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Canadian Rail 052 1955

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Canadian Rail 052 1955

CANADIAN RAILROAD msrolUCAl ASSOCIATION
INCOEPOEAlI:D.
I:IErJ.3 Lll; PJHJ. HU. 52 J A:JTJAHY
J.955
(
Montreal, CenaJ a.
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of f i cer s for 19 5 ~ will be e18c t c~ .
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ccau ;-,F~ of t he tL.18 usua lly c onsuraed by t he bus i ness at.t.enrt­
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IrOm LJ t1c·; .uuu. · Gompan:;T,l aU8 ,Lp~n [J a . lor us e :In tfJe ,~ l. 0.J.ry
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L[::t hbr::clce-:Jle dicine jat ser v j,c8 in ;:;outJV:rn Al b,-~r ta . The
or uer c O l~s ist8 of tfJO ICJC -3 uni t s , t o })U llumbered 9021 and 90 22 ,
a ild t wo lwe··2 u rlits ~ t o bea.r nu.mbers 9100 D.n c~ 9101 ., J}; ile th e
Comr;a :rv nlreadl po:=,s e;3se s Olle HD(> ~ unit , ~ jo . j()20 , Dr>:: se nr:,l v i :1
t h. 8 · (;o;:c,h BaY ··[ : ;;1.t~ta!2,-Arwliers 3er ; i ce, the H.JC,-2 u rlit s 1tJi l ~L be
th e i i:: ~)t s ~Lch to b:3 pu:cclJJ ~;elL oy t he Company . Ji:eceipt of
th t, :::;e C iL~: S ;Ii J.l brin r~ to ele ven , the nUDbe r i f: B1Jd cJ-l:Ji.
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CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTOPJCAl ASSOCIATION
i-!·~T? )P(Dfl :r,. 5~
db! •. ::> .i.U.I .Jhl d· … ). ;(.
I NCOEPOEAIED.
JA]iJAHY
r-I~–:-~–C-~:(j::-~~~:–:~~~(, -, The Anm.lc.l n~~etin{ of the k::,~30ciatil)n
I ~UJ..L.;L I h;_,.L,.L1JJ..r I -1!, It· nO· T .
JILL. )8 lle..r.. l!l 1001:1 /,!. J 1. 1anspo:c1,a·r.~:::. or
1. ____ ._. ___ . ____________ ._.-1 Buildin/, 15) (,1a:L.· ::3treet IsE;t, LIell treal
O~l ~JecLne3day, January 12th, J.YS1+ at d:oo PM. Heports for the
year 195h w::.ll b;,:; read by the reti.rinr l~=~ecut..,ive, and trw ne;]
of~icers for 195) will be elt~ctclA.
Eccau:..i~ of the tL.1e usually con:3ur;leJ by the business a.ttenrl-·
inr the Annual i.leetin
G)
no formal entertDinment ha.s been
s chedule,l.
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::{ecent1y} Can::ldi.1D
Pacifj.c ItailHClY
orders~ four adJit­
ion~l aDC rail cars
from the BucJ.d Compan.:r, Phi1auelpld.a, Fa. for use in the CDlpdry··
. b· ~ I l·· … +-•• +-1 , l t 1
Lr.:tn r::Clce-cl(:(U CJ.ne .ta l.. serVl C8 In ::30l1vlJ.C;rn il. oer a 0 1 1(~
oruer c()ll[~ist3 of t~fm H:)C··3 units, to fJU numbered 9021 and 9022,
aiid two lwe·· 2 units, to bear nu.mbers 9100 O.n(~ 9101 1li18 th e
Corilpa:1Y nl:(eady po.sse;3~)es one HUC-· 3 unit, J.iO. 9020, pr8sen~, ly in
the [,;orth Bay··!~c .. tta,!2c-Ar.w!.iers ;3(;rvice, the H.iJC-2 units will be
1. i . 1 4 1.- +-1 C . 1 n
tne L.~st S:.tC.1 GO U(~ pliTC~l,qSeu oy v 1e ompany. Ji.8Celp -:, 01
these ca:o:s -,-.ri~.l brinf~ to eleven) T,he nUDher If: Bwid-f;li 1 + :;r:~(
UIli ts (.JHnej by th.8 Canad.:a;l Iacific HailvTay.
1
r———-·———-·——-­
l
I J
During December ) Canadian
(flfWYAL CANADIAN.i! T.O .BE NAI1E FOR ! Pacific Rai lway i ssued a
1~b1J J CAIJADIAN P .jWI. F~I C I pr ess stat e~ent to t he effect T
HANSCUNTI NENTAL I that t he new, Budd-bui l L.
__ _ ._
I
I Sceni c- Dome-equipped t ra~s ­
,::ont inent al t.rai.n, vmic:
1
1 ~;,
to go Lrrto service bet ween Mont real-·rror ont o arid VanC01.lV01 early
in the summer, will be named the RoyaI Canadian11.
The tr ain is to be handled by diesel-electric locomot i ves
f rorn llont.r-eaL to Vancouver, wit.hcut. int ermodi ate change} U~C
same units maki ng the compl ete tr~p o ,Canadian Pacifi c claimb t hat th
is will be the longest continuous scheduled run made by
a diesel-electric eng ine. (Ed.not e: UNLESS the Russians have
dieselized the Transs iberian Ha ilway)0 It will al so feature the
longest continuous clome ride in the world. The new train is to
carry operating nwnbers 1 and 2, necessitating a number of
numerical designation shifts among the other long-distance
t.rs i.ns .
The new na.me brings to mi.nd other names whi ch t he CPR has
used in its transc o~tin ental services . The first names , started when
the trans -continent service was inaugurated in 1886, were
t he PACIFIC EXPH83S and the ATLANTIC EXPH:CSS) for the west-and
eastbounG trains , resp8cti vel y. Late~ , in the ear l y 1900s, t he
tr
a~ns presentl y designated nos . 3, 4, 7, g were named T
RANS CANADA LIMITED; later>they were renamed DOMINION, the
pr esent designation.
The
true successor of the original ATLANTIC and PACIFIC
.c;xpr 85ses was the n1P:~ HIAL LIMITr.;]), trains 1 and 2. These numbe
rs now designate unquesti onab.ly the Lon r-e st. continuous
10cal train run i n t he VJester n Hera i spher-e,
Rev
erting to the ROYAL CANADIAN, it is under st ood that a con
siderable time saving in schedule is to be made init ial ly, and t
hat the departure from Montreal wil l tqke pl ace during the
daY rather than in·the even in~ as has been t ne ~aso ha~ ~ ~ af~~0 .
A i est run is to be made, 1 8 a~ ing lfuntreal Januar y 5th, us5ng
spare rolling st.ock totalling up t.o t he tonnage equi.vaLe.nt; of t
he new train when al l units of the nC:,If jJQ.s c;en g e r s t.o ck are
in service .
000000000000
_
CA
._-
NSO

CA
_
USi
….._–
vJ

AY
­—,..-…
It is expected that the new ra.i l-;liv:1.1;Jay
causew
ay across the; Strait of. Canso, between the main-l and
of Nova :Jcot ia and Cape Br-et on Island : wi l.L be opcn f
ortraffic dur ing Mar ch. The Canadian Nat ional Rai lways, who
se main IIalifax-~Jyc1ney line vri.Ll. cross the Strait JJ
thi s means, el l mi nat i nE a ti~e -consuminf r a il-ferr y sc~vi ce
bet vmen Ic int Tupper al~d ~Tl) l «r-ave , US has completed i t 0
rai l approaches a : ea h c.nrl, T:c,:: r ::>,· 1., : l ~ Yl c, ) ,-ect
r.-­-
(
r–~->———————
, J
l
nrWYAL CANADIAN II TO BE NAlm FOR I
l~I:;vJ CAlJADIAN PA.CIFIC
TlcANSCUNTINENTAL
During December) Canadian
Pacific Railway issued a
press statement to the effect
that the new, Budd-builL.
Scenic-Dome-equipped tra~s­
,::ontinental train, vmic:h ~ .
to go into service between Montreal-·rroronto end. VancOllJolearly
in the st:mmer, will be named the !?7loyal Canadian 11 •
The train is to be handled by diesel-electric locomotives
from Montreal to Vancouver, without intermediate change, the
same units making the complete tr~p.Canadian Pacific claims
that this will be the longest continuous scheduled run made by a
diesel-electric engine. (Ed.note: UNLESS the Russians have
dieselized the Transsiberian Hailway)0 It will also feature the
10Il£1:est continuous clome ride in the world. The new train is to
car~y operating numbers 1 and 2, necessitating a number of
numerical designation shifts among the other long-distance
tr,<>ins.
The new
nar.1e brings to mind other nElL.11es which the CPR has
used in its transcontinental services. The first names, started
when the trans-continent service was inaugurated in laS6, were
the PACIFIC ~Xpm::3S and the ATLANTIC EXPHESS) for the west-and
eastbountl trains, resp8ctively. Late~, in the early 1900s,
the tra~ns presently designated nos. 3, 4, 7, g were named
TRANS CANADA LIMITED; later> they were renamed DOMINION, the
present designation.
The
true successor of the orifinal ATLANTIC and PACIFIC
~xpre5ses was the HIPLJiUAL LIMIT~D, trains 1 and 2. These
n1..:.mY3LS now deSignate unjuestionably the lon[est continuous
local train run in the Western HeQisphere.
Reverting to the ROYAL CANADIAN, it is understood that
a considerable time saving in schedule is to be made initially,
and that the departure from Montreal will tqke place during the
day rather than in-the 6veninr as has been tne ~aso ha~~~af~~e.
A test run is to be made, laaving lfuntreal January 5th, using
spare rolling stock totalling up ::,0 the tonnage equivalent of
the new train when all units of the n(;iV pf).s~en[:.er st0Ck are
in service.
000000000000
It is expected that the new rail-~iv~way
causeway across tho Strait of Canso, betw~en ~he ~aln-
land of Nova :)cot 1a and Cape Breton Is land ~ ,nll De. cjJen f
or traffic during March. The Canadian National R~ll~ays,
whose main Halifax-~Jydlley line will cross the Stralt 0J .
this means. ellminatinp a ti~e-consuminf rail-ferry scrVlce
betvmen Fc j,l1t Tupper a~:d ~Tl)l gr.ave, HS has completeJ it~)
rail C:l.ljproacbes a~ ea:–h ond. T:.:c-o: r::>.1.,,,: ,)l !:yoc, {) -2ct
-2-
a t.c.apor-ary trestle across the eh ip channel which will enabl e
� vess els to use the Strai t . The CaUSClay, wide enough for rai l
a nd
h i.ghway only at its crest , i s fifteen hundred feet wi.de at
it s
deepest point , 203 below wat.er: level , deopes t in the wor Ld ,
— –1
Toronto Tr anspor tation Co m ~issio n raplQ
I
I NuTES AN]) HEWS t.rans it service was interrupted for a
I
1� …. •. 1 shor t ti~ e on the morning o~ December 6t h,
d
ue to condennat.Lon i n train brake l i nes
at
a t emper-at.ur-o of t en d e E:r E3e~,3 . , This i s the sa:Je oi.ffLcul t y
as was exper ienced last year by Canadian National Ha i l way, on
i t s new i0nt r eal subur ban t erritory el ect r i c multipl e uni t cars .
An
ent t.h« cur-r-ent, di.s cus s i on in Hont r eal political cir cles on
tIle question of superhiphways vs. rapi d rail trans it, to les sen
co
ngesti.on i n the city 1 a coru.ient made recently by the Chairman
o
f the B02rd of Irans por t Conuissioners is worth repeat.Lng, Prior
to the 18cent comnut.er rate hear i.n.5, 111. Justico 1,carney i nt i m­
&t
cd t llat Provincial a uthorit~es mipht find i t cheaper t o encour ­
aEt; aud make cant ribut ions to the es tabli s hment of ralLway
co rnmut.or-s or-vi ces , t han to try to solvo tho co.nmut. er problem by
buiLdi.ur; co.st Ly supor-hi ghways with &.:r ade separations. He sU[f!es­
t
ed t hat , as an example , the authorit i~s mipht pr ovide large
ra.r ki nr spaccs at auburban stations J to encourage people to keep
their
pIi vat.e aut.omo bi Lcs out of the city This is particul ar ly 0,
a rpl.Lcabl e to [,iontr eal wher e a constantly deterioratinp: tr affi c
situat i on Ls not bc;illf Lmpr-ov ed by st reet wi deni nr-, Many agree
Ti th the pr oposi tion that st reet wideninp is aet ua11y he1pinr.
mat
.ters to become wors e, by encourafi ng thos e who presently leave t hE::lr
cars at home i n tT,lraf,es , t o bri ng t hem downt.oun on nowl y­
wi
d~n ed st reets, but with no further parkinr facilities than there
1[Jerc) before . I·Ir . I : (~ar. sai d, in t.hi.s conriect Lon -9 I may agree
that a
garage for ever y carl repre s ents a Canadian ideal for this
century, but the aimof la parkingspace dOvntownfor ever y car S08m3 to me
to be in the same class as Ipi e in the sky . If we
r
e ~oncil G ourselves to tllis , then perhaps we can pursue the a1­t.e
rna t Lve in more dete1rlined fashLon, i { Al 1~m ! -Ed. )
Tho aJaDtahili t y of the diesel-electri c locomotive to operate
e
( ~u~l ly wc;ll in ei ther ui re ction, or to operate in multiple wit h
ct h
Lr units, is apparentl y b Gin ~ abused. An observer reports
having noticed a train on one of OUl~ la1[er C::lnadian rai lways
wllo
se huad-end mot i ve power, in that order, was: a road switcher , a
road Bunit, a road Aunit (r unni nr backward ) and anothEr road s
w:it chur-• Ihat next ?
Connectint tr ain survice on the Thousand Islands Ra i lway has not
been shown in rccerrt Canadian IJc,t ional timetables. Perhaps some
re
ader can enlighten us as to the status of pa ss enfer ser~ i ce on
t he
TIR. The same timetables show t he fol lowin~ stations a s
~ …
liavi.ng bt;cn el imi nated :j.(I 9a~s ell g er tra i ns on the Montreal-10ronto Line: Col Lt.ns Bay , L
rnestown, Fred (,ci~k)bl1YC:: , ~ ~ :oY :I: : ~ 1.10 · : ~Cl
.::Jhannonvi 11e .
-3­
a tC;laporary trC stle a eros;:, the ~)hi p channel whi ch wi 11 enable
vessels to use the Strait. The causeway, wide enough for rail
and highway only at its crest, is fifteen hundred feet wide at
it s deepest point, 203
1
below water level, ch;epest in the vvorld.
i–~~U~ES AND IJ~J{s–l
1 ____ . ________ .. ___ . _I
Toronto Transportation Com~ission rap1Q
tranE3it service was interrupted for a
silOrt tir.18 on the morninf, 01: llect;mber 6tb,
due
to condensation in train brake lines
at a temperr~ture of teh clee:ree~3.. This is the 5a:.:1e c.lifficulty
as l170.S experienced. la,c3t y8ar by Canadian Hational ~{ai lway, on
its new i0ntreal suburban territory electric multiple unit cars.
Anent thro current discnssion in Nontreal political circles on
tile question of superhiphways vs. rnpid rail transit, to lessen
c
onge.stion in the city) a COl:1Uent made n~cc-ntly by the Chairman
of
the Board of Transport COL1uissioners is worth repeating. Prior
to the recent com:,1Uter rate hearin!·s, Ik. Justice 1.earney intim­
ated tllat Provincial authorit~es mipht find it cheaper to encour­
at~(; rllld mab~ centributions to the estahlishment of raihvay
commu.ter ,sc:rvicE~s, than to try to solve the COdr:mter problem by
buildiup: c00tly superhighways with &:rade separations. He sUfges­
ted that, as an example, the authoriti0s miVht provide large
yarkiup spaces at Huburban stations, to encourare people to keep
Uleir 111 va+-,G automobiles out of the cit Yo , This is particularly
a rplicable to r,lontreal wfwre a constantly deterioratinr: traffic
sit Ilat ion i.3 not bcillf i,;lproved by street wiJeninp. Many agree
~rith the proposition that street wideninp is actually helpinr
iTIat~ers to become vvorse, by encoura[ing those who presently leave
thHir cars at home in t2,lrages, to bring them clowntolIr1 on ncvdy­
wid~ned streets, but with no further parkinr facilities than there
vJer(:) before. T·Ir. [ear. sa iei, in thL) conne ct ion -9 I may agree
that la garage for every car represents a Canadian ideal for this
century, but the aim of fa parking space dovntown for every car
s~ems to rna to be in the same class as pie in the sky. If we
re~onc~le ~urselves to t~is, then. perhaps ~~. can p~~sue the al-t
errlc~ trITe l!1 more deterr.nned f8.sh1on. If ~ AIID,IJ ! -E,G.)
The adaptahility of the diesel-electric locomotive to operate
e (~u211y well in (i ther ui r, ct ion, or to operate in multiple with
Gth~r units, is apparently being abused. An observer reports
having noticeu a train on one of our larcer Crlnadian raiJ.ways
wllose head-end motivu power, in that order, was: a road switcher,
El. road B unit, a road A unit (runninr backward) and anothE:r road
swj_tch~r. Jhat next? .
C
onnectin[ train service on the Thousand Islands Railway has not
b
een shoHn in r,.;cent Canadian tJc,tional timetables. Perhaps some
reader can Gnlighten us as to the status of passenfer s8r~ice on
the TIR. The same timetables show the followinf stations as
l
wving bt;cn uliminated :j. ….. ~a.:3sel1v,er trains on the I.lontreal-T0ronto
li:1e: Collin~3 Bay, Lrnestown, FredE:H~i,;k)Ql1Y.::, ~.:~.,.J:iC ~110·r~c1.
ohannonville.
-3-
.,
~,
Incr edi ble as it sounds, we have a reliable report that an
(
electri c rail transi t ser vice is to bo nrovided on the new
b
ri J~e across Hal i f ax hRr bour , conn e ct i~f our ea3tern port Bi ty wi t h
its subur b of Dartmout h. Can any of our f1ar iti me readers gi ve add
itional details for pUbli cation ?
Canadian lb t ionrtl H a i l~tJay s is pl anni ng a fifty-acre railway yard i n
the industri ~l sect ion of Port Arthur , Onto to serve an iron or e dock
Wili ch is being lengthened to 12bo foot .
Have y
ou noticed the meLal bars which have been Att a ched to the t.ops
of Canadian Pacific_l £fDQ_ser i cs diesel-el ectric pas sengcr­10
comot iv(~s ? Some people are vvonder inr about their purpose
They arc: another res ul t of t he advent, of t he ilJcenic Domo for
tlley ar e intended to break off pr o t rudi~g points of icicles
hanging fr om i):(idvcs, tunnels J etc. whi ch mi s-ht ot.herw.ise damar;e t.he
rlass in t lie domes .
Clo
Elring was commenced on Septc,mber 28th at St.r-ut.hers, Unt . , a siui ng
33.3 miles west of Jhi te Hiver, Ont on the Canadian Pacific
main line, beginning construction of the new branch line fr o~
that point to ]lanit ou1tJadge Lake mining area. Completion of thi s b
ranch line wi l l r-e.rcve the crn Schrei ber Division 1s di stinction
of being the only lJi vision on the,Jy:::;t em VJit hout a branch li ne.
On
t a.ri o l~or thlan d ltai Lway st i l l oper ated a f ew steam l ocomotives
as of the mont h of Uctober. At that time , steam power sti l l h
andled. local freight between Cochrane, Ti mmins and £nrl ehart,
~nd
about t he same t ime , engi ne #701 was ~ee n under steam at CrR
North Bay st ation. infines #302 anJ 303 were noted in oper­
a~
io n and swit cher J 900 was under steam at Cochrane. All coal
c~ute s and water tanks were sti ll being suppl ied and operating.
c~ n diesel-electr ic car 15845, rebui lt recently from Central
Vermont rail car No t 48 , is reported to be out of serpi ce.
On D
ecember ~th , 1954, Canadian Nati onal R2i1ways operated it s
flrst trai n into Ki timat, BC over the newly-complet ed ~lO mill i on b
rancll from Terrace , on t ho former Grand Trunk Pa cif i c line to 1+
l-rLnce kuper-t . The first train was a wor k train. C;CJrl S ~ Y l-lct ion
was st ar ted in O cto b~ r 1952, and act ua]. completion of the ine
,. t 1
l

1El
t ~
a
t i
W:L
. 11 L b ~ -3
as Je ~)I ·
I
r
c,
. -st .ion _ .. nave�
,
g 0 1..0 ·,::,,)ne L> ltJoeri el1sct cfl Cr: .
Thi s Li.ne was L.: st vi suaLiaed at the t.ur-n of the CC!1-Gmy, wrien it was the
GTPs intention to establish its western por t at this
point . Howeve r, attempts at real-est ate specula tion caused the changeover
~rll
ich eventua lly saw the l i ne compl et ed t o Pr i nce h
upert, the present western terminal.
Be[
inning Bond2Y, lJecernbor 13t h, busses have be(;n providi ng what
is said to be ilimprovedII service, bc,tvwen Cotcau and Va11eyfiE:::ld, l
ue repl acin~ the shut t le t rain servi ce bet ween t hose poi nts.
There is nowno passenger ser vice o pe~a t ed. Thus , one more sec­
tion of the former Canada Atlantic Hail way has seen i t s l ast p
assenger tr ain, though r-emai ni ng as part ~ 1 Qn Lu.po r-t.ant freigL:­
route .
o
-4­
(
Incredible as it sounds, we have a reliable r~port that an
electric rail transit service is to bo provided on the new
briJ~):e across Halifax ht1rbour, connecti.nr our ea3tern port Bity
with its suburb of Dartmouth. Can any of our Maritime readers
give additional details for publication?
Canadian Ibtional Haihvays is planning a fifty-acre railway yard
in the industri~l section of Port Arthur, Onto to serve an iron
ore dock Wllich is being lengthened to 12bo fect.
Have
you noticed the metal bars which have been attached to the
tops of C(~i(ln Pacific 14_00 s(:;ri.;s diesel-electric pa.ssenger
locomotiv(~s? Some people are vvonderinr about their purpose.,
They are another res i.-ll t of the advent of the il Jceni 8 Dome It for
tlley are intended to break off protruding points of icicles
hanging froill briC!V8s, tunnels) etc. which mifht otherwise damClf,e
thE.; r lass in tll(~ dome s.
G]3&ring was commenced on September 28th at Struthers, Ont., a siu
ing 33.3 miles west of Jhite River, Ont on the Canadian Pacific
mdin line, b~ginning construction of the new branch line fro~
that point to ]lani tou1tJadge Lake mining area. Completion of t,bis
branch line will re .. love the cpn Schreiber Division! s distinction
of being the only 0i vis ion on th8, Jystem v.[i thout a branch line.
Ontario Northland Hailway still operated a few steam locomotives
as of the month of October. At that time, steam power still
handled local freight between Cochrane, Timmins and t:nfdehart,
~nd about the same time, 8ngine #701 was ~een under steam at
CFR North Bay station. invines #302 anJ 303 were noted in oper­
ai:ion and switcher :;!900 was under steam at Cochrane. All coal
c~Lutes and Hater tanks were still boing supplied anJ operOlting.
c~n diesel-electric car 15845, rebuilt r8cently from Central
Vermont rail car uol4a, is reported to be out of service.
o~ December ~th, 1954, Canadian National Railways operated its
flrst train into Kitimat, BC over the newly-completed ~10 million
i::rancll from Terrace, on tho former Grand Trunk Pacific line to
~rince Uupert. The first train was a work train. C0ns~~uction
was started in Octob~r 1952, and actual completion of the jne
~0 the Kitimat station will have been effcctcrt as we gn to pI~~0.
This l..ine I·vas fi:rst visualiztod at the tl~rn of the C0~rrLUlY, wl18n
it was the G~Ps intention to establish its western port at this
point. However, attempts aG real-estate speculation cau~ed the
changeover which eventually saw the line compL:ted to Prlnce
hupert, the present western terminal.
Beginning I;Iond2Y ~ lJecember 13th, busses ha~e becn pro;:iding ~h?-t
is said to be ilimproTed VI servi ce, bet ween CotLOau and v alleyfle.ld,
~ue. replacinE the shuttle train service between those points.
There is now no passenger service operated. Thus 1 one more S8C­
tion of the former Canada Atlantic Hailway has seen its last
pas senger train, though remainir1g as part ~ 1 .1n iu:portant freigl1:­
route.
-4-
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TH.r.; f1;:jOYIE11 ;/0/(1/, :/i :1/ 1 1_+ -1-. – .
CPIUS LAST
ST :::~HIrvJHEELEH
IJy Forster Kemp ~~ ~-O-_<~~~4;¥~~l~f:_ji,~~c->-,-
——–_…_.._…_…__…..–.._.._..-_……..–..–_._..-.–
i
~

A little over eifht months ago , we were
appr iscJ of the news that the sternwheel st eamer MINTO was b
eing re t i reJ by the Canadian Pacific Rail way Company, from
it s British Col luJbia Lake &Ri ver Ser vice. At that time, it
was stated in t.he newcpaper-s that the IvIINTO was the last stern­
wheeler i n Bri t i.sh Col.umbi a ; t he pr es s was evident l y unawar-e of
the frJ.c;t t hat cJw lIIHTO has a sister shi p, t he MOYIE, which st il l
plies a route bet ween Procter, Kaslo and Lardeau, B.C.
all situated on Kootenay Lake .
T
his lake is a lonp and narrow body of water lyinG in a d
eep valley among the snow-capped peaks of the Kootenay tfuun­t
ains. It is about seventy miles in length, but only about a m
i.Le ~:t nd a half wi de . The mountains ri.se steepl y from i t s rock-edged sho
res. They are heavily f orested) and rise up to
t he snow line, whe r -e edges of p.laciers may be seen bet .v.een the
highQst peaks. Th0 southern ena of the lake is parallelled by
the railway for about thirty miles, from Kootenay Landi ng to
Pro ct er . North of Leo cter, LOIITc~ v e r , Ls t.he territory of the L
ake arid HiveI ~3e rvi cen as r epr es ented by the ster-nwheeLer
MC.J:{IE ~ the t ut GEANTHALL and several car barges .
It was to see and ride the HOYlE that I came to Procter,
B ., C on d. fine day Last Au[ust . I had ~3 pent the nip.ht Ln Nelson, ar i s i ng ear l y
thqt Jnturday mor lli ng to catch tr ain Number Twe:ve,
which Rt thAt time left at 5:25 M1, Pacific Standar d Time. This d
iesel-hauled train made a Quick run up to Procter, along the
shore of the Kootenay Ri ver whi ch forms the out l et of the l ake of
t11(; saGle na.ne , condu.ct ing t.he lak e outflow to the Columbi a
River at Castlegar . The ar rival of No.12 at Procter at 6 ~07
f2 V~ 9 convenient connect i on with tho ~mYIE , whose depar ture time
-,. ( .,rJ c-f-11 ,,~ 7 00 A:I … Co ., ~. . 1 Y )8;t h ….. ~.
wa s d >lu. .Jt., J..L L .1.,,) . 1 . llow,ver, on …Jcnt.,cilloe. t >, UrCLLn
scheJul cs were altered, so that it is now necessary to s t~y over a
t Proct.er, or eL-3e make the connect ion by car fr-om Nelson.
F
rom t ho s t ati.on at Pr-oct.er , a road leads for a short dis­tance onGO
0 wharf, whichisbnilt quite low in the water. To t he; Le
f t. of the; road is a small hot el known as Hol.t.dav Enn,
St ill. f arther to the west is a spur railway l ine vrh i ch, after sepa
r-at.Lng from the mai n line, divides .mt.o t.hr-eo tracks, whi.ch a
re laid down an incline to a cove. From a dist ance , t~e s e t anks a
ppear to lead up over a landi ng , and on to a car barge ~ ! ich is
tied up to it. Upon oxami.ni nr-it mor-e closely, however, I tcund
t hat. the rails are Lai.d rif:ht down into the wat.e.r, and thet the l an
ding i s supported upon wheel s which run on t he rails . Tho ra
ils on the landing ar e taper ed to fit over those on the land.
h heavy steel cable is run through two large blocks and one end
-5­
(
-i~~
::Ji, lill.r f!.~~-i{7-;-.-.-,,-.
. _________ . ______ / •. /:-~/Ir/ -//-;:~;?f:-!–..• ~ .;~_ -;~-
6~~ ~~;k~~~:;EELER ~ ~~~ .. _3:j~~,~~~t~~;~~~~.:~:~~,-
by Forster Kemp i
—.–.. -~-…. -… -~~ .. –,.– .. —-… -.. -.. —.—
A little over eipht months ago,
we were appriseJ of the news that the sternwheel steamer MINTO
was being retireJ by the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, from
l·.~~ Br_:~~.~lrl C;OllU·.·lb~,~ l,J_crl~e & P~VE!r ~CIvl(e 1~ t~lat tL–ne lOt
_ ~ ~ v _ ~ … Ol ,,-.l ~ J ; . • • . u . I ., ,)
was stated in the newspapers that the fUNTO was the last stern­
wheeler in British Colwnbia; the pres~) was evidently untl.1iITare of
the frtct thatc.,hE.~ IIIJJTO has a sister ship, the MOYIE, which
still plies a route between Procter, Kaslo and Lardeau, B.C.
all situated on Kootenay Lake.
This lake is a 10Ilf and nC).rrow body of water lyinG in a
deep valley amo.1.g the snoviT–capped peaks of the Kootenay r-Ioun­ta
ins. It is about seventy miles in length, but only about a
Qile anJ a half wide. The mountains rise steeply from its
rock-ed~ed shores. They are heavily forested, and rise up to
the ,snow line, where edges of {2lacier3 may be seen bet
een the
highQst peaks. Th0 southern ena of the lake is parallelled
by the railway for about thirty miles, from Kootenay L~nding to
Procter. North of Procter, however, is the territory of the
Lake and Hi ver ~3ervj c e!? a[:i represented by the sternwheeler
MOYIE, the tur GRANTHALL and several car barges.
It Vjas to see and ride the HOYlE that I came to Pro eter, B.,
C on ct fine day lCl.st Aurust. I had ~3pent the nif,ht ~!.n Nelson,
arising early thijt Jnturday morlling to catch train Number Twe:ve,
which Rt thAt time left at 5:25 Mi, Pacific Standard Time. This
diesel-hauled train made a ouick run up to Procter, along the
shore; of trw Kootenay River which forms the outlet of the lake
of tll(:) same nalne $ condu.cting thc~ lake outflow to the Columbia
River at Castlegar. The arrival of No.12 at Procter at 6~07
gE1V~ ::. convtmient connection ltv-ith the HOYlE, >1h05e departure time
1fJdS (and still i3) 7: 00 ML However, on ,.Jentember 28th, train
5cheJulcs were altered, so that it is now necessary to st~y over
a t:; Pro cter, or else make the COnIlE) ct ion by car frora Nelson.
From
the sta1~ion at Procter, a road leads for a short dis­
tance: onco a wharf, which is Dllilt quite low in the water. To
the 18ft of thc3 road is a small hot,~l knovm as I1Holiday Inn
l1

Still farther to the west is a spur railway line 1[!hieh, after
seporating from the main line, dividcs:.nto three; tracks, Ivhieh
are laid down an incline to a cove. From a distance, t~ese tank3
appear to lead up over a landing, and on to a car barge ~!ich is
tied up to it. Upon examining it more closely, however, I fuund
that the rails are laic; ri[ht down into the: vTater, and th2.t the
landing is supported upon ,!heels which run on the rails. The r
ails on the landing are tapered to fit over those on the land.
A heavy steel cable is run through tlID large blocks and one end
j———_._-_ ._.._._.._-.
i s attached to the la nding. The free end may
j !SS29}E~..!:.:L}::~~I~ !{ 5.t
be fa sten ed to the end of a string of cars, so
that the landing may be raised or lowered, i
I);;
accordinp-to water l ev el . These landings are
I -,
I }.._-, (:~ )-
almost st andar d on the B.C.L.&R.S.
: 1 ~ ):~lll!/Un / I
)() .<.
7i , 1::f\ Loke
At the steamer whar f, the white pl ume lx ,: . I
iss uing from the IvILlYIE I s slim stack stood out
~
. t,I I
against the early morning sunshi ne. A f ew:

~« (~.) (~ ­
pa rcel s of express were placed aboard
l
a l ong .—- ~\ ~.: :~{ -:
with some frei ght, a milk can, and an auto-·
30 ,) (
I
I
-)i(. ) i
mobil e.
..–_.~. j (i
The_ !1~YI~ is a t.wo -vde cked ves seI similar ! I -~( –/F!
to the M:lHLl In appearance. She has two clos-I 11 /i
ed de cks ) surmounteci by t he wheelhouse. Her ! ~ I!v.,):: , /
bow J:as an .o pe~ de ~k , wJ::lch is of t en us ed for I …> .. ./ (, ~ .~ i
Lo a d.ing a nd u n.l.oad i.ng ar. way st ops. The .//. dI l-.[::~~Oe n t a l
v
e ~s,el is pa i?t ~d al l whi te, e :::cc~pt f o~ the I I Lar e al:[35>·i. b I
bUl 1-anj ··bl a ck I unne I and ver-ml Ljon-coLoured !) .r ~:: t–V I
st.er-nwheeI wi.r.h its aluminu~-?ainte cl . main . – J ~~:, _ …j !
r ods . un the lower , or fr-eizht, deCK , there . _ .r–/ ~! c I
is a steam boiler, mu ch li ke that of a 3/+00 ; JO,,:..~~~ o n s I
cI ass 10CO;;10ti-!e• Ahead ofthis.is a coal I /(c,(1enCiy ~?lvr–, i
Docket , wh i.ch l S kent full of br-Lquet t.es, the 1 i·.L L I, >:-, !
.. .J. . I .I tJh (.. I ~ . ,I
universal fuel in that country. Two sli ding ! Il . < )J ~ I
door s separate thi s from t he f ron~ deck, . I <;:x(i./-. I
j
lh~re a~~ 1pa3s ag e~!a~s ~lor:g ?he s~de s. ?! the I -)<~ ·.3.~ i bOJ_l
er . wa. oe en.?ugn to admit. an automobiLe, I ~~ /:::~ ~~~ ./ __!
but wh i ch are Kept clear for pa ssenger s to i. I, Ka s 10 >:,: !
p
3. SS fo r-ward fr?fJl the centr e do?rs , out ?nt o I )-~~2..-…_ ;:~::I ;~:OJ,~:-;J
t. ho f orward de ck and up the st a i.r-ways wh i ch 1-/ ( ..y )_~..r-
le2,d to the pass enr-er-deck. i/ I )~.) ….
,, . /~,./ …. <,.
I /~—.
The area to the rear of the freight load -I <, -~ -.. · ·_· .t~ :>l ..
i ng door s at t he centre wa s occupied mainly by ! ( ::::{ ,-~
2, pickup truck beLong.inr-to the mate, a C.P. 1..—·~i. _
t,YL::Jress fou:c-·whe elecl truck, a p.ai.r of two-1 .-. . ) ;;.~ . :: .~ ;
vrh ee Led hand t r ucks l ettered vs . S. rUNTUt1 and I /-f..::: ·G
de
i
-r •1flO .d / . ). .J
s evernr pi. es 0 ex press parce s, n one s i.c e I . –< ,
1 :: t he crew room and .J-avat ory ….. .i A~_sw o r th o ~~~!
1 .1 •.h I -. r, ~ ,
VJ;1l..e. on tne otner sa.oe .is t! e I . ……__ -j: ~<::1 /
BiJ L l.ey , f r-o.a vrhi ch er.iana t:, ed the I ) J«( ~I}r
oJ . t , …. ….. .
odou ~ of en!;.s . and bacon! t he prep-! ….. J ,! _/ :~/ ,. I
~r
c, t< :ion of 1
iJnJ
_
chvv
c:
s bei.ng
sup~ r -I ,,/ Be.lf ?ur /::–:?~~~~1) :.:. ,
-j. -l · -.lri – …. 11 · …… .J I )10 ~. … …. …….. ….. .�.,j•• ….
.L .i v ,:.rlU~~ by t he l -, ,~J..n es e cook , Her-e, i q le~~c ~:)s.=~:;::-, :::-~ k;
v
0 en
, t:.
C,
.

yo <, I meinber c; (, + +-he
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.
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bu
~;ily cOLsuming their mor n i ng I e ~:;::I,- -. ·Y Pr oct er \;~>. \
lY18 OUTrter s of an ho.ur before deDar t-i f.;j Yl :~
L . … t 1-. , C C T~ 8•t .1• .,
ure t ime. ~~t the rear of the . i ,~)f 0 1: : ~ J. , 0 ~k~:? ,
c1oseJ. portlon of the vesse:: l EO i .ll..;/ _ : 1 J. nC11 1;:.<:/
t h e 1
engi ne r oom
Y! –not a room at, {::?~· o NE L::;Oli · 1 < ~.::::-<
all , actually, but separated from :.__. . . .. 1/… .,
.
/

-6­
is attached to the landing-. The free end may
be fastened to the end of a string of cars,
so that the landing may be raised or lowered,
accordinp to water level. These landings are
almost standard on the B.C.L.& R.S.
At the steamer wharf, the white plume
issuing from the IIllJYIE! s slim stack stood out
against the early morning sunshine. A few ~
parcels of express were placed aboard, along
with some freight, a milk can, and an auto­
mobile.
j——_._-_._-_ .. _—
. KOOTENAY LAKE
j -·—-~—–f -.~-
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i I-~ )?~. .1 f /11. (1/)
! ~~ ~. LoJ-rc I
I y,~ .~,
I ~. fl tJ I
._– ~fl ~~~~) //-II
>0i) {
-))-,-.-i i
.—~ ( I
. .
The I.1JYIE is a two-decked veE3sel similar I ,( .–!
. I) …./:
to the IvENTlJ in appearance. She has two clos-l ;< / i
ed decks) surmounteci by the wheelhouse Her I -r I
bow has an open de ck, which is often ~~ed for I ,.—-·/i–.-:
r· :
loadin[ and unloading at vlay stops ~ The /.(: -+-(~jo !
– . t d II lt t f th -JTJard6auti~~Argenta!i
vessel.. lS pall1 er-Ct_ wn e, excep .. or e r 3).~,:
buff-and-· blad.:: funn(~l and vermilion-coloured II ._) /; t~t—–v-I
sternv,rheel Ii-eh its aluminum-painted main /,,) , ,
rods. un the lower, or freivht, deck, there / r-/~ ,,-……. j I
is a steam boiler., much like that of a 3/+00 i ~ Jo,:r~nsons I
, i ;::< I
cla:::;s loco;notive. Ahead of this is a coal i )(c(1enCiY i~?tv-j i
pocket, which is kept full of bri<1uette,s the It/, .. ) ,
., -! f L Q ,(. . 1 i
universal fuel in that country. Two sliding ! if-t. . P – I
doors separate this frof!l the front de ck. I x ( .. :~
rtll 1 1,. • d I; > (. ./-. I
lnere are passageways a ong tile Sl es of the I ~~ II
boiler wide enough to admit an aUc,omobile, I r. )?-i .. ./
but vvhich are kept clear for passengers to I 11 K~. s 10 ~~;~ -!
p3 ss forward from the centre doors, out onto ) __ ~-<..-;-,-·or·)
the forward deck and up the stairways which I ,(/ ~ <~-)~~.r-
le2,cl to the passenoer deck. I )~
_ t I I /f;.·f … -,
The area to the rear of the freirht load­
ing doors at the centre was occupied mainly by
a pickup truck belonginf to the mate, a C.P.
1Y~:iress four-·wheeled truck, a pa.ir of two-
i –:=~-.. t~~~~).·
i >-~-,—-,
-~ .. =:~.
.r– ~ __ — ,.:../.. _
J J~ … ~ ~–
.-.. /f ,;) 1
– ,~ 1..–11.;;-,-,
vrb 981ed hand trucks lettered n3. S. rUNTU f! and
several piles of express parcels. On one side
/, >..:.. de};
/ I.
. ~:.
Ainsworth o~~
i~ the crew room and lavatory
vJh i!_e on the othe:: s ide is the
8CilleYJ froi,1 1,lhich erl1anated the
odour of efgs and bacon, the prep­
aration of which was beinr super­
intended by the Chinese cook. Here,
several mernhers of the crew were
b ud_ly consuming their morning
mea
l, as there was still three­
cludr·ters of an hour before depart­
ure time. At the rear of the
closed portion of the vessel is
the 11engine room!! –not a room at
all, actually, but separated from
-6-
—-.——)–_. —. .. ——~f~:-j ,/ I
I r … ·· …. ·, (
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Be.lf?ur (~<...:~.i.J ~.
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i . . , –o:-~->–. ~ -…. ~~ ) ……. 1
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II 1,6:?7 (:) 1) … =. 1 m 1. •
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rv inch
L..,;.:fo NETBOi;r ./~:
1 PI;.~ -1 ,~ ………….
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the remainder of the spa ce by a rai li nr, with mat s straterically
pl~ ced for wi pi ng feet. The engines are quite simple in design, each
one being merel y a long, high-pressure cylinder, aui te smal l in
diameter . The pist on rods are attached, by a crosshead
J
to
(
the large main rods, of steel lattice const ruction, which in turn
act upon eit her side of the lar ge, non-f eathering paddlewheel, Besid
es the mai n engi.nes, tb.er e are al so two pumpi ng engines and a
generator for lighting. In the cent re of the engine spa ce is su
spended the throttle and reverse levers ~ and a bell) wi t.h a cor d fastened to it . Th
is cord runs to the wheel house, and const itutes t
he cngLne room telegraph II .
Af ter inspecting the lower deck, I retur ned to the bow of the ves s
el, where the fireman had re turn~ d to his post and was bai l i ng i n b
riquett es through the fir ehol e ~ whi.ch was now open. No
but.t.er-fLy fi re door here -.=the chain door is st ill in favour!
I went
out onto the bow deck, where there is a large capstan,
whi ch bears a brass plat e inscribed Carradi an Pacifi c Eai.Lway
Company -1,g9,gn. I ascended one of the closed et aLr-way s , vvhj ch br ought me o
nto an open pr-omerrade deck which encircles the cabi ns, The pas
senger deck is di.vided int o three main rooms or caLooris,
(not hing to do with al coholi c beve r ages !~) The f orward one i s semi-c
ircular. with windows al l around. There is a varietv of
. ,/
cltairs in t.ni s room, which is termed the obser vation saloon. Towa
rd the rear, ranged al ong the si des of the sal oon, are the
pur-ser s of f ice and a number of st.at.er-ooms, whi ch are used now as crews quar t
ers. Next to this comes the dini ng sal oon which is
stil l equi pped wi th t.abl es, though meal.s are no longer served.
Passengers usually eat t heir l unches there . The tables ar e
covered wi th velour cl oth) in ~a r k colours. The rearmost cabin, is t
he Ladi.es I Cabi.n wlt.h an elaborat e si.r-n to that ef f ect e
tched in the [l ass ove r the door . This cabin has all cloth-uphol­st ered f
urnitufe, but nobody minds any more if rent lemen use i~ .
There are t wo wnshroo!Yls and a few more st at erooms along the out­
side of it . The MOYIE bas about t wel ve stat eroomsal t op;ether , but
not al l of them are furnished. Behi nd the Lad i.es Y Cabi n and bo
tween it and the backboard, is a covered, open-air space, whi ch co
ntains several chair s . The backboard i t self i s an essential
part of a sternwheel vessel , as it stops the water which is thrown
up by the paddl ewheel.
Aft er hav i~g exami ned t he vessel completel y , j f ound that i t
VJCJ.S aLmost Leavi nr-t.Lme 0 This was confirmed by a bl ast of I1IJYIE1s whi s
tle . Two crew members picked up t he lines and took them aboa
r-d, One of them pulled a bell cord which hunt. from t.he ,tTi1eel­
house down to the foredeck The Captain sounded two 1:.7..8113 il the
,nvine room~ and the rIO YL~ eased away from the dock, her paodle­wh
eeL churning up the wat.er as each bl ade st ruck theVJat8r ,,;j.t h
s: thumpc The r esul t ant t.hump-Lhump-vt.hump H sound i s characr.er-i.a­
ti c of t his t ypA of ster nwheel , i n whi ch the bl ades are rnereJ?
stout pla:lY.:s ; secur el y oolted t o t he frame of the wheel .
The fi rst s
top was b.C J03 S the ri ver at BaIfour ~ t he hi.ghuay
ends here, and traffic is taker. on .:;o3.rd f.e-ITj ,;C:> (.> Lr: ~uY t ,:, : :~ ~_ ;::
-7­
(
the remainder of the space by a railine, dth mats stratericaL_y
pl~ced for wiping feet. The engines are quite simple in design,
each one being merely a long, high-pressure cylinder, Quite small
in diameter. The piston rods are attached, by a crosshead, to
the larfe main rods, of steel lattice construction, which in turn
a ct upon either side of thE: large, non-feathering paddlewheel.
Besides the main en~ines, there are also two pumping engines and
a generator for lighting. In the centre of the engine space is
suspended the throttle and reverse levers ~ and a bel1
1
1,lith a cord
fastened to it. This cord runs to the wheelhouse, and constitutes
the !fengine room telegraph II.
After inspecting the lower deck, I returned to the bow of the
vessel, where the fireman had return~d to his post and was bailing
in briquettes through the firehole ~ which was nOlt! open. No
7fbutterflytl fire door here -~ the chain d)or is still in favour!
I
went out onto the bow cleck, where there is a large capstan,
1f.lhich bears a brass plate inscribed ICanadian Pacifi c Raibvay
Company -1898
11
~ I ascended one of the closed stairw.ays, vvhj ch
bJ_uught me onto an open promenade deck vkich encircles the cat.Jlnsa The
passenEer deck is div~_ded into three main rooms or n~:>aloons.
(nothing to do with alcoholic beverages !t) The forward one is
semi-circular, with windows all around. There is a variety of
chairs in this room, which is termed the observation saloon. Toward
the rear, ranged along the sides of the saloon, are the
purser
f
s office and a number of stc=;terooms, which are used now as
cre1;v
Y
s quarters Next to tld_s comes the dining saloon which is
still equipped with tables~ though meals are no longer served.
Passengers usually eat their lunches there. The tables are
covered with velour cloth) in ~ark colours. The rearmost cabin, ·is
the nl~adies! Cabin
1
? with an elaborate si[n to that effect
etched in the rlass over the door. This cabin has all cloth-uphol­
stered furnitute, but nobody minds any more if fentlemen use i~.
There are two washrooms and a few more staterooms along the out-
s ide of J_~. The I-JIOYIE has about twelve stateroomsal top;ether, but
not all of them are furnished. Behind the Ladies Y C8_bin
l1
and.
[–,otween it and the backboard, is a covered, open-air space, ,vl-:ich
contains several chairs. The backboard itself is an essential
part of a sternwheel vessel, as it stops the water It!hieh is thrown
up by the paddlevvi1eel.
After havi~g examined the vessel completely, J found that it v
Jas aln:.ost leavin[ tine 0 This was confirmed by a blast ofWlYIE f s wh
istle. Two crew members picked up the lines and took them
ab08rJ. One of them pulled a bell cord which hunE from th:::; tTD.eel­
house dm,vl1 to the foredeck The Captain sounded two tT..-ells it the
eHrine room~ and the rIl)YL.: eased away from the docL, her p3.adle­v
ibeel churning: up the VJater as each blade struck the water d.th
2.. thump 0 The resultant Vthump-·thump–thump ,.( sound is charac c.elis­
tic of this typA of sternvvheel ~ in wb ich the blades are mereJ y
stout pla:lY.:s; securely oolted to the frame of the wheel.
The
first .::top ,,las b.CJ03S the river at Ba Ifour ~ the higrnray
ends here, ai1d traffic is takeE on .:.:odrd f(.rrj ~;0:-> t.., ~
·· t,~, : :.nl_;:::,
-7-
across the lak e to Kootenay Bay. The CPR facilities at BaLicor
consist of i:J. smal l sheLt.er and a sLopLnr-wharf which i nclines down
into the water , thus alLowf.ng proper berthing at any st age
of the water l evel .
(
After leavinc Balfour, the fIDYIE chur ned out into the main
body of the lake . The sun was now high enou[ih t o r>ppear above
the mount ains, disclosinr still more of the beauties of the regicn. The
next stop was the little hil l side settlement of Queens Bay: which h
ad another wharf and shel t er. From there, the course lay di
rectly acr oss the lake to Kootenay Bay, wher e the landing was
right beside that of the fer ry service, and in fr ont of a rustic
hotel, locat ed on the beach.
T
he fer ry service is operated by two dies el-ered vessels, named ANSCOMB and B
ALFOUR. The forQer has an unusual type of
dli ve , as her engi nes are l ocat ed on the overhanging decks on each side, and
there are ver t i cal dri ve shafts which pa ss through the
decks, much li ke those of out boar d motors.
T
he MOYIE continued her zigzag course across the lake cross­
in[ it several times to stopat /al kers, Deanshaven, Princess C
reek, Joodber r y, Ainsworth, Rionclel , Hirror Lake and Kas Lo , At each
of these places, a few snaIl packages are lef t . A few p
assengers come aboard, destined for KasLo or just along for the
ride. The principal place is Ri ondel whe re the shafthouse of the
Bluebell Mine is visible., The base-met al ore is conveyed to the sur
face and then taken to a spe cial loader. Vhen there is ore to
load, eupt y ore cars are pl aced on a barge and taken up to Riondel. The
baree i s t i ed securel
v
and the l oader fills the ore cars in a
preJ
e t e~mined order, so that the barge wi l l not be upset. When
all are filleu , the barge i s returned to Procter, the cars are removed and
hauled to the smelter at Trail . The mine was not oper­ating
at the time I was there, due to a miners strike. There is anot her m
ine across the l ake know as Kootenay Florence Mi ne , but
i t was inactive at the time , t hough engaged in pro~pect lnf f or
more ore. By this time, there were quite a number of pas sen~ ers ,
mostly peo~le from the mines and settlements out for a days trip,
either to Kaslo, or to stay aboar d until the 11UYIE ret urnod to
t heir ho~e landi ngs .
At K3.s1o ,
an ol d mining t r-osor t, the r a.ilway ( tJ.:) descends to t he water f s edf;e by
means of a switchback. Tilere is another of the car landinf 3 re~er ­
red to earlier, and a couple of box car s reposed on a tracy ,h:li::h
par aLl.eLl.ed the wharf down into the water
(To be c
ont i nued next month )
(it ) -Now the epn l.a sLo Subdivisi on, but once the nar-r-ow­gauge Ka
slo & Sl ocan. A story on t he K&S i s to appear
in one of the spr i ng News Repor ts.
He news it em
pa.ge 2 on the cpn Y1Royal Canadian. Test trai n le
avi ng Hont real 11:00 AM January 5th consi.st s of cars as foll VIS :
No.62 {dynamometer ); tourist Garson, Garber; official Kin? sme~e
tour i st Kesv,ick, Hemlo, Ker r obert, Hil lcrest; dormitory 3008 ,30(;..
12;Q1..2.QJ:.~; Lake 1[;nes ; Skyl i ne 510; Hourrt Burgess . ._.. _
Ldi.t or iaili OffLce: b959 ue IEpee Avenue, ?!font r eal 15, Canada,
(
across the lake to Kootenay Bay. The CPR facilities at Balfou.r
consist of a small she1t8r and a slopinf wbarf which inclines
down int:;Q the wat:;er, thus allowing proper berthing at any stage
of tbe water level.
After leavin~ Balfour, the rroYIE churned out into the main
body of the lake. The sun was now high enou[h to p.ppear above
the mountains, disclosinr still more of the beauties of the regicn.
The next stop was the little hillside settlement of Queenfs Bay: whi
ch had another wharf and shelter. From there, the course lay
directly across the lake to Kootenay Bay, where the landing was
riCht beside that of the ferry service, and in front of a rustic
hotel, located on the beach.
The f
erry service is operated by two diesel~ ered vesselS, named
ANSCOMB and BALFOUR. The forQer has an unusual type of
drive, as her engines are located on the overhanging decks on each s
ide, and there are vertical drive shafts which pass through the
decks, much like those of outboard motors.
The
MOYIE continued her zigzag course across the lake cross­
inr it several times to stop at fulkeris, Deanshaven, Princess
Creek, foodberry, Ainsworth, Rionclel, Hirror Lake and Kaslo. At
each of these places, a few snaIl packages are left. A few
passel1p;crs come aboard, destined for KFislo or just along for the
ride. The principal place is Riondel where the shafthouse of the
Bluebell Mine is visible.) The base-metal ore is conveyed to the
surface and then taken to a special loader. Uhen there is ore to
load, eLpty ore cars are placed on a barge and taken up to Riondel.
The barge is tied securel~T and the loader fills the ore cars in a
preJetermined order, so that the barge will not be upset. When
all are filleu, the barge is returned to Procter, the cars are
removed and hauled to the smelter at Trail. The mine was not oper­
ating at the time I was there, due to a Qiners strike. There is
anoti1er mine across the lake know as Kootenay Florence Mine, but
it was inactive at the time, though engaged in pro~pectlnF for
more ore. By this time, there were quite a number of passen~ers,
mostly peo~le from the mines and settlements out for a days trip, eit:;her
to Kaslo, or to stay aboard until the 11UYIE returned to
their ho~e landings.
At
Kaslo, an old mining tC?JJn whi ch is now somewhat of a
tourist r.;sort, the rail (Aray (fJ:) descends to the water f s edr;e by
means of a switchback. Tl1ere is another of the car landiof3 re~er­
red to earlier, and a couple of box cars reposed on a track ,il:li:::h
pa.rallelleJ the wharf dovvn into the water
(To be continued next month)
(:it) -Now the epn l~aslo Subdivision, but once the OarrOd­
gauge Kaslo & Slocan. A story on the K&S is to appear
in one of the spring News Reports.
He news item page 2 on the cpn 1!Roya 1 Canadian 11 • Test trctin
leaving Hontreal 11: 00 AM January 5th consi:3ts of cars as folL VIS:
No.62 [dynamometer); tourist Garson, Garber; official Kingsmere
tourist Kesv:ick, Hemlo, Kerrobert, Hillcrest; dormitory 3008
1
308..
1,~2;Ql..3..21.1; Lc:lke Ar;nes; Skyline 510; Hount Burgess.
tditoriaili Office: b959 0e lEpee Avenue, Montreal 15, Canada.

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