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Canadian Rail 083 1957

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Canadian Rail 083 1957

)
CANADIAN lUUIl?OAD msrOFJCAl ASSOCIATION
INCOEPO:R.AlID.
MONTREAL, CANADA
News Report No.8) November

-. .
White Pass & Yukon Route engine No. 73, southbound
on a passenger extra, passes Train No.2 at Bennett,
B.C., a meal station nearly midway along the 110-
mile, 3-foot gauge system.
C.R.H.A.
.
/

News Report –1957 Page 105
~(~I H ,<)1 tlt·I.(
v!>,~ .. ,
THE ROAD OF nOLD …..
Some historical notes on the
White Pass & Yukon Route,
by
Orner S.A. Lavallee.
KLONDIKE is a name to conjure with. Etymologically, it is an
Anglicization of the Indian name Tron Deg, meaning Hammer Creek.
Geographically, it refers to one of the tributaries of the Yukon
River, but romantically). it has come to be associated with the en-LiJ(!
cold-bearing region of Yukon Territory, written forever upon the
pages of history as the locale of the gold rush, whose fever was
felt throughout America in the closing years of the nineteenth
century.
The IUondike brought many things: riches to some; ruin to m<.tny;
adventure and hardship to all. Today, all that remains of the
Days of 98
11
are a few ghost towns, memories of old timers, relics
and souvenirs of gold-mining days which have become museum pieces,
and the celebrated literature of Robert vi. Service and others.
History, however, has dealt mercifully lith the most enduring
project of the hectic days of the gold rush. Today, in the course
of modernization which will enable it to pl~y a part in a more sub
stantial and enduring prosperity than th.:lt brought about sixty
years ago, one can ride comfortably over the 110-mile vfuite Pass &
Yukon Route, the three-foot-gauge railway which linked llhitc Horse and
the Yukon River with the ocean, and helped to avert the diff­i
culties and sufferings of the rock-ribbed trail upon which so many gOld-
seekers lost their lives. Today, outliving Soapy Smith and
his gang of outlaws, long after the miners sluices on Bonanza Creek
have rotted and the wilderness has reclaimed all of the remote mining
claims, the White Pass & Yukon is a fundamental part of a hardier
economy, that of the development of the northland –one of the
worlds last frontiers and certainly one of its most promising ones.
In 1862, five years before the United States made the deal the Russian Empire, by which Russian America became Alaska, gold
was discovered in the Yukon River region. In the year 1875, a Frenchman named JUneau made a
strike at Gold Creek, Alaska, and on
the same Site, the town of Juneau was later raised, becoming in
our times the capital of the United States Territory of Alaska.
Other rich ~inds were made in 1884 and in 1886, so much so that the
lure of gold attracted many prospectors to this area.
Ten
years later, on August 17, 1896, George W. C~rmack, an
Illinois miner who had been prospectinG in the area since 1390, made a
strike at Bonanza Creek, news of …. lhich was carried back to Van­co
uver and Seattle by steamer. In 1897, the gold rusb began; anyone
who could forsake home and loved ones, job and responsjbilities long
enough to reach the IIPromised Land and stake a claim, packed up and went. The
wharves at Seattle, Vancouver and other dest Coast ports
thronged with potential passengers for the Yukon. ~~ny had only a
faint notion as to where it VlaS, and most of them didnt care.
Vessels were loaded to capacity, some eold-seekers even contracting
)
C.R.H.A.
News Report -1957 Pag., 106
for sufficient
deck-space upon which
to spread blanket-romls and
wait out the long trip to the frozen north. One of the intrepid
adventurers was a
man named Charl
es O. Birney. Striking it rich,
he returned
to Seattle, only
to 1050 all in speculation. Seeking
sustenance
for his family, he obtained
a position
~lith the street
railway company a
nd, rising rapidly in its ranks, he was destined
to
become the designer
of the safety street raih/ay car, the IIBirneyil
J
with which his name is synonymous.
Nearly forty thousand
individual
s entered the territory in the
years 1897 and 1898. Dawson
City, the center of the region, was
the site of a trappers hut in the autumn of 1896. By 1901, it was
a city of 9,000
people. Today,
it has less than a thousand
souls.
F
irst results only served to fan the flames of the gold mania.
In June 1897, the steamer Excel
sior landed at San Francisco, and t
he S.S~ lfHumboldt at San Diego,
together
carrying gold dust tot­
alling Jl, 500,000 t In the eight years folloVling
Carmacks dis­
covery, nearly ~lOO,OOO,OOO
in gold was taken from El.dorado,
Bonanza, Dominion, Hunker
and Sulphur Creeks and their tributaries.
In the midst of the furore,
railways were
being promoted
right
and left. Mackenz
ie and Nann obtained
authority
from the Government
to build a railway from Telegraph Creek, at the head of navigation
on the Stikine River, in British
Col~~bia, to the head of Teslin
Lake, but Parliament
refused to ratify the project.
In the same year, the Government
of British
Columbia voted u l
and subsidy to a rail,/uy which would be
built from the head of the
Lynn Cana
l, through British Columbia into the Yukon.
Shortly after,
there followed
the simultaneous
incorporation
of three companies
to prosecute
this work. In the United States, a charter was granted
to the Pacific & Arctic Raihlay & Navigation
Company.
British
Columbia
countered
with the British Columbia Yukon Railway (60 Vic.
Cap.49, 1897) while the Dominion Government,
for and on behalf of
the Yukon Te
rritory
chartered
the British Yukdtn filining,
Trading
and
Transportation Company
(60-61 Vic. Cap. 89, 1897
). The name of the
latter company was changed
to the British Yukon Railway
Company
in
1900. It must be
explained here, of course, that these were not
rival compani
es. Together
, they would form a continuous
line of
rail~laY, the P&.A in Alaska,
the BCY in British Columbia, and the
BTI~T&T in the Yukon, projected to extend from Skagway,
at the head
of the Lynn Canal
in Alaska, over lhite Pass, to Fort Selkirk on
the Yukon River, about 325 miles.
In the spirng of 1898, surveys
were carried on alone by Michael
J. Heney, who shortly afterward combined
his talents as an engineer
with those of a Britisher
, Sir Thomas Ta
ncrede of Loneon,
and an
American,
Samuel H. Graves, of the same profession,
~mo represented
British
financial
interests
anxious
to ret a railtJay
into operation
to tap the rich traffic then strugglin
g over the White and Chilkoot
Passes. They wasted no time. At the end of 111ay, 1898. construct
ion
of the railway
vias started at Skagway, and
on the 21st of July of
the same year, the first passenger
train ever to operate
in Alaska
Territory
hauled passengers
for four miles out of Skagway,
up the
course of the Skagway River.
C.R.fl.A.
7

)
News Report -1957
,!HITE PASS &.
YUKON RAILI/AY
,._-
–~ h
;1
—-. ….. {
,
<-
,-/
~ .. –

I
.,
J-
. ,.
Paee .1..07
Enlargement of,
Skagway-Bennett
section -I

• ,
I
I
.-Ii.H.A.
NeNs Report -1957
Pac;e ~ c,,
For motive poler, the contractors
had purchased
two Brooks
2-6-05 from the Pacific Coast Railway, of California
. Built in
1831, the Hoguls, Nos.l and 2, later Nos. 51 and 52, weighed
only
t-,ionty-eight-and-a-half tons, had 42-inch drivers and developed
a
tlf1ctive
effort of 10,200 pounds.
No.51 is ~till in semi-preserved
cl..1nriition at White Horse and is said to be the subject of a preser­
vation project
planned by the Chamber of Commerce.
Vie hope that it
may be so.
Nine
days after the first run, on July 30th, 1898, the Company
was given official
consolidated
status, organized
in London, Enr;land
as the White rass &. Yukon Railway
Company, Limited.
This company l£l.S
registered to carry out the charter
rip:hts and conc
e.ssions of the
three constituent
companies,
the Pacific & ArctiC, the British
Col­
umbia Yukon, and
the British Yukon railways
. Samuel H. Graves, one
of the three origj,nal
associates
, became
the first President
with
headquarters
at Vancouver, B.C. A.B.
l~ewell vias Vice President and
General ~1anager. The London
offices L headquarters
of Charles
Colin
Mac.rae,
who was the Chairman
of the tso.J.rd, and five other directors
, was
at No.7 Moorgate
Street, E.C.
Construction
work wasted no time. The steep stretch out of
Skagway to the surrunit of White Pass, where the railway
climbed 2$85
feet in about 20 miles, was completed in only eight-and-a-half
months, by mid-
February, 1899. This section includes the roads
only tunnel, some 250 rong, and the Dead Horse Gulch Viaduct, 215
above the rock-strewn stream bed, and 19 miles from Skagway. The
45-pound
rails were swung
up grades reaching a maximum
of 3.9% and
having an average
of 2.6%, and around 16
0
and 20
0
curves. This por­
tion of the railway cost $100,000 per mile to build. The head of
Lake Bennett was attained
on July 6th, 1899. The summit
of the
line, Log Cabin, B.C., 2,916 feet, was rea.ched on
this section.
During the summer of 1899 J a new eold-strike vias made
at Atlin, B.C.
and early in August,
construction
practically
came to a halt
when 1500
el!lployees deserteti,
thoughtfully
taking along their picks
and shovels t About th
is time, it ViaS decided to proceed
lith the
simultaneous
construction
of the northern
portion of the line,
southward
from Vlhite Horse, and on June 8th, 1900, this ViaS completed
as far as Caribou 6rossing
(later Carcross)
. The joining of this
section with that from Skaeway, was marked
by the driving
of a
golden spike on July 29, 1900. Two weeks lett,er, on Augutt 15, 1900,
the railway
was opened throughout
from Skagway to lhite Horse.
In order to extend the effective
reach of the railway
beyond
lhite Horse and down the Yukon River system, the steamer
lines of
the Canadian
Development Company
were acquired on May 1, 1901, and
~hese were turned over to the British
Yukon Navigation
Company.
This line provided
connections
from lhite Horse to Dawson City, 434
miles by way of the Yukon River, and from Caribou Crossing to
Itlin, B.C., 90 miles, via Nares Lake, Tagish Lake, the Taku Arm
of Tagish Lake, and Atlin Lake. Taku
Arm is 40 feet lower than
~tlin Lake, and betv1een the two bodies of w:.ter, for some two-
and­a-
half miles, ran a portaee railway, which was
opened vTith the inc­
eption of the steamer route in 1899, and became a
part of the lhite
?ass & Yukon Route
in 1901. The fare of the portage railway at Taku ::ity was
~2.00 –rather expensive
for such a short trip !
)
u.I.~.H.A.
News
Heport
-1957
For
many
years
J the
port8.ge railway
handled
D. three
-foot
gauge
train
hauled by the
IlDuchess;/,
an 0-6-0£
cmr,ine,
built
by Baldwin
in 18761;
and acquired
from
the Uelline;ton
Colliery on Vancouver Island
in 1899. The
iIDuchess
/ was
in regular service
on the
porttigc
line until about
1938,
when
it was
retired
, moved
to Carcross
, e.nd
is nol
preserved
at that
point. The
fare
on th
That
the
rail.,ray
realized
its
purpose
is shown
by the
operation
­
al statist
ics for the
year
ending
December
31, 1903.
In that
year
,
with
sixteen
locomotives
, fifteen
passenger
cars, an officia
l car,
258 frei[ht cars
, 6 serv
ice cars
, 21 river
stenmers
and
five
barges
,
the
company
carried
22,729
passengers
and
57,448
tons
of freight
.
Net
income
for the year
was
~331,404, 16% of the total
revenue.
Though
the
railway
had
been
projected
to Fort
Selkirk
,
White
Horse has
remained
the
northern
term
­
inal
to our
day.
Briefly
, how
ever
the
route
mile­
age
exceeded
110.7,
wbile
the
I/P&Y
I s on
ly
branch
line
flourish
ed.
In August,
1910,
a branch
line was
built
from Macrae
J
seven
miles
:~;~~~~~~~~~~W~
~P~~&~Y . R. DUCHESS
Preserved
at Carcross
J Y. T,
south
of vlhite
Horse
, for 11 miloo
to Pueblo, a
mining
district
. M
acrae
, the
junction
, and
an intermediate
station
on this
branch
,
called
Carr
Glynn
, were
named,
respectively
, after
the
Choirmnn, :::harl
es Colin Macrae
, and the
Vi.ce
Chairman
, Sydn
ey Ca
rr Glynn
,
of the
Board
of the White
Pc?ss
& Y:ukon
Railway
, Limited
, in London. The Pueblo branch
functioned
for
a few
years
I but was
abandoned
about
the
end of World
War I
•• Another
early Director
, Jnmc5 D
ug­
dale,
had
a station
named
for himself
on thEJ main
line nenr i4.1.crae.
The
110.7
route
miles
are
distributed
o.s follo1;IS:
Alaske
, Pacific
& Arctic
Ry. & Nav. Co.
British
Columbia
L
British
Columb
ia Yukon
Ry. Yukon,
British
Yukon
Ry. Co •.
20.4
32.2
58.1
miles

~he boundary
betw
een the Unite
d States
(Alaska) and Canada (
British
~lumbia)
is in White
Pass
, while
that between
British
Columbia
~d Yukon
is about two miles north
of Pennington
, The
exact point
~ marked
by signs
, facing
the
railway
, erected
on an Island
in
tlC middle
of Lake
Bennett
.
During
the
thirty
-ye~r
period
wy1s position
remained
unch~n
ged.
between
1908 and
1938,
the raH
­
The s
light surp
lus of motive
)
.1.
— .. _-
Nels Hoport – 1957 Page 110
;:-.·~r -tas lowered by the sale of three enpines to the Klondike !~incs
;)~lway, and two to the Tonanan Vallcy Railway, in 1906 and 1907.
Engine b9, a Baldwin 2-$-0 built in 190$, was the last enrine built
until the salO< firm delivered No.70, a superheated 2-$-2, in 19;18.
During this period, the peak year, 1927, sm the lhitc p .. ~ss & Yukon
carry 22,667 passengers.
SOIDe idea of the travellinr; facilities in the earlier days is
gained by an examination of a timetable for 1913. Train 1/1 left
Skagway at 9: 30 AM daily except 3u.1day arrivinc White Pass at
11:55 AM, Bennett at 1:15 Pl4, Earibou tCarcross) at 3:10 and White
Horse at 5:50 PM –eight hours and twenty minutes for 110.7 miles,
an average speed of thirteen miles per hour 1 No.2s tine in the
return direction WClS sliehtly better; leaving White Horse at 9: 30AU, it
nrrived Caribou at 11:40, Bennett at 1:20PM, t;lhite Pase at 3
:00 PM and Skagway at 4: 35 PM. Much of the time variation bct
1
:men
the trips in either direction was nnturally taken up by the auverse
grades out of Skagway encountered by the northbound train, 2 hours
and twenty five minutes being allowed for No.1 to climb from Skag­
iay to Bennett, while No.2 was only allowed an hour and thirty
five minutes to descend. At this period, sternwhee1 steamers took
passengers to Dawson City during the season of navigation, w~1ich
cxtenudd from mid-?-1…:t.y to mid-October. From Dawson, other vessels
cono.;cted down the river for Fairbanks, Nome, St .1.1ichacls, and
ot:,: …. pcints. Spring and fall saw six-horse Concord coaches oper­
at i. ~:~ ever the Government Road; they were replnced during vJinter
by::;).! ·j.ghs. Passengers stopped £..t road houses each ni[ht, nnd
tht)·:.l comfort during day travel Vias eusured by lfplenty of robes
and foot warmers Ii.
The outbreak of the 1939-45 Iar or rather the entry of the
United States into that conflict in December 19h1, WetS responsible
for a complete rejuvenation of the Road of CQld
il
• ll;c rtlilway
proved to be of considerable milita.ry importance as an artery for
the conveyance of IllD.terials destined to the C.:lnol odl pipeline
project, the Alnska High,,,ay, and United 3tates military bc:tscs in
the interior of Alaska. Accordingly, it …. as tnken over by the
Transportation Corps, United St.:lt~s Army, on October 1, 1942, and
military personnel supplemented civilian employees. The same agency
imported twenty-six locomotives for the railway from the United
States; at one time, there were 1600 U.S.Army personnel working on
the Ylliite Pass & Yukon Route. The annual peacetime tonnage of
25,000 nearly quadrupled in 1942, and in 1943 amounted to 2$2,000
tons
L more
than eleven times the normal traffic! The peak month
of 1~43 was August when 47,506 tons were moved. In one day alone, 2,0$5
tons travelled over the W.P.& Y.
The railway was handed back to its owners on April 30, 1946. The U.S.
Army Transportation Corps took back much of its motive
power and rolling stock, to be scrapped or disposed of otherwise.
a new corporate step was taken in 1951, when the railway in­
qugurnted a dieselization policy by the addition of two C-C type
IIA units, built by the General Electric Company of Erie, Pa.,USA.
Several steam locomotives v/ere disposed of in recent years, two
eo i;;r: to museum railway projects viz.: No;4 the 2-6 … 2 to t~e Oak
Creek Central in Vlisconsin in 1955, and No.69 to the Black Hllls
Central RH in South Dakota, in 1950.
News n~port -1951
!J;lge 111
The recent formation of British Yukon Ocean
Services
, Limited,
a nuvigation route between Vancouver
,lnd tIle Yukon, was
in connection
. -:1 a container
traffic which the rJ.ilway lIes brought into being,
1, mi.nimize the difficulties
imroseJ
by trans-shipment
from ship to
:,ai:!.way
at SkacvIaY,
and raihmy to road at ~lhite Horse. At the
rrc.s(mt
time;, all freight
cmunodities
arc carried in containers
on
flat cars, and nutomobiles are curried
as well. Freight
and refrig­
erator cars now lie unused, while there is an understand.::ti..lle premium
en platform cars.
In the
early part of 1957, three nore diesel unit.s by General El
ectric were !Jrought into use on the railway, briw~in[;
t.he total of
these enfinos to five. The fi
ve units [l.rl? said to be sufficient
to dieselizc all normal operations
on the ~iP&Y. The four 2-8-2 5,
engines 70-73 are, however, retaj.ncd
for cmerecmcy
or tourist
season
use, such as plol service in Winter, or tourist special trains in
the summer months; the latter arc made up of open pl£1tfoll;,!
p,3.rlour
cars entirely. As a matter of fact, the :v. P.& Y. is unique in that it
OffiS far more parlour cars than passenger cars:
The
future of the railway seems secure, as the dieselizat
ion pol
icy would indictite
. The Canadian
North is coming into its Olffi,
and whether
connection
at White Horse will ultimately
be rflC.dc with
a ereatly-extended Pacific Great Eastern
Railv/ay, or tilE) much-heral­
ded. Wenner-
Gren monorail line, there appears to be little doubt but
that traffic will continue
to rollover the slim 3-foot gauge track,
up the precipitous
20-r:1ilo, 2900-foot cli.r.1b from Skag,/().y to fhite
Pass, and on to White Horse, for somo time to come. Destirv1Y :UElY
indeed hnve in store, that the I. P.& Y. will be the last 3Qfoot
gauge common carrier in America.
The
following list of passenger
-train
PAS.mrrGER nOLLING
STOCK
rolling
stock in existence in July
1957, 1<35 compiled
by 111. Fo1stGr
Kemp.
If any reader possesses
the information
necessary
to <,.llow it to be turned into an all-ttme rost,er, Im fill
be glad to re-print it in that form:
203 Baggage with Cupola.
206x Parlour LAKE FRASER. 2
07 Baggage
lith Cupola.
2099 Bagg. Ie Smoker with 6upola.
21~e

21 Coach.
2,8w Parlour LAKE ATLIN
2.Ow

LAKE DEWEY
2;;2
LAKE LINDERMAN
224

LAK3 J·IARSH
2<6 Coach
223

3
4 ,
Parlour LAKE COWLEY
1.-Car out of service.
&-Car used as caboose. v-
Car has four arched windows.
236 Parlour LAKE MAYO
238

LAKll lATSON
240

LAKE Bl~NNETT
242

LAKE TESLIN
2/+4 Coac
246 Parlour LAKE I·!UUCHO
248

LAKE lAGISH
254x

LAKE E~1J.;n;. LJ)
256

LAKi!; LEBARGE
258

LAKE KLUAHNE
260

LAKE TUTSHI
262

LAKE SUMJI·!Il
264

LAKE AISHIHIK
(Ed.note: 232, now
scrapped
, was [.n
open-side mountain
observation
car used with IlDuchess
l
on the
Atlin portage.)
C.R.H.A. News Report -1957 Page 112
. MUTlVil PC,IER
The following is an all-time roster of locomotives
of the ~fuite Pass &. Yukon Route, conpiled by the
author from various sources The explanation of
symbols and initials is given on the next page,
No.
1
2
3
4
2/4
5
6
7
8
lOu
14u
20u
21u
22U
23u
24u
51 52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
&7
68
69
70
71
72
73
80
81
90
91 92
93
94
Builder
Baldmn
Brooks

Grant
Balduin
..

..

Cl1Jna:z:
Baldu1.n
.. ..

..

Brooks

Grant
Baldin
..
..

Climax
Baldwin

..
..
Brooks
..

Bald,d.n
..

..

..

A.L.Co.
..
Gan.El.
..

at the end of the roster.
Yoar Type Oy1
t
s Dri. ~ Wt. BP
1878 Q-6-OT 10×12 30 22470 150
1
881

1879
1878
1912
1885
1899
..
1894
1916 1919
1890

1904
1906
1904
1881
..
1879 1878
1885
1899 2-6-0
n
2-8-0
4-4-0
2-6-2
2-
8-0

B-B-B
4-6-0

Z-8-0

2-6-0
..
2-8-0
4-4-0
2-8-0
..
II II
1894 B-B-B
1900 .4
-6-0

..
1881
1878
1881
1
901
..
1907
1908
1938
1939
1947

1920

2-8-0
4-6-0
2-6-0

.
4e6-0
..
2-8-0
..
2-8-2

..

1954 e.C
1956

..

15W<20
12×16
15x
20
15×18
17
:<20..
.
13×14
16:<22
..
16:<21 16:<20
..

15W<20
12×16
15×18
17x20e
.
13xl4
17:<20 17XZ2
14×18
12%18
14×18
17XZO
..
19:<22
2lXZ2
17XZ2

..
..
19%20

42

36
42
37
36
38

30
45
n
37
n
..

.
4Z

36
4Z
:.iG
38 95900
98600
73000
120000
100000
159000

165000

114000

132000
..
..
95900

98600
73000
100000
159000
II II
30
42 .161000
..
38
44
42
38
42
..
n

167000
160000
73350 72000
73550
161000

40 213000
42 I
44 2:305(0
It 11 (
II If
160

140

160
1
50
180
u
160
180
u
150
..
16C

160

140
..
150
180

160
180
u
..
u
135

..
lao

160
215

tI
If 213000 170
fI II
6-9xlot 34 162000

..

..


n

O.S.A. Lavallee
Remarks, Origin, Disposal
1899-Ex WCRy.
-Preserved
1898-Ex PCRy.
1898-Ex PCRy
1898-Ex
1898-Ex
1942-
Ex IWRy
1898-Ex
1899-Ex
Named lDuchoss
at Carcross, J:T
1900 ro 61
II 11 52
I n 53
11 II 54
1955 to OCORR
1900 ro 55
;1 ;T 56
It I 57
II 58
1942-Ex ETOWNCRy. xl943
x194S 1942-Ex II
1942-Ex 0&5 69
1942-Ex II 70
1942-Ex SG&N 3
RUS1945
1946
11 1946
1
94.6
:1 1946
1942-Ex 4.
1942-Ex II 5
19OC-ex
1
1900-ox 2
19OO-ox 3
190D-lb: 4
1900-Ex 5
190D-Ex 6
1900-
;;:; 7
1900-Ex 8
Preserved Whiteaorse
II Te.ku. BO ?
%.1918
1907 to TVRy.
1907
to KLiRy. 2
x1938
1907
to KllRy. 3
1903-to log.ry. Wash.
%1918
%1918
%1918
xl918
19()().-oex Cmy.
19OO-GX n
1900-6% 11
1907 to KMRy. 1
x1918
1906 to TVRy.
xl953
x1918
rocks1ide andx1918 Wrecked in
1956 to BHORR.
194 -Ex SVRR 19
194 -Ex II 20
Diesel-Electric

u

u
1<
* *
;,
It
x195
It
It
It
It
It

,{,H .A.
News
iieport
-1957
–.
~!.
1l.1 l:r.u Baldwin
1920
4-6-0
194G-~:: USA
>~l.;,,,,u
1·Qu

1943 2-8-2
16×2~
~O 211000
185
fiB from metre-go.uge.
nus or x
l
r
,lu

j.92u.

19~u

lS4u

195u

196u

n

n

n 19711

n

19fJu

199u

n

2000
n

n 2500
A.L.C
o. 1923

18×22
n
25~500
200 1942-cx
D&l1GW
470
RUS1945
251u

.,

471
252u

n

472
253u

474
254u

475
255u
,

477
256u

479
3 .. ) Plymouth
G:1301ine
switcher
u- Indicates
brought in b
yU.S.Army
Transpor
tation
Corps.
e-Engines originally
compound
, 11~19x
20, rebuilt
1907.
k-On rost or, July 1957.
X Scrapped
RUS-Returned
to the United
States
, presw
nably scrapped
. PCRy.-Pacific
Coast Railuay.
KMRy.-
Klondik
e Mines
RaHnay
.
~VRy.-Tenan
a Valley
RaHnay
.
CPRy.-Canad
ian Pacific
Railuay
-(Trail Creek
Tram~ay)
SVlill
-Sumpter
Valley Railroad
.
D&TIGW
-Denvor
& Rio Grame
Western
RR.
ocurm
-Oak Creek Central.
(museum) Railroad.
BHCPn
-Black
Hills Contral
(musawm) Railroad.
WCH;{4-Vlellington
Colliory
Rail1sy
.
m&rINCRy
.-Ea.st
Tennessee
and W
(;stcrn
North
Carolina
RR. c&s –
Colorado
& $outh0rn Rai
lroad.
SG&N-Silverton, Gladston~
& Northern
RR.
Encines
observed
by ~Ir. F.A.
Kemp
, serviceab
le,
in July
1957: 70, 7
1, 72, 73, eo, 90, 9
1, 92, 93, 94, 3.
Engines
observed
partially
scrapped
:
66, 8
1, 192, 195, 196.
000000000000
THE
COVER
PHOTOGRAPH
, which
illustrates
our
feature
article
on the Vlhite
Pass
&
Yukon
Houte
thi~
month, w
as made by
the
Assi
stant
Editor
, Mr. Forster
Kemp
, during
his
visit
to the Yukon
in July
1957.
It
shows
~-e-2 type
engine
1173, running
passeng
­er ex
tra,
passin
g the
rear
of Train
i:f1 at
the
station
at Bcnnett
, British
Columbia. The
passcnger
extra
was
running
on the

time
of No.2, the regu
lar
trai~
having
been
delayed
by a
derQilment
.
.,

JI:
Canadian Railroad Historical
Associa tion
News Report No.8} November 1957.
Editorial /1ddress: Box 22,
Station B,
Montreal 2, Canada.
Editor: Orner S.A. Lavallee
Deputy 3ditor: Douglas Bro,m Asst..
Editor: Forster A.Kemp
ComJnittee: Kenneth Chivers
Anthony Clegg
William Pharoah
Research Historian:
Robert H. Brown
tlotice o.r ~1ceting I
I
The t:1ont!1.1y meetin;:~ of the
Association will be held in
Room 203, lransportation Buil­
ding, 159 Craig Street fest,
on Wednesduy, November 13th, 1957
at 8:15 PM.
Entertainment ill consist of
il showinc; of slides by r,lr. F .A. K
emp entitled -II From Eontreal
to Alaska. and return, via Norton,
New Brunswick 11. This all-embr: ,c­
ing subject will be treated
through the medium of about two
htmdred of Mr. Kemp I s best slides
featuring the ,lhite Pass & Yukon Route, which is the subject of our
feature article this month in the News Report, and the Alnska Hail­r
oad. Guests will be welcome.
ASSociatio~
The October meeting was easily one of our
most successful evenj nes from a fin.1.ncinl
point of view. T,1~ilc t.he a>.;.tendancQ ,as
lower than usual due to the specialized
nature of the activity, an auction of r.:::..ilway miscellany, the
sale of the vnrious items netted the Association the su:n of JP30.00.
The actual swn realized from the sale of items was J29.86, and
the additional sum of 14¢, to make .,n even ;;30.00, {,a_~,~g~,nl?r.ouslL
contributed by IYlr. Lavallee (Ye Editor), who acted ClS .:luctioneer~.
The outstandinG success of the Auction has ensured that it vall be
repeated sometime early in the Ne1 Year. It ic suggested that
members start setting duplicate material aside, against this event,
which will be announced in the News Report.
One
hundred and fifty~eight persons
Fall Foliage veekend participated in the Annual Fall FoliaGe
ExcurSion, which .jas held this year over
the Canadian Pacific Hailway from l·lontreal
to Labelle, and Jl10nt Tremblant, Que. Other than the fact that a
misunderstanding necessitated a last-minute change of plans 50 that
the Canadian Pacific Railvlav was un.able to provide the advertised
Hudson-type ent:ine, the 6xcured.on WC,S-v~ry enjoyable. rhe locomot­
iv03 finally assigned to the train W.:lS G3 class 4-6-2 No. 2h67, in
very clean condition, and a train consisting of a combination
baU;a:go-buffet-passengcr car, three air-conditioned coaches, a
rerular parlour car, and e.n observation parlour ca.r. The train
left lindsor Station on time nt 7: 50 M-1, and Clfter passenger stops
at Westmount, r.lontrcal West and Park Avenue, made its way through
the Autumn-coloured foothills of the J~urcntian mountainc. The
first stop, of 45 minutes duration, was had at Sha ……. bridge, where
the regular Ste.Agathe train was nllowed to paGs. Thon further
picture stops ere had at Vimy and at Val ~Iorin. About half of
the passengers detrained @.t Mont ireIJ1blant, and were taken by bus
)
Page 115
to the Chalet at Lac fremblnnt, wilel::; ti!.ey p:1rticipntcd in a motor­l
aunch tour of the lake, and chair-lift rides up the mountain. The
balance of the party cuntinued in the train to Labelle, having an~
other photograph stop about a mile north of Mont lremblant stat ion,
on Lac Mercier. At Labelle, they explored the village and environs, and
watched the train being turned for the return trip.
The return trip was uneventful, N0
9
7, the ilDo:ninion
ll
being
held at ~funtreal West for passengers from our train, and arrival
vas made in lindsor Station at 8: 30 PM.
On the precedine day, fifty four participants enjoyed a tour
of Montreal over lines of the Montreal lransportation Commission,
using Observation Car No.1, dean of the t-.lIC rail fleet, now &nd1nc
its fifty-third season. £he tour included a trip up NIount Hoyal,
·,herc some delay was incurred when the regular car, IIITC 1347,
der1:i.led just after leaving the do>mhi11 mouth of the 33B-foot
curved tunnel near the summit. The passengers watched the intri –
cate operation of rerailing, and then proceeded on the rest of the
t.our, which took them to Lachine and Snowdon. The ~1TC crew, in
charge of Instructor T. Bonenfant, handled the operation very effic­
iently, with the result that the 1~5-minute delay on the 1·1Quntnin was
absorbed, and the trip returned to St.Denis a few minut4s ahead
of schedule. The tour up Z.lount Royal v:as the lList one to be uncier­
taken officially by the Associa.tion, as the service -/as discontinned
the following day, October 6th, pending c)nstruction of a hiGhway
on the tramway rieht-of-way.
Due
to the withdrawa.l of rail
Trip Committee Announcements service on the fl.1ontreal Trans­
portation Commission t s rail
routes serving St.James, St.
Antoine and Girouard streets, an excursion will be held over the
lines affected, also to Lachine, using car ,¥997, on Saturday,
November 2nd. The trip will leave lit. !loyal at 1: 30 P~l. and the
fare will be ~2.00 per person.
Members will recall that No.997
is one of the units of the J;1usGum
Collection, having been painted
in the MSR cream colour scheme for
the MTe Pageant last year. It has
~ot been used by the Association
3:i.nce repainting, and this will be
3. good opportunity for those who
::10 not have photOGraphs of it in
t~is colour scheme, to rectify
—–
t~e omission. Reservations are
n;>t necessary, just be on hand at 1-1CI1t Royal Division, on November
2nd. Fares will be collected on the car.
Clt 1:30 PM
The Railway Division is giving consideration to a Spring Excur­si
on over the Canadian National Railways from l-10ntreD.l to Hawkesbury
Glen Robertson-Coteau-Lacollc-St. Johns-Montreal. latch this
co~umn for details.
)
THE FALL FOLIAGE excursions this
THE FALL FOLIAGE llEEKIlND year, for the first time, formed
part of a Joint weekend betieen this
by Forster Kemp AS50cic,tion and the Upper Canada
Hai lway Society of Toronto. rhe
weekend included two excursions, a
trip over lines of the llontreal Transportation Comr!lission on Satur­
day, October 5th, 1957 and an excursion via the Canadian P:;cific
.n< ilway Company to Mont Trembl,:mt and Labelle on the following day)
Sunday, October 6th. Both trips were successful ventures and were
aided by excellent ..cather conditions v/hich prevailed on both duys.
AROUND MONTREAL BY OPEN OBSZRVA7ION CAR -Members of the
Association and other interested persons beGan to assemble at St.
Denis car barn shortly after noon on S:3.turday. ObservClticn Car .:!l
soon made its appearance, and as usual, was the ~ubject of many
photographs. As the passengers began to pick out suitable places,
the crew arrived and took up their positions. Mr. Laurin acted as
Motorman, Mr. Heider as Conductorand the trip was accompanied by
Mr. T. Bonenfant, Instructor. A cRpqcity crowd of fifty-four was
on board at 1:00 Pio as No.1 moved out into St.Denis Street. Passen­
gers included railway enthusiasts from :nany parts of Ea::;tern Canada
and the United States. The car followed the usual route via Saint
Denis, Bellechasse, 3t.Lawrence Blvd., Bernard and Park Avenue to
Laurier. After bac:l1:ing around the corner on to Laurier, Ie followed
the seldom-used loop via Laurier, St.Lawrence Blvd. and Mount Royal Avenue.
This enabled us to make a direct approach to the Jl10untain
line. The Inspector at Park and Mount Royal reported that the rog­
ular Mountain car (No .1347, Run /11) had not come down, so we were
warned to proceed lith caution. Ve came across No.1347 at the mouth
of the tunnel. The front truck had been derailed when leaving the
tunnel on the dovmward trip, reportedly [lfter strikinb small stones
on the rails. Ie proceeded to the highest point on the line, where
a prominent cliff overlooks the line. A stop was made for flhoto­
graphs at this point and at the loop. On the return trip, the car
was run inside the tunnel to a point only a fev, yards from the rear
of #1347. An emergency cre …. ! were engaged in rerailing operations,
using jacks and blocking. This was a precariuus task, owing to the
proximity of the line to a steep drop at this point. After about
thirty-five minutes of work, /hich proved to be very interest inc;,
the rerailed car was able to resume its run. It vias followed at a
prudent interval by observation car /(1.
After the trip down the mountain, an unusual route -0.5 followed
to reach the Lachine line. This vias via }l.10unt 110yal Avenue, Delor­
imier Avenue and Ontario Street to Bleury, thence via Craif Victor­ia
Square, St. James , St.Henri Place and Notre Dame. This route was
arranged to pass over the last trolley ~IGrand Union
il
inters8ction
in Canada. This is one in which t,10 double-t.rack lines cross and
are connected in all directions, so that there are eieht curved
connections in all.
Photo stops WEEe made on the Lachine line at the point where
it leaves Notre Dame street, and at Sixth Avenue, the end of the
line. Vie turned \fe~t at St.Henri Place, threaded our way through
the crossover on St.Denis street, and a3cended the hill to Girouard.
)
1;/e headed into the private-rie;ht-of-way and made
another photo stop
at Snowdon Avenue. From
there, we turned into Queen Mary Road and
climbed up the hill to St. Joseph 1 s Oratory, where a short stop was made
to allow Bill Pho.roah
to explain the interestinr
features of the
structure
. Vie then proceeded
over the Outremont
line via Decelles,
Maplewood, Bellingham, Cote St.CJ.therine
and Laurier to Park Avenue,
thence to St.Denis
carhouse
via the usual route. The trip ended at
about 6;00 PM, and it llaS agreed that it had been
enjoyable
, indeed.
STEAM POWER .IND PARLOUR CARS -Despite
the usual efforts of the
Trip Co~~ittee to sell tickets by mail as far as possible, there
were a considerable number
of tickets
to be sold at Wi~dsor Sta~ion
on Sunday
morning, as additiona
l passengers were
attracted
by the
warm, fine weather. This later brought about a shortage of lunch
supplies, as there flaS a greater demand than was anticipated
.
The
Hla class locomotive
which had
orieinally
been requ~sted
and
confirmed
by the Canadian
Pacific Railway, was refused during the
week preceding
the trip. Although HI class engines are authorized
for passage over the Ste.Agathe Subdivision
to Labelle, they have
never gone beyond Ste. Agathe. Also, ve
ry feq crews on this line are
qualified
for enr.ines of this type. For these reasons, a G3 class
engine, No.2467, was
used on our special
train. The other equipment
included baggage-buffet coach 3052,
coaches 2263, 2270 and 2268
and
parlour
cars 6616 and 6613. The latter is a buffet car observation
platform. The coaches were of the semi-streamlined type
with 70 reclining seats, among the most comfortable
of all CPR coach
equipment
.
The
use of parlour cars in our special for the first time caused
some difficulti
es as coach passengers attempted
to make their way to
the rear, disregarding
the sign reading iFirst Class Passengers
Onlyl.
As a consequence
l passengers in the parlour cars were subjected
to
frequent
checks l·or tickets and hat checks by the Trip Committee.
The
tratn ran as the second section
of Train 451, and left
lindsor
Station
at 7:50 Af-1, E.S.T.
Stops were made at lestmoWlt, Montreal
lest and Park Avenue to entrain passengers. At Montreal West,
the CRHA Lunch Service loaded the necessary
supplies aboard car 3052
which soon became
the most popular
car on the train. A considerab
le
amount of dust was raised as our speed exceeded
50 ;-:-liles per hour on
the gravel-ballasted roadbed west of St .Martin Junction
. Passengers
on the rear platform retreated
inside as the dust rose, but stepped
out again as the train slowed.
The dust …. laS most noticGable at Rosc­mere. A
brief stop was made
at Ste. Therese
for orders, then a brisk
pace ~s maintained
up the hill to St.Lin Junction
and ocross the
flatla;}ds
to St. Jerolile, where
another
operating
st,op ~Yas made.
Above St.Jerome,
No.2467 began to attack the Laurentian
grades
with fu!.l force. The hills were clothed
in the most brilliant
of
Autumn raiment, and the murky North River shone blue in the bright
sunlight of the morning. At Shawbridge, the train pulled into the
siding for a scheduled 40-minutc stop, which would
allol train No.453
to overtake
us and reach Mont Rolland station before we followed
.
It was some 35 minutes, however,
before No.453, haul
ed by engine
1257, came along
stdc our train to make the station stop at Shawbridge
and then depart. We followed, some 25 minutes
later, to a point
north of Vimy sidin~, on a curve w~ore an excellent rear-end view
)
_ ,.-1II-:-___ . ____ -N6-w,,.:…:.1l.po:!.r;~t:_..o–19u:l–______ :..paL.{e–1.=l~a
could be taken of the train on a curve beside the North River.
The engine was worked quite h.:lrd on tre trip, but. nowhere: so
much as at the next photo stop, Ste.!JIarguerite. Passengers detrain­
ed at the station and walked about h:lIf Cl mile up tho track, around. a
curve, and on to a gradient of almost 2%, which passes through a
cut. When everyone had taken thGir positions, th~ siGnal was passed
down and the train advanced toward the in.i-cing photographers, bel­
ching black smoke with reverbcrntinf; exhausts. It s(;opped on the
steepest part of the grade J but -las le difficulty, although with very m1.ny sOlll1d effect::. !
The next stop was made near Val I.lorin, wherc the line crosses
a portion of Lac Raymond on a fill. Some good photographs were
taken here, despite the hanidcap of soft gravel on the roadbed. At
r~nt Tremblant, approximately eighty passengers detrained for trans­
fer (via the local school bus) to 1·lont Tremblant Chalet, «here
forty-three of them were taken on a boat trip on Lac Tremblant and
most of the remninder made the trip via Chair Lift to the mount top. Some people made both trips. While passengers detrained,
pictures of the train crew and other publicity pictures Viere being
taken, using the engine as a back-drop.
After leavinr; Nont Tremblant station, the train moved on to a
point about one mile beyond, where another run-past was made, around
a curve skirting the shore of Lac r.1ercier. From there, it required o
ly n feltl minutes to complete the run to Labelle. For those who st.:ly
ed lit;h th~ train, its switching operations at Labelle proved
interest.ing. The lYC at this point will only hold the engine and
three cars. The baggage-buffet and parlour cars lere therefore:
separated from the coaches and turned on the fje, which is pictures­quely
situ~ted between tvw larce hills. The train lias then re1rran­
ged, backed under the coal chute, then run up the shop track to the
ash pit so that the ashpan could be dumped. It is rather unusual
to see a complete passenger train on a shop track l
The pa
ssengers occupied themselves in various ways ….. Ihile in
Labelle. It is a pleasant plncc to spend an ::Ifternoon. There is a
waterfall on the Riviere Rouge, which flows through the tallll. This
river also flows through Huberdeau, destination of tltl0 of our prev­
ious Fall Foliate excursions.
Members
of the Trip Committee hUd to prepar(·~ the train for the
return trip. Seats had to be turned in the three coaches and the
buffet car had to be cleaned. The sandwiches and other food had all
been sold on the trip northward, but arrangements were made for more
at Ste. Agathe. The train left Labelle at 4:50 PM, and made a quick
run to Mont Tremblant to entrain the viewers of mountain scenery_ The
high point of the return journey was the aiicent of thE: steep
grade bet leen l>lorrison and SU1!lI:!it, where the engine fac0d its stern­
est test without difficulty. It is unfortunate, however, that no one had n
tape recorder, to preserve the locomotigc sounds l
Stops were made at Ste.Agathe, St.Jeromc and Ste. Therese as well os a t
the city stations, The train ran as No. 460, which does not oper­
atc during the autumn.
tlllen thG
time comes to plan our next trip, we shall have a hard
time to equal this, our fifth Fall Foliage Excursion.
)
C.R.H.A.
N81s port -1957 rage U..2
000000000000000000000000000 9 The rontmorency Dubdi vision of the
Cana:iian ,,~ … ,tionQl RaihT:-:Ys :i.s to
hav,,:; n nm. terminal tl.t uebcc. The
old 1:i.
T
kP :;t3tion at St.Pnul 3treet, f!itb
its iron gates, stub switches
and turnt~ble, is to be replaced by
o 0
o NOTES AND NEVIS 0
o o o
by Forster Kemp
o o o
000000000000000000000000000 a new terminal near Parent Square,
former terminal of the Ct;!.nadian Nor-
thorn Railway. Trains will run along part of St.And.re Street, to
reach tho neirl location. The old bujlding will bc removed to make
vlay for a new Post Office building, and a irlidened St. faul Street. The filontmorency
Subdivision is electrified and providcs a frequent
suburban service bct/een Quebec, l1ontmorency :ralls, Stc. Anne de
Beaupre and St. Joachim.
9 Caru!dian P.:lcifi~ RailHRY has sold its station in ~lalkerton, Ont.
for the sum of ~1.00, to the tovms recreation committee. The
brick building has been isolated from actual rnil Gcrvice for ov>::r a y
ear, due to weakening of the three-span bridge over thG 3au[c.~cn
River, which was condemned for the passage of trnins. A n:~lV st.:…t­
ion has been built on the opposite side of t.h(: riv{;:r.
a £h0
several suhurb.:in stations betvleen Saint John and Westfield.
Bench, N.B., on thG Canadian Pacific Iltlilway, have been demolished
nnd their platforms plowed up. Tl10Y were notable for their unus­
ual but picturesque names: Acamac, Ketepec, fi.1orna, Jl1~nti!lon,
Pamdenec, Epworth Park, Inelesidc, Ononettc, Hillandalc. They
were wit.hout service since the discontinuD.nce of tl:1.ins 105 and 106
in September 1956. The stations at Bc:lleisle and Granville on the
Minto Subdivision have also been torn down, but t.hnt nt Bclleiiole
has been r … ~placed by the for,.cr bunkhouse from r·1into, NB.
9 Several mixed train services h.:lva r0centl~! been discontinued on
both major Canadian rD..ilways. Some of these changes have hcen
reported before, but they arc summarized as follm1s:
CPR Trains 115-116 Bay Shore-St. George SO October 27th.

II
5$2-5$3 Renfrew-Eeanville, Onto ·Soptember 20th.

II
612-613 Kingston-Sharbot Lake Onto June 15th.

II
605-606 Havelock-Bobcaygeon, 6nt. October 27th.·

,/
659-660 Woodstock-Port Burlell, ant. AUftst 3rd.

747-74$ Orangeville-Elora, Ont, July tho

II
753-756
Orangcville-Tceswater, Onto August 3rd.

715-716
Orangeville-Uulkcrton, Ont. -1/

366-367 1rois itivicres-GrandGs Piles, Que.
October 27th.
CNR

233-238 Hamilton-Port Rowan
6
Ont.
II

235-236 Simcoe-Port Dover, nt.
H
e Other changes i.nclude the discont.inuance of CNR pc-· ssonger trains
28 and 37 (Stratford-Goderich,Ont.) on October 27th, and has made
cxtensi ve chane;es in services bet1een Halifax-Sydney, Montrcal­
I~land Pond, and Regina-Prince Albert, where R.1iliners have replnc­
ad sterun trains. lhe new Sydney service provides an evenirc.: arr­ival in Sy
dney for pa.ssenger from the Ocean LiL1ited, and a long­swai
tcd 23-hour redUction in travelling time between St.Johns, Nfld.
and Montreal. R.J.n!ling time Truro-Sydney is 5~ hours.
)
, .
e Canadian
Pacific and Canadian
N.:!tional began cOIYunon-carrierpiggy
­
back
ll
operations
between Montreal and loronto
on September 1
6th,
and began operation of special trains on October 9th with fast
schedules of 7 to 8 hours.
Both railways hUV8 fitted a number
of flatcars with roller bearings
, steel floors and special fittings
for haulage of tho longer common-carrier trailers. The CPR has
one 75-foot flatcar and is reported
to have more on order. Such a
car can carry two of the larrest trailers
. A new terminal
has
been built near Cote de Liesse Road in the nontrcal
area for the
service. Trucking
lines involved are Smith Transport
Limited,
Kingsway
Transports
Limit:. ad 1 Inter-City Transport Limited,
Motor­
ways Limited Direct Motor lransport
Limited, Husband
Transport
Limited and Reliable
Transport
Limited. CNR train numbers are
300 and 301, while
the CPRs are 929
and 930.
8 Reeular service
began on
the Canadian
National Railways Chiboug­
ar.1au line on Honda
y, October 7th. Mixed tr
ains run from Senneterre
to r~iquelon on ~1onday, Wednesday
and Friday, returning
on Tuesday
Thursday
and Saturday. From
Miquelon
to Chibougamau,
thu service
is Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday, returning
on Honday, Wednesday and
Friday. (Mr. Kemp comments
that it vlould take six days to
make a round trip from Montreal to Chibougamau
and return. Going
north, Forster?
-Ed.)
e Canad
ian Pacific Railway timetables
in effect October 27th, con­
tain an almost complete
renwnbering
of all district
and regional p
assenger
and mixed trains. The tr;).nscontinenta
l services, and
certain lone-distance
regional trains retain their old numbe
rs.
Purpose of the ren~~bering
is to rationalize the assignment of
train numbers, a
llotting certain blocks of numbers to each dis­
trict, and segregating
mixed trains from all-passenger
trains.
As on example, on
the ~uebec District, all passenger and mixed
trains formerly
carried numbers
in the 200, 300, 400 and 500
series. Under
the new arrangement
, passenger train3 carry numbers
between 131 and 293, and mix
ed trains arc numbered
in the 600
series. Space does not permit us to publish
complete
details, but
they may be obtained
simply by comparing
old and new
time folders •
Montreal
Transportat
ion Commission Changes
.lLECTRIC RAILI/AY
enthusiasts
in the
Montreal area VlCre taken by surprise
on October
3rd, when the Montreal Tra­
nsportat
ion Corrunission an»l.ounced
the
abandonment of its most scenic route,
No.ll, designated MOUNTAIN
. This line
cx .. ended on a private
right-of-way from a loop ~t the intersection
of P:::~.rk and Mount Royal Avenues,
to a loop near the Police Station
in
~:Ount Royal Park, about half a mile from the Chalet. The line as
buil~ during 1928 and opened in 1929. It
included several sharp
curves, steep grades, rock cuts and a tunnel. At one point it was
built on a shelf blasted out of the mountains
ide, affording
an exc­e
llent view of the north and west sections of tho city.
Cars in use on -his line lere ten of the 1325 series, specially
eql:..ippcd
with dynamic
braking for usc on the line. It ViaS operated
daily during July and >.ueust
from 10: 00 AM to sunset, and from
May 15th to June 21st, ond from Labour Day to the advent of cold
weatr.er, during the same periods on Suturdays and Sundays only.
)
G,rttrl.A. News Hoport – 1957
On sunny sum!l1sr dc:.ys, six or more cars Nou.ld J~1 in service, buv
in the spring and fall, one c that on Sunday, October 6th, 1957, at about. 6:uO PI,I Daylight Time
(at about the same time as our specinl train ,1.pploJ.ched l·iont Trem­
blant station, on the Full liolitl.ec ;xcursio{l), t.hlt Car 1347, Run I,
Route 11, left the Park Avenu0 loop for the last timc, to make the
long, winding climb up through the ·:oods, rock ~helf and tunnel to
the Mountain Loop, where the Bil~ey car on Route 93, SHAKE:JPEARE, l
ater ftE~1E:MBRANCE, uscd to , .. ait. TIle waiting pnsscngers boarded
the car, most of them unawnre that it waS the last trip, then the
car climbed to the summit and st~rted on the long descent, ,·lith n
short pausG at the tunnel Ilhile the press photoeraphers recorded the
occ:J.sion. The growl of the dynamic brake was hGarJ for the last
time us No.1347 resurned its dovmward course into the twilight,
unlonded its passengers at the Park Avenue Loop, then drew away
into Mount Royal Avenue.
-Forster A. Komp.
Removal of the track on the Hount,::in line commenced on the day
following its .::!.bandonment, and requir..::s about three tecks to accom­
plish. About t1onty men were employed in the \fork, usinG Crane Car
V13, flat car 3102 and two motor trucks. Rails were pulled from the
ties by the crane, then separated by the men and loaded on tho flat
car for tr~nsportation to the loop at Park Avenuc, where the rflils w
(;rc stacked. Work on the southbound line (up the grade) started
fi15t, as the cars worked from the northbound line. Rails inside
ttj() tunnu1 were lifted by hand labour and dragged outside by tho
motor trucks. A motor road will bo constructed on the route of the
former trolley line.
About
the same time, it was ::mnounced that the LACHINE line,
.~oute 91, will cease oper<:!tion on .bnuilry 5th, 1957~ ark is now
under wayan the improvement of the North Bank 10ud ,lou,f t.he
Lachine Cunal from Cote St. Paul Road to Fjfth Avenue, Ville Saint
Pierre, for USG as a temporary route by busses. A trunk sewer is
to be constructed on or nenr th~ l.outc of the car line, and a road
will then be constructed on the present rieht-of-way.
As has been previously announced cars of routes 48, ST.ANTOINE­
CARLAND, and 31 ST. HENRI-N. D. G., will make their last runs in the
early hours of Sunday, November 3rd, 1957, ~nd will shortly thereaft(:.l.·
be replaced by Hutobusses.
EXPENSES ••• AND
PUBLICATION
OUR
Small as our oper.:rtion is, the Im … s of
economics apply nonetheless inflexibly. A
review of our costs has demonstrated
the the money derived from subscriptions,
~s well as the soecial allotment mauc
by the Association, is insufficient to pay ail expenSC:1S incident:ll
to the Editorial COCll.llittee. Faced between the unole.:tsnnt ~ltcrnatie[;
of curtailing the size of our publication, or increasing the subscr­
iption rate slightly, we have chosen the latter courso, hoping that
our subscribers will understand our position, ~. and continue their
support. The new rate will be .;2.00 pcr year, and in addition to
meeting our busic expenses, we trust that it Itill enable us to pro­
vide more illustrations during 195$. Thank you. Orner
S.A. Lavallee

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