Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 094 1958

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 094 1958

NOVEMBER 1958
(
INEWS REPORT NO.94 I
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAl ASSOCIAnON­
INCOEIOEAT!D.
P.O. BOX 22. STATIONB�
MONTREAL 2 . QUEBEC�
Canadian National Railways 4-6-4 type No.5702 is shown
pulling the CRHAFall Foliage Excursion special train
across the Little Riviere-du-Loup viaduct between
Joliette and Shawinigan Falls, Que., on October-5th.
Photograph by Paul R. McGee
NEWS REPORT NO.94 NOVEMBER 1958
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAl ASSOCIATION
INCOEPOEATED.
P.o. BOX 22. STATION B
MONTREAL 2. QUEBEC
Canadian National Railways 4-6-4 type No.5702 is shown
pulling the CRHA Fall FOliage Excursion special train
across the Little Riviere-du-Loup viaduct between
Joliette and ShawiniganFalls, Que., on October-5th.
Photograph by Paul R. McGee
C .J.H .h ~� News
C~N~DIA N &~ILRO ~D HISTORI CAL
£~S 3()CI./l I ON
News Report No. 94
•.N~ ovcrab C…r ,� 105u• V .I..!. ..;7 r)·
Editorial� A~dres s :
0~ ~tl ( rl l
Box»o,x 22, U L!-J. D,�
MontU r cI.,:. )t~ (; ,-,:. L·1~ r]­~ ~..,, .c… .,J , ; l_
2ditorL Orner S.A. LQv2l 1ee
Asst .EJitor: Forster Kemp. Publ i s
her and Di stributor:
vJill iam L. Phnr-onh
Commit t oe : .cnt .horiy Cl egg
1 2,(,
Repor t -195e�
,
P
~0 C( ,J __ ,0
…,Un·..·C
i t
)I B- ….n� 11 .,1
~
oj ~h~ are respectru y remlnLec
that subscriptions for 1959, $2.00, become p
ayabl e bef or e December 31st , 195
e. In order to avoid the uncertai n­
ty of the holiJay mail rush, it is sugges
ted that r emit t ances be sent in
to the: .vs so ci at.Lon I s Editor i al Commi t t :
n ,·.. ·,·Il,o;,. 22 (~ trt lon nBil Ivl)nt r r:l 2
-.J ,

l..-.. ~J ~J .:.. ……. , v (. l. .. . -, c;.;; C.. ,�
C· r~ ,… :.) befor · December-15t h,_…J.L ..(….. , U I..:.. .L 1.:.. …….. d . c; •�
Thi s not ice does not apply to regular or .iun
ior member s of tho i~ssocio.tio n ,
r
()~3 i J.ont in Mont real , whose dues ar e co
llected personal ly by the Treasurer .
NOTICE OF MEBTI NG:
_ _ 0.-
_____.. .,__.Lor ne__~) erry~_ I
I
The r egul ar monthly meet i ng of t he Associ
ation wi ll be held in Room 202, Tran s port ~t i on Bui lding, 159 Craig St r e
et VJeE.it, on v1ednesclay, Nov ember 12t h, 19Se, at 8:15 PIvI. Several me
mbers wi l l gi ve short p2pers on topi cs of general interest , following
whi.ch an nu cti.on of books , manu s cr-Lpt s, pi ctur es and other memorabi l ia
will be held, proceeds to go to the Associ ations general funds. T]lose
members possessing dupli cate mater ial of n nature disposable by a
uction are invited to submi t it by telephoning the Edit or, Mr.Lnval l ee, [tt
Cn. .9-Se22, who acts as auct ioneer. Provision is also ma.lc to dis­
po
~e uf it ems of unusuc.l val ue for t he Gember s , upon t he proviso that
10;:) of the amount of sale accrue s to the ~ . ssoc i ation .
-o-O-O-O-()-O-O­
._..~–_._–_._-~�
The Trip Commi.t .t ee hos announced two trol l ey�
Lssocicltion News I tr ips forthcoming. Tho first, to be held on
~
� I
Sunday, November 9th, 1958, wil l be over thelines of
the Mon t .r-en I Ir-cn soor-t.a t Lcn Commission served by
the St. Honr y carhousG, that is, from St.Renry to Cartiervil le, and re
tur n. The CQr to be used will be a double-t ruck Fr ink plough of the 3
000 cl ass, whi ch ca r-rLcs two cabs. Thus, accomodntLon wi l l be stri ctly limited. Pa
rticipants wi ll also bo requi red to sign a release of res­p
onsi bility f ormfor tr avelli ng on non-revenue equi pment, and due to
t.hoso features, members who intend to par-t i ci.pat. c MUST HESEHVE BY TELE­

_i~
~
LJ
V
C l,t l l l am
1; c .oown ,
IT�
ornma
cn 9 —cTO?)2
_P

-r
_Ll
T
~

i

::£:!…..:..~
-
0
·
v
J
1
· · ~ I Ch
1 a i
.r
rnan
T
ruP
CLt t c:eo, :- –
(50 ::l!L~~ .i:., •
Tho fare will be, as usual , ~2.00 . On this trip only, we would parti cul ­
o.rly ask that members refrain frommaking reservations for ladies.
/~ trip over L incs of the Ot.tawa Ir nn s por t at i.on Cornmi.ssLon is schedul ed
for Sunday, De c~~bur 14t h, ~l ich wi ll be the first weekend rai l ope5ation for the wi
nter season. Car to be used will be one of the 651 cl ass, as was used last wi
nter. Fare wi ll be $2.00, reser vations are asked from
par-ticLparrts outsi de; of tho Hontr eal ar-ca,
The RailwQYDivision hnvo received an important now acquisit ion in the for m of
Canadi an Paci.f Lc RJ.ilv,;ay bu sIricss car No . 38, recently rotired
fr-om s er-vi ce, This car, for-mer-Ly t he iiSaskat ch ewan 11 used by Sir VJilliam V
an Horne , VK1S conveyed t o the i~SS ,) ci.at.Lon t.nrough the ef forts of Hr ,
l
H . l«, Cr-or.n i aue, ASf3i.st::mt Vi ce-President, Canad i.an Pac i.fI.c Rai l way, and
other offi cials, on Octobor 14th, 1958. Space to st ore the COlr has boen
offcr-cd by l-Ir . VI. Taylor-::]c:tiley, Chai rman of the Boar-d of Domi.ni.on Bliclge
Company, Linut .ed, Lacni.no, (luebcc. ;J. story of the Sa skat chcwan and
··
S . ~
rope
L
·[:·i rl
0
11
£h
~
( · 1
./
-:13 of t
v
hi
1:)0
J hl
J. U
s t.orLc 1.-
J ·….;
T
� l ssuo
•L …·…0v , l:..;:o -..lb~ ……
C
V
i:,)
C •. :L H • il. 0_–,,_, _______ ~N:..::..c~ … .JS Report – 1958
C~~~DIAN R~ILRO~D HISTORICAL
;S30CI .. TION
News R8Dort No. 94
Novcri1bu~o, 1951:5.
EJi
torial A~druss:
Box 22, Station B,
I
{lcn~re~l ~ (~~~ln
,J u ~.~. t, .J~.;.l_l….wL .. c ….
01t L
DC,]. or Orner S.A. Lav211ee
Asst.Editor: Forster Kemp. Pub
lisher and Distributor:
vJil1iam L. Ph::..roclh Comr
ni t tee: ld1thony Clegg
_~ _____ .. __ . Lorne __ ~)erry ____ 1
SUBSCRIBERS are respectfully reminded
that subscriptions for 1959, $2.00,
become payablo before December 31st, 1
958. In order to avoid the uncertain­
ty of the holiJay mail rush, it is
suggested that remittances be sent in
to thc: :.3i3ocic:!.tion! s Editorial Committ:
(c., :.;-fi
O )
, 22 (~tr·+·l· )n nBil Ivl)ntrl 2
v v, I… .. ~.J .+-1 … …. .. v (. I. V .. c; c.~ ,
Can~dL, before December 15th.
T
his notice does not apply to regular
or junior m8mbers of the f~ssocio.tion,
rc;~3iJent in Montr8al, who~3e JUGS are colle
cted personally by the Treasurer.
NOTICE OF I,1EETING:
The regular monthly meeting of the
Association will be held in Room 202, Transport2tion Building, 159 Craig
Street vJest, on vJecJ.nesc1ay, November 12th, 1958, at e: 15 PM. Several members w
ill give short p2pers on topics of general interest, following
which an uuction of books, manuscripts, pictures and other memorabilia
will he held, proceeds to go to the Associationis general funds. T
:lose monhars possessing duplicate material of 3 nature disposable by
auction urc invited to subnit it by telephoning the Editor, hr.Lnvallee,
at cn .• 9-8822, who .:::.cts c~s nuctionecr. Provision is also mc..~:c to dis­
po~e of items of unusual value for the members, upon the proviso that
10% of the amount of sale accrues to the ~ssociation.
ll.ssocic.tion NevlS I
————-~
-0-0-0-0-0-0-0-
The Trip Cornmittee h,]s announcec. two trolley
trips forthcoming. The first, to be held on
Sunday, Novcnbcr 9th, 195$, will be over the lines
of the Montreal Tr~:msportation Commission serv8d
by the St. Henry carhouse, that is, from St.Renry to Cartierville, and
return. The car to bo used will be a double-truck Frink plough of the
3000 class, which cc..rrics two cabs. Thus, 2,ccomodation will be strictly
limited. Participants will also be required to sign 2 release of res­
ponsibility form for travelling on non-revenue equipment, and due to
tll;se features, members who intend to po..rticipate MUST RESERVE BY TELE­
PHClfS IN J~DVil.NC~ to William l::IcKcDwn, Chairman Trip Committee, CR-9-8822.
Tho fare will be, as usual, ~2.00. On this trip only, we would particul­
arly nsk that members refrain from making reservations for ladies~
/~ trip over lines of the Ottawtl Tri:msr)iJrti.:~tion C.)lnmission is scheduled
for Sunc.ay, Decomber 14th, which will bo the first woekend rD.il ope:pation
for the winter season. Car to be used will be ono of the 651 class, as was u
sed last winter. Fare will be ~2.00, reservations are asked from
pclrticipe.nts outside; of the Iliontrcal nreLi..
The Ra
ilway Division havQ receiv0<.1 ;~n important now acquisition in tho
form of C2nadic:n PJ.cific RJ.ilv,;ay businoss car No. 3[~, recently rot ired
f . rh .
1 … 1 ,./ n k 1 1 1 1, • IJ-• 1 1 .
rO[;1 serv1c8. L 18 car, IOrm[!r. y G118 I .::>2S_ al:,cn(; .. [{~n usoe oy ::>11 ,L ___ lam
Van Horne, VKl.;5 convoyed to the i~ss,) Ci2.tion thr;)1.1[;h tho efforts of 11r. H
.J.. Grecni[~us, Assist:::mt Vice-President, Canadi,C..n Po.cific Railway, c~nd
other ufficials, on October 14th, 195$. Space to store the car has been
offered by Mr. V. Taylor-3ailcy, Chairman of the Boar~ of Dominion Bridge
CU
l~,)ny Lll~lltrQ~ I cnln
a
L)U(jJCC. s~rory ()f +··h,:·-·, iIC~qskrtc1.-1·Tl1i·1 nel
J! 1 … <.... , . -~__ c , . Jc_ ... .1.__ C ,,~ • -• .1J.. U v....... !o..JC~ CL 1. ...... vv(..l,. CL -
its historic past, begins on pa~u 133 of this issue.
_______ _ P~~;e 127
The Cobourg &Peterbor ough Rail way s trestle across Rice Lake h
ad the distinction of being •••••
CANADAS LONGEST RAIUJAY BHIDGE
C.R.H.A. N e w~ Repor t -1958�
….;;,q;o.
�.
An Account by C.W. Kenneth Heard.
J

..~� -A-1: HE IvIAJOH OBSTACLE i n the r oute of the Cobourg & Pet erborough�
iiiItai l way was Hi ce Lake, whi ch lay athwart the path of thi s�
I; pioneer li ne; the C. & P. R. was ihcorporated in 1852, under�
. ~ the laws of the Province of Canada (16 Vi c. Cap.40 )lto build _ b
etween t he t owns mentioned hi its title. Pr ojected in 1852,
the railway chose a pat h which involved a cr ossing of Rice Lake, the
only appreciable body of water in the vicinity. The lake, about fifteen
mi les iniliand f rom Cobourg, on the shore of Lake Ontario, is about 18
mil es long and less than three mi les Wide, at it s widest poi nt.
The reasons
for deciding to bui ld acr oss Ri ce Lake are obscur e. It h
as been surmi sed, withlittle documentary substantiati on, that inasmuch
as t he Pet erborough ~ Port Hope Rai lway was being proj ected at the same ti
me, it would be better, in the int erest s oftraffic, to build. the
Cobourg &Peter bor oughline sufficiently removed fr om the former so that each l ine wou
ld open up a different sect i on of t he country for l umber
devel opment. lVIoreoger, in order to avoi d the grade s which f aced the
Port Hope road, on its way out of Por t Hope , it was considered advisable
to build theline suf ficiently east so as to avoid the steepest part of
the height of land bet ween Lake Ontar i o and. the Trent River watershed.
It was felt that the added expense of a bridge across Rice Lake would be mor e
than compensated for by lower oper ating cost s ober a more ea sily graded
line. Asit turned out, however, the costs of the br i dge (Which,
incident ally, was fi nally built across the widest part of the lake) ex­c
eeded al l est imates and the Port Hope road was able to capture the ldon s
share of the Peterborough-Lake Ontario tr af fic all year r ound.
Thus, with two strikes aga inst it at the star t, the railway commen­
ced const r uction. The contract or was none other than Samuel Zilnmerman,
Viho had held many contracts for rai lway building in OntariO, and who w
as to meet his death in the collapse of the Des jardi ns Canal br i dge
whi ch, ironically enough, had been bui lt by himself. Whi l e the railway
was opened for traffic in May, 1854, Zimmerman woul d not hand it over,
claiming that the line was not yet finished. Consequentl y, in 1855,
when the stipulated three years wer e up, theline was sti l l technical ly
unfinished. 2 The contractor would give no substantial reason for his
delay, nor wouLd he make any concessi ons for improperly constructing the
br i dge over Ri ce Lake. The original plan called for a rock and gr avel causeway held in pl
ace by pi les, wi th a drawspan in the middle. Zi mmer­man
s engineers, hovrever, had underestimat ed the dept h of Ri ce Lake and consequen
tly subst ituted for the origi nal causeway, a trestle and bridge. F
urther, in an ef for t to avoid heavy (and costly) ear thworks, Zi mmer man
had built the line over the height -·of-land·bet ween Cobourg and Har wood
with 0. ruling gradient of one in thirty (3. 3%) in bot h direct ions, thus
reducing considerably the effective capacit y of the locomot i ves. Zimm­erm
an, notwithstanding the reprehensible constructi on, refused to turn
the asset s over t o the rai Lway unti l he had been paid for cxt .r-as
The Company thus tlid not get possession of the nominal ly-completed road
until l at e in 1855.
The bridge, referred to by a prominent Canadian engi neer, T.C .Clarke,
I
C.RH.A.
The Cobourg
& Peterborough Railways trestle across Rice Lake
had the distinction of being •••••
CANADAS LONGEST RAIUJAY BlUDGE
An Account by C.W. Kenneth Heard.
MAJOR OBSTACLE in the route of the Cobourg & Peterborough
Itai1way was Rice Lake, which lay athwart the path of this
pioneer line; the C. & P. R. was ihcorporated in 1852, under
the laws of the Province of Canada (16 Vic. Cap.40)lto build _
between the towns mentioned hi its title. Projected in 1852,
the railway chose a path which involved a crossing of Rice Lake, the
only appreciable body of water in the vicinity. The lake, about fifteen
miles iniliand from Cobourg, on the shore of Lake Ontario, is about 18 mi
les long and less than three miles wide, at its widest point.
The reasons for deciding to build across Rice Lake are obscure, It
has been surmised, with little documentary substantiation, that inasmuch
as the Peterborough ~ Port Hope Railway was being projected at the same
time, it would be better, in the interests of traffic, to build the
Cobourg & Peterborough line sufficiently removed from the former so that
each line would open up a different c-3ection of the country for lumber
development. Moreo~er, in order to avoid the grades which faced the
Port Hope road, on its way out of Port Hope, it was considered advisable
to build the line sufficiently east so as to avoid the steepest part of
the height of land between Lake Ontario and the Trent River watershed.
It was felt that the added expense of a bridge across Rice Lake would
be more than compensated for by lower operating costs ober a more easily
graded line. As it turned out, however, the costs of the bridge (which,
incidentally, was finally built across the widest part of the lake) ex­
ceeded all estimates and the Port Hope road was able to capture the
lehons share of the Peterborough-Lake Ontario traffic all Lear round.
Thus, with two strikes against it at the start; the railway commen­
ced construction. The contractor was none other than Samuel Zimmerman,
who had held many contracts for railway building in Ontario, and who
was to meet his death in the collapse of the Desjardins Canal bridge
which, ironically enough, had been built by himself. While the railway
was opened for traffic in May, 1854, Zimmerman would not hand it over,
claiming that the line was not yet finished. Consequently, in 1855,
when the stipula.ted three years were up, the line was still technically
unfinished. 2 The contractor would give no substantial reason for his
delay, nor would he make any concessions for improperly constructing the
bridge over Rice Lake. The original plan called for a rock and gravel
causeway held in place by piles, with a dra.wspan in the middle. Zi~ner­
mans engineers, however, had underestimated the depth of Rice Lake and
consequently substituted for the original causeway, a trestle and bridge.
Further, in an effort to avoid heavy (and costly) earthworks, Zimmerman
had built the line over the height-oof-land between Cobourg and Harwood wi
th a ruling gradient of one in thirty (3.3%) in both directions, thus
reducing considerably the effective capacity of the locomotives. Zimm­
erman, notwithstanding the reprehensible construction, refused to turn
the assets over to the railway until he had been paid for 1extrasV?
The Company thas Hid not get posseSSion of the nominally-completed road
until late in 1855.
The bridge, referred to by a prominent Canadian engineer, T.C.Clarke,
;,T _ _ .~ )~nOI~t _ 1 0~ rl-
C.E .B .A .
. ~ _ //0� Page 1~ 8
~

r~= :=).j) – .
I.
(;…-.._.~ : ..~;~P ) C.E. , as per-haps the Lori­
.-._!If I (Q)h/ // gost railway bridge on
. I( .,_ .., ; I ~~) / t his continent , and on e of
. JJ( ( (,I j ././ the largest in the wor ld113
HIAWA1H~
. .~ / -……..-/ ) \ w~s tw?-an~-six-t enths
..I,I••,,~ 0 f},tv/ () 0.1 a mi Le a.n l engt h,
.,. ~,7 /.. /j 1t!n J~ rt: , t~ ./ ~. .~l,~_, over . the wi dest part\�.1.
: ,1/ , c/ /~) / ~ of Hl ce Lake. The
!j I} / .j / – -v rail way crossed from
/ -;/� ~1[~ / . 4~ ( C$ ~:.>~ Ha.r..wood,. on,the south
/I� ~/ }f -::A .=—. shor e , to T1C(k ) rs­
fl
IJ� ./ . ……. 1 l and by a pi l e bridge�
/. l~ ._-) j 3, 754 feet in length. On
/ ~ J II/) Ti c Island it curved a . ./
~
little, t he deflect ion
-..::7 ·jflllfNrtk Pl. / —-being 2!0. Fr om t here to
=-r–/ ~ f -/ the nor t h side of the main
./c JJ–J ,//
jj
channel a di st ance of
. j./ / r/ 2, 760 f ~ et, there was a
l~ ; .__…/ 1 succession of wooden cribs
. .. / 1,.-..··<, . / / / ,::-/ lOx20! in size, sunk on
— ,I ;n SrOId./7· ~� e ~f,hty-f? ot cent r es and()K. · ,1/�_
/..?)!)� ……I j f :L.ll ed Wlth stone. These
>~) ~ ~ /!f~ : ~t/, , . served to suppor t thi r ty-f
…. /. (..,; , U)!){ . three SO- f oot Burr Truss
..B d l.-r;~ :: ~ H!.l.:f(VJOOD spans ,L-rr~ .­.
_ ,~(l1-I,.· ,.-/. , , ., ..l. )
/~
! -.–J I ,. ,… ..< , I
~
I -:..·./~–t./ . ,~. , ;: … f) /~: .. •••• In ,t~e channel, ther e was
!fV
!;fJJ (/;r:Z~ /.# ,.i { a pa,yot d~ aw on.a turn­
(0 ~ ~~. ~ ; t able II (swl.ng brLdge),
._. ~ ./ -;::;:?/ _ .-,.t,, 120 long, and suppor ted
/ ~ -by a pier 20×40! in size, giving t.wo
r
I
·,r-::. / ,.-. openings of fi fty feet each for navig­
. I ation. In or der to al l ow for a clear-
MIlts nnce of twelve feet between high water
I· !Iiildl
-I ! and the bottom of the SWi ng span,
o ~ .v..
,� allowance ther eby bei ng given to per ­mi t the pa
ssage of low barge s, et c wit hout SW
inging the bridge, the eight spa
ns on ei ther side of the dwi ng span
were inc lined at a gradient of about 1 in 70 (1.43%). Obviousl y, such a g
radient on a st ructure of this type, introducing, as it did, a hump
into what was to al l intents and purposes a wooderi trest le two-and-a­
hal f mi l es long, lef t somethi ng to be desir ed froman engineer ing point of
view. Star ting at Ti c Island, the first sevent een Bur r Truss spans
were level, then fol l owed the eight spans inclined upward, the swi ng sp
an, then the eight spans inclined downward. At this point, the end
of the tr uss bridge, another pi le trestle 6,728 feet in lengt h, simi lar to that ext endi
ng out from the south shore, connected the truss wi t h
the north shore. This north side trestle, however, was strengthened
every five hundred f eet by a crib 10×20 in size, loaded with st ones.
The
bottom of Rice Lake is bl ack mud in a semi-liquid state, and as
such afforded no support to piles. Under the mud, there was a st rat ­
um of very hard and compact sand, overlying the cl ay. The depth of
wat.e.r and mud aver aged fourt.een feet, south of Ti c Island, and si xteen fe
et between the tr uss bridge and the nort h shore. The tot al seasonal
rise and fall of the water level in the lake is six-and- one-hal f feet .
The pi
les were dr iven through the sandand in some instances, into
____ OT_-.~ )r:.r:
ort
– 1958
::;:?..-..:: :~-
r; .. .-,–~, ,rO C.E., as liperhaps the lon-
,; I : 7~/) /
., r;~-~-{ I (Q)Q // gest railway bridge on
_ – I) this continent, and one of
C.ll.B.A.
_o-
N ,
Page 128
)) / ( (,lj / / the largest in the world 113
HIJWA1H~ –~ ,. / -,, .. / / ) ftl was two-and-six-tenths
• //~ I j), / I) of a mile in length,
,,-7, /fq~ni~ ff. k~ ~ } L_ tl· d t t
,
.1/,,/ 1, \i / ~_} /,~~, -, -, over 18 Wl es par
. I C,/ / / of Rice Lake. The
.-Ij I~/ j /._-…–/…. railway crossed from
~,,/ I
/

=—-HarvlJOod, on the south
. / ~r -~~\ ,~ shore, to Tic (k) Is-
/ / , – I land by a pile bridge
I / / 1 /,) Tic Island it curved a
I. /
~ . little, the deflection
, flllil/ff-l( PI· / __ . be ing 2:!0. From there to
=-/–/ ~ ,-, Ticl<: /d, fjjj the north side of the main
~ 1./ /c ,a,J (( :0J //~/ ~~76ge}~e~, d.~~~~~c~a~f a
).J.. .,J –.,_ •. r-) 1 succession of wooden cribs
. j / I~~–, . /// …… ,.r .. _/ 1?x,201 in size, sunk on
jjrv:. Sfook ld., ,:jT/ / -~ ~J.,g,:~y-f?o: ;ent:es ~nd
( /IJ! ,) / 🙂 ~;, LL1led Wl tn >:) tonI;:;. ~hese
~I /,,1 /;::~, .~,~ 2 served to support thlrty-
.. ,- /-!f:>:~ ,~ , three 80-foot Burr Truss
~B L-Id ( /IZ~: ,:~ ~ H Ii, WOOD spans,
~~
~J)jl) /~:;,/: __ ~–L,/;;{( ( -. ,~. t,;>,:; .. In the channel, there was
!,,~I g-, () a IIpivot draw on a turn-
/! (({;;/.~./ :~ { table/ (swi.ng bridge),
,:.-/~~/… ,~, 120 long, and supported
/~r ., by a pier 20x~,O 1 in size, giving two
,~, , openings of fifty feet. each for navig-
( 0 ation. In order to allow for a clear­
i!..c! leij dl
lIHlf-.. S
I!
ance of twelve feet between high water
and the bottom of the swing span,
allowance thereby being given to per­
mit the passage of low barges, etc.,
without swinging the bridge, tho eight
spans on either side of the dwing span
were inclined at a gradient of about 1 in 70 (1.43%). Obviously, such
a gradient on a structure of this type, introducing, as it did, a hump i
nto what was to all intents and purposes a lOoden trestle two-and-a­
half miles long, left something to be desired from an engineering point
of view. Starting at Tic Island, the first seventeen Burr Truss spans
were level, then followed the eight spans inclined upward, the swing
span, then the ei.ght spans inclined downward. At this point, the end
of the truss bridge, another pile trestle 6,728 feet in length, similar
to that extending out from the south shore, connect.ed the truss with
the north shore. This north side trestle, however, was strengthened
every fi.ve hundred feet by a crib 10×20 in size, loaded with stones.
The bottom of Rice Lake is black mud in a semi-liquid state, and
as such afforded no support. to piles. Under the mud, there was a strat­
um of very hard and compact sand, overlying the clay. The depth of
VIater and mud averaged fourteen feet, south of Tic Island, and sixteen
feet between the truss bridge and the north shore. The total seasonal
rise and fall of the water level in the lake is six-and-one-half feet.
The piles were driven through the sand and in some instances, into
….;:P..:;~C.H.E.A.�
~~~s
~~)o rt -1958 . a=e 129
the
clay. Generally, they were dr iven an average of ten feet into the
sand, Driving was a difficult pr ocess, the pile not going more than
two inches at a� bLow, from rams weighi ng 18 OTt. , fal l ing thr ough forty
~

foot l eader s.
Fr om Tic Island to the Tr ent Canal channel ; the lake was deeper, a
veraging twent y-eiGht feet from lowwator-mark. The channel is thi r t y­
six feet from low wat er mark. TtL:> depth made a pi le br idge impractic­ab
le , and t he af or ementioned t russ br-Ldge VJD.S substituted. The mode of cons
truction was as fol l ows:-Four long pi les were dr iven and capped,
to bear the vertical pressur-e of the bridge, unti l the cribs would sink
to their bearings. They also served as guides for the cribs, which 2
i1
were built ar ound them, lOx20 at t he top, and battening in 12
11
at
the ends and 1 if� in 12
11
at the side s . They were made of s quare timber
above, and round t imber bel ow, the water . They were sunk to their
places through the ice in wint er, and then loaded wi th boulders col lec­ted al ong
the shore. (See accompanying diagram Figure 1).
Inspection of the accompanying Figure 2 will demonstrate the sup­port s
for the trestle. The two cent er piles (A) were v.hite oak, while
the outer pai r (B) and the spur s (C) were in most cases pine or tamarac. Th
ese wer e driven and capped with pine caps 12×12
i1.(
D) The spur piles
were driven with a leaning machine, so that thei r tops stood about four
feet from the others. They were then drawn up wi.t.h strong tackle and
secur ed with 1 1/ round bol ts. The corbels (E) were fastened to the caps
and pi l es by I II square r ag bolts th re e -and-a~half feet l ong. They were
notched an inch on the caps. The str i nger s (F) of pine, 12×181! were
secured to the corbels by I round s cr-ew bol ts . Ti es {G) of 3 oak
r~ t#I ~~
~–..
~ I I l~
z _=.—/-I I­I. –~
.:;;>. =–;.. ~ . _.
:2 towE;2. I (Jfl OI1D ~
C� • ~f­
,/ 12 · 12 II of/ I( OOt –04 -r~4~� ~1d\jji~-~ –.–­-
-Eio. ~� ~1~~ \ 1 t
l ~~;I ~
c:
MJ . I.­ 11. II­ 1/(/
, :/.;1. � 1 I !.to.
01::
~, [)L� \ ~.~I~
E,~R
,RuSS BQ 1)(;£­ PIER.
,—- _..
I
Y
;0-/ ) ,~ ~II
~~ 1\~I ~l _ r~1 ~~ . j/J \ 11A}
-:;:-_ I 1
1
I( -~ -./ _.. –, . /1-(! \~
:.::~ i ~ . …… – ( ( j I ,\~~
-:
-::: .:~~~-1f01ll l ii . ,. -I/J\) ;!J~ ~~–, .-
:
_-> _ .~_ .� ~11 lh ,-nkd (I\. ~:J .———-­–
~~~ 1 \)1\ ~t.i~ , 1 ~ . __.__..
~p~ –
j

P7 II ? � 7,\ c-­
4;—.) ! \i( .J!J~p5 U~.~~..~~~�, .. ,II~~
.-_…__…~ .- _.. ,,_.. .. –
::
,~J[%~~~ ! I! I fC(t.. jl I M.ll)lil~ 1
~~~(rff]:!J I1 IIf \ (IWDP!.D
~

C.iLE.A. __ IJ.eVJs H .. ~p0I.~~ -l..::..9..:::..5…..;;8 ________ . ___ ~P;….;a;.:;Jg~e~I_2…::…9
the clay. Generally, they were driven an average of ten feet into the
sand. Driving vvas a difficult process, the pile not going more than
two inches at a bloVJ, from rams weighing 18 cwt., falling through forty
foot leaders.
From Tic Island to the Trent Canal channel; the lake was deeper,
averaging twenty-eisht feet from low water mark. The channel is thirty­
six feet from low wcrter mark. T1.i::3 depth raade a pile bridge impracti c­
able, and the aforementioned truss brid.[e VJl:1.S substituted. The mode of
construction vvas as follows: -Fov.r l.ong piles were dri vc:m and capped,
to bear the vertical pre~3sure of the bridge, until the cribs would sink
to their bearings. They also served as guides for the cribs, which
were built around them, lOx20
f
at the top, and battening 211 in 1211 at
the ends and l11 in 1211 at the sides. They were made of square timber
above, and round timber below, the water. They were sunk to their
places through the ice in winter, and then loaded with boulders collec­
ted along the shoro. (See accompanying diagram Figure 1).
Inspection of the accompanying Figure 2 will demonstrate the sup­
ports for the trestle. The two center piles (A) were nito oak, while
the outer pair (B) and the spurs (C) were in most cases pine or tamarac.
These were driven and capped with pine caps 12×12
i1
• (D) The spur piles
were driven with a leaning machine, so that their tops stood about four
feet from the others~ They were then drawn up with strong tackle and
secured with 11/ round bolts. The corbels (E) were fastened to the caps
and piles by 111 square rag bolts threG-and-a~half feet long. They were
notched an inch on the caps. The stringers (F) of pine, 12×18
11
were
secured to the corbels by Iii round serev,] bolts. Ties {G) of 3
11
oak
}Iio. 1
o
LtJNCrITIJDI N A L Sr:~11 0 (IS
OJ::
~v;RR I~IJSS BPI))6E. .PIE8:
C.rLE . A. News ReBor t -1958
Page 130
~i~ . 2 ~ 5
1
(:, –7­
oo L.L.. L COlI0 (~
II
;/!/ —==-==-! ; ~Flb—=~~
LlI~/4r-I\til ~,-
Or-it!! I~~~ _
(
TR rJ~-rLE e> ENT E. -. Jy . ~~ I=­
L_ ~ _ v]
i .~~
<--­
])
rid. 3
6
PLA N OF J)£CK BE/WEEr,l Btrtl$ IJ;>
F
I I /
f~~~–k~;::=-~~~~~T=:7 ._..: J:::±J_-:~_I I
Z-­-__. I . !I~ w (.=;=
–;; . –=-::=::J~3·
.. r~7
./ / ril l
, , ~ (;f O~
~I
j&
I
I· ~
.I I i / ,el-
l)
II /<:4./
-.—.—-.~ ——/ …L–~.._, 1 j
I
I ~Jt:> ­
e=:t. ~::=!J.. I: :/,,.I J:; • .. I -c. <::::;d:!:;;;., c-:.;.
I .. _ J• •1.- I ~ ::.;
. .l..–L- I . P, ; II ~
, t~ ~—~ I –
I~
·—150 —-~ o
I I. KAIL
, V
— – —- f –~ I). =7.~——-
I E 1:21:1 2 ,/ :
I.
: g~l
iig. 4-11iJJl
LilVI)TI; N Of DECK ~fml ~
RICELAKE f~ETLE -C.O~oUR6 & PfTER50ROUGHR~I LiJAY
c . Ii. • H • A •. _______ –..:N.:..:::e,;::iVs::.:…..:.:R;;.Jep~o_=_rt.::..__-…….;]~. 9:…::.5..:::..8 ______ ~P:…:::a:.b..ge:::……..:::l~3 0
~
.~ 2 .ILI/
~ .. -5G –7-
.. 1,. ,
CRosS o~E(~1101~ F -?lJ4 -. —=-i\e f
T~(:6ILE ~E~T E ?-/v. ~. ~ E
i .?::,;/~ . . ( ,~ •
L : J> I
—-H.i6~~ .. -V:;;.7E7i·~··-·~· .. -;:11~T(-~v=)hk~~ ~-~-~lRI,1/.·~-~.~~.-~
4;~ !~~~I,IIP J !V~
;; !. I ~/ —–f I : I ~:~ ,
19 g iI €?I IIj iii
-~~//f -~ il);O;j ;;;;,rr~ 0;0 c~iM. ~–,IMi~~\,;—
c. 8 I:; ABC.
Fid.3
6
PLAN OF ])ECK. 6ErWE£J\ Bttv$ 1>
1)
I
I~
150—–
. ____ J:=:=
f
:::Z
===:J~
I
C
.~LH .A . News Hepor t – 1958 Page 131
pl ank, connect the ~tringer s on t op. The total cost of the bridge had
been not, far f r om ~175 , OOOH. 4
The
bridg;e was construct ed in t he summer of 1853. After the next
two or t.hree wint ers, however-, it was soon discovered that it was al ­mos
t as di f fi cult to mai ntain as i.t was to constr uct . In wi rrtcr , the
ice on Rice Lake formed to the t.hi ckness of two and one-ha l f feet. After
the ice had f Q):.~m e d, t llC:; lake uaual l.y rose some t.wo or thr ee feet; and the ic
e, being frozen to thepi les, would have the effect of a pile
clrivel in r-everso, 11or eover , extreme changes of t emper ature i n the wi
nter season would cause the ice to buckle during the day, and then
settle at night again.
In the
first winter, that of 1853-54, the for ce of the rise in the
level of the lake was suf fi cient to dravJ out a few piles near the Pet­
er borough shore, and to rai se the pile br idge north of the truss bridge
some six or ei ght inches, except whe r-e it was held down by the cribs
sunk ever y f ive hundred feet . Thus, it had a rather undulating surface
and the cont r actors were obliged to raise and bl ock up the stringers at
t.hese 10vJ points. It was proposed to prevent this raising of the ice
by put ting flash boards on the dam at Crook !s Rapid s ~ at the lower end
of Ri ce Lako, and. t.her-cby rai se it to maximum l evel before the ice
formed. In or-der to maintain a constant wat er level in the lake, if
more water fl owed i.n, it would be drained off. On one occasion that wi nter, the ice
cracked and broke the br id~e . The r esult was t hat the
two sections were out of line as much as 3b i nches.
However , in common wi.t .h most per-for-mances of a spect.acuLar, and
dramat i c nat ure, the best was yet to come, for it was on Januer-y Lst ,
1855, in the next wi nt er , that the br i.dge received it s worst bl.ow to
date. The day was warm, and the srnoot.hness of the ice was marred by
sever al ominous cracks. Because of these cracks, an ice jambegan to form in the
channel . Thisjamhad theeffect of pushingthat ice whi ch was not in the ch
annel shoreward, taking the bri df,e with it. The north
pile bridge was pushed toward the Peter borough shore, but owing to the nu
mber of cribs in it, it did not move too far . The truss bridge was pu
shed t.oward Ti c Island, so much so that the span adjacent to the island
sl id four feet up on the sol id abutment. South of Tic Island, the pile
br idge was li kewise pushed towar d the Cobourg shore. It was pushed so
far that the bri dge parted near the island, leaving a gap of seven feet.
The pi les were now leaning at a cr-azy angLe, and where the thrust met
the resistance of the shore, it cr-ushed the sol id 12×18 str i nger s , turni ng theminto sp
lintersandbending the rails doubl e. Mr .Clar k then
follows this description wi t h the signifi cant sentence: Ihls has al l been si
nCE: repaired, and the trains ar e now crossing regularly.
i15
Since Mr . Clark1s communi cati.on to the Canadian Journal is dated
April 2nd, 1855, it becomes nec essary to turn to other sources in order
to ascer tain the lat er hist or y of tho bridge. Unfor tunatel y, these are
scanty. We do not have ready acce ss to local newspapers of the period,
which mi ght throw more light on the lat er story of the bridge . Profess­
~
r Cur~i~, ,in hi~ book, _T1)e ,Gr an~ .TruI~k _Rai Lvay .of C,:-nada,6(Toronto,1957)
o.evotes t hr ee pages t o the Cobour g & Pet.er-borough RaJ_lway, but he r
estrict s his analysi s mainly t o financial and business detai l s . What t echni cal
and en~ ineering detai l s he mentions are taken fromsour ces
which I have alr eady investigated –fr om three Annual Reports extant ,
from the article of L,Tr. Cl ark, from J . M. and E.Tr out , Rai lways of Canada, and the S
tatutes and Sessional Paper s of the Legislative Assembly of
the Provinc e of Canada.
(
News It e pOl:.!:.._-_;,;.;.1..:;..9-5_8 __ . ___ -______ …;P;..,;a:::.lf;.;o.;e.::;;…..;;:;;;1,,3.;;;;.1
plank, connect the stringers on top. The total cost of the bridge had
been ilnot far from ~175,OOOil.4
The bridg;c Wi3.S constructed in thB summer of 1853. After the next
tvlO or three winters, hoveve1, i twas soon discovered that it was al­
i!iOSt as difficult to maintain as it was to construct. In winter, the
ice on Rice Lake formed to the thickness of tWD and one-half feet. After
the ice had formed, the lake usually rose some two or three feet; and
the ice, being frozen to the· piles, would have the effect of a pile·
driver in reverIii:e. Ha1eover, extreme changes of temperature in the
winter season would cau~;e the ice t:.o buckle during the day, and then
settle at night again.
In the first winter, that of 1853-54, the force of the rise in the
level of the lake ·was sufficient to drav out a few piles near the Pet­
erborough shore, and to raise the pile bridge north of the truss bridge
some six or eight inches, except v,,11ere it was held down by the cribs
sunk every five hundred feet. Thus, it had a rather undulating surface
and the contractors were obliged to raise and block up the stringers at
t.hese low points. It was proposed to prevent this raising of the ice
by putting flash boards on the dam at CrookTs Rapids~ at the lower end
of Rice Lake, and thereby raise it to maximum level before the ice
formed. In order to maintain a constant water level in the lake, if
more water flowed in, it would be drained. off. On one occasion that
~dnter, the ic~ cracked and broke the brid~e. The result was that the
two sections were out of line as much clS 3b inches.
HovJever, in cornmon with most porformances of a spectacular, and
dramatic nature, the best was yet to come, for it was on January 1st,
1855, in the next winter, that the bridge received its worst blmll[ to
date. The day was warm, and the smoothness of the ice was marred by
several ominous cracks. Because of these cracks, an ice jam began to
:Lorm in the channel. This jam had the effect of pushing that ice which
was not in the channel shoreward, taking the bridf,e with it. The north
pile bridge was pushed toward the Pl~terborough shore, but owing; to the
number of cribs in it, it did not move too far. The truss bridge was
pushed tov.rard Tic Island, so much so that the span adjacent to the island
slid four feet up on the solid abutment. South of Tic Island, the pile
bridge vras likewise pushed toward the Cobourg shore. It was pushed so
far that the bridge parted near the island, loaving a gap of seven feet.
The pilesil1Tere novJ l3a.ning at a cre.zy anele, and where the thrust met
the resistance of the shore, it crushed the solid 12×18!l stringers,
turning them into splinters and bending the rails double. Mr.Clark then
follows this description with the significant sentence: YIThis has all
been sinCE;; repaired, and. the trains are now crOSSing regularly. u5
Since Mr. Clarks communication to the Canadian Journal is dated
April 2nd, la55, it becomes necessary to turn to other sources in order
to ascertain the later history of the bridge. Unfortunately, these are
scanty. We do not have ready access to local newspapers of the period,
which might throw ;nore light on the later story of the bridge. Profess­
or Currie, in his book, T1}~_Grand Trunk Rail,vay of Canada6(Toronto,1957)
d~votes three pages to the Cobourg & Peterborough Railway, but he
restricts his analysis mainly to financial and business details. What
technical and en~ineering details he mentions are taken from sources
which I have already investigated –from three Annual Reports extant,
from the article of r-Ir. Clark, from J .M. and E. Trout, Railways of Canada,
and the Statutes and Sessional Papers of the Legislative Assembly of
the Province of Canada.
C . j.~ .H.A .� NeVIS Report .. 19.-::5~8~_ _ Page 13.2
From exami nat i on of
the Tr outs H~1.il.!~3. Y~_ of Ca.:1ada and Walling, H.F• , At
las of the Dominion o.t_Canada, Mont real , George N. Tackabury, 1875),
it appears that every winter the bridge suf fered partial destr uction.
(
The prohibitive costs of repairing and mai ntaining the bridge wer e such,
in 1857, as to force the road into bankruptcy. The bondholder s fore­c
losed and in 1858 had an Act passed. which enabl ed. them, among other
thi ngs, to take cont r ol. In January, 1860, Mes srs. Covert and Fowler
leased the line and st ar ted to build a causeway in place of the bridge,
ac
cordin~ to the or i ginal plan. It appears, however, that in the winter of
1
86 0-~1, the final blows were dealt to the improperly-built br idge by the ic
e.
In ~rr . Wall ings Atlas 7, however, it is menti oned that the bridge was b
eing reconst ruct ed in a very substantial manner under the management of
the Companys Gener al Superint endent, and engineered by Wal ter ShanlYJ the br idge was
to be reopened for traf fic in 187L-I t is highly possible� th
at that part of the embankment still in existence today8 (cf. map) dates�
fromthis attempt at reconstruction. However , it is problemati cal� wh
tJt her the bridge (or causeway, as it may now have become) was reopened.­ Ev
idence at hand indicates that the last year that the Cobourg &Pet er­­b
orough Rail way had full use of the Iii.ce Lake bridge was in the year 1860.­
J
Boldly planned but inadequately exe cuted, the Rice Lake struct ure r em
ains an i~po rt ant and ambit ious part of t he story of rail ways in Can­ada
in pioneer times; it is one of the few natural obstacles which our e
arly construction engineers, with their smal l engines and pr imit i ve
equipment , were unabl e to conquer permanently and successfully.
0000
0-00000
ED
ITORS NOTE: Mr. Kenneth Heard, Nho assembled the notes
foregoi ng, is engaged in writing a definitive histor y of the M
idland Railway of Canada, it s constituents and l
ocal cont.empor-ar Les , He woul.d be interested i n hear i ng
from 8.ny reader who might have material , such as docu­
ments or photographs, to aid him in this research. Le
tters may be addressed to him in care of the Association .
———–,
BIBL IOGlU~ PHY :
1-Statut ory Hi stor y of the St eam&El ect r i c Railways of Canada, 1836
-1937, Rober t Dorman, 2-Annu
al i ~e port of the Cobourg & Pet erborough Hai lway Company,
mentioned in Curr ie, A.VI. , ! pe Grc~Q_d Trunk Rai lway of C,s.na da , (Tor ont o,
Uni.v, of Toronto, 1957T p. 284.
3T Cl ark, T.E . liOn the Action of the Ice upon the Bridge at Rice Lake
ll
in the CStnadi an Journa:!.:., .Juno 1855, n-249.
~.-Constructional data on bridge fr om-Ibid. , p. 249
5-Ibid. , p.250.
6-Currie, A.vv. , QQ!….cit. , pp.284-6.
7-VJal l :Lng, ELF. : !~~lSl_~ of .~ll-~..l!2!n i n i o n of Ca r~~ (Mont r eal, George
N. Tackabur y, 1875~ .5 5 .
8-
Canada, Dept. of Nat ional Defense, Army Sur vey Establishment , topogr ap
hical map, ilHice Lake; sheet 31 D/l East Half, scale
1:50,000, Second Edi t i on, 1950.
(
C.le.H.A. News Re po rt .. 19·…::.i:…;G:,.. ____________ F.;,.a:.l;.F;…;, e_l..:.3:….,….2
From examination of the Trouts HC;lJ:1.l~~_of Ca_nada and Walling, H.F.,
Atlas ?f_yhe Dominion o.f~ Canada, Montreal, George N. Tackabury, 1(75),
it appears that every winter the bridge suffered partial destruction.
The prohibitive costs of repairing and maintaining the bridge were such,
in 1857, as to force the road into bankruptcy. The bondholders for$­
closed and in 185fi had an Act passed which enabled them, among other
things, to take control. In January, 1860, Messrs. Covert and Fowler
leased the line and started to build. a cau.seway in place of the bridge,
accordin~ to the original plan. It appears, however, that in the winter
of 1860-01, the final blows were dealt to the improperly-built bridge
by the ice.
In
Ik. iJallings Atlajl7, however, it is mentioned that the bridge
was being reconstructed in a very substantial manner under the management
of the Company1 s GenereS.1 Superintendent, and engineered by Walter Shanly;
the bridge was to be reopened for traffic in l87L
i
-It is highly possible
that that part of the embankment still in existence today8(cf. map) dates
from this attempt at reconstruction. However, it is problematical
wh-ether the brid.ge (or causeway, as it may now have become) ias reopened.
Evidence at hand indicates that the last year that the Cobourg & Peter­
borough Railway had. full use of the Hice L~3ke bridge was in the year 1860.
Boldly planned but inadequately executed, the Hice Lake structure
remains an important and ambitious part of the story of railways in Can­
ada in pioneer times; it is one of the few natural obstacles which our
early construction engineers, with their small engines and primitive
equipment, were unable to conquer permanently and successfully.
00000-00000
EDITORS NOTE: Mr. Kenneth Heard, who assembled the notes
foregoing, is engaged in writing a definitive history
of the rViidland Railway of Canada, its constituents and
local contenporaries. He would be interested in hearing
from any reader who might have m<:lterial, such as do cu­
ments or photographs, to aid him in this research.
Letters may be addressed to him in care of the Association.
——–,
BIBLIOGli.APHY:
1-Statutory History of the Steam & Electric Railways of Canada, lS36
-1937, Robert Dorman,
2-Annual 1~E3port of the Cobourg & Peterborough Hailway Company,
mentioned in Currie, A. J • l !he GraQd T:r:1.mk Railway of Canada, (T
oronto, Univ. of Toronto, 1957;p. 284.
31 Clark, T.E. nOn the Action of the Ice upon the Bridge at Rice
Lake 11 in the Canadian Journal, ,June 1855, p. 249.
4-Constructional data on bridge from-Ibid., p.249
5-Ibid., p.250.
6-Cuii::ie, A.~v., 2J2.!….cit., pp.284-6.
7-Walling, H. F .: !~tl<2-_~ of .!-11..~ Dc:mini.;..C?n of Canada (Montreal, George
N. Tackabury, l875J,P.55.
8-Canada, Dept. of National Defense, Army Survey Establishment,
topographical map, Rice Lake ii, sheet 31 D/l East Half,
scale 1:50,000, Second Edition, 1950.
——
C•It •I-I 9 il .­News Re ~ort -1 95~
l
_._.._-_..•–~.-
Page 133
D
uring the third week of Septem­
CAlJADI~!J PAC IF~.r c l1A.•n..J.!.JA.-Y RE;I ~~I ber, Canadi.an Paci.fi c Railway
(
off i cial car No.38 was withdrawn
.. VAN HOHNE S BU :J~.~ ~ :C:3 S_~~R .__J
from service outof Tor ont o, wher e
it had been assigned for the use of the
Superintendent , Trenton Division, Ontario Di st r ict . In
lieu of a nondescript fat e ~t the scrap dock, the railway com
pany doriat.ed the car to the Canadi.an Iia.iLr-oad Historical Asso
ciation, for preservation as a personal monument to Si r
VJi l l iam Cor nel i us Van Horne, for whose use the car was built
in ISS), and as a particularly fi ne spe cimen of the rai lway
off i cial car in it s golden ago. The Edi torial Commi t tee feels
it appr opr iate to present, at this time, the st ory of the car
Saskat chewan, as it was by this name that it was known o
riginally, and by which it wil l be knOillIl hereafter, as an
impor t ant accessi on to the Associations rolling stock collecti on .
ii� OURTRIPHASNOTHINGTO DO wi.t .h the openingoftheroad. It� is
just the pl ainest ki nd of a bus iness trip. Just the usual� t
rip of inspe ction before the wi nt er sets in. T l~r e has always,� g
ot t o be a general clearing up before winter comes on . We�
int end goi.ng to Briti sh Col umbia, but cannot say whether we wi l l� pa
ss ovor the line befor e or after the last spike, about which� you ap
pear to be so anxi ous, is driven. No, 1
1m
sure I canlt�
say who will dr i ve the last spike. It may be Tom Mularky or�
Joe Tubby, and the only ceremony that I fan cy may occur will be�
the damni ng of the for eman for not dr i ving it quicker. TtIer e�
will be no conc luding ceremony, no nonsense. Some roads may�
like to adver t i se by making a great fuss, but we do not car e�
for that sort of thing. 11�
So spoke 3i r Wi l l iamCornelius Van Horne, Vi ce Pr esi dent and
Goneral Manager of the Canadian Pacific Rai lway, to a reporter of the
dinni peg iI],1anitoban
i1 ,
on Oct ober 31st , 1885 , as he ar r ived by special
train from Mont .r-caL en route to the Pacific coast in antici pat ion of the
completion of the line. Accompanied by the soon-to-be Lord St rat hcona
and Mount Hoyal , Donal d A. Smith, and by Sandford Flemi ng, Mr. Ha.rris
of Blake Bros . & Co . , Doston, a direct or, and Henry Abbott, manager of const r uc
tion on the eastern section, the distinguished party occupied the Cana
dian PacifiC pr i vate of ficial car s Met apedta il and Saakat chcwan11
whi ch, accompanied by a baggage car, made up the speci al train whi ch vlas
destined to be the first to cross Canada from the Atl antic to the Paci fic.
One week lat er, on Satur day, November 7t h, 18e5, at alittle aft er
nine oYcl ock in the morning, the special train ar r i ved at that spot in
the Gold Range of the Sel ki r k Mount ai ns, si.nce hal l owed by the name Cr
aigellachie, which mar-ked the joining of the rai ls from the Atlantic
and the Pacifi c. Havi.ng an appointment VIith hist ory of which, if we
are to accept Sir VIill:l.am Van Horne I s word, they had no previous inti.m­a
tion, Donald Smi th, Van Hor ne and Sand.ford Fl eming stepped down fr om t he
ilSaskat chewan
ll
to see the last spike dr iven. The appear an ce of Smit h set tled any q
uest Lor; whi ch mi ght have arisen as to whom the task of h
onour would befal l . As the seni or in years and exper i ence among the promot
ers, it was only natur al that he should perform the function
whi ch wouLd make t.ho Canadian Pacific an accomplished fact. Courageous- . l
y, Smith took the hammer, and af ter one false start, we are told,
drove home the last spike. In the words of Sandford Fleming:
(
C, It. 1-_1~. _,_, _____ ._._ .. ___ News HS~120I1…_-19 5~
Page 133
—————~
l
i CANADIA~J PACIF::,rc HAII)!,,TAY RETIRES
V AN HOHNE f S BU:)nn:;,~:3S CAR
…. -_ ….. —><-_._-
During the third week of Septem­
ber, Canadian Pacific Railway
official car No.38 was withdrawn
from service out of Toronto, where
it had been aS3igned for the use
of the Superintendent, Trenton Division, Ontario District. In
lieu of a nondescript fate ~t the scrap dock, the railway company
donated the car to the C:::Ln.Ci.dian Hailroad Historical
Association, for preservation as a personal monument to Sir
vJilliam Cornelius Van Horne, for v:lhose use the car was built
in 1883, and as a particularly fine specimen of the railway
official car in its golden age. The Editorial Committee feels
it appropriate to present, at this time, the story of the
car t1Saskatchewan
i1
, as it was by this name that it was known
originally, and by which it will be knoATIl hereafter, as an
important accession to the Associations rolling stock collection.
OUR TRIP HAS NOTHING TO DO with the opening of the road. It
is just the plainest kind of a business trip. Just the usual
trip of inspe ction before the vvinter sets in. There has always,
got to be a general clearing up before winter comes on. We
intend ,going to British Columbia, but cannot say whether we will
pass over the line before or after the last spike, about which you
appear to be so anxious, is driven. No, Im sure I cant
say who will drive the last spike. It may be Tom rvlularky or
Joe Tubby, and the only ceremony that I fancy may occUr will be
the damning of the foreman for not driving it quicker. T~ere
will be no concluding ceremony, no nonsense. Some roads may l
ike to advertise by making a great fuss, but we do not care
for that sort of thing. 11
So spoke Sir William Cornelius Van Horne, Vice President and
General Manager of the Canadian Pacific Railway, to a reporter of the
Uinnipeg iYManitoban
11
, on October 31st, 1885, as he arrived by special
train from Ivlontreal en route to the Pacific coast in anticipation of the
completion of the line. Accompanied by the soon-to-be Lord Strathcona
and TIount Hoyal, Donald A. omith, and by Sandford Fleming, Mr. Harris
of Blake Bros. & Co., Doston, a director, amI Henry Abbott, manager of
construction on the eastern section, the distinguished party occupied t
he Canddian Pacific private official cars iqIetapedia 11 and IISaskat chewan 11
which, accompanied by a baggage car, made up the special train -which vIas
destined to be the first to cross Canada from the Atlantic to the Pacific.
One week later, on Saturday, November 7th, 18e5, at a little after
nine oYclock in the morning, the special train arrived at that spot in
the Gold He,nge of the Selkirk Mountains, ;:5ince hallowed by the name Cr
aigellachie, which rilarked the joining of the rails from the Atlantic
and the Pacific. I-raving an appointment Hi th history of which , if we
are to accept Sir William Van Hornes word, they had no previous intim­
ation, Donald Smith, Van Horne and Sand.ford Fleming stepped down from
the ilSaskatchewan
Yl
to see the last spike driven. The appearance of
Smith settled cUly queE3tion which might, havo arisen as to whom the task
of honour would befall. As the senior in years and experience among t
he promoters, it was only natural that he should perform the function
~Jhich would make the Canadian Pacific an accomplished fact. Courageous-. ly,
Smith took the hammer, and after one false-start, we are told,
drove home the last spike. In the words of Sandford Fleming:
I
,.,..–….�
;0
!
,
i
~j
— _._-._ —–_._—_ ._._ —-_._—-

f
,
I /~~:.~-:: . ~·~L-:it ~.J l~ 8 GJ –c -J ~1 ~:H.£1 g:J eLf =c:=:ldb–·_gj~~.::t:~
I
~~. •• -:;: …., : —•.1 . -..: = j —,• ..; .•—;-<::.;<;:;:::~:. -,._. ~ --.. = - .-..--ir ~
ii r ;-:-,-:–l r ,,.n 11 I ;-:1111-;;-1 I r;;-; ~I -T T07li li~-f11 ~/,-rlll rh7 -(II}I·fl
:l i~=—–I —-;;11 -, -I : 11 1 1,1 i li l IL: _~..1 . 2]11 1- ., , -~ 11!1r== ·Ii

r
~
ffiX I~ :·:-· l~~~–~~Q~Ji;l~~~~__:~~_:~~I_P_~~~:_~_!J._)~~ . . _~ ii~.}~~~ i!~:_._ ._~_~_. J~~ _~!.:..l. ~~~~.
i3.II
-I II,,, I t:.. II I) 1/ 1,:4, f • !
r 11,1 I llll! 1 , , s -….. St-<;.:>..–.:::.-;l-. = v-.··/.:>-, ,……. ! ,j, Pi !! 1,111
11
1i :1 III I i~
i !,J.3!�
…!.o…..–l. , t II IIII ,. .j , I.,
L— t , ~11 ~.,_. _I ! f~ tl l. ,. I i. ; ,-,
I j ,P ;F
/..–_1. / ….f) ····-L· .. · · I· · · ~ cl i J~~..~=:~ . ~D-.1–. : _–:~
,—,( /,1 / ! tt!.-.–_:==,,-=.:,:,. (/ . ( . . i __ –> I EIIf5_ ~-i1
L-__ I n —–2r 1—->:-·t -·)— —.-.- i: i. .L __.+ _ 1._-+ .+ L-.-i

—–c.-… , «: –.5+./ –+./ –.—-.— —. —– -_.- — ..~ .~ –..!..r J!
!
~I~
I ~. 5~ -~. SY ,;d. ~ iII!
j
.. . 4I ~ !KuCK e e:-iiTR t: ~ II I -=j ICD
,

~-_._—-_ .–._ – -.,. 0 ._._ -. ~
.. -t l ;C T L wtt t. f; I.·a ~ Sof: -II I
~
~—-_ . __-•.~.4_–••-. -;,,-o :;—–!~~=s·————–.
I
–…-..3-…:.3 :! :::::JI
l~ ~
~
!_-. _ 67 o~ . ~i{, h (IN6 P L JIIo–es –~--
z:
H CD
CJ U
I
,H 0
, ~~·-·l Lo?~- · ?T: k 1 ~=zEL
.. … (72 :-d ., !iF i :::.:~;~. c :-·,rl~~~:=-~r–}.! II ,,::-:;, C:;.C· ~ ! I ! ,,….
)
.—… Q:·I ,I :
!j I1 , ~ .; A I • /r -, , , r ,
e·G /! ~J< i~ lrif I: i \_-:-:=- j ,!I: I I 11 1!I ;I 1\
/ 1
l~l
1- I) . .J .::..:-. _ _..-1 I~L~ vrJ! ~, <..... .-/IL... ,..llj; ·
/ I . i:(k l,fj . , I __I —..–,–_ I I
—J —I I I I-…..
.~ I_! ! ,–_. / :.:: l·! ­
, I [(.:,0 10. .. 1. ! .. I-II C.tlEr-! 1I
I
5,v!i — –…….. ~ t] s�
—,…
I
I
X . r II I I I :./ , .=. ~–::> ij i ;J 0/
4I / O I, Sf:: Ry f(iI i) I ~ ROOM .
.
/
I .(. ij/(;; . ! ij
lL .I l>~( ~,;:, !–=c~ , – IIII : <. I
I I ;.,_…….-llF~-..,,—==;{ i I 1 ,I tfV/…. R, •.__……, .
, .-.. ..—rrr: »: 1 1 I / I
It.._ Hlf:-==.–~–::c…_~. L . I!.. ~.! ·r . -,_. ])i ~j I IV~ « OO!o
i I
p,-.—II-_ …./
I –. ~–_..-… ! . l.. . s l ~ . .. r—— –….

:Pl )
t-l et
o

;::;j /!_J
~D
Vi
CJ)
co.
~

, I C/)
I l iWJ ~b-jJ Lt. rH;··~J l ljl ~ ~i( !f ·:I ~Ll~
….(,. . j—- r Oo i[-J I ?-:::

__
:./1 /
I . 1., ~ . fl6 1:: , _.•. _ I
,I I ~— — — :, . II, !! .J I
::=;.1 ._. _ c .. ~ , !_
d -… .. .. Z.;I, ; ,; ….,.,. .~. .. ….,.. ~
1·~..L.. ……L:=..L. !I• .:….-~,O?Z<:Zt.Z,-.:d!.2, (:700... >;.2d?j _ -J… …!J
I~

b
H_
;:J>
,
I
0, I
~-.:….. I
>1
~

~I

23
~-j
~~
~

~

1
DI.i) U 6 1
lllTfl
i,)1ft N !::Y
W£.f,Hi :
6c S M it H ,
11-=10 0 0 Lrt:. _
D1­ Nior.l;,. O~IO ~ U-£ .A
MARcH 2N l 1 5S~,3 })HI1IEREll 1o CW. PA C. «Y .
/;,IIYli:n Sfl5.-( f i cN. £ W A N ·/
j t,,, . IlTl-I 1<;l.t~J KE.i ;.,YlG L AlIl<.c N A I-J
NnVCMBER Z7 i H .. Glut:. E,Ec:..·
AUloI.l5-r l.3Rl> 1929 f :. NI! r-l,e.L l f$
,

I~
I~
I
_ ___
Cn~ ~Il l flit RiIlRoiil k1,,-InEI[n L l1Oc~ tL
RilLIA:-i 1)1(161C1\ –KClLllNCr s-r ()~ K. Dr:.P1
IYONTR C:: A L _
J
DCfO& R 14 ,H 1£).55.< PR [~ E I ~f r: ll -ro CF1 NI1DiAtJ R~~ l lR.Of b
.n :>MKrC . .,.
I- )TOIMAL A~IL
~
I
__I
—;
}.J
Jt1
([)
.1-
..0
.+:­
f
,
!
I
I
Cnt~fDIP.N K!llR)liJ tiOFILAL P6StL . J
KiIL1A:-/ 1)( 16101\ -K{)LUN<:r ::-r()Q.K 1lEP/
IYIO N r~ e At…. •
——————-
Jt, .. 1_ IlTIoi 1~-6 KE_M·)/Ylii, LAu!(.i:.IIIAr.J
Nnv,,-, e,E: R 27 il1 ) .. Q u £. E,E.c:.
AuGI.l5-r l.?JRD ;929 F-E.IiU rMJ .. D·Clb&R 1411-1 1955..< PRl:bEI~-rr:ll 10 CFlNtlD1Af.J R~~IU?_Oflb HIJTot RtcNAN~D :::>~.SKA-rCil1:. i
I
i31I
I 1i1.1J!
I -.. ~;..
t -;:P Of
I 1£:1115
,
~I
I;;
I!-<]
I~
~
I
I
I
b H
I
;:t.~
,
0
I
~J
:;>
I
~
I
!o ~
l-:rj CD
[0
~
en
I~
~
Q
,H 0
I~
1
ct
0 I
>-
~j I-
,.0
C.H. H.A.�
_
News
.::.:::.L •.

_ _ ._..__ • •
_IJ5
~_____•
ILo~o r·L 195d­ Pag§ _
ilThe wor k was car-r-Led on in si lence. Nothing was heard but the rever­be
rati.ons of t.he:bl oVls struck by him. It was no or dinary occasion; the
(� scene was in every respect notewor t hy, from the ,::T OUP S which composed it ar
and the ci.r-curnst.anccs whi.ch had brought together ~3 0 many human beings
to this spct in t he heart of t he mountains , unt, il rec ently an unt racked
solitude . .1
In the ensui ng sev3nty-three years, all of the human act or s in the
drama of Craigellachie have passed beyond t hei r mor t al span. The inati-· im
ate occessories of the seene have all but gOne. The spike, and the
maul which drove it home were treasured possessions for many years after ­w
ard, but they havesinc e been lost. Tho little uni dent i f ied engine,
whose spiral of steam from a singing safety val ve spelled the defiance of
civilization at the si lent mount ain bar r iers of Eagle Pass, whi Le the
spike was driven, has beeri scrapped these many year s. Thebaggage car, also
unidentified, L3 i?ono too, as 11aE3 the President f s car, Met.apedLa Ii,
which was burned at Pri.ncet.on, Br iti sh Columbia, in 1925.
All that remains of the historic set ting, are the mount ain crests
of the Cold Range, and the pr ivate car IiSaskatchewan1, presently No.38, now pas
sing into retirement at the venerable age of seventy-five and a h
alf years .
The
ilSa~, kat cheitmnll is easf.Ly t he most notable of al l of t he private
car s whi.ch have been owned by the Canadian Pacifi c Rai lway Company. Af t
er ;Jir iHl li tJ.m Van Horne had been engaged in 1882 to direct the work of co
nstr uction of the railway across the prai r ies
1
the company pl aced an
order with the fi rm of Barney &Smith, of Dayton, Ohio, U_S.A. , a wel l ­known company
of high reput e who had cont Ta cts to bui ld many of the rail­
way s first passenger train cars. In the construction of this uni t, the
builders excelled. The inside and outside finish was of mahogany, and it was t
urned over to the Canadian Pacific Rai lway, complet ed, on Mar ch 2nd, la83,
assigned to Van Horne.
One of the first impor t ant t.asks which the car was called upon to
perf orm, was the t .r-anspor-tat i.on of MI, Van Hor-ne, and a gr oup of railway
officers and distinguished Europeans to Calgary, upon the opening of the
li ne to that point. This was in August, 1883. Accompanied as usual by
the car Met.apedLa if , the trai n s important passengers included, in
addi tion to George Stephen, the rai Lway Pr-esi.derrt, Van Horne and other of
ficer s, Prince Hohen1ohe of Germany, Vice Admiral Count Gl eichen,
tho Earl of Latham, Lor d El phi nst one and Lor d Castlet own. It is of int­
erestin passing to notothat thistrainleftthe BonaventureStation of
the Grand Trunk i.-1ailway, on Tuesday, August 21 , 1883 for the tri p to Calg
ary, rat her than from the CPH stat ion in the east end of the city,
at Dalhousie Square. The departure from Bonaventure took pl ace as it
was necessary to go via G_T_R. to Toronto, Port Huron and Chicago , thence
to St.Paul and the l ~ci.n i t oba bor der by t he St .Paul , Mi nneapol i s & Manitoba . Canad
ian Pacific lines wore used from Emer son to Winnipeg and thence to Calga
ry. fhe Canadi.an Pacifics own line around the north shore of Lake
,super ior flas not finished unti l May, 1885.
In the hectic years of construction, 1883, 1884 and 1885, the car
ii,saskat chewan VIas ovcrywher-e wi th t.ho indomit able Van Horne. It was
his office on the road, fromwhich wont fort h instructions on all phases of the
construction work. It was the haven to whi ch he retreated for r
est and nutrition periodically, but not of nece ssity coincident with
the fall of night , or the occurrence of a conventional meal time.
(
C.H.H.A. News Ro~ort -195j
_____ …. ____________ .:::..:::..L __ …… .., ….. ______ … ____ •
liThe vvork vms cctrrirj(l on in silence. Nothing was heard but the rever­
burat ions of t.he: blovIs struck by him. It was no ordinary 0 ccasion; the
scene was in every respect noteworthy, from the !troups which composed it ar
and the circUIrl[5tancc3 v.rhich had brought toget!J.er ~30 many human beings
to this sp(b.t in the heart of the:; mountains, l,lnt il r(2cently an u.ntracked
solitude. 1/
In the ensuing sev3nty-three years, all of the human actors in the
drama of Graigellachio have passed beyond their mortal span. The in~ti­
imate occessories of the seene have all but gone. The spike, and the
maul which drove it home were treasured postessions for many years after­
ward, but they have since been lost. The little unidentified engine,
whose spiral of stoam from a singing safE~ty valve spelled the defiance
of civilization at the silent mountain barriers of Eagle Pass, while the
spike was driven, haG be~~n scrapped. these many years. The baggage carl also
unidentified, is gone too, as has the Presidents car, iYfJIetapedia
rl
,
which was burned at Princeton, British Columbia, in 1925.
All
that remains of the hi~3toric setting, are the mountain crests
of the Gold Hange, and the private car liSa skat chewan 11, presently No. 38, now p
assing into retirement at the venerable age of seventy-five and a ha
lf years ..
The lISa~,kat cheirJan 11 is easily t:.he most notable of all of the private
cars v,rhich have been Ql.;vned by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Af
ter ;3ir VJillicun VelD Horne had been enf£aged in 1882 to direct the work
of construction of the railway across the prairies, the company placed an
order with the firm of Barney & Smith, of Dayton, Ohio, U.S.A., a well­
known company of high repute who had contracts to build many of the rail­
ways first passenger train cars. In the construction of this unit, the
builders excelled. The inside and outside finish was of mahogany, and
it was turned over to the Canadian Pacific Railway, completed, on March 2nd, l
S83, assigned to Van Horne.
One of the first important task,s which the car was called upon to
perform, was the transporta.tion of Mr, Van Horne, and a group of railway
officers and distinguished Europeans to Calgary, upon the opening of the
line to that point. This was in August, 1883. Accompanied as usual
by the car ilMotapedia ii, the train! s important passengers included, in
addition to George Stephen, the railway P:cesident, Van Horne and other o
fficers, Prince Hohenlohe of Germany, Vice Admiral Count Gleichen,
the Earl of Latham, Lord. Elphinstone and Lord Castletown. It is of int­
erest in passing ta note that this train left the Bonaventure Station
of the Grand Trunk t1ailway, on Tuesday, August 21, 1883 for the trip to
Calgary, rather than from the CPR station in the east end of the city,
at Dalhousie Square. The departure from Bonaventure took place as it was
necessary to go via G.T.R. to Toronto, Port Huron and Chicago, thence
to St.Paul and t:.he lTc::.nitoba border by the St.Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba. Canadi
an Pacific lines wore used from Emerson to Winnipeg and thence to
~algary. IEhe CanadL.:i.n Pacific! S ovm line around the north shore of Lake
,superior Vias 1l.Ot finished until r.~ay, ISS 5.
In the hectic years of construction, lSS3, 1884 and lSS5, the car
ii,saskat chewanilwD..s everyvvhere with the indomitable Van Horne. It was
his office on the road, from which went forth instructions on all phases
of the cOD.struction work. It was the hD.von to which he retreated for
rest and nutrition periodically, but not of necessity coincident with
the fall of night, or the occurrence of a converrtional meal time.
C . H .~ H .I1..!….__ N.ews Repo!t -1958� Pa ee 13
=.:…..:_ ­
This, indeed, was the man char a cterized in later years as aillmman
(�
dynamo!, and t he Saskat.chewan met t he demands of this man among men, unfa
ilingly. rhe yeE,1 H585 was a busy one for the IISa skat chewanil, as
the ra i ls fr om W
inni peg stretched fart.hcr-and fart h er avJay across the
boundl ess expanse of the prairie, toward the sinuous st ret ch of iron
~li ch was r eaching slowly up the canyons of the Fraser and the Thompson.
Headquar t ers and ra ilhead stretched farther and fart her apar t , now a
mat.tcr- of many hun dr-eds of ml Les , Ih o number of t i.mes that the iYSask­
atchcwan poLdshed this t.r-ansccnt.Lnont.aL steeL is ATithout number . 1885
saw trips to t hc ea st, too ; the l1 ~3 (.lSkc:tt chowan cooled its heel s in
Ot.t.awa whil e its ma st er aLdo d hi s fe Ll.ovr di rectors i n trying to coax
ad
ditional aid from a reluctant government . The outbreak of the se cond N
orth ~iJest Rebel l i on, aLl.owt.ng the company to prove i t s potent ial wor t h
by s
ending tr oops ar ound the north shore of Lake Superior over an unf i n­
ishedline, prompted tho classi c suggest ion afterward that the rai lway
s
hould have er e cted c;: monument, t o Louis Riel .
Hitherto the Saskat.chewan travel led between VJinni peg rand l/Iontreal
,� , J.:. _ I
by vJay of Ch i ca go, using the GTR in Canada. The Eastern Section of the
C.
P.It., howcvcr , was comp.letod i n May 1885, when the rai ls were connect ed
at Noslo, Ontario, on the north shore of Lake Super ior near Schreiber .
It was now only 0. question of time. The Canadian Pa cific would be fin­
ished; with renewed vi gour, the work went ahead dur i ng the summer of 1885•
.?i nally, in the last week of October, the Sa skat chewanII, trw iJIvIetapedi a
ii
.
and their di stinguished car-go lef t Montreal for iJinni pc;g and Cr-a i.gel.La chde ,
and thG event which wa s Q8scr i bGd at the beginn ing of thi s arti cle.
Stc:.ndil1G on the back pLat.form of the iiSaskatchewan
il
as his train pre­
p
ared t o Leav e VJinnipcg, Van Horne said, II ••••anyone who warrt s to see
7
J
-h , Laat -dr Lv_ en wi.Ll, have ..G,:-to pay . fu.l..l…L c. .� d. spi.ke) . _ I.. _ far eU l ..l. (….. _� vJ . cl v 11
On November [5th, 1885, the il3a skatchewani wa s i n the first train to
ar ri ve at Port MJody on the Pacif ic Coast, af ter having travel led thr ough
f rom east er n Canada by r a i.L , The pa s s engers in the n:i;etapedia
il
and the
iS ;::l ~;)k :c t chevJan ( were the first to en joy the Rocky IJIount ain panorama as it
unfoLds fr-om a t.r-an s cont incnt.al passengur train, that jour ney from Calgar y
through to Vancouver which continues to delight and impres s thousands
upon thousands of tourists each year.
Th
ereafter, the cartravaI led the length and breadt h of the system
on Van Horne ts inspect ion trips. He retained the use of thi s car through
his Presidency, which lasted f ro ~ 1888 t o 1899, and continued thr ough
him Chaf.r-manahi.p, fr-ora 1899 until he resigned, on a p.l.ca of advanced age,
i n the spri ng of 1910. Dur i ng this period , the ilS,?skatch(.;wan
d
carr ied
many dist i nguished visitors, incl uding t.he Marqui s of Lorne and Pr i n cess
Louise, when they t .r-avcl l.ed to ::,;uebec, leaving Canada at t.hc end of thei r
vice-reGency. It was duri ng this t Lmo, t oo, t.hr.t. Sir ~H l l i ,:;,I:1 Van Horne
experienced the fastest tr ainride of hi s li fe. This Dccur red in August,
1906, when , sceki.ng t o t est t he speed po esLbi Li.t.Lcs of engi ne 832, a
4-6-0, a special tr ain cooposed of the engine, a baGGage car, the ilSask­
atchewani and ano t her private car at tai ned a spead of 79 ~ c.p.h. near
BClgat, Manitoba. Upon arrival in Wi nni peg, it is recorded that the crew joined I,
lr. Van Horne; f :)r :..ii nncr in the ISa sk,::,,:tchowan
Y1
to cel ebrate the
occas i;n, which the Chai.rraan aLvrays considered to be a mi lestone in hi s
l
ifc. Duri ng thuse y ccr-s , the ilS::.skat chcwan 1 wa s sarfed by a coloured
nan, Jir.lLlie Fr en ch, who was Van Hor-ne 1s major–domo and companion on tho
road f or many years. i:Ic~ny of those event s ar-e chroni cled i n -­
Vaughan , vlo.ltoT -liTHE LI FE AND VTOHK OF EHH l I LLI PJvI VAN I-IORNEi , New York,
The C
entur y CD. , 1920. ( t . 139
con a.nucu
1
on page J
C • Ii . II 0 11 • _____ I(ews Repo!,t -1958 Pape 136
Cd -… ~_
This, indeed, was the man characterized in later years as aiihuman dynamo
il
, and the ilSaska·tchevvan
ii
met the demands of this man among men,
unfailingly. rhe yecH 1885 was a busy one for the iISaskatchewanil, as
the rails from Winnipeg stretched farthcr and farther away across the
boundless expansE:} of thc; prairie, tov.rard the sinuous stretch of iron
which was reaching slov-.r1y up th3 canyons of the Fraser and the Thompson.
Headquarters and railhead stretched farther and farther apart, now a
matter of many huncirC9ds of miles. The; number of tiInes that the ;13ask­
atchuwan polL3heci this transcontin0ntal st2el is without number. 1885
S8.1d trips to tLl.e (:;ast, too; thel~3f.lskc:tt ChCiATClp
il
cooled it s heels in
Ottawa while its master aiG.ed his 10110) directors in trying to coax
ad~itional aid from a reluctant government. The outbreak of the second
:North ~18st Robellion, allowing the company to prove its potential worth
by sending troops around the north shore of Lake SUperiot over an unfin­
ished line, promptud tho classic suggestion afterward that the railway
should have erected a monument to Louis Riel.
Hitherto, the ,1Saskatchewan travelled between VJinnineg and Montreal
. LI
by vJay of Chicc:~go, using the GTR in Canada. The Eastern Section of the
C.
P.n.., howGvc:~r, was compl,3tocl in May 1885, when tho rails were connected
at Nos1o# OntariO, on the north shore of Lake Superior near Schreiber.
It was now only a question of time. The Canadian Pacific would be fin­
ished; with renewed vigour, the work went ahead during the summer of 1885.
}inally, in the last fleek of October, the iIS.£lskatchewan7, th8 illvletapedia
i
! .
anu. their distinguished cargo left Montreal for VVinnipc;g and Craigellc:.i.chie,
and the event ifjhich was described at the beginning of this article.
Stcmdi:1.g on the back platform of the iiSa$katchewan
il
as his train pre-
pured to l;;ccv(j :;vinnipcg, Van I·forne said, 11 •••• anyone who VJants to see
(tht,; last spike) driven will he.vo to pay full fare. 11
On November [5th, 1885, the iI3Clskatchow.::mii v.,ras in the first train to
arrive at Port MJody on the Pacific Coast, aftor having travelled through fr
om eastern Canada by rElil. The passengers in th8 lI:~etapediQ i? Qnd the
IlS
c
.. ;;;,kctche1flan
n
were tho first to onjoy the Rocky liIountain panorama as it
unf81dsfroLl a tr::.nscontinental passenger train, that journey from Calgary
through to Vancouver which continues to delight and impress thousands
upon thousands of tourists each year.
Thor
oafter, the car travelled the length and breadth of the system
on Van Hornets inspoction trios. He retainod the use of this car through
his Presidency, which lasted fror:J. 1888 to 1899, and continued thrDugh
hiw Chairmanship, froD 1899 until he resigned, on a plea of advanced age, in
the spri.ng of 1910. During this period, the l1So.skatchowan carried
E1t::.ny distinguishci visitors, inclucling thE: Marquis of Lorne and Princess
Louise, ilion thoy travelled to Quob~c, leaving Canada at the end of their
vicG-rogoncy. It wa.s durin!.::; this t inw, too, th2t Sir ~·Jilli.:~tO Van Horne
o 1 l.p t 0 01 r> h
O
10f 1 0 r! A .L
oxperlcnccc. t 10 J.. astest rc:un rli e Oi • lS . l· e. OlS occurroJ, In ugus l,
1906, when, sec,king to tost the speed pDssibilities of engine 832, c:
4-6-0, ~ special train cooposed of the engine, a baggage car, the 113ask­
atchowan
il
and another private car attained a speed of 79~ c.p.h. near B
agot, Manitoba. Upon arrival in WinnipeG~ it is recorded that the crew joi
ned I,lr. Van Horn8 f:Jr .. linner in tho ISask,:,:tchewan! to celebrate the
o
ccElsi.:.,n, which tho Chairnc..n always considered to be a milestone in his
lif u. During these YOD.rs, the ilE.L:, .. skat chowan 11 was scrfed by a coloured
Ew.n, Jimnie i~rench, who vms Van Horne 1 s lTIc..jor-domo and companion on the
road for Elc..ny years. l:1c~ny of these events E1.re chronicled in —
Vaughan, vJalter -THE LIFE AND VTORK OF EHR HLLIPJIfI VAN I-IORNE!?, New York,
T
he Cont ur,r Co., 1
0
20.
:/ (continued on page 139)
,9.l1.H.A.� News Report -1958 Page 137
Bvery change of t imet
able results in further
l
~lH :r~ CHA I~Qj~ OF TIME decimation of Canadi an Passenger s chedul es , ON CA
NADIAN RAILWAYS al though there is a tendency to eliminate
{
OCTOBEH 26, 1958 tr ains dur ing the course of the summer as wel l .

Here is a summary of pr i ncipal changes in pass­enger tr
ains si nce April 26th, not incl uding chang
es made at that ti me:
CANADIAN NATIONAL -CRArID TRUNK WESTERN� Days
Date�
Train No. Type From To Operated Removed�
340 M
ixed Owen Sound Park Head Ex. Sun. June 21
11­ If It
339� Par k Head Owen Sound
Ii­ IIi1
x337-341� P
ark Head vViar t on
Yl� it iT
x336-338
iTiart on Par k Head
34 Ps
gr. Montreal Her vey Ex. Sat. Aug. 11
n
33� Herv
ey Hont r eal Ex.Sun .&Mon.

Ii­ 11
21� Quebec Senneterr e Ex. Sat . 22�
11
Senneter r e Quebe c Ex. Sun.
11

II II11

42� Hichmond Quebec
11­ f? II
45� Quebec Ri c
hmond
II� 11 iT
25� Mont real Br ockvil le
it­ Ii
26� BrockvLl.Le Montreal

11­ II
x92 Toronto £ Peterboro� Oct. 26
it� II 11
x95� Pet erboro
£ Toronto
il­ 11 it
x603� Lindsay £ Midland
il­ TlII
x604 Eidl and £ Lindsay
45
11
Toronto Orillia
11
July 12
if IiIi
44 B
arr i e Toron-oo 70
GTIv
i1
Pont iac Detroit Ex.Sat .& Sun. Oct . 26
IiII IV II
75 Dotroi t P
ontiac� 102
II
linnipeg Capreol Ex.Sun ,fromWpg
il

630(Railiner)ii Sa.;3katoon Regina Ex. Sun.
iI

The foregoi ng trains have been el imi natedfrom schedules. x-In
dicat es these removals have elimi nated passenger ser vice compl etely
f.romthe followin? lines: Park Head-Wiar t on, Ont. , Li ndsay-Blackwater ,
Ont, , (via Manilla), Lorneville-Ivlidland, Orrt, ,
£
-Via Mani l l a.
Changes
in frequency or days operat ed:-From�
To
216
Mi
xed Edmundston Campbel lton Tu-Th-Sa
Thurs.
216
II Campbel l t on Edmundston Mo-WeOFri Wed.
69
II Edmundston Riviere du Loup Tu-Thu-Sa Sat.
70
II Hiviere du Loup Edmundston Mo-We-Fri Mon.
il
267 St .Hyacinthe Sorel Fri Tue.
268
II Sorel St.Hyacint he Sat. Wed.
620 PsgI. Sarn
ia
London Daily Ex. Sun
621
II London Sar ni a 11
jJ
A neV mixed train, numbered 3 and 4, has begun service between Port-aux­
Basques and St .Johns, Nf ld. , making local stops and handling mai l and
express. Trains l and 2, The Car ibouII , have had 3 hours and 45-50 min­
utes cut fromt heir running times. These schedules connect with the new· fer
ry MV ilWILLIAMCAHSONll whi ch nowmakes a daily tr ip in each direction, r equi
ring 6~ hours for the tr i p. Most of ths westbound journey is made in dayl
ight . Not re Dame Jct.-Lewisporte schedules have al so been
adjusted .
(
C.n..H..A,

News ~eport -1958 Page 137
l
~rHi CH.l~I~GE OF T nilE .­
ON CANADIAN HAIVdAYS
OCTOBER 26, 1958
Bvery change of timetable results in further
decimation of Canadian Passenger schedules,
although there is a tendency to eliminate
trains during the course of the summer as well.
Here is a summary of principal changes in pass­
enger trains since April 26th, not including
changes made at that time:
CANADIAN NATIONAL -GRAND TRUNK vJESTEHN
Train
11.,0 •
Type From To
340
r,1i
xed Owen Sound Pa,rk Head
339
Ii
Park Head Owen Sound
x337
-341
I
Park Head ~Harton
x336-338
Y1
Wiarton Park Head
34 Psgr.
Montreal Hervey
33
IV
Hervey Montreal
21
iY
Quebec Senneterre
22
II
Senneterre Quebec
42
11
Hichmond Quebec
45
11
Quebec Richmond
25
If
Montreal Brockville 26 il BrockJ
ille Montreal x92
11
Toronto £ Peterboro
x95
,I
Peterboro £ Toronto
x603
i7
Lindsay £ Midland
x604
il
Hidland £ Lindsay
45
II
Toronto Orillia
44
H
Barrie Toroni.!o
70
GTIv
11
Pontiac Detroit
75
I! n
DGtroit Pontiac
102
II
Winnipeg Capreol
630(Railiner)n Sa.;;katoon Regina
Days Oper
ated
Date
Removed
Ex. Sun.
iI
II
ft
Ex. Sat. Ex.Sun.&Mon. E
x. Sat.
Ex. Sun.
II
11
11
Ii
II
if
?I
YI
11

June 21
It
f!
if
Aug. 11
11
11
Y1
11
II
if

Oct. 26
I!
It
II
July 12
Y1
Ex.Sat.& Sun. Oct. 26
!1 II
Ex. Sun , fromiJJpg
Ex. Sun.
If
n
The foregoing trains have been eliminated from schedules.
x-Indicates these removals have eliminated passenger service completely
from the following lines: Park Head-Wiarton, Ont., Lindsay-Blackwater,
Ont.,(via Manilla), Lorneville-Midland, Ont.,
£
-Via Manilla.
Changes
in frequency or days operated:-From To
216 Mixed Edmundston Campbellton Tu-Th-Sa Thurs.
216
II
Campbellton Edmundston Mo-WeOFri Wed.
69
!l
Edmundston Riviere du Loup Tu-Thu-Sa Sat.
70
II
Riviere du Loup Edmundston Mo-le-Fri Mon.
267
II
St.Hyacinthe Sorel Fri Tue.
268
II
Sorel St.Hyacinthe Sat. Wed.
620
Psgr. Sarnia London Daily Ex. Sun
621
11
London Sarnia
11 H
A neW mixed train, numbered 3 and 4, has begun service between Port-aux­
Basques and St.Johns, Nfld., making local stops and handling mail and
express. Trains 1 and 2, I1The Caribou
il
, have had 3 hours and 45-50 min­
utes cut from their running times. These schedules conneft with the new
ferry MV l11lILLIAM CARSONi? which now makes a daily trip in each direction,
requiring 6~ hours for the trip. Most of thE-westbound journey is made
in daylight. Notre Dame Jct.-Lewisporte schedules have also been
adjusted.
l
C. ll.l-r•A. ~ews Repor t – 1958 Page 138
New York Central llai~ . (St.Lawr ence & Adirondack Rai lway),
terminated al l passenger service bet vmen Mont real and Malone, N.Y. , with the last tr ips of it s
trains J166 and 167.(CPR 228 and 227) on October 26.
CANADI AN PACIFIC
. _..__
HAIL
.-
.IAY COI
..-
IPANY
The·changes whi ch tookplace on this Company slines effectige August 17t
h, SeptembBr 2nd and September 7th, have alr eady been enumerat ed in an earl
ier issue. Wi th the October 26th timetable change, the foll owing
trains were el iminated f romthe schedules:­
578
-579 Mixed Woodstock,NB Fredericton Three times weekl y. 217
-218 Passenger Mont r eal Jutton,Que. Sunday only. 213
-214 Ii Farnham,Que. Sut t on, Ex. Sunday. 299
11 Mont.r eaL Beaconsfield Ex. Sat . & Sun. 13
5-136 P
apineauvi l le Sunday only.
il il
295-297y 11 Ott awa Maniwaki Sat. &Sun. 1
01-102 Fort Wi l liam Hinni peg Twice weekly.il
47-/+8 Dayl i ner Mooso Jaw Calgar y Three times weekl y.­ 3
9-40z Pass&nger Winni peg Regina (via Sour is )ii n 11�
103-104z 1/ ,I Del oraine-Napinka Weekly.­ 10
5-106z 11i1 Ii -Lylet on Twi ce weekl y.­
107-108zz Brandon Estevan(via Sour is)· Thre6 times weekl y­il
555-556x Mixed Brandon Minnedosa Wed. , Sat .­ 527- 528x
11 McGr egor Thur sday .�1
557-558x 11 II Lenore Mon. Thurs.� 553
-554x Ii Brandon Mini ota Tue. , Fri.­ 203-204z PsgI. Regina
Prince Albert Daily­
205-206 II Lanigan Sa skat oon
,i
leach mo.­
60 9 -61 0x~ Mi xed Uut l ook MclIorr an 1st and 3rd Mondays .­ 649
-650x II Rosetown Gunnwort.h VJeekly. l each moo­ G15-616x
II Swift Current Stewart Valley 1st and 3rd Fri days­ 647
-648x 11 Eppi ng Par adise Val l ey Thur s .­ 617-618xy
11 Assiniboia Ki lldeer Mont hly.­
x-Indi.cat;es all passenger service suspended.­
y-
Ii
replaced by later trip of No. 293.­
xx-
il
passenger service suspended Gunnwor-t.h-Mcllor-r-an­
II
xy-
11 iI 11 Rockgl en-Kil ldeer­
Ii�
z-
11 repl aced by di sconnected mi zed trains .I
zz-
I
II 11 discontinued between Kemnay and Souris.
OTHER
PASSENGER NOTES: It is no longer possi ble to go through fr om
TIlont real to Chi cago via Pool Train 5 and CP »st . as the latter does not
connect wi t h NYC 369 at Detroit. Passengers from Toronto must use Dayliner tr ain 359 to make t
his connection.
Trains 261 and 262 bet woen Ot t awa and Brockvi l le are now operated by
Dayl iner s, thus ending through OttaQaQTor onto coach service on these
tr ains. The Dayliners are also used between Ott awa and Maniwaki , replac­ing gas-electr ic car #9005. Dayl iner s have repl
aced conventi onal trains
305- 308 between Toronto and Owen Sound, cutting running time to 3 hours
and 5minutes, and eliminat i ng al l service to Islingt on, Cooksvil le and
Erindale. An additional trip has been scheduled northwar d on Sunday ni
ght and southbound on 11onclay morning. The 3:40 P]I suburban train
out of Montreal for BcaconsfLeLd has been eli minated, and the Ste.Therese local t
rain 181 has been restored to its former 5:11 PMleaving time f
rom Nont.r eaL, The 5:27 a li I,Iont real-Montreal West train has also been r
estored.
C .11. 1·1 • A •
1!gy~J1eport – 1958 Page 138
New York Central R,ai~ (St. Lawrence & Adirondack Railway),
terminated all passenger service betvwen Montreal and Malone, N. Y., w:i.th
the last trips of its trains ;/166 and 167.(CPR 223 and 227) on October 26.
CANADIAN PACIFIC HAII.J~;AY COI:PANY
~~;;~~~~.-,-. -. –
The changes which took place on this Companys lines effectige August
17th, SeptembBr 2nd and September 7th, have already been enumerated in
an earlier issue. With the October 26th timetable change, the following
trains were eliminated from the schedules:-
578-579 Mixed Woodstock,NB
217-218 Passenger Montreal
Fredericton Three times weekly.
Jutton,Que. Sunday only.
213-214 H Farnlimn, Que. Sutton, Ex. Sunday. 299
11 MontrE;al Beaconsfield Ex. Sat. & Sun.
135-136 11 II Papineauville Sunday only.
295-297y 1 Ottawa Maniwaki Sat. & Sun.
101-102 Ii .Fort ~;Jilliam
47-1+8 Dayliner Hoose Jaw
39-40z Pass&nger Winnipeg
V7innipeg Twice weekly.
Calgary Three times weekly.
Regina (via Souris)!? Ii il
103-104z II 1
105-106z i? il
Deloraine-Napinka Weekly.
107-108zz Brandon
-Lyleton Twice weekly.
555-556x Mixed Brandon
Estevan(via Souris} Thre6 times weekly
527-528x 1 11
557-558x II 11
553-554x Ii Brandon 2
03-204z Psgr. Regina
205-206 II Lanigan
609-610x~ Mixed Uutlook 649-65
0x I Rosetown 6
15-616x 11 Swift Current
647-648x. 11 Epping
617-618xy Ii Assiniboia Mi
nnedosa Wed., Sat.
McGregor Thursday.
Lenore Mon. Thurs.
Miniota Tue., Fri.
Prince Albert Daily
S2,ska toon
Mcl·J.orran 1st and 3rd
Gunnworth vveekly.
Stewart Valley 1st and 3rd
Paradise Valley Thurs.
Killdeer rJIonthly.
x- Indi£aibes
y_ 11
all passenger service suspended.
replaced by later trip of No. 293.
Y.JC-
11
passenger service suspended Gunnworth-r1IcMorran
xy-
11
/1 II 11 Rockglen-Killdeer
leach mo.
Mondays .
leach moo
Fridays
z-
11
11 1/ replaced by disconnected mized trains.
zz-
11
iI 11 discontinued between Kemnay and Souris.
OTHER PASS.ENGER NOTES: It is no longer possible to go through fTom
l
J
lontreal to Chicago via Pool Train 5 and CP ;i
f
37. as the latter does not
conllect with NYC 369 at Detroit. Passengers from Toronto must use Dayliner
train 359 to make this connection.
Trains 261 and 262 between Ottawa and Brockville are now operated by
Jayliners, thus ending through OttawaQToronto coach service on these
trains. The Dayliners are also used betvveen Ottawa and Maniwaki, replac­
ing gas-electric car #9005. Dayliners have replaced conventional trains
305~308 between Toronto and Owen Sound, cutting running time to 3 hours
and 5 minutes, and eliminating all service to Islington, Cooksville and
Erindale. An additional trip has been ~3cheduled northward on Sunday
night and southbound on IJ10nday morning. The 3: 40 PM subuYban train
out of Montreal for B:::;aconsfield has been eliminated, and the Ste.Therese
local train 181 has been restored to its former 5:11 PM leaving time
from Montreal. The 5: 27 PM 1,Iontreal-Montreal West train has also been rest:-ored.
C.R.B .A.
News n.e .£Q~.:L-=-1 9 58 fa£ 8 139
FIC G
-r RAT-r-.. vt
Thi s line has ope ned passenger service P
l.
C
1

Ih
::> T
J:.Jr. J~jk)
o m
,lj:,
-r)
i
~l
1
,
J
_ l JJi-.
(
bot.ween Prince Gcor-ge, B.C. , Fort So.int John, and Dawson Cr-ock., Ir-a iris
Leave Pr-f.n ce Geor ge at 7:30 AI1, and ar r ive at 3:15PM on Mon .vled.Fr i. in
F
ort Saint John,_.,clnclon ll.:w.Thu?Sat. ,9.t D.dwson Cr eek. Returntrip
Lcave s ::: cL at 400 Pl 1. ~ c.l~_l :; ,,-ru 11 55 p r!l •(_1 . l.. l.l ll~ 1rl ijr,S c -:… ,d J .l
ADDENDA TO CPR-CNU NOTES
CPIt Tra
ins removed: 7;&207-208 Psgr , M~)o se J:n r-As siniboia three times
weekly replaced by mi
xed tr ains.
#5-6 discont inued between Cal gary and Vancouver . CHH Tra
in el imi nated: #68, Pas,sengi:;r, Saskatoon-llelfor t , ,Sat . Only.
Se
rvi ce r educed: 55, 11 Mcl for t -SaskC1toon, IVIVJF , now Wed.Fr i .
CAR ilSASIC·.TC
HEVJANil (c.ontinuesU
The Saskat chewan was assigned to other duties when Van Horne rot­
ired from the active executi ve post in 1910, but it returned briefly to
be i
ncluded in hi s fun eral train, collowing his deat h, at the ago of
s
eventy-three, on September,l lt h, 1915. When his remains were moved
from M,mt rer1.1 t o J01i(;t , Tl.Li.no is, near his bi r t hpla ce, it vst:..S onl y
f
itting t hat the il:3ask2t chewc:m
il
, wit h whi ch he had, been as soci at.ed so
long in his lif etim
e, would accompany himon his fi nal journey.
Four
months Lat.cr-, on -Januar-y 18t h, 1916, the Saskat ch ewan 11 wa s
renamed
Laur-ent. i C,nil.and in November of the same year, W(lS on ce again
r ede
signat ed 1IQuebec
d,
this time for us e by the Gerier-aL Super intondent of
the C~nal ian Pa cifics Quebec Dist rict . Upon the advent of the steel
c
ars for Jistr i ct of f Lci.eLs in 1929, LncLudLng a st eol 1?Quebecl, the
f
ormer ilS:::tskc.tchevJCln
il
was demoted to divi sional status on August 23rd,
192
9, becoming simply Busi ness Car No. 38. Thus it remo.ined, until it s
r et i r oment i n Sep
tember 1958; at the t i me of r et i r ement , the car was
D.s signcQ out of Toronto, 1.Jr us e by the Super i nt endent of tho cpns
Tr
enton Divis ion. Even in these l(lt t er yoo.rs, and in spit e of the un­
Lmag
i.nat.Lve number, i t WQS st i l l Van Hor-nc t s car- t o t he older generat ­
i on of
r-ai.Lwaymcn , Upon removal to .imgus Shops, the Canad.ian Paci fic
he..i l way Company

  • scrap Jock shuuld consume this last link with Craigellachie. Accor di ngly,
    ?n
    Oc~ober . 14~h , 1958, it was pres ented to the Canadian Rail road His tor­
    leal rtSSOclat l
    on.
    liS
    .IVan Ho.rne ts car and fittingl y r-enamed rI,Se.skatch8lrJan l,it wil l
    be preserv
    ed for posteri ty by the Association as a p ~ rso na l tribute to
    one of Cariadas gr8,?,tost rru.Lwaymen, to the Company whose hi.s t.ory i s
    linked so inextri ca bly with the history of Canada in the lat ter years
    of tIle Nineteont h century, and to the spirit of Canadi an railroading as
    2. whole , t hus exemp.li ILed in one of t he finest exampLes of an of f i cial
    ra
    iLway car ever to rLle its rhyt hmic way over Cnnadi.an r a ils.
    Onwr S. A. Laval l ee
    The Account of the Fall Ful
    iagc weekend, by Mr. Kemp, as wel l
    as the Notes and News, were received too late for inclusion in
    t
    his i s sue of t he News RGpor t . ~ll of this ma terial will
    a
    ppear in the December is sue.
    C.R.B.A.
    rage 139
    -_____ … _______ o-U ___ — __
    PACIFIC GHEAT EASTEHN RAIL~iAY
    This line has opened passenger service
    bctvleon Prince George, B. C., Fort S2.int John, .:.wd D,J.wson Creek. Truins
    lc,?,ve Princo George at 7:30 Ar1, and arrive at 3:15PM on Mon.liJed.Frio in
    Fort Saint John, 2n(.1 on Tue. 1h1.1, Sat. at Dawson Creek. Return trip
    leaves nt 4:00 PH nnc~ arriv,-,;s nt 11:55 PM.
    A
    DuENDA TO CPR-CNR NOTES
    CPr? Trains removed: 1!-207-208 PsgI. M~)o S8 J:.:rvr-Assinibo in three t imos
    weekly replnced by mixed trnins.
    #
    5-6 lis continued betlArc(:m Cnlgary nncl Vancouver.
    CHR Train eliminated: 1168, Passenger, Saskntoon-lJIelfort, Sat. Only. Se
    rvice reducod: 55, IY Mclfort-Saskatoon, J.l.tfWF, now Vved .Fri.
    C
    AR IISASKxrCI-mVJAN11 (continued)
    . ……….
    Tho 1?S:J.skatchewan
    il
    Wil.S assigned to other duties whE.~n V£m Horne ret­
    ired from the active executive post in 1910, but it returned briefly ~o
    be included in his funeral train, collowing his death, at the age of
    seventy-three, on September! 11th, 1915. When his remains were moved
    from VbntroD.l to J01i(~t, Illinois, near his birthplace , it W[~S only
    fitting that the rlSaskntchewcm
    n,
    vlJith which he had. been associated so
    long in his lifetime, would accompany him un his final journey.
    Fo
    ur months lL:.tcr, on Jnnu2.ry lSth, 1916, the ilSa,sk2.tchewan
    i/
    was
    renamod l1Lcurent iCmil. nn,j. i:n November of the same year, was onCG again
    rodesignat8cl 1IQueb8c
    d,
    this time for use.; by the General Superintendent of
    the C~naJian Pacifics Queboc District. Upon tho advent of the steel
    cars
    for Jistrict officL::.ls in 1929, including a steel 1?Quebec
    I1,
    the
    former 11Se,skc..tchevmn
    il
    wns demoted to divisional status on August 23rd,
    1
    929, be.;coming simply Business Car No.3S. Thus it remained, until its
    retiroment in September 1958; at the time of retirement, the cnr was
    [lssigncd out of TiJronto, for usc by the Superintendent of the cpn y s
    Trenton Division. Even in these latter yoars, and in spite of the un-
    iElaginati vc; numbQr , it WC..S still .IVan Horne; s car
    l1
    to the older genernt­
    ion of r:,dlwo.ymen. Upon removal to linEus Shops, the Can3.di,qn Pacific
    R2.ilway Company C:id not feel it ~:tppr,Jpri2,tG thr~t the fires of the Angus
    scrap dock shoulJ consume this last link with Craigellachie. Accordingly,
    ?n Oc~ober.14~h, 195$, it was presented to the Canadinn Railroad Bistor­l
    eal rtSSOclatlon.
    AS .IVan Hornev.s car
    l1
    and fittingly rene.med rISa.skatchewan
    i
    , it will
    be.; preserved for posterity by tho Associ2tion as a p~rsonal tribute to
    on8 of Canacln
    l
    s gr8e,test rcl.ilvmymen, to the C~:)[l1pe.ny whoSG histc)ry is
    linked so inextricably with the history of Cnnnda in thG latter yonrs
    of tile Nineteenth cGntury, and to the spirit of Canadian rnilroaJing as
    2.. wholG, thus exemplified in one of the finest exc~mples of an officinl
    r2ilway car over to ri~:e its rhythmic vmy over Canadian redls.
    Ornor S.A. Lav2..1lee
    The i~ccount of the F,::-lll FJliage vveekend, by Mr. Kemp, as well
    as the Notes and Nows, were received too late for inclusion in
    this issue of the News Report. All of this material will
    appoar in the December issue.
  • Demande en ligne