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Canadian Rail 077 1957

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Canadian Rail 077 1957

CANA.DIA.N
RAILROAD
HISTOIUCAl
J:sSOCIA
TION
INCORPOR..mD.
MONTREAL, CANADA
NEWS RE PORT
NO. 77
APllIL 1957
The April meeting
of the Association /i II
Notice of Meeti
ng
be held in room 2 ,
Transportation
BUil-d-
ing, 159 Craig Street West on ;Jednesday, I
April 10th, 1957, at 8:15 PM. No business
will be transacted
at this meetirlg, but
the
prog
r
amme
will
be
given
ove
r
to
a
description
of
ra
il
wa
y museum p
ro
j
ects
in
North
Ameri
ca
,
illu
strated by slides taken by several of the members. As usual,
guests will be 1ilelcome.
L-__ A_s_s_o_c_1_a_t __ i_o_n __ News I
The Twenty Fifth Anniversary Banquet of
the Association, which coincided with the
March meeting
, w
as
he
ld in
the
Re
n
dezvous
Room
of
Ch
il
ds
Restaurant
, P
ee
l
Street
,
Iiiontrea
l, on
vlednesda
y,
March 1
3th
. Nea
rl
y
fi
ft
y
memb
e
rs
and
guests
participated
in
th
is
important
observance
,
which
was g
iven
good
press
co
verage
thanks
to
the
efforts
of I-1r. Lorne Perry, our
Public Relations
Officer.
The Banquet
Conunittee Chairman, l·1r. Douglas Brown, acted as
Master of Ceremoni
es; other Euests at the head table included
the President
,
Mr
.
Anthony
Cl
egg
;
Mr
.
John
Loye, fo
under
and
first
President
of
the
Assoc
ia
tion
; ~tr. Arthur Duperron
, Honourary
Vice
President
; an~l Messrs. S. S. Worthen
and Orner S. A.
Lavallee, Direct­
ors, who spoke on liThe Last T>;enty Five Years 11 and liThe Next Twenty
Five Years respectively. Mr. William G. Cole entertained the
gathering
with more of his inimi
table recollections
of his railvlsy
experiences
on the Canada
Atlant
ic
Railway
,
mora
th.1n
fif
ty
.fivo
years
ago
.
The bl~ssing v:as invoked by the Hccording Secret.C1ry,
f-ir. William Pharoah, and the speakers Jere thankt~d by r1r. Lornl.
Perry. In addition to the regular members, many old
friends of: the
Association
vlere noted including Miss Anna QDowd, Assistant
Cur,:ltor
of the Chateau de RaOlezay, D
r. R.V.V. Nicholls, and Dr. and Mrs. L
eo Mason. The toast to the
Queen was
p
roposed
by
Mr
.
Brown,
whi
le Dr. N
ic
holls p
ro
p
osed
a
toas
t
to
the
Associat
i
on
.
A number of i
tems
we
re on
exhib
i
ti
on
fo
l
lowine
the
b
an
q
uet
,
They
i
nc
l
uded
a
co
ll
ection
of
the
ear
ly
Bul
l
etins
of
the
Associat
i
on
and
photo
gra
phs
of
act
ivi
ties
in
the
1
930s
,
brou
ght by
Dr
.Nicho
ll
s.
Two
model ~li scale models of early Muntreal
street railway equipment
, bui
lt
by
14r
.
Clegg
.
An
oper:lt
ing ~II scale mudel
Canadian National
Railways
4-8-4 type locomotive
and van, built by r·1r. John Saunders
.
Mr. Binns brought
a large-scale ~l to the foot) model of MTC car
1800, while Mr. Jack Hewitson
, who viaS unable to be present, exhib­i
ted his ~II scale model live-steamer locomotive
No.285 of the C,:mad­i
an Pacific Railwuy,
the
first
eneine
to
be
bu
il
t by thtit Company in
1883. These itcm3 VIere the subject of V0!y favourable
comment from
those attending
the Banquet.
It is regretted
that many members
were unable to be present to
JOln in the observance
, which convened shortly before 7:00 PM and
adjourned
at 11 0 clock. That the occasion was a successfu
l one i::;
due in large measure to Mr. Douglas Brown, who made
the a::::angr:c~~
:
,
t
i i
i
)
C.R.H.A. News Report
1957 _ ..
Ppge 38
CANADIAN LOCm,iOlIVI:J ….. ••.•. by Robert R. Brown
Railroad Cho.mplain &. Saint Lawrence
J .il.30N C. PI3RCE 1837
IN ITS ORIGINAL FOR~I, Can~das firot locomotIve, the ;JOHCfrnmn
was not too 5::..tL~:f made it vety unst.cnc..:
r
~h2n !Ull!ling at spc£d on the rough f;tl~;_~p irun
rails. l .. s a rf:::u1.t, the C.iieCl.::lrs decided. to buy another 2nri;~( of
<1 typ0 which It.ol,ld be.: more s .... cceosful under such adrersc conditions.
In July le~61 the locomotive GEORGE VlASHINGlON, of the Phila­
delphia & CoJ.un.bia aailroad, built by Jilliam Norris of Philadelphia,
made a great nQ.rrlC ::Jr itself and for its builder by performing the
noteworthy feat of hauling a train, weiehing 19,200 pounds, up an
inclined plane 2[~}OOO feet long and having a gradient of 1 in 14,
which is 7.1%. lhc direct:.ors of the Champlain & claint. Lawrence rrR
decided that this was the kind of a locomotive they needed and the
order was placed in the autumn of 1836.
On March 27th, 1837, Uilliam D. Lindsay, the commissioner (or
general manaeer) of the company l..Trote to Philo Doolittle, r.lerk of
the Champlain Transportation Company, Ihich operated the steamboats
on Lake Champlain, UI;i follows:

Vie are about makinr; ar::::J.nG(.ilcnts to enrage a boat at
,~hit..0haJ.l or Troy to proc(,jd there to Philadelphia for
th(: pllrposc of bringing in a locomotive enp;ine built
for thit~ conpm1y by Mr. Norris of that place and ;lhich
is to be TG,tdy ~(>r ship:nont about the 5th of April. I
1-3:,; fro;). l·II. i?ierce thnt yOllI company .srG about to
searl to the E·ame pltice for th3 boilers for their new
boat.s Now ,·rot:.ld it not bo of r,lUtual advantage for us
to ::::end a bOClt as will aecompli:1h the …. lishc-s of both
pa:tie8~ Jc vlill either bring in your boil(!rs ch·lr···; ,
ene-haif the freieht to BurliI![t,on or we wi.ll ullOl~· : .)11
the ontS-half of the vlhol(~ freight for bringing in our
engine, the total w(!ight of which is un t;ons
at the most.
Mr. Norris is to send on an engineer in chnrge tho
,<[ill of course look after it during the passage. I
fancy the boo.t had better be en£;aged at Troy as the
navi.gation will be open and a boat can proce8d f·Com
t:wrc some time h(!forc the canals from ;lhit~!hall will
be nuvigablo. n
The lo~ol1ot:i…,e .1.rrivc.:d at St~ Johns about the 1st of May 1.nd it
was r:::.vbn the nc.:nc at Jason C. Piorce, one of the directors of the
comp3ny -.. n man who did. :narc them :·ny other to organizG ·.:.hl; (.c…~­
pany and get it started.
fhe lOCOf.l0t:ive IIJASON C. rIl~ilCE it letS a. grcnt success and it
had a lonE and busy life of about sixty years.
C.R.H.A. News Report
1957
Page 39
It was a Norris class nell engine with the following
leading partic­
ulars:
Cylinders
•••••••••••
Driving Wheels .
…..
Truck Vlheels ••••••••
Theel ArrangeMent
•••
Length of EJi:..er
Length of tJ.h…:;r-(; .••
9×18
11
48
30
4-2 ·0
12
1
01
7~(/
Number of tubes ••••••
Diameter of tubes ••••
Heating surface
••••••
~leight in running order
, …..
Weigr_t O!l drivers
~ ~ .. .,
58
2
9.7 sq.feet
15,705 lbs.
e,022 II
The r:har..i(tcri~H::
.(; fe:H~Ule5
(!( t te !]orr is locomotives
were: rather
light b3.r fram-J<.j,
s1 i.gh>.:.~.y inclined
outside
cylinders,
boilers of
small diameter
,rith 2.
1
copper flues and semi-circular (D-shaped)
fireboxe
s Rlso of ccpper. The firebox was surmounted
by a hemi­
sphericaj.
l:crn.S! u;;, haysack
pattern which, in turn, was drowned by a
much srnal~.er one, cIso r~emispherica
l and made of polished
brass or
copper, ,,1:~ ch cHrriG1
tl:e S1ict} v L
atcr at:., l~rCcab.ly
c:~boJ.!~ 1648, the JASON C. PIERCE was rebuilt
as a 4-4··0 ~ypBj with an e:.:S~::-ely
nE)f; 5tJt of dimension
s, as shown
in the Keefer Heports of 1859··60:
Cyliiltl(~r3
. (. ~ … , 0 ~.

….. ;i n -hI:> i … …. -. -Eo h .v.· …. .::> .: ~ , ••
1 • nuwt-ar
Lengt.h of tubes ~ •• ~.
N1.unher of tubes e ••••
IOt
x20
46: 4
7
1
6
n
91,
Diameter
of tubes ••••
Weight of engine •••••
n of tender •••••
,later capacity
of
tender • ~ •• 0 •••••
l~II
12 tons
3 II
500 gals.
Betwce1 leJ.17 ai:l(~ ] 3::;9. tr:.e raiJroad
rece:i.VGc1 se!!:e new and
larger Ie cornut;lves
nut fi!1[..:.l Y 1 tht;; JAS:JN C.
PIEdGE W.: •. , ~.-3 i.d aside
for sale, g!Jiq; to t,h.:-3t. 1i.W:31~CC; &. In 1850, for 3e:vj ce Jr. that 7G8d !:letwe:8n II.l.1n!a:E
and Jo::Jf!tte, and, when
requi::,~(;l.t on tLe In.tl~;t ri~ V:a.Li.3se :mJ. J.awcl.on Hat1. … 3.Y, It kept
its origjn.l:~
nC::.mep~.ate
ba-;–,: 01 t~f! ·Jc::i.,.;tte
line, it; W2.~ bettor
known by it:) r.ieknolDE.
FACATji) –t,he name of a prominent,
journalist
and poli tic:!.a!1 .•
Authorities
differ as to whether
the JASON C. PIERCE had a cab
in its later days. ,!he late Dr. Ferland,
of Lanoraie,
described
a
cab with one gothic-shaped window on each side but ~t seems more
likely that it was the locomotive
~lONTREAL
(probably
renamed
LAPHAIRIE)
which had a cab. The late Jos. Hivest, who travelled
over the line many times, insisted that the PACAUD did not have a
cab -Lingenieur
etait expose a lair et dans lhiver il portait
un capuchr:l.iY.k
Also, my father remembered
seeing it doing light
shunting
ill tne Hochelaga yard, about 1$$$-$9,
and he was partic­
ularly arnllsec:i by the ludicrous
sight of a tall stout engineer perch­
ed on the rc::.tllng o/h3re the cab should have been.
Ir. ~.$$l, chp. 8t. r~awrence
&. Industrie
Village
Railway
became
part of :,lH; prov?.IlCiaJ
government-owned
Quebec, Montreal
, Ottawa &
Occ:;deJ1taJ.
Railway
anti the Jason C. Pierce was numbered
33. in 1882,
the Eastern Division
of the QMO&O became the North Shore Raih (controlled
by the Grand Trunk
Railway)
with the engine listed as 1.
:4:-itThe engineer
was exposed to the air, and in winter he

wore a hooded jacket.
C.R.H.A. News Report -1957 Page 40
The DORCHESTER, Canadafs first steam railway locomotive,
built by Robert Stephenson & Co., Newcastle-upon-Tyne,
England, in 1836 for the Champlain & Saint Lawrence R.R.
The JASON C. PIERCE, Canadas second railway locomotive,
built by William NorriS, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,
U.S.A. for the Champlain & Saint Lawrence R.R., in 1837.
)
C.R.H.A. News ~eport
1957 Page 41
Then,
in 1885, the road became part of the Canadian Pacific Railway
and the JASON C. PIERCE became No. 197. The C.P.R. had little use
for such a small eneine so, in lSg9, it was sold to the 1Assomp­
tion Railway, which ran from the village of that name to a connec­
tion with the Canadian Pacific at L1Epiphanie. Several years later,
the exact date is not known, the station, engine house and rolling
stock of the LAssomption Railway were destroyed by fire.
Jason C. Pierce, the :.kl11 I!hosc name the engine bore, was born
on September 9th, 1778 in Sandersfield, a little v~llage in tho
south-west corner of 14ass:lchufletts, ahd in 1810, he moved to FrFlnk­
lin County, Vermont. J-;e servr::c d.3 ,!.
ol..i.ntee:- …. n t.ho Vermont State
militia during the l1u.r (·f ~_ti12 al11. ciuT.ing th3 I3at.vl~ of Platts­
burgh, he was capturet:. Ly eing released, he c0r.tin11ed in .:let-ivG business c::.ro~nd the lake
until 1817 when he ;n!vfd to Canaja. firot in rJiontrcal but after 1825
in St. Johns where h~ c(,mmencec. business as a gener3.1 merchant, as
an importer and exporter and as agent there for the Champlain Trans­
portation Compttny. Hi.s house J… which is still standing on the north­
east corner of Champlain and ~rontenac Streets alongside the track
of the railway, las the firot brick building in the town, and was
built about 1 ~30 with bride:-. i:nrorted from Burlington, Vermont. He
became a British subject ane he and his son, Charles S. Pierce,
were the most promi~cnt ,nc. calthy m~n in the district; both served
as directors of the Ch3fl).,tJl.1J n de Saint Lawrence Rall:oad ~
Jason was VE::r:~ (;ef!€.s&sd Nh .. m the railway ~:[,.5 ~xtended to
Rouses Point in U.!:;:. viton he.. realized thHt his ;::r?,:;p.Jrous business
would be ru.Lned. H;::: cO1nc<.:tion ,fith the Champla i:1 Transportation
Company was ~5F(~cial~y v~:l~ablc and on ~eptemL.er 9~h: IPI)~~ his
seventy-thi.:;c t it~h(:fY, ~lf; V~l.) :i.eSt. stenmb:::>fJ:t puJ 1f.( [~ay .lrCm the
St. Jc.hns A;·li:.rf, J~t.cn r.~ Ii~:c~~ C.ied
Jason oS grandson, t:::l:arlar-, S. Pierce Jr., wC.:-J.t (IV:); I .~ r
and, while serving as an officer in a swanky guQ.rds r:::lgi.r.,·.~11: ri .. :~
ly dissipated the family fortuno. He then returned to .~(, .,~.
where he and his two unmarried sisters lived for many yc,:.~
state of genteel poverty. The tl0 sisters at the time of the Railway Centenary, though they resided in one
room in a mean rooming house, in a state of destitution.
0000
x
X
X
X
X
00000000000
SEE THE SEAIIAY CONSTRUCTION! SPRING TRIP
On Saturday, April 13th, 1957, the Association is
sponsoring a railway trip from Montreal to Cornwall,
followed by an auto bus tour of the Seaway workings
from that point. Participants will travel to Cornwall
by Canadian Pacific Railway, in a chartered Daylincr
lT
RDC car. Route will be from Montreal to DeBeaujeu,
then via the freight-only Cornwall branch to Cornv,:?l …
Trip leaves Montreal, Windsor Station •••• 10: 45 AM
If returns to II •••• 6: 05 PM
0000
lIi
X
X
X
X
ALL INCLuSIVE HAIL AND BUS FARE, per person .. ~4. 50M t 1
on rea •
RESERVATIONS OBTAINABLE FROM: Trip Committee, Box 22, Station B,/
CAPACITY LIMITED TO 70 PEOPLE. ORDER IIOW!
,-C-, R,:.!H!.!,-Ac:. ____ ~ ___ –N,9w8–lli> jYlrt -19 57 Page 42
Forster Kemp reports on •••••••
FOUR YEARS OF ROCS IN CANADA
Are they meeting the challenge ?
MORE THAN FOUR YEARS AGO, in February 1953, the Budd
Ear (RDC) first appeared in revenue ~ssenger service on a Canadian
railway. Budd demonstrator car No.2960 spent three weeks in revenue
service on the Canadian Pacific Railway, operating between Montreal
and Mont Laurier, and won enthusiastic acceptance by the people of the
Laurentian area, as it represented a great departure from the normal
equipment of wooden, gas-lighted coaches.
Since that time, more than 50 such cars have appeared on Canadian
railways –on the Canadian Pacific, the Canadian National and the
Pacific Great Eastern. They have been used to replace conventional
trains on main lines, secondary lines and on branch lines, in both
local and express services, and in a few cases, they have inaugurated
new train services. On some routes. their rapid acceleration and low­
er centres of gravity have cut running times to a greater extent than
would ever have been possible with ordinary equipment. Their ease
of operation enables trains to operates with a crew of two or three
men, instead of the five or six required on regular trains. Also.
they consume less fuel than the usual diesel-electric or steam loco­
motive, so that passenger train costs may be cut in several ways.
However, some railway officials see t~em as a cure-all for the
ills of railway passenger service, and that is the outlook with which
we must diaagree. The RDC has many advantages, but it also has
disadvantages, which mainly accrue to the passengers who use these
cars, when compared with modern, locomotive-hauled cars.
One of the chief definiencies is that, the Pacific Great Eastern
excepted, no provision is made for meal service. RDC cars are ncW
used on several runs where the time consumed.exceeds four hours, and
where the schedule covers normal meal periods. In many cases, ~h_
trains which were supplanted by RDC services had buffet-coach, bl.l .. ~C>~t_
parlour or c~fe-parlour service. For example the example the l]:;t:­
liner service betvleen Yarmouth and Halifax NS on the Dominion f.tJ 1n­
tic llailway requires 6 hours and 10 minutes eastbound, 6 hours end 15
minutes we:=;tbound. At Digby J it connects with the SS PRINCE3S H,·,J·gr.rz
which carries passengers from Saint John, with Montreal and Bo~~on
connections. If these passengers appetites are disturbed by the sea
voyage, they will probably not hc:.ve any opportunity to eat between
the morning leaving time of the steamer from Saint John, and the arri­
val of the Daylinerll in Halifax at 6: 35 PI.l.
Another disadvantage of the RDC units generally used is that they
are not equipped with reclining seats. Most of the day coaches built
in recent years ~ave been so equipped and many trains replaced by RDC.
services had reclining seat coaches. Thus we have, in effect, a down­
grading of service to the passengers. RDC units are not permitted
to haul other cars as trailers, and this limits the reserve capacity.
Passenger traffic on many Canadian railways varies greatly from day
to day, usually rising to peak load level on weekends. Also, special
groups move from time to time by trains, such as school classes,
C.R.H.A. News Report -1957 Page 43
clubs, teams, tours, etc. Vlith an ordinary train, extra equipment
can usually be added to take care of these requirements. With a
limited number of RnCs assi.gned to a terminal passenger capacity
is strictly limited. In add~tion, no special services, such as
lounge, parlour, buffet or sl~eping facilities, can be provided for
special parties as on an ordinary t.rain. Therefore, as RDCs become
more common, train travel will become less popular with these groups.
The
RDC tends to reduce all train travel to a Ilcommon denomin­
ator. Parlour cars are mainly operated for those who wish t.o have
a quiet journey separated from rowdy individuals and noisy e:I-,lldr3n
who, unfortunately, often travel in coac!1es. They are williag to
pay extra for increasen comfort, in this sense. HClev~r, tb~:e are
as yet no parlourl RDCs and passengers must travel itcoach class,l.
Although the ROC is a smooth-riding car, the noise and vibration
of the Wlder-floor engines, particularly when accelerating, reduces
the comfort le;rel to considerably less than that of an ordinary
passenger car. This becomes tiring, expecially on a long journey,
and makes rail travel little better than riding in an automobile or
motor bus. The baggage service is one of the chief advantages that
railway travel has over other forms of passenger transport. Passen­
gers can have trunkS, bicycles, skis, dogs and even canoes forwarded
with them on a train. However, some RDC services have only a small
baggage space, and some, particularly on the Canadian Pacific sub­
sidiaries, the Dominion Atlantic, Quebec Central and Esquimalt &
Nanaimo railways, have no baggage service whatsoever.
lith all of these disadvantages, where should RDCs be used?
There are qUite a number of lines -There sisable towns receive only
mediocire passenger serVice, ~~th outdated equipment and slow sched­
ules. Examples of such lines are Canadian Nationals Halifax-Yarmouth,
Moncton-Saint John (equipment good but schedules slow), Montreal­Granby
:,, Waterloo, Hamilton-3imcoe-fillsonburg-St.Thomas, Longlacl..
Fort William, London-Palmerston-Kincardine-Southampton, and Canadian
Pacifics Trois Rivieres-Shawinigan Falls-GrandMere, Montreal-Jol~::~te­
St. Gabriel Ottawa-Prescott, Kineston-Renfrew, Orangeville-Tee.!:;ojn-o:or,
Woodstock-St.Thomas and Woodstock-Tillsonburg routes. On both sY3tems
there are a large number of lines in western Canad~ where p-1.s~one:(~l·
service was greatly reduced, but could be revitalized by an infus:on
of ROCs. Many of these lines have only a slow mixed train SeIvi.c0
which carries passengers who only ride as a last resort. Can we
blame them? Introduction of modern RDC service lOuld have to be
accompanied by an agrossive publicity campaign, with paid advertising
in we~kly newspaper3, the editors of which are influential among the
people of smaller communities.
Another point is that where running time is reduced by the use
of ROC equipment, schedules of connecting lines should be altered to
make convenient connections. Connections are often the answer to
continued good patronage. This wa$ most obvious with the discontin­
uance of trains 17 and 18 by the C.P.R. between Montreal and Sudbury,
which formerly offered close connections with the tlDayliner between
:r.1attawa and Angliers. This is now a five-hour connection, with No.9
and a 4 hour, 27 minute connection with No.8 at 14attawa. Patronage
has suffered to the extent that it would not be surprising if the
service reverts to mixed trains, one of these days.
)
C.R.H.A.
News Report -1957 Page 44
Similarly, local services on main lines lend themselves well to
use of RDC equipment, but schedules should be arranged to make con­
venient connections lith throngh t.rains and trains of other routes.
The so-called Dayliner
ll
(IT between Sudbury and Fc.rt ~1ilJ.j.11 Oil a C.P.R. is a particular offender
on this scorB, since p3.3senfcrs 0:1 through trains must wait all day
at either terminal before plocp.cding to their destination on this
service.
RDC equipment can and should be used to improve frequency of
service between citiQS which are a medium distance apart. This has
been done in the Calgary·-Ec!mJnton, Toronto-Peterboro and Toronto­
London-Detroit services, but what about Saint John-Moncton, Rcrin.:l­
Saskatoon and other similar applications ?
To sum up, the best use of RDC equipment is to provide faster
and more comfortable service to patrons of branch lines and local
services. If used in main line express services, they should be
equipped with reclining seats and provide buffet service, but even
with these amenities, they are not as comfortable as a modernT loco­
motive-hauled train. They should be used to divorce passenger from
freight service on branches serving larger towns. The mixed train is
an ancchronism, beloved by railway enthusiasts, but having little
attraction for other passengers, and should be eliminated, not by
discontinuing passenger service, but by agressive promotion of the
modern, low-cost service which the RDC can provide.
000 000
The Pacific Great Eastern Railway in
PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN British Columbia now offers two tri-
OFFERS NEW SERVICES weekl:r schedules betvTeen North Vancouver
and r~ince George, B.C. Trains 7-1
and 2-8 are the new ItCariboo Dayliners It
with complimentary meal service and reserved seats at additional
charge. Trains 3 and 4 are conventional trains with 12-section, 1
drawing-room sleeping cars. The schedules are as follows:
No.5 I No.J I No.7-1 Stations No.2-8 I No.4 I
No.6
Daily MWF £ £ WFS Daily
,
6:10P! 9:JOA 7:45A Lv.North Vancouver Ar. 11: 45P
I
7:10Pi12:23P
6:)$F lO:02A $:lJA Horseshoe Bay Lv. 11:16P 6: J$P ll: 5~A
7:0~fj 10: 27A $J5A Brunswick 10: 53P 6:10pl11:1S
7: 251, lO:50A $:45A Porteau 10:JJP 5: 50Pllo:: .. 7:
411-1l:05A 9:09A Britannia 10:18p 5:J5P10:JlA 8:02P
lJ.: JOA 9:30A Ar.Squamish Lv. 9:5BP 5:10P lO:08A
11: 50A 9:J5A Lv.Squamish Ar. 9:50P 4:15P
6:10P 2:00P Li1100et Lv. 5:10P 10: JOA
2:05A 7:25P Williams Lake 11: 50A 2:JOA
6:00A 10:07P Quesnel 9:2$A 11: lOP
9:09AI12:JOA Ar.Prince George Lv. 7:00A 7:40P
I TTS £ £ I TTS
£-No 1 leaves Squnmish TTS, arr. Prince George lFS. NO.2, leaves
Prince George WFS, arrive~ Squamish WFS. Nos. 7 and a, N.)rth ~i1-
couver to Squamish, run daily. TTS-Tuesday, Thursday, Satul,r.:;I.v.
MWF-Monday, Wednesday, Friday. ;·lFS-I.Jedngsday, F!iday, Sunc!>y.
)
C.R.H.A. News Report -1957 Page 45
CPRCNRAC&HBGWIDDARNARPGEC&GT
R ~;~~~~;~~~ __ ~;~~ 1~
:&:Pm:iIm&tJimR:1Z! …,…:-m75l;,} J
~RSA&JQCrtOfiR
K Clearing of the route for Canadian
National Railwaysf Heath Steele branch
has continued during the winter and
the line is expected to be ready for
operation next autumn. The 23-mile
branch line will connect the lead,
zinc and copper mines of the Heath
Steele Company with the main line of
the Bathurst Subdivision at Bartibog, N.D. A largE! amount of Vlork m
must be done in grading the line, which crosses many ravines and ill
pass through roc;k-cl~ts up to 40 feet deep. Some 22 million cubic
feet of rock anci. scil will be moved in cutting and filling operations.
The first stat~.on on the line has been officially named Heath Steele
after the mining company_ The mine is expected to produce 120,000
tons of ore annually.
K Another Canadian National Railways line is even nearer to completion.
It is the relocation of the Cornwall Subdivision between Cornwall
and Cardinal, Ontario, which is expected to be open to freight
traffic in May. About 15 miles of ballasting in the vicinity of
Long Sault and Ingleside have yet to be completed, and the tracks
must be lifted, levelled and trinuned. Five nel stations are under
construction at Cornwall, Long Sault, IngleSide, Iroquois and
Morrisburg. Work on the Cornwall station is expected to be complet­
ed in June. The Cornwall building is of ultra-modern design, with
brick walls and aluminum trim. It measures 168 by 38. It is
about one mile north of the present station, as the relocated line
begins east of the Cornwall city limits. The present station is the
original Grand Trunk Railway stone bUilding, to which two additions,
each as long as the original building, have been made.
K A new type of railway meai service was recently inaugurated on the
Canadian National R.qilways trains 3 and 4, the Maritime Express
tl
,
between Montreal and Mont Joli, Quebec. This service is provided
by Cafeteria C~rs 498 and 499, which have been converted from a
nother type of dining service, probably Cafe-Parlour. They ITVI)
a six-table dining area, seating 22 persons. rfhore is [ c::..~· __ iQ
display counter with a refrigerated section for cold meats, sal.< .. J
and deserts and a steam table for hot dishes. Passengers obt{-:.in a
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL
___ ….. _icS.SG9IATICN, INC.
Hc.-:: ~.,:;;()rt No~ 77
Edit)r]~J A1d~Gss:
tray and select their food hil08
passing along the counter, as in a
land-based cafeteria. Prices are
comparable to those of the dinette
and coffee-shop cars in use on other
CNR trains. Regular dining car ser­
vice is operated between Mont Joli
and Halifax. There are now ei~ht
Box ~!.} 8taticn B, Montreal types of meal service cars on var­
EditorL Orner ~~A. Lavallee
Depl).ty -.:i:(ij.tor; Douglas Brown
Ase:t .. ::;::fl~.tc-r: PC:cster Kemp
COIf1f!1i·t~Ge: Kenneth Chivers
A:1~hony Clegg
Research Histor·:..an:
Robert R. Brown
ious C.N.R. trains. These include
dinine cars, cafe cars (passengers
sit lith backs to windoVls), dinette
cnrs (have long counter with 26
revolving seats), cafe-p;:lrlours (have
six tables, smaller kitchen than
dining car, but give regular dining
car service), buffet-parlours (have
)
Page 46
smaLl, ·square kitchen, two·-man crew, meals are served in sepi::u.·o.:!;:.:,..
section of three or four tables or on tables set up in parlour
car), barfet-~leeper (meals are served on tables set up in sections
or in lOlnee, some types are used as club cars, serving snacks and
bever8ges), cof+:eG shop (a buffet .. sleeper with separate meal sec-
tion, op~rated in tourist service and serving low-price meals) and t
the cafeteric card G There are also commissary cars J used on mili-t
tary a~d imrr.igrant trains, and lunch counter cars used on pilgrim-~
age and o::.her special tlains. ,
K Up to the time of \Titing, Canadian Pacific Railway has received
eleven ltDa.yliners~ from the Budd Company. The RDC-l units are
numbe!ei 9062 W€::1-1 placed in serl!~e on the Quebec Central Railway between
Quebec and ~herbiCok9 on February 17th, running as trains 1,2,3
and 4 • . mixed traLl, Nos~27 and 28, was placed in service between
Vallee Jonction and Levit> a~ the saMe time. The remaining Day_
liners were placed in service on trains 39 and 40 and 204, Mon­
treal-Ivl3gRntic, 2(t2, 20:;) and 215 Montreal-Sherbrooke, 469 and 1~70,
fo.1ontreal-Ste.,rllerese, 601 alld 6C2 Toronto-Havelock and various
other Laurrntidn Diyis~on w3ek end trains. At the change of time
on April 28th, thEre w:i.J.1. be fll&.ny che.nges made in these and in
other serVl.C€8. It i3 ex~cteti 7.hat passenger service between
/oodstocx ar.d :)~ .. ,ri?_:::Y!3, Ont … , a!:.i bf!tween South Devon and Chipman
N.B.
wi.ll be di.scontinuE-:;;, It is a~so expected that gas-electric
cars wi.:.l be ~lA.ced in f:ervice b~tfeen Ottawa and Maniwaki, Que.
The RD~:::; 110.01 llse:d on the Ste. l!;.ert:.sG run v/ill enter service on
trains 4?1, 422, 423 and 424 betvieE:n Montreal and Ottawa via
MonteheL … o, with a reduction in running time.
* The Canadian Pacific Railway has scrapped two units of its 4-4-4
type steam locomotives. Engine 3001 was scrapped at Ogden Shops
on March bth and engine 291J was scrapped at Weston Shops on March
11th. They Iere the first units of their classes (F2a and Fla
respectively) to be scrapped.
)[ Passenger train service between Winnipeg and Churchill, !lan., has
been increased to tri-weekly instead of twice weekly as her&tofore.
Churchill pa3sengers may leave linnipeg on Monday, vednesday and
Friday on train 63 and a:rive Churchill Wednesday, Friday and Sun­
day on tr.s.in 123. ReturninE, train 124 leaves Churchill Sunday,
Tuesday and Thursday connecting wj.th train 64 vhich arrives Winni­
pe~ on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
ANOl!IF.R DONATION FOR
oua ,tOLLING STOCK
COL:;;:;Cl ION
00000000000
During the month of 1-1a.rch, the General
Superintendent of the Railway Division,
Mr. O.S.A. Lavallee, was advised by
Hr. G. Brodie Gillies, of Gillies Bro­
thers & Company Limited, lumber dealers
at Braeside, Ontario, that that firm
had decided to dispose of a Single-truck, ten-bench former electric
car. to our Association for the nominal sum of ~l.OO. lhe car had
beer. urJp.cl for about thirty years to handle employees in the mill
yard a~ Braeside. Built by Patterson & Corbin at St.Catharines, Onto in
the late Nineties, considerable repairs will be necessary before it
can again be placed in operating condition.
I
i
~
)
)
This Mikado type locomotive (Clau 5·4 -Road Numbers 3800·38051 was built
for Canadian National Railways by the CNR and the Canadian Locomotive Company
in 1
930 and 1936.
# .
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~

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I-~~ ….. :1:: ..• + … , … .1.> ••
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TECHNICAL DATA
Extreme Width
10 9
l
/,
CYLINDERS DRIVING WHEELS FIRE BOX TENDER CAPACITY
HAULAGE
Dis.
Stroke O.S. Di8.
,..
JO

* Without hopper 16 toni
With hopper 18 toni
LOCOMOTIVE COLORS
Exterior, black.
C
ob sash, red.
Interior of cab, green.
Lettering, gold.
Dis. Ctr. Length Width
… 120/ .. 84, .. –
PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPARTMENT
360 McGill Street
Montreal, Que. Canada
Waur Oil RATING
It,600 gls . 4,000 gil. 6O?
TENDER COLORS
Exterior, black.
Lettering,
gold and monogram gold
an red background outlined with
black.
)
This Hudson type locomotive (Closs K.5 -Road Numbers 5700 to 5704) wos buill for
Conodian Notional Roilwoys by the Montreol Locomotive Works in 1930.
TECHNICAL DATA
CYLINDERS DRIVING WHEELS FIRE BOX

I
Dia. Stroke 0.5. DiB.
l3 28 80
LOCOMOTIVE COLORS
jockel, planished or black.
Cab, wind defleclors, running board,
skirts streomlining,
green.
Underframe, etc., black.
Interior of cab, green.
Bailer
back heod, black.
Le
ttering and striping, gold.
Cost brass numbers an running board
skirt.
I
DiB. Ctr. length Width
,, 126/,* 84
s
Ju
PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPARTMENT
360 McGill Street
Montreal, Que. Canodo
TENDER CAPACITY
Wat .. r Co.1
14.000 gls. 18 tons
Extreme Width
10 11,,*
HAULAGE
RA
TING
53t B
TENDER COLORS
Sides and end, green.
Underfrome and trucks, block.
Lettering,
gold.
Managrom, gold letters on red back·
ground with black outline.
)
This Mountain type locomotive (Class U-1 -Road Numbers 6060 to 6079) was built for
Canadian Notional Railways by the Montreol locomotive Works in 1944.
Al-,D
D @PCl
,
.0
,

I
···~· _.—1 !—-~ .. ….. J , .. o· ,o..-!
.0 I ….. i I
~ ~o ,0. •
• .,.0 1
Extreme Width
]0 9
TECHNICAL DATA
CYLINDERS DRIVING WHEELS FIRE BOX
Dia.
I
Stroke
0.5. Dial
24 30 73
LOCOMOTIVE COLORS
Jacket, planished or black.
Cob, running boord, skirts stream­
lining, green.
Underframe, etc., black.
Interior of cab, green.
Boiler back head, black.
L
ettering and striping, gold.
Cast brass numbers on running boord
skirt.
Dia. Ctr. Length
I
Width
66 1201, 84/:
PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPARTMENT
360 McGill Street
Montreal, Que. Canada
TENDER CAPACITY
HAULAGE
W •• I
Co.l RATING
11,700 gls. 18 tons 52%
TENDER COLORS
Sides and end, green.
Underfrome and trucks, black.
L
ettering, gold.
Monogram, gold letters on red back­
ground with block outline.
)
This Northern type locomotive (Closs U.2 -Rood Numbers 6200 to 6234) wos built for
Conodian Nationol Railwoys
by the Montreal locomotive Works in 1942 and 1943.
CYLINDERS

I
Din. Stroke
25/! lO
LOCOMOTIVE COLORS
Exterior, block.
Cob sosh, red.
Interior of cob, green.
Lettering, gold.
Trim, while.
TECHNICAL DATA
DRIVING WHEELS FIRE BOX
O.S. Din.
73
I
Din.Crr. Length Width
66 126/, 96/,,
PUBLIC RElATIONS DEPARTMENT
360 McGill Street
Montreol, Que. Canada
TENDER CAPACITY
W., I
Co,I
11.600 gls. 18 ton~
Extreme Width
10 10
HAULAGE
RATING
57%
TENDER COLORS
Exterior block.
l
ettering, gold and monogram gold
an red background outlined with
black.

Sand
Storage
28 cu. ft.
)
This Diesel·Electric Passenger locomotive fA unit) ICioss CPA-16 _ Road Numbers
6700-6705) was built for Canadian National Railways by the Canadian locomotive
Company in 1955.
TECHNICAL DATA
Boiler Cooling
Lubricatingl F I Oil
Wheels Journals
Maximum Haulage
Water Water
Oil I
202010. lib. 250 I..,,,. AI •. 262 m.AI •. 1000 m. ,I •.
LOCOMOTIVE COLORS
Sides,
sash, doors, green.
Vestibules and steps, black.
T
rim, yellow.
Outside
of back end door, green.
Roof, trucks, underframe and band
along side, black.
lettering,
gold with black outline and
monogram.
Numbering,
gold.
lettering on trucks and underframe,
white.
Speed
40 dip. 6/~ x 12N 90 mph
PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPARTMENT
360 McGill Street
Montreal, Que. Canada
Rating
j
38%
)
Sand
Storage
28 cu. ft.
)
This Diesel-Electric Passenger locomotive IB unit) IClass CPB-16 -Rood Numbers
6800-680.5) was built for Canadian National Railways by the Canadian Locomotive
Comoqny in
19.5.5.
TECHNICAL DATA
Boiler Cooling
Lubricatingl F I Oil
Wheels Journals
Maximum
Water Water
Oil j ue Speed
2020 Imp •• . 250 1m …. . 2&21 …. , •. 1000 Imp .• , •. 40~ dia. 6/, X 12 .. mph
LOCOMOTIVE COLORS
Sides, sash, doon, green.
Vestibules and steps, black.
Trim, yellow.
Outside
of back end door, green.
Roof, trucks, underframe and band
along side, black.
lettering, gold with black outline.
Numbering, gold.
Lettering an trucks and underframe,
white.
PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPARTMENT
360 McGill Street
Montreal, Que.
Canada
Haulage
Rating
38%
)
)
This Diesel-Switcher (Closs GS-12 -Rood Numbers 7000-7016) was built for Ihe
Canadian Notional Railways by General Motors Diesel Ltd. in 1952-53
TECHNICAL DATA
Sand
Storage
Cooling
Water
Lubrgiringl Fuel Oil
138 Im~I •• 1500 1m, III •.
28 cu. ft. 185 1m. tl •.
LOCOMOTIVE COLORS
Body, roof, underframe and t.rucks,
black.
Lettering
and stripes, block on gold.
Numbering, gold.
Monograms,
gold color letlen on red
background with black outline.
Wheels Journals
Maximum
Speed
40· dia. 61/~/lx12#
65 mph
PUBLIC RELATIONS DEPARTMENT
360 McGill Street
Montreal, Que. Canado
Haulage
Rating
36%

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