cn C. 18 . I.J V l L C
J
OJ,
schedul ed pa s s eng er serviCE:: on Canada! s l a s t i nten lrba n t r o l l ey l i 1.1(:.
Details of the f i na l t rip will a ppear next month .
(
y ..
… I.) … ~ … I· .. I .•. ,. •… ,. ………….. ,,,,, …… _ ……….. , N ~ __ • __ r. _____ … _.,, ______ .. ,. __ …. _1 eV{S . .11-;:.:~-:-~O:::.:~. __ … ~,,?j9 __ … __ … __ . ,,~,,-…… , .. . ,,,,
———————————–~
SUPPLEVENT TO NOTICE OF rvmETTlTG
As we reached page 47 in preparing this
months News Report, the President called us
to say that the speaker for the April, meeting
will be IvIr. John vJestwooJ ~ of the Depa;,-tmFont
I of Tran,sportatiCJn Hesearch
J
Canadian Nat;J.I;D.a:. ,[I
I
I RC1ihlia_Y0 ~ . who will addresf:, the Association on t
he topic, i1Russian Hc.1.ilways,1. I
-E~(iitor IJ I
… ~ _____ …………. __ .,_._~._… ___ ·d
e Nineteen sleeping cars have been purchased by Canall:tc~n Ur.(t :l}~J;::-> :.·~,::i.1.~
ways from the Nc~w York Central Rail.r.!)c..
d.•
Tte c:n 3 CC;DT,,,I:} ::J;h:.;;,,<·,.
roomettes each~ and are o,f l:i.ghtv:n:i ght.. ;:;rrJI),)·.:;h··, (>::-~:)~l~·.,j L1:1 :.,:>~
traccnable str:;ps ar.:d fou.r=0ihe(:<~ t,Y;;l8k:; i j,llr;l~ r;,I!:::~tJ)r:(c i;,(.;.~r ,,lire wh:i .. te
colour scheme, Thl;Y Dr.: ~cc;i1!:~ lf:[<-1 :(J; :~, >1:1.:>,; :~~ !,,:;-~,i,c::3S ~~1)r:.;J
in Jilontreal
s
NYC nc:unc,s, an,} ·L.f·,i . ; ,,f :::r:ji.:~~c, ,;,::~!,.>J~I.~.,-;;l ,c::.r(, as 1011011[0:
NYC name
n2p~e
_. ____ . ____ -… …. _ …. __ ,_. ______ … _._ .. _ … ______ ~ …… -.. _ … …..-_o.Z1 ……… ___ ., _.~ _ ……. _,~-,~…–.. ….. ___ ~ .. ________ . __ .-._,~
Caminada Bay
Dorcas ;JDY
Sandy Hook BilY
Traverse Bay
Gardiners Bay
Huntingdon Bay
Sodus Bay
Casco Bay
Dorchester Bay
Three-IIile Bay
,
I
20.52 Vell /llal.:1 i (~hr.:.r.r·:~f· 1~1(
I .. ,–. ,J<~.::,.; - ... 1,..1. .. ,.; (.J
·)(.· .. ,,1).) 1 .-T) -( … r
~ .. 1 hU l:HL . .Lant.: T)~~f.;:lt 1: V)t:ic l~:ly
205!.r
2055
2056
2057
2058
2059
2060
2061
V·,c.,·1 ~art; ~r I T, [lOC l),·V
:.L.L -.. .I_;; IUd ••.• , u L (J •
ya~ Cot;o ,Chrl~~:nC
~ Bay
Jal Court Hu~~er bay
Cal d ~ Amour I TL1J.r~der Bay
Val dfEspoit Delaware Bay
Val dOr . /Haverstraw Bay
Val~Doucet I San francisco Bay
V::tlbala L.. …. _..oJ.. I
) 0,f., ?
1 .. . .J.~,
20~~J
2064
2C165 2066 2067 2068
2069 2070
V.s.l . .Tolbert
V:J.J.j eCln
Va1.marie VaJmont.
Va
lois
Valparaiso
Valroy
Valrita
Val St. Patrice
Some existing cars bearing names in the l1Val f1 series have been reE,c:uTecl
and others have been redesignated as coaches, with numbers in the 43008,
~ ThG last steam loc@motive on the OntD,rj.o Northland Hailway, Nc .. 2()(), 3
4-6-0, will bo displayed in Lee Park in North Bay, Ontario, as a mG~­
orial in an area il-lieb owes much of it;3 CiJ.!(lopment to the J l)CCJDJl:,j-vsl~,
use as an in strur:lcrlt of rapid and higll c:1;;.Jc.l.city tran,c3portati(,n.
e
An i:11.portant change has been made in the tirc.etc,bJ..<3 f,-:.l CO:,.;;0:-·:;).I·1 ~~()c(!
rails t.o ru?ber _ C?f two Montre?-~ Tr:a~spo~!,at.iGn ( __ ~ommL:~.::;i:)n :rj,.~i.;:;~:< lij~~:?
are routes 2~_ r,il.LLLEN and 1.f-0 Ml}NTR~A1J NOrw ~ b,::th C:rJf.;Y of way from Youville Shops ~ Originally piaDti.ed IC;T. E;;pt.;~mL~·;~ . tL I:?
ch.lngeover to bus operation will be made MC1.y ~~rd. ~~:ds L; GI,,U t,e, ~,:18
intention of th<3 Citv of Hont.r(~al t.o com~10t(;~ t.:~,,? rO,:-J,,.v:r,( (;,1 ~,fL :~-;:~.
T, Avenue, and to widenJBlvd. Henri-Bourassa by appropriat~i.;~:g U!lc1 p:p:3.:;rn.
track reservation.
e P
assenger service on the Niagara, St.Catharines & Toronto R2iJ.way wil],
also have ended before this appears. March 28th
l
/Ta:::; the la:Jt. dar of
scheduled passenger serviCE) on Canada 1 s last int.8:l.urban trolley li11(3.
Details of the final trip will appear next month.
— ——– – –
G T
.~ i ~
~T ~_- (t d~ : -,~ .;
( I1.-~ …(
.:
:d
(
_..-.._.._._ – –_ ..__._- –
.-
.~ .~ …,-……… ,.,._,–_., _. ~ , …. .,~ ……­~~–
e Ot tawats d~ cimat8d tra?t i?n sy~t8m , w~i?h SRW the su bstitut i on of ~use s
f or el,e ct.r i. c COT S of tne J3 ~1nk·=H: . PD.t r J. cl: r out.o on Ja nuary 12th l EJ1Q
H11 I . 1> ,]/ h
h
.11 k Irui l.
1
on t118t 0 [tnQ ~ .J:1l.EJ.c:;r J..l ne on .to ebr-uary .o t. , WL ma e a si nu .ar: cnan ­
geover on t he Pr c 3t e)·l,··Hid
r
3cm r-out-e ear-Ly on the morning of Apr i l I+t h .
r .1. -) +-• ·c . 1 b J
iC: ~(· : · :,; ln r j) J r , ; i r:l :ll ·
ro
c /) r cr:.· uoo o j cxpect.ed t o Cl convcr-t.ec
1
.1. . ,t,~, ·. _~J…,:c. -i+,t .l e:; j — ~:~· :~i ~- · ..L.~~c~~__;,_. : Cl.;) ~…J . . : .. ;::-:y…. ~J –(~ l- 0 ~:) .r·~-: … –,… ~. !..J ~ rV o .z: ._ U
on .iunc or.n, lc-•..uoval 01 Loll,.; ur-orrson t.r-oLl.e yv coach ..L11e ~ expecccd .i.nJ
(,I t; .r . r) t:1… :: .,-. r ..,r ..1 1 (. – 1 q -1 1 P l :l , ~~ -., : -.1.J.. · -l r: 1 . rhat t …• … 0 -) ,…. -: -(~ r y. C
UC:p :J,>.,il)C.l l,..L. . 01H.. c,.l. . ;,.. e ct.ri c opor-at i.on on \/vC:U:3 enco z.novm (l .,j_u,
thc Ot t awa Emectric Heilway.
9 Canadi an Nat i onal ]ai l wa ys has purchased bodi es fromNational ~;t Gcl
Ca
………
l CO Ico r-at
~
A. .
l j n
., O
f
_
u~!
m J
_
1 ; r , On t
.., u .
~1
….

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…:…
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l. .t
(.C .~ r
. .•,l.,l….

_
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1l.1.
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v
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…… 1-.# ..)
,,
l.., ~�
cs ed 1 –1 -, offL c ials rr~
l CI ) . :. …. … vri.Ll b e f ;: (lcl::-::, :-p l r:;c c l .1 (1, 1.1
U wC ,JY
·
I vu 0 l ….. __..,.<. U. ,1.J0, C ~11 S l~, J. .._ ., .J O . ..1 .. , <:,., . , O.oJ. o l... ·, ,) . .....
1
~
…..
.
appear-ance to t he charter car-s Bur-r-ar-d and ilBedf or d 11 bu i.J.t. .l.n :; r:: ~)/:r ,
and to Bu si.nes s Car No.91 , whi ch W2S rebuilt fYom Coa ch 5~):.~ I : .., ::,:
11 -,td 1 .] t P C· , Cl ,..1 -lj •,
wri oe comp.r.et e oy erie r c:n . ..way a _o i.u t ot.• un ar-re s .:..lLUp5 j t1 j;.u :l ;lc;
e Ca nadian National Rnilways dis cl)Dtia~0d r~s s Q~fer ser v ice on m ~ ,xAd
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Port Hawk es bur-y and (;i-{)c c:r~ 1 < 1 Jh~/ h i ,, ·t ·, f ~)Y> .~ h ~j l; ) ;: p] 11
_ ~, :~ if .a.• .J ~n , ,~ J.; .~:; t~ ._~.~~ ,v~ j :~ j ~ ~ ~_! .. ..- ~; r~(-: . ~~~~i: I-.~ J :q!~~-~:~~~ ~,w r-. lj~ -,: ~; ,:~~ l.l~ , ,_~
I n ,.]On Cvon.. I h e Chrt L..:C) c J. ,.ljJ ,1.
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(;- ..·C .L [,., ,,·(. l , ….. 1.1 .. 8 .!.. 8 J..LR 7( [tHO. (,) he,,-..t
··.{·:.(· l 1,0> Ct 0 11- n l PO l v1r c1u, · [ lC~ Nf:) 1.,; :. i.., ·, (l C .! ,·j (;, · .r> ~ -ll n B~ ; C~ (· .r.(;[:J· :~�
….., .1. ,1.. 1 .1.1 (.t __…… _ J….J _ _ #• •_… , ,.,.u l .,,-,) . . U ., .L ;:J_ …..I1 .., ..11. v …., . ~…~ .. A. )
·#f • C y • .1-C l~ ~ -.. _. ~c~ ~ r) c .t-r :::)1–;…. , – – r ,/1.::1 , 1 L 1 ·, . t ..-1….. C: ..~ r) y …._, _ ..
llc,tn.:.>poJj Ou1LlJ_S0l 0 n e ro r.,….) ).1.0., ). ev 1.)8 t J,J. .,ld,_e p,lO.lC. 11(, ra J.,.,:, l,c.:.,. l J
about 200 commuters dai l y I many of Vlhom are empl oyed i n t ,he CNH IloC:lc:::cm
shops .
e The sit e of the Monct on hur:Jp ya rd of C .?~ rJ.Cldicm Nat i o nal Haih lJCty,s pj.~ovide s
a considorably la rge open space for a ta sk whi ch re quires a great deal
of gr ound by re ason of it s natur e. This involves the welding toget her
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t 1. O i L.;) , ec J.1 LoLe .o..<,u. ln~.s 0... 11em onCo d Lor cl..J.d 0 :;J open -d 1Q 6onu.0 c;,s.
Such a train re cently carried 42 such rails ZromMoncton to Springhi ll
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laid in tho IVlcmct on-·Hal i fax line duri ng thQ summer. This iVa;)thefirst
tine that VJe ldecl rails IL:;.ve been ca rried in tie rs on CNR li nc E!.
e Canadi an Pacific Railway rec ently opened a new station at St .Basi le,
( 1.10 . , on the ~ont real-lu8be c li ne. Although it is of the mo der n, flat­
roof ed d
esiu;n, it h~ ;..:t t ract i v(;ly f E:,C (~d in loca lly-quar ried stone. The
fon ner station buiJ.ding, erected original l y in the lat e 187 0s by the
, .C . .1-,,1 0 ·:·t·., l~ 2 0 .·d··· ·t -1 ) , 1-,, lClct d 1· , ; Y,
I..tl.t l; l)~; C, h ,) n Lor e U…L, l 0..1. CCl en ,1 lI.c,l..L,iC. j, was C .:;) Jrcy () ,)y J,. 1. t.N

three year s ago .
H
C :~ n rod j r1r1 (u C 1 -Pl C If,l L i J~ l C ( j 0 ,,I.,(1 l 11 ..J r. T j J ; ,l r, l t t~ 1st freJUr
r::::7 …….. .L <:1 1 r 01 (r ..~v.-,t ·ry ,., l f ~ ~ , ;.,-j ,, k-~ I ,T th C ,. -,-, , c· ·..
pc..I _OVo .-D . ;.; l, Cl l·.).l Ca l., . tS cLL c.S .~.U . • 0 ..liO/,n , ,.C wG are Lon ,.:.. j,.,~.
public passenger car s on t he CPR systeo heving open observation p] .a~-
f
1 yC ( ., ~, ..) -y ( 1….., (: . _ ·t . n .-..y-…… :J ….- .~ ,-r) ;:t) ;-; 1….. :.l .-. l- 1 ~n 1… 1 -l 🙂 !
01 lilo fi.lOUilCc,l.l o.,,:>er va l On ….. c;;, ~ ;:;, C.i..C,, lJ(,.,;L • 1.J.H; Cel r;;:, we re nU,.,u8 LG.
6612, 6613, 6615, and 6616. Also to be scra pped is re st aurant car
6402 (for me rly eli ni ng car tlBangor
ll
) . cJ:he d.i ni ng cars 1/\[i 1ton i1 , 1Ii;Jood. ·~
sto ck 11 and IIAirli8
11
are to be convert ed. to :3er vi ce car s.
VI SIT TO PAHOTlM:IA OF T j}~ LEPH ONE pnOGn L: :~~S , ••
…~ ,—————_.._._-­
The f ield. of communi (>1. t·. ~ .n ).j !::J
{ is all ied so cl osely to that of tr a nspo r t at ion, that our member Mr. d
I their wives or fri ends to visi t the Bel l Telephone Company !s i1Pano:cn.,:l
of Te
lephone Progress II, an exhibition of historical commu.nicati orJE; (-l C!J.:; p ,
?len t., (~t t he I3(:~11 ~uil ding , Be ,,:-ver Hal.l Hill, 1.Iontre c:Otl, at 5: O?, P:iI, )~l

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served, but members MUST m!~ S EHV E IN ADVANCE at the Apl:i l (5th meeting
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._ ~; ___ ……….. __ ~_,_ ………………… ___ ., ._., • .,._ … , ….. ._ …… ___ u.
e Ottawa1s decimated traction system, which SRW the substitution of buses
for sle ctric COTS of the Iklnk-·St. Potrick route on January 12th, 2nd
on the Holland-L<:.;U1:icr line on February 16th, will make a clirni1.ar chan­
geover on tlH~ Prei-3tc;11-rtid~3au rcute ear:l.y on tho morning of April +th.
T} c ~ ,.e r,, j n·i r g 1 j r: ,, -;:,,;-.. ; t C, 11~ i , ( ,.) reI·, T in i) j, C-pr: C
J,
ed to bo co llvorted
,.1 . .•. ~. _~L.:C_ i. _ t .L? ) ,.-,·~-,:: … -,,r~ ……… .L .(~C_.I:~_ , Cl-;: ~….re. :~ .::~~ ~-(-~ .. i ,… ~= … ) .r .0 .. :……. ~ , … , .. : J r c; 0 .:.. .•
on JUulc utll~ 1, … 1-10.1 01 1.,,11,-, ,t3ronG(nl I.r~).L.Lcy-c-)ach – . .J..He~ exp,cLed Ul
(.IJ. … lJ·.L(·)y~l,..)C-I .. jr~~l·L ·~r!~1 <)-11 P-l(C~-rl ~ oprJ.L-iol nn ht 1a·~ 0-)e 1··~...,rTry· ,.le
V0l J>.H( j ;.J .. ..l… GlL .. Cc.l.._ ;.. ::. v C ,t, a.L.l.. , -1 :, _u Iv J ~L.~ r…1L .. .d u,.,:,
the Ottawa Eiliectric Heilway.
e Canadian National anilways has purchasod bodips from National f;~801
Car Corporation, of Hasiltoll, Ontario, for six new business cu:c ~0 ~0
U ,-
e d }Yy l .J. c 0 ff l ~ i : -1 co Tr r, ,., r:> C :-l~ S -:I-il J i-b (0) 0 j ;1,n (1 Tn) 01 c C J (, ( . :1 n; .1 Y .? ,,
u .J ve> V __ -…A..u…. …, … 0……. :-l. ……… _ .. _,J …… ~ _ ..,.C~.J. ……… 0.,c.) …. : … ) …. _ .. ..< •••. .._ ,~.
apPGarG~nce to the charter cars IIBurrard;1 and JIBBerardi? bt~. iJt, Ln :i ~:, :)/:r.,
, t-r B1 . 0 -~ n. 1j 01 ,1. l . .,,, ~lf-fY , (,. ~ ,}, h, ()l ;f–,
anl ,) ~US1,n,::.,s,-, I…,ar 10.7 , voJnlc~ was ruIJU.L I. … on ,Jc)-1C.l .. ,.Jr..:., ~!. :Cic,
. ., 1 , t d J… 1 ] t P c-, C I ., r.,. T • . I
1rIlL oe cornp.I.e· e oy In1e rC:D … way a .. ()i~lt ,)(,. .llarj.<:::s -Lops jL1 1;.0:1(;.;.0,, .. ;,
e Canadian N.::. t:I orw.l Hai:LVJay~3 C. i,:; c()r;r;iil:~ld f.iS[J~lp;(~r service on m~;xp.d·
t1
l n s 1 C;? Jnd 1 )1-, ( -Dr., l ,-, ;-, l -j c t-h Yf:~: C, :r, P : ;,rr! e ~(·l …. 1.,(,+.1. ,0,, I ~l
(:.,., C
c..:!. . ./ ~ .. :L… + , …. r-,_ ,…t …. .J. ) I •. t. .. .. …… • …. lo. • . -/. …. ., Y …….. l …..
, , …. .L _ .. 1 J -~. . .. J, .. ~ , ,I.,) l
Por
~t Ual.r]rpS·oury <,:,1 c-;j-DC~cr; 1~ ~; J,hI~:~l I,,·; .. (te,· 1 11~J1;) l:;PJ1,1
11 1lJ:…… .. u-J. …. _ t-..J~l.u ~)~ ~j, .. ~.. l ,(_,- .. _ …J….)l/,~ cl.J .. ./1;..;., L,~ ea..!. -S ._,,_
in ~bncton.. The ClJR. ,:d.3C) a::;-p!.iH:l .I·,C dL:.;,.(J.ti::U18 l.iraiES 17 and (::~ hel>·.
,,)··e·1·1 i:OYCtO1 11,1 POlvlf clu (;rl;:rIC ~r~! 1.,,):, ,:-;.,., CJ.EC.!j, .,.!, 11!:: B~;I(-~ (F
…….. J.l.Ll .1 L.t __ ,,-,-_ .L..J …. _ -.. … , •• , 1;,.u l,, ,) , .L;::)_I…..I1~. )1.. v …….. .~.-I …… A. ) ..
TrCt!1sport COlilmissioners 1:.:.:3 not yet bep:tl ElcLCle pU.blic. Tho tr,3 ir::.~; c.J.TlY
about 200 commuters dailI, many of whom are employed in t.he CNH llo::Jc:::cn
shops.
e The site of the Moncton hur:J.p y,3.rd of C.?~rl:::ldian National HailwQys provides
a co
nsiderably large open space for a task which requires a great deal
of ground by reQson of its nature. This involves the welding together
of 39,·foot 10;ngths of l32-pound rail into 1.170-foot ((rib bonrail iI se c­
tio
n8, and the lo::..ding of them onto a train of 25 open-and gondolas.
Such (} train recently carried l:y2 such rai13~rom Moncton to Springhill
Junction, a distance of 65 miles. 14 miles of welded rails will be
laid in tho Ivloncton~I-i titlE) that welded rails l:w.ve been carried in tiers on erm line.~.
e Canadian Pacific Railway recently opened a new station at St.Basile,
.. T b ]. fIt h·t· .0 ….. , d fl t
l lS 01 LnG rao ern, . a —
r
oofed design, it i::~ ;~;ttractiv(;ly faced in locally-quarried stone. The
f
ormer station buiJ.ding, erected originally in the late 1870s by the
Wl.l.r. .. be c, I,Iontreal, OttavD, & Occ idental 1t,ailve:Y, was destroyod by fice
thrue years ago.
e C
anadian OaC)fic Hel.ilway is engaged in s cr5:Jpi~1g its last four bE:::j:8·:~ .. –
parlour,-ob~3()rvation cars. As far 2S it :i,s known, these are th8 j c: :j;~
public passenger cars on the CFB. systeu hc:ving open observation j)la
r
J.
forms (rnountain observation cars excepted). ~hc; cars were numbe.~~ed
6612, 661), 6615, and 6616. Also to be scrapped is restaurant c~r .
6402 (formerly dining car YiBangor
1i
). Tb,e dining cars lIVIilton,l, tiVJood·,~
stock 11 and flAirlie
il
arc; to be converted to :3ervice cars.
1[I31T fTO P.AITOTlAr~rI!. OF rrf;~I,EPHOIIE P:~10GT{i·:~.3·S g • 0
~.-.–,——-.—–, .. -…. —
The field of communic:1.t,~.~);:JrC)
is allied so closely to that of transportation, tha.t our member 11i ,:iY~.d
Motton, of the Bell Telephone Company, has invited Montreal member::; :-,r:J
their wives or friends to visit the B(C)ll lelephone Company! s f?Pann:cn.,(a.
of Telephone Trogr~s~ 11, . an e~:hibition of_ l!~stoTical comm1J,nicatio~~; ~q:rj.p~.
Dle
Y
lr f ~he 1·:;,-,lJ ,::lllldlnrr Bever T.Jl l·T) 11 Tr)ntrerl .,,·t cOO ,.,r ,~
.L ,v, U V LI _ .1. … …::, _. _ .1..) ,1. (~ , Cot .1.1 c.:-A. …. L ~ ……… __ , .:.. i . . …. o. , Cl 0 r ~ J.~. . ) 1..l
~ied..ne sday, April 15th, There is no charge, and refreshments v,1ill be
served, but members M(J~T HIESEHVE IN ADVANCE at the Ap:d .. l [5th meeting 0
(
NOW
I S l
l
HE 1.
1
Ilvill
FOR ALL R1:. I L FANS
~l.0
DECIDE TO P,11EHD THE
Sr I1IDG E
.LrCUEf3ION
BELLEVILLE -BANCIWWT

ONTAh I O

MAY 10, 19[59
6.45 a.m. -5.45 p.m.
E.S .T.
~i MOGUL AND A CONSOLI DATI ON
DOUBLEHEA DED
STEAM POWER
TICKETS $8 . 00
MOVI E RUNS AND PHOTO STOPS
xx -xx- xx
LUlJCH CAR
xx-xx – xx
A TTENT ION 1,iONS-HEAL AND NEI ELJ GLAND PA SSENGER S
A roomette car wi l l be reserved for passengers from Mont r eal , or pass­
ing through Mont real to the Spring Excursion Trip via C.N.R. from Bel l evi
lle t o Bancroft . Ret urn fare and roomette charge is $24.15, Montreal -Bel l evi l l e ret
urn. A minimum of 18 reservations is required.
Reservations received wi l l be held until the minimum has been received;
then mai l ed pr omptly. If by May 2nd., the minimum numbe r has not been
r eceived, you wi Ll be adv.ised i mmed La t eLy by mai l ; and your money r
efunded. V~ e wi l l advise on other conne otions ava.iLa bLe a t t hat t i.me,
SCHEDULE
May 9 Lv, Mont real CN Central 1ermiD&1 8.35 p vrn, EST AR. Belleville
May 10 2.44 a.m. , occupancy to 6.45 a vm, Ret urning via Train 118
(
May 11 a~ ~2: 3~ ~.~ .• (~ c ~u~a~ci !O.p:m:).a!r!v!n ~ ¥oqt ~e ~ l 6.55 a .m.
TO: rassenger Age nt. Canadian Rai l road Hist ori cal Assn. ,
P.O. Box 22, Stat ion B, Mont r eal , ~neb e c .

PleE,se reserve __ roomette(s) (b. ~24115 . and__ ticket (s) Money Order enclosed
ADDEESS . . …. . . . . . .. Canad i an Punds ,

… .. . … . . .

(
NOW
IS :-rHE 1.I1ME
FOR
ALL RAIL FANS
TO DEC IDE TO A ~1EnD THE
SfRIUG EXCUnSION
BELLEVILLE -BJ-:.NCHOItT
ONTARIO
MAY 10, 1959
6.45 a.m. -5.45 p.m.
E.S.T.
j:~ MOGUL AND A COnSOLIDATION
DOUBLEHEA DED
STEAM P01J1J ER
TICKETS $8.00
MOVIE RU.NS AND PHOTO STOPS
xx -xx -xx
LUlJCH CAR
xx -xx -xx
ATTENTION 1,~ONi.REAL AND NE] ENGLAND PASSEmGERS
A roomette car will be reserved for passengers from Montreal, or pass­
ing through Montreal to the Spring Excursion T rip via C.N.R. from
Belleville to Bancroft. Return fare and roomette charge is $24.15,
Montreal-Belleville return. A minimum of 18 reservations is required.
Reservations received will be held until the minimum has been received;
then mailed promptly. If by May 2nd., the minimum number has not been
received. you wil J. be bdvised immed ia tel;y by mail; and your money
refunded. We will advise on other connections available t).t that ti,me.
SCHEDULE
May 9 Lv. Montreal CN Central 1ermiD&1 8.35 p.m. EST AR. Belleville
May 10 2.44 a.m., occupancy to 6.45 a.m. Returning via Train 118
May 11 a! 12:3~ ~.~ •• (~c~u~a~ci !O.p:m:).a!r!v!n~ ¥oqt!e~l 6.55 a.m.
TO: rassenger Agent, Canadian Railroad Historical Assn.,
P.O. Box 22, Stution B, Iviontreal, ~uebec.
PJesse reSelVe _ roomette(s) 1~-l~Il.;1E • I!I ••••••••••••••••••
••••••• ••
ADDRESS . . . . . . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
ticket( s) <0 ~~8.
Money Order enclosed
Canadian J!unds.

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