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Canadian Rail 048 1954

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Canadian Rail 048 1954

CÂNADIAN RAILROAD HSTORICÆ ÀS SOCIATION.
ÏNCORPORÆD.
.sÊP_±=?_q_tæ_.±__Jæ
è4t=,r`tx-.t+Ë-l u.r`.arpd®. – «
In place c>f thc rcguiar -Séptembcr M;e-ting of thc
Canadiarï` Ra,ilroad Hià.tQrioal Jlgcf`~ -].t has becn
arranged fcT mcmbc and güosts to Participatc in
^ -_,^^l.-_J._J _L _ _`.:« TF±ïS_`_RË_EQ~R_TLÆJq£8_
£ïOTIŒ OF I`ÆEETING
* ____ ____r+J~`JJ JLLl
a conductcd tour of thc C= N. Express fa.cilities
at Contrc.1 Station. Tho date will be thc secor}dWccinesday of the month — Septomber 8g 1954 at 7545 p day
light savirjg t.imo~`Jbnbcrs are invitcd to bring fi`icnds who might bc interestod
in this toür, which
sbould prove both instructivo and interc`gtir]g.
M3et at the Green Light in Ccntral Station.
7}45 pümç da}/-light saving time„
Wcdnesdav. Sobtember 8¢.¢
CROsslïJG THË RIVËR
Par.t 3
by Robert R.Brown1
the greater cr.edit. Ther`eels, especially since the
anyway, the honour` can be
_ __J -` _-__J -`r-, ¢–,+-1 *1
,, ~,,+ + +,J+IJJL+,LL*J,+S.designed the superst,r.uctur`è and super.vised aii the necessa
ry calcul-at,ions and tests, while Alexander Ross selected the sitc, de
signedthe piers and wor`ked out the plans and procedur`es for const.
Ï.uction.
PJlr`. iioss came out to Canada in the Spring of 1853
to examinethe area, arid., getting in toitLch with the government offi
cials in
Quebec, he was r`eferred to our old fr`iend, Hon. John ¥
oung, who inthe mean time had becoriie Chief Cor.ii+iissiciner` of Pu
blic Ti,7orks. li`Jhata fortunat eTÏ:;tî:Ëtt,ïâ:b`cJ:S+-,5Ë,:LîeîrÈ
îgosgË3.j ê :::ïnËnËoÎ TPï:àgË:a|builder!and the day folloTvvin€-thëir` arrival, they hired a cano
e and an ex-
ËÊ;àîn:Ëg gîd#â:, |gïâ#deËg::r:g ËÏ
: Ïà::: :Ëâr3Ïg.!#HÊÏ.:àlstË:|and
âî:tïî::gîîîî:T:1ÏâîË:Ïiïîî
î:Ï;iï:::Îïîrî:Ï:ÎoÏJ::Î:ÏÎËeï
îî::Î:oÏÎîîd
out from Ëngland.
When Mr..ïloss completed his inspection ancl had weighed al
l the
ÎggîË:ÎîâÊ|;nàLdgÈÊ:Ëv:f:ag|:: :|î,
i:ÎcËa3fùg:: :::È:Ï:nîÈËe,Î,; `gâmïgî
Keefer. He ri{i.htly concluded that consti-uction would be
no Ïïif)`r.edifficult and no mor`e costly ther`e than elsewhere, and since
it
Ë,âÊd:::â :gr;3ûrîs:hg:::n3ff::: :|Èg::êrt:Ê
aËràgg:h:ogË£e:epf:ggs:àghtSites. The saving in t,he cost of the stir!Ç>rstr.uiit,ur
e alorie was
e n o r`mo u s .
The contractors, Peto, Brassey and Betts, then sought a chi
ef
engineer` for. the jc>b, and their choice fell on James Hodg
es, who had
:â;naàâ Ë:Êà:uîmg:âïrâ:: s?an#ey|:ââ
sr::ËrËâdf:g£e:ÈËË::d3:sïâ:gs r:àà;time before but he was r`ecalled fr`om his rustic retreat to
engage inThe Victoria Br`idge had, as consulting
engineer`s, twc) of, the most eminent men
in the Profession — Roberrt, Ûbæpïiorloufl
and Alexancler I`il. Ross ~- and it is very
::nï:::Ë:L3?ot+h:,;:w:f:.:r;:.ÏTî|„Îï:,d|gecgâ:
ro-versies oveï` which of the t,wo desoi`vedis no .point in re.v.iving thes© old quarr-
pr`incipals the.m§elves were not invo|ved;pretty evenly divided. Rober`t Stephenson
~ .~e most important and most di fficul t job of his career. A dist­
~
i]~u i s hed American engi neer said:
• i?
It is my firmconvi ct i on that the cont ract ors never, in any of
their gr eat enter pr i ses, di splayed mor e wi sdom and sagacity, or g
reater abi li t y to cope with preat difficulties, than in
{
select i ng Mr. Hodges for the arduous work of placing the Vic­
tO Y =!.a Bri dge where it nov! stands, as firm as the rock it rest s
upon. It is not enough to say that no better man could have te
en found for the place. I go further and asser t , that in any coumun
ity, however Lar-go , of int elligent and able men, it would
have been a di fficult matter, a di fficul t mat ter indeed, to
have picked out a man so eminentl y fi t ted in all the var ious
qual if icat ions it re4uir ed, as Mr. Hodges has proved himsel f to
be for conducting the great wor k- to a successful completion; and it
: s not onl y in his dea:ings vii: th the Saint Lawrence that he proved hims
elf a man of resnurce and a skilled and patient
workman but, bettur st i l l, in his dealings between man and man
he has proved himself to be t hat whi ch the poet has termed, Vt he
noblest work of God, an honest man
1l •
It is but negati ve
praise t o say t hat Et man has no enemies: of lJlr. Hodges it is but simp
le truth to say that in eve ry man with whom he had de
ali ngs during his sojourn amongst us here in Canada, he
secured a fricmd. il
No smalL pr aise indeed from a man who perhaps might have hoped to
have had t ho position himself !
(To be corit.Lnued)
000000000000 000000000000
CANADIAN PACIFIC HAILVIAY unveils its eqUi pment for
r—-­
! THE ifJu1? LD 1 S LONGBST
SCENI C lJOHE .RI DF·.—-1
r,
l
;
by Omer S.A. Lavallee
L
}
~ve r since Juno 1953, when the Canadian Pacif i c RaiLway acnoun­ced
it :~ Lnt.cntion t.o streaml ine, in thelit eral sense of the word,
the; :~J J L Lc[p stock in use on the transcontinental trai ns between
M8nt ~ 031 and Tor ont o, and Vancouver, Canadians have been wai t i ng to set; to
w~a t extent Doder nity in train travel could be carried . When
t he ~40 J OOO ,000 order was placed with the Budd Company, of Philadel­phi
a: fa . , for 173 new units of passenger trai n rol l ine st ock, the
CO lliP ~Jl1Y pr-omi.aed the publ ic that the equipment would be worth waiting fo
r, Bu dd } aLready famous for the immensel y popular IlDC car , exam­
p.l os of which are nOH in service on both of Canadavs larger systems, have
achievud a number of other distinctions in the passenger rolli ng
stock fj eld, hitherto unfamiliar to Canadians. One of the things
for h:r.icr; t he company i s f amous i s the modern adaptation of t he
1Ic.~ () ~n, , ; i? tc passenger t.r-aveL; anot her is the st.ai.n.l.ess st eel, fluted
.s i cl .~ P qui.p.nent; which it has supplied, notably the Chi cago Burl ingt on
& C-::.:~ncy ltailroad, whose dome-equi pped HZePFlYr sIVhave claimed the
di2t ~~ctio n of being the most popul ar trains in Amer i ca.
One
f~c t or links the Budd dome car s wi t h Canadian Pacific, and
pG ~h2 p 3 makes it appr opr iate that the CPR shoul d be first to intro­
d
l~ ~O the moder-n cars in Canada. flat. is , that Canadian Pacific bui l t
and oper-at ed what, i s bc.li eved to 1:::e the world vs first dome11 cars ,
~.~e most important and most difficult job of his career. A dist­
~~~uished American engineer said:
• 11
It is my firm conviction that the contractors never, in any
of their great enterprises, displayed more wisdom and sagacity,
or greater ability to cope with Freat difficulties, than in
selecting Mr. Hodges for the arduous work of placing the Vic­tor-j.a
Bridge where it nOVi stands, as firm as the rock it rests
upon. It is not enough to say that no better man could have
bpen found for the place. I go further and assert, that in any
coumunity, however IDxge, of intE,lligent and able men, it would
have been a difficult matter, a difficult matter indeed, to
have picked out a man so eminently fitted in all the various
qnallfications it recjuired, as Mr. I-lodges has proved himself to
be :for conducting the gr(~at ,work· to Cl successfU.l completion;
and it :;3 not only in his dE.~a~ings w:: th the Saint Lawrence that
he proved himself a man of resvurce and a skilled and patient
workman but, bettur still, in his dealings between man and man
h(:; hRs proved himself to be that which the poc:t has termed, Vthe
noblest work of God., an honest manll. It is but negative
praise to say that a man has no enemies: of NIr. Hodges it is
but simple truth to say that in every man with whom he had
dealings during his sojourn amongst us here in Canada, he
se cured a friend. 11
No swall praise indeed from a man who perhaps might have hoped to
have had the position himself !
(To be continv.~ed)
000000000000 000000000000
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILVJAY unveils its equipment for
f
~
l
L
THE W0ilLDS LONG~ST
by Ome;r SC
ENIC l)OHE RIDE—–.
S.A. Lavallee
}~ver since .Juno 1953, when the Cana.dian Pacific Railway ar.noun­
cad itG intention to streamline, in the literal sense of the
ord,
th(J :-J.!_:Lnp: stock in use on the; transcontinental trains between
M~nt~031 and Toronto, and Vancouver, Canadians have been waiting to
see to w~at extent oode;rnity in train travel could be carried. When
the ~40JOOO,000 order was placed with the Budd Company, of Philadel­p
hia: Pa., for 173 new units of passenger train rolline stock, the
COmpJIlY p2:omised the public that the equipment would be worth waiting
fo::. Budd I alreQdy famous for the immensely popular RDC car, exam­
p.l.t; s of lh ich arc nOH in service on both of; Canada f s larger systems, ha
ve achiuvud a number of othe;r distinctions in the passenger rolling
stack fjeld, hitherto unfamiliar to Canadians. One of the things
fo:, l,:r.ich the company is fa.mous is the modern adaptation of the
1I(),n. il tc passenger :t:,rav(.l; another is the stainlei3s steel, fluted
sid.~c p quip:{lont Hhich it has suppliod, notably the Chicago Burlington
& C:),:~ncy rlailroad, ylh05e dome-equipped IVZepFlYrs IV have clEdmed the
Jt~ti~ction of being the most popular trains in America.
One f2
ctor links the Budd dome cars with Canadian Pacific, and
PG~h2p3 makes it appropriate that tho CPR should be first to intro­
dl! ~8 the Ii10dern cars in Canada. Tlat. is, that Canadian Pacific built
and oper2ted wha.t is boli::;ved to be the world V s first dome 11 cars,
more than fifty years ago. At that timo, engineers adapted the c
aboose cupol a spec i~l ly for passonfer usc , and produced pl ans fpr
riount.ai,n observation cars with [lass roofs and t,,;o passengcr -size
(�
supolas, one at each end of the car. Jevernl car s were bui l t and Tsn s
uccessfull for a numbcr of years. They were actuall y the
d.i r ect ancestors of the n3ccni c Dome of today. VJhi le this claim of p
riori t y has been disputed by at least one Amer i can rail road
~sing dome ~ cars, the facts stand for themselves.
The fi r
st unit of the newor-der, a non-dome sleeping car, was
accepted by Mr . N.R, Cr-uup, Canadian Pacific Vice Pr-esi derrt in a
special ceremony at Phi ladelphia.. Ihis first car , t he Chat.eau
Bi3nvil le 1 vias then shipped to lIont r(c:al , and upon arrival at that point on July 4.th, was
rushed to the cpn Angus Shops where cer t.ai.n Canadi an-manuf act u
red it8ms had yot to be instal led. Actually, qui te a larGe pe
rcentage of the items r e~lired for construction and main­ten
ance of the car are of Canadian manufact ure. Thoy include such
things as tr ucks, dr aft gear, roller bear i ngs, journal boxes, air brako equip
ment, public address system, batterios, lighting fi xtur es, gen
erat or drives, p2rcol racks, air filt ers, window sash, lavat ories,
tOi lets, seats, chair s, carpet s, inter ior murals and other items.
A
f ew days aft.cr-t.he arrival of Chateau Bienvil len and on what
wil l hereaf t er constitute D (f or Dome) Day in the hi story of Canad­ian pa
ssenger rolling stock, Monday, July 12th, the first dome car
for a G:.anadian r al Lway , tho new :Banff Park( arrived at ,Tindsor St
ation in Mont real . It was coupled at the eear of the Delaware &
Hudson over night New Yor k-Montreal trai n, and presented an impress-
i vc sight indeed. A number of us had made it our bus iness to acquai nt ou
rsel ves with the time of arrival of this car of cars, and as it
stood at the end of the train, out beyond the shel t er of tho trai n­
shed roof, it symbol ized the ar rival of a new era in Canadian rail
passenger transport at i on. The sunlight polished it s gleaming sides ,
the seats in the dome presented an impression of cool ai r – conditioned co
mfort behind the groan tint ed glass, and the devi ce of the beaver,
not just a painted emblem but cast in relief on the sides of the c
ar, procl aimed for al l to see that, unlike many railroads, the C
anadian Pacific had not lost fait h in the pass enger , and in his
abi l i ty to provide adequate revenue when gi ven good, modern equipment
in return for hi s expendit ure.
It is ant ici pated that the compl etedtrain will not be ready for
sur vice until May 1955. Meanwhile, complet ed cars wil l be placed in
service as they arc received. Depreciation is a not inconsiderable fac
tor to be reckoned wi t h, and while it is felt in some ci rclcs
that the impact on the publi c would be creator if the cars were with­held from se
rvice until all were on hand, it would be economi cally
impracticable to withhol d car s from ser vi ce for so long a ti me. When the
order is completed next year, it is expect ed that the tr ~ nscon­
tinental schedulo for the trains wi ll underf o a drastic overhaul . Uhile the Conpany h
2s not made any disclosure to this effect as yet,
~~. t is f E~ irly obvi ous that time cutting of at least twelve hours can
1)(; made, comfor tably, -{ith the new equipmcmt , which wi l l be handled
throughout th0 r10nt real/Tor onto-Vancouver run by diesel-elect r i c
locomot i ves .
Normally, each train wi ll include two scenic-dome coaches, one f
or the first-class passengers and ono for the coach class passengers .
more than fifty years ago. At that time, engineers adapted the
caboose cupola speci~lly for passenfer use, and produced plans.fpr
lTI.ountain observation cars with rlass roofs and t,·:o passenger-slze
supolas one at each ond of the car. Severnl cars were built and
Tsn suc~ossfull for a number of years. They were actually the
direct ancestors of the !13ccnic Dome;1 of today. VJhile this claim
of priority has beon disput~d by at least one American railroad
~si~g dome
n
cars, the facts stand for themselves.
The
firE:it unit of the new ordE~r, a non-dome sleeping car, was
accepted by Mr. N.H. CruiJp, Canadian Pacific Vice PreE.,ident in a
3 pecial ceremony at Philadelphia.. This first car, the I1Chateau
Bi3nville
11
iND.S then shipped to 1Iontr(~al, and upon arrival at that
po int on July 4.th, was rushed to the crn Angus Shops where c8rtain
Canadian-manufactured items had yet to be installed. Actually, quite
a larse percentage of the items r04uired for construction and main­
tenance of the car are of Canadian manufacture. Thoy include such
things as trucks, draft gear, roller bearings, journal boxes, air
brako equipment, public address system, batteries, lighting fixtures,
generator drives, parcel racks, air filters, window sash, lavatories,
tOilets, seats, chairs, carpets, interior murals and other items.
A felt!
days after thE; arrival of Chateau Bienville 11 and on what
will hereafter constitute D (for Dome) Day!! in the history of Canad­
ian passenger rolling stock, Monday, July 12th, the first dome car
for a @;anadian railvvay, the new ~IBanff Park
Yi
arrived at i.Iindsor
Station in :Montreal. It was coupled at the r!ear of the Delaware &
Hudson ovornight New York-Montreal train, and presented an impress­
ive sight indeed. A number of us had made it our business to acquaint
ourselves with the time of arrival of this car of cars, and as it
stood at the end of the train, out beyond the shelter of the train­
shed roof, it symbolized the arrival of a nev,T era in Canadian rail
passenger transportation. The sunlight polished its gleaming sides,
the seats in the dome presented an impression of cool air-conditioned
comfort behind the green tinted glass, and the device of the beaver,
not just a painted emblem but cast in relief on the sides of the
car, proclaimed for all to see that, unlike many railroads, the
Canadian Pacific had not lost f.aith in the passenger, and in his a
bility to provide adequate revenue when given good, modern equipment
in return for his expenditure.
It is anticipated that the completed train will not be ready for
s8rvice until May 1955. Meanwhile, completed cars will be placed in
service as they are received. Depreciation is a not inconsiderable
factor to be reckoned with, i:md Ii{hile it is fE:~l t in some circles
the,t the impact on the public .vould be greater if the cars were with­held
from sc~rvice until all were on hand, it would be economically i
mpracticable to withhold cars from service for so long a time. When
the order is completed next year, it is expected that the tr~nscon­
tinental schedule for the tr~ins will underfo a drastic overhaul.
Uhile the Conpany h2s not made any disclosure to this effect as yet,
~>t is fE~irly obvious that time cutting of at least twelve hours can
:.w made, comfortably, -{ith the new equipmcmt, which will be handled
throughout the 1110ntreal/Toronto-Vancouver run by diesel-electric
locomotives.
Normally, each train will include two scenic-dome coaches, one
for the first-class passengers and one for the coach class passengers.
?3gular di ni ng car facilities vvill be offered, and in additi on , ~or e

~; cQnoQical , lighter neals wi l l be available in a buffet wh ch will be
:0cat ed under the Scenic Jome in coaches so equipped.
In accordance wi t h standard Canadian Pacific practice, sleepi ng
d::_ni ng and parlour cars al l car ry names as designations, while the
pdssenger coaches and baggage-dormitory cars wi l l be number ed . The
~
3~es have been specially chosen to ref l ect Canadian history and ru
Lt.ur-e , The dining cars ill carry names of celebrated Canadian [Rcifi c Ho
tel di ni ng , lounge and public rooms.
-:; .;.tW:rC LJOllIE LOUNGE This is the showpiece of the train. Sleepi ng S
LEEPING CAR facilities in the car include three doubl e bed­
rooms and a drawing room. These rooms are in
-, ~1at sec t i on for-vrar d of t he s ceni c dome. I mmediat ely beneath the 00ue
in the depressed center of the car, is the Mural Loun ~ e, equipped
~
~th a bar. Each lounge, as its name i mplies, contains an orisinal
JI11.1ral depi ct ing the natural park af ter which the car is named. These rlur als h
ave been executed by eighteen wel l -known Canadian art i sts, al l
neubers of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. The dome section in
this car accomodates 24 passengers in its foam rubber seats, with
adjust able leg and foot rests. Behind the dome, there is a thirteen
passenger obs er-v at.Lon lounge sect ion, and the wall decorations include
a map of t he appr opriate nat ional or provincial park. The names are :
A
lgonquin Park Kokanee Park Sibley Park
Assiniboine Park Koot enay Park St rat hcona Par k
Banff Park Laurentide Park Tremblant Park B
vangeline Park Pri nce Albert Park Tweedsmui r Park
Fundy Park rtevelstoke Park IHat er t on Park
Glacier Park Ri di ng Mountai n Par k Yoho Park
DUPLEX ROOMETTE DHMlING ROOM Twenty nine of these carS ar ~ to be
BEDROOM SLEEPING CAR provided, each cont aini ng five di ffer – .
ent t ypes of accomodat i on. There are
four open sections at onc end , wi t h the usual toilet and washroom
facilities adjacent . In the center of tho car, there are three doubl e b
edrooms and a drawing room, the former providing accomodation for two p
ersons in each room, the latter for three persons. Unlike the usual
railway sleepi ng car rooms, those in the new equi pmerrt have completely
disappearing beds, for daytime use. The bed·o are replaced by comfort­
able movable easy chairs, and the rooms possess individual toilets and wa
shbas ins. Two of the double bedrooms can be opened Hen suite
il
l
Ht t: il-end o~f. t liu C9.r are .s it uated .:.-iCht Q,uplex roomettes.
The se cars carry the names of prominent French Regime Canadians,
a.nd include not only those whose neiTIes are widel y celebrated, but
others like Raphael Lamber t Cl osse, Montr eal military officer under
the Governor , and Francoi s Dol l ier de Casson, mi l itar y engineer and
vrir inat or of the Lachine Canal who are per haps not as familiar, but
wfj,ose names ar e nevertheless inextricably linked with Canadian history.
Ct
ateau Argenson Chateau Dol l ier
Chateau LeMoyne
Ch
ateau Bienvi l le Chateau Iberville Chateau Levis
C
hateau Br ule Chateau Jolliet
Chateau Maisonneuve
Chateau Cadi l lac Chateau LaSalle
Chateau Marquet t e
Chate
au Cl osse Chateau Laval
Chateau Mont calm
C
hat eau Denonvi l le Chat eau La Tour
Chateau Papi.neau
Chateau Dol lard Chate
au Lauzon
Chateau Hadi sson
R3gular dining car facilities will be offered, and in addition, ~ore
-,:, c~nomical, lighter Deals will be available in a buffet wh ch will be
:~sated under the Scenic Jome in coaches so equipped.
In accordance with standard Canadian Pacific practice, sleeping
.Ening and parlour cars all carry names as desif.nations, while the
passenger coaches and baggage-dormitory cars will be numbered. The
~~~es have been specially chosen to reflect Canadian history and
~ulture. The dining cars I~ll carry names of celebrated Canadian
fRcific Hotel dining, lounge and public rooms.
-:;:-;,bHIC 00ME LOUNGE
SLEEPING CAR
This is the showpiece of the train. Sleeping
facilities in the car include three double bed­
rooms and a drawi~g room. These rooms are in
,~1at section forvrard of the scenic dome. Irmnediately beneath the
0.uLle in the depressed center of the car, is the Mural Lounge, equipped
~~th a bar. Each lounge, as its name implies, contains an original
1l1ural depicting the natural park after which the car is named. These
flUrals have been executed by eighteen well-known Canadian artists, all
me~bers of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. The dome section in
this car accomodates 24 passengera in its foam rubber seats, with
adjustable leg and foot rests. Behind the dome, there is a thirteen
passenger observation lounge section, and the wall decorations include
a map of the appropriate national or provincial park. The names are:
Algonquin Park
Assiniboine Park
Banff Park
8vangeline Park
Fundy Park
Glacier Park
Kokanee Park
Kootenay Park
Laurentide Park
Prince Albert Park
Revelstoke Park
Riding Mountain Park
Sibley Park
Strathcona Park
Tremblant Park
Tweedsmuir Park
ivaterton Park
Yoho Park
DUPLEX ROOMETTE DRAHING ROOM
BEDROOM SLEEPING CAR
Twenty nine of these carS ar~ to be
provided, each containing five differ-.
ent types of accomodation. There are
four open sections at one end, with the usual toilet and washroom
facilities adjacent. In the center of the car, there are three double
bedrooms and a drawing room, the former providing accomodation for two
persons in each room, the latter for three persons. Unlike the usual
railway sleeping car rooms, those in the new equipnlent have completely
disappearing beds, for daytime use. The bed~ are replaced by comfort­
able Dovable easy chairs, and the rooms possess individual toilets and
washbasins. Two of the double bedrooms can be opened lien suite
n
l
… t t:!l-l:nd o~f.tliu car nru .situated .:.-ieht .Q.uplex roomettes.
These cars carry the names of prominent French 1iegime Canadians,
and include not only those whose names are widely celebrated, but
others like Raphael Lambert Closse, Montreal military officer under
the Governor, and Francois Dollier de Casson, military engineer and
vririnator of the Lachine Canal who are perhaps not as familiar,.but
w)ose names are nevertheless inextricably linked with Canadian hJ.st,ory.
Ctateau Argenson Chateau Dollier Chateau LeMoyne
Chateau Bienville Chateau Iberville Chateau Levis
Chateau Brule Chateau Jolliet Chateau Maisonneuve
Chateau Cadillac Chateau LaSalle Chateau Marquette
Chateau Closse Chateau Laval Chateau Montcalm
Chateau Denonville Chateau La Tour Chateat:l Papineau
Chateau Dollard Chateau Lauzon
Chateau Hadisson
I
Chateau Hichel i uu Chateau S~ l a barry
,J . :1
Chat cau hl[aUQ Cha t e~u Var ennes
Chateau Hober val Chateau Vercher es
Chateau Houvil le Chateau Viger .
DELUlIiE COACH There are thi r ty stD.ndard recl ininr:–seat 60-passenger
coaches on order, enough to provide two coaches for each
train. T.e seats are rotat i ng and have adj ust2ble head-and foot- rests. T
he seats ~r e ar r anged in a 24-p··ssenger smok ing sect ion, and in a 36­
pas s cnr -er-non-smoking compart ment . Separ ate washLng and toi let faci.Ltt. «
ies are provided at each end of the car on each side of the center ai sle. The men
rs faci li t i es, following the conv~nt ional patter n, are at the
smoking end of the car , while the ,mmon s rooms are at the oppos ite end.
T
he deluxe coaches will carry numbers 100 to 129 incl usive.
scsnr c Dm-lE COACH Eighteen 73-passenger dome coaches are being built;
ther e i s a 2G-passengcr cO Dch sect ion, of the same t ype
2S the ~e luxe coaches, ahead of the dome. At the end of this sec­
t ion, two steps drop t he passar.eway into t he depression beneath t ho 21+­pqsscnger
dome, which is of the same type as that on the Dome Loun[ e car . Thi s sp
ccc boricat.h t.hc dome i s occupied by the kit chcn and a six-pass­
eng;r buffet section. ~:k yond the dome, at the ot her end of the car, th
ere is a further 17-passcnger buffet socti on, tastef ully f itted wi th
cur-v-d sct t oos and banquet t.c scats and t abLes. In plQCCof the usual r o
ller cur-t. r.Lns on the wi ndows , the buffet section is to be provi.ded wit h ven
etian blinds.
These Scenic Dome Coach es wi l l carry numbers 500 to 517 incl usive.
DINING HOUM CAR The new
dining car s will be of unpr ecedent ed capacity in CanndI
an red Lway service. They will provide seat ­ing accomod
ation for 48 passengers, and wi ll help to al leviate th3
lineup, of t Gn extending into the a.djncont cars, which is presently J. feat­ure
of tr anscontinGnt nl train tr avel in tourist seasons. Thirtv-two passengc
r-s will be seat ed at t abLos in the convent ional munner , whi l.e the
remaining sixt0en will occupy banquette sections in each corner of the
cal. ;icle vri.ndcws wil l be equ i ppcd wi.t.h vcriet Lan bl i nds of t h..same t ypo as
those in the buffet section in the Jceni c Jooe C02ches . Kitchen and
pantry will be constructed onti rely of stai nl ess steel, and will
have electro-mechani cal refri ger at or s, automatic dishwashers and a three­
[allon coff ee ur n and si x [:~a l10 n hot wat.cr bo i lcr-. The cooki nr: r ange
viii11
notabl e
utilize: pr-opane
pUbl ic r ooms gas . i n Ca
N
2, m(~ S of n
adi an Pac if
t hese
ic Hot c
ars
els . fi
ll comrnemor-at c t he
Ann
c:-l?o l is
.H CaGlan Al .xand
ra
Al 112ilbr a Em
erald
Empress
Fa.irholme F
rontGnac
Loui s e P
alli ser
Pri ncess
Selki r k
Car-t Ler
Ch:unpl a i n Imper i
al
Kent H
ascana
Yor k
.ui(r,IBTY[:; CUhPARTMBNT BEDHOOlvT The 11J.l.anor I? class sleeping car i s si.mi.Lar
SL~< ;EPI :~G CAR to t he I1Ch::tteau11 class car, but possesses a
different ~rra ng ement of opsn and uncl o-
c~ Epsce. This car has four secti ons at one end, like the other cars, but in th·,; cen
ter of t.ho car are locatud compart ment and fi vGdouble bedrooms.
I
Chateau
Chat~au
Chateau
Chateau
Hichelieu
11i[~al1d
Hoberval
Houville
Chateau S~laberry
ChElte:1.U Varennos
Chateau Vercheres
ChD.teau Vii?:er.
DE1U~E COACH There are thirty standard reclining-seat 60-passenger
coaches on order, enough to provide two coaches for each
train. T.e seats are rotating and have adjust2hle head-and foot-rests.
The seats ~re arranged in a 24-pssenger smoking section, and in a 36-
passenc(~r non-smoking compa.rtment. Separate vvashinl! 2nd toilet facilit··
ies are provided at each end of the car on each side of the center aisle.
The mens facilities, following the conv~ntional pattern, are at the
smoking end of the car, while the JOmc;nYs rooms are at the opposite end.
The de
luxe coaches ,rill carry numbers 100 to 129 inclusive.
SCENIC DOME COACH Eighteen 7J-passenger dome coaches are being built;
there is a 25-passengcr cODch section, of the same t
ype 2S the ~eluxe coaches, ahead of the dome. At tho end of this sec-
t ion, two steps drop the passa[.8way into the depression berlOath tho 2h­
pqssonger dome, which is of tho same type as that on the Dome Lounge car. Th
is spuce b0neath the dOfile is occupied by the kitchen and a six-pass­
engar buffet section. 30yond the dome, at the other end of the car,
thsre is a further l7-passenger buffet section, tastefully fitted with
cLl:;,~vld s·.~tt()(;S and banqu(;tt(; se2ts 3,lld tCj.bles. In place of the usual
roller curt:_ins on the windows, the buffet section is to be provi_ded with
venetian blinds.
These Scenic Dome Coaches will carry numbers 500 to 517 inclusive.
DINI
NG HOOllI CAR The new dining cars will bc of unprecedented capacity
in Carwdian r8.i lvvay service. They will provide seat­
ing accomodation for 48 passungers, and will help to alleviate th3
lineup, often extending into the 2djncGnt cars, which is presently J. feat­
ure of transcontin8ntal train travel in tourist soasons. Thirtv-two
passl~ngcr3 will be seated at tc:~bles in the conventional mannor,· !,rhile the
remaining sixt0en will occupy banquette sections in each corner of the
cal. -dele ,rinuovvs will be equipped with venetian blinds of thi; sanle
type 2S thos~ in the buffet se;ction in the Jcenic Joms C02ches. Kitchen
and pantry will be; constructed entirely of stainless steel, and will
have electro-mechanical refrigerators, automatic dishwashers and a three­t
::allon coffoe urn and six [.:~al10n hot water boile:r. The cookinG range
wi 11 utilize prop[~ne gas. NcU11(~S of these cars will cor;lInemorato the
notable pUblic rooms in Canadian Pacific Hotels.
/.nnE~I?olis
1-.CaOlan
Al_xandra
Alharlbra
C,J.rtier U
nmplain
Emerald
Empress
Fa_irholme
FrontGnac I
mperial
Kent
Louise Pa
lliser
Princess
Selkirk
Hascana
York
_U in·ISTrE CUhPARTMBNT BEIHtOOI.,1
SL~<;EPL~G CAR
The lJ.·J.anoI 11 class sleeping car is similar
to the I1Ch:::tteaul! class car, but possesses
a different Arrangement of opcn and onclo-
c~ Epsce. This car has four
ill th·.; center of the car are
sections at one end, like the other cars, but
located compartment and five double bedrooms.
Two pa i.r-O£ t.he -[x;..d.r..oQ~ls.>.. oari, be o-pened lien suite n by means of folding
partitions. _ ii~ the other end of t he car, thore arc four full-size .
roomettes . H-a l e t hc Chateau cars commemor-at.e 1!O.m:i.ncnt French Regl me po
litical and mi l itar y figur es, those of the .i~nr l ish R.egime are r emom­ber ed by
t hc narnos of t huse cars, which are of the YManor
il
class; i t­
( s
elf the gr Eu;mat i cal cornploment of the French word Chat.eau ,
Abbott Manor
Burton Nanor�
Jrummond Manor Lor ne Manor Al
lan Manor� Bu
tler Manor
lJufferin Manor
Ma cdo nal.d Manor Amh
erst Hanor
Car-Let on Manor­�
Dunsmui r Manor ]Iackenzi e Mari or­
Ay1mur Manor� C
abot Manor E
lgi n Ma nor­
Monck Manor
Bayfield Manor� Cam
eron
Fras er
Manor Nanor O
sler Manor
B
c~ l l Manor
Christie Manor�
Fr ankl in r·1anor
Eogers Mano r
B
l ~lir fih nor
Cornwall Mc:.nor� Gr
ant Manor Sher wood M
anor
Hr,.nt Manor Cr
aig Manor­
Hearne TIiIanor
Stuart Manor� 3
rock Manor
Dawson Manor H
unter Manor Thompson Manor
Bliss Mcmor
Dour-L a s Ivlanor
Jarvis Manor Hol f e Manor
Ur-a pur-Manor L
aird Manor�
f3i~ G GA GL:; DUm-UTORY CA,RS Eir:rhteun bafrgage-dormitory cars , carrying�
numb
ers 3000 to 3017 i nclusive, wi l l provide�
livi ng ~uart ~ rs for the dininp and buffet car st aff s. There is a sep­
a a t.e� L ower bert. hr r oom with upper and s f or the stewart, while the crew�
secti on wi ll accomodate fi fteen men in fivetriple-ti0r bunks. There� ar e a
lso separ ate toilet and shower faciliti es in these cars.�
:/ ACI LITILS l ~N IJ DECOILi.TI V:;:; SCHEME
T11.·; tra in, as a unit, will be provi.d ed with a publ i.c addr oss syst em wi r
ei for three channoLs, two of whi ch wi Ll, provide music, whi le the
third can b0 used f or station announcemcnts, or commentary on tho scen­cr y. The de
corative) SCh 8 1110 throu [ ~hou.t, .has c;lvoided the U S f:; of paint.,o-d
surfaces by the provision of plastic walls, r8R.dj .ly W-.Sl::ablJi,
In addLti.on to the oi.r-ht cen or i.r-LnaL murals whi ch will be a f (3 ;:>~tu:r e
of the Dome Lounge cars, other dist i nctive Canadian ill u3t rati ons will be found in
the trai n. The Scenic lJome Coaches will be illust,r&t(,d wi t h Canad
ian and Pr-ov Lnci aI coats of arrns , map.s of C ::t ll ~ld 3. and mural s d
epict i ng tIle pr ogr ess of transpor tpt ion in tho nation, fr oD the primit­
ive cano ~s of the Indi2ns , and kayaks of t he ~sk imo , throufh stagecoaches, wooij
burning locomoti ves, to present daytrains. Sipni ficant events in
Car.ad i.an Pacific I s histor y will be commemor ated as wel l . These mural s wi l l be
of handcarved linol eum.
Th
ere ar ~ also glass etchinfs representinc the official flowers
of the sev eral provinces as well as of repres entative Canadian birds.
~h
erc will be many f r amed pictorial r eproductions of Canadian paintings ,
The ex
ter ior colour scheme unites the traditional Canadian Pacific
c.oLour scheme, wi t h the new unpaintod stainless steel trend in passerr­
;
:2 ~ car exter i ors. Each car is in unpainted stai nless steal, except !or
~
narrow band of Tuscan r ed pa int above t he windows c a~ryin g the
r:,1:lwQy narno, There will be; a furt her str i pe on the bel. t rai l moulding
lelow the; windows, while the car name or numbor will be carried in a
~
2~tra lly-situated panel, in Tuscan red and gold. The Canadian Pacific
.
r ~st , surmounted by the beaver, i . located in the duad li [ht ar ea, at
~
a ch end of the car. This reproduction is cast in relief.
Two ~a~r-Oft.he—[w.dr-OD~- carL be opened en suite?i by means of folding
partl tlons. _,.lit the other end of th<.; car there arc four fu.ll-size
roor~e~tes. jhi~e . tile Chateau cars comrll~lllOrat8 ,,-rom:incnt French Regime
polltlcal and mliltary figures, those of the ~nflish Regime are remem-
( ber
ed by th~ nawos of these cars, which are of the 1~1anor classj it-
self thE, grcu;-matical cornploment of the French word Y?Chateaul1•
Abbott Manor
iUlan Manor
Amherst HanoI A
ylm(Jr Manor
Bayfield Manor
B(~ll Manor
Bl~lir lVhnor
Hr,:>nt Manor
3rock Manor
Bliss Manor
Burton Manor
Butler Manor C2
.rleton lVbnor
Cabot Manor
Cameron Manor
Christie Manor
Cornwall Mawr
Craig MC:lnor
Dawson Manor
Douflas llilanor
Drapc~r Manor Jrummond
]1anor
Dufferin rvIanor
Dunsmuir Manor Elg
in lJIanor
Fraser Nanor
Franklin Hanor
Grant Manor
Hearne Manor Hunter
Manor
Jarvis Manor La
ird Manor
Lorne Manor
r·Iacdonald Manor
nackenzie Manor
Monck ]1anor Osler Manor
Hogers Manor Sherwood
Manor
Stuart Manor
Thompson Manor
Holfe Manor
n.£~GGAGL:; DUmUTORY Cl~RS EiphtlH)n bafrgage-dormitory cars, carrying
numbors 3000 to )017 inclusive, will provide
living ~uart~rs for thu dining and buffet car staffs. There is a sep­
arat? roor~l Wl th upper and Imv …. ::T berths for the stewart, while the crew
sectlon wlil accomodate fifteen men in five triple-tiar bunks. There a
re also separate toilet and shower facilities in these cars.
:/j~CILITILS dJ:J DECOELi.TIV:2; SCI-IBNE
—–
. Thu train, as a unit, will be ~rovi~ed with a public address system
wlrei for three channels, two of which will provide music while the
third can b0 used. for station announcements, or commentar; on the scen­
ery • rho d8coratlvc~ schuTIC throuchout. ,h.::~s c-lvoided the use of paint-on
surfaces by the provision of plastli!c walls, r8!.cU_ly -w:…Sl-:ab Lo,
In r:ddition to the eir:htcon ori[inal murals whi ch will be a fe8.-tur-e
of the Dome Lounge cars, other distinctive Canadi~n illu3trations will be
found in the train. The Scenic lJomc Coaches wj_ll be illnst,rt3.t(,d
v>Ji th Canadian and Provinci.::..l coats of anm, map~3 of C.J.ll depicting thQ progress of transportption in tho nation, from the primit­
ive cano~s of the Indi2ns, and kayaks of the ~skimo, throufh sta~ecoaches,
wooH burning locomotives, to pr<.;sent day trains. Sipnificant events in
Can.?,di:-m Pacifics history will be commemorated as well. Thuse murals
will be of handcarved linoleum.
There ar~ also glass etchinrs representinc the official flowers
of the several provinces as well as of representative Canadian birds.
~here will be many framed pictorial reproductions of Canadian paintings~
The exterior colour scheme unites the traditional Canadian Pacific
C OlOllY sch-.;;me, with the new unpainted stainless steel trtmd in passen­
;:2~ Cdr exteriors. Each car is in unpainted stainless steal, except
!or J narrow band of Tuscan red paint above the windows ca~rying the
rJ.~lwo.y name. There will be; a further stripe on ~he b81t ra~l m?ulding
l, clow the windows, while tho cc;.r name or numbc!r wlil be carr~ed ln ~ .
~2~tr~11v-situated panel, in Tuscan red and gold. The Canadlan Paclflc
,Yost, s~rmounted by the beaver, i .. ~oca~cd in t~e dua~ lifht area, at
::a.c~l end of the car. This roproductlon lS cast ln rc llCf •
,
The second -J
in a series on�
TI-
JE CANADIAN NORrI£RN RAI LWAY�
1y Ant hony
CleGg.�
(
LAEE MANITOBA liAILHAY & CANAL co.
JV1!l.NITOBA SOUTu li rlJ: ~ T 1=: P llT
RY .
March 31st,1900.
J..~
J…1 -.V .L .L.J ,!. l. J.II
This has certainly been a month to go down in history. Messrs. Hack­
enz
ie and Mann have announced the formation of The CANADIAN NORTHEiLN R1I.IL­
vJAYH .
The new
organization will consolidat e the future rail lines built by
Hackenzi o and
Viann under one manageme nt, and the Lake Hanitoba Li.ne and the
Manitoba South Eastern have been placed under its jurisdict ion. Hr . Hanna
is
st i.I.L our superi nt endent but it looks Li.ke it will Dot be long beforo he
becom
es Vice President .
The or igin
al Li.no has nowgrown by some eight y five mi les and regular
s
ervico is provided as far as SV<1n River, whLLo the Banitoba South Eastern
soct.Lon, east of v.Ji nnipog, extonds to a place called Warroad in Hinnesota.
It seems t
hat layi ng rail around the south (Americaili) si de of the Lake- of­
th
e-,!oods is tho easiest and most corrvorrierrt way to reach Pt.Arthur on Lake
Supe
rior.
As I m
entioned proviousl y, Mr . Mackenzie acquired the chart er for tho
Mani
toba Scut.h Easter n t.wo year-s ago and oponed the part to Marchand on the
I
2Sth of Novembe r y 1898. For economy ! s sake , we had t o use a t.ypewri t t on
f.
timetablo at fj.rst,and even had to unof fi cial ly bor row some cordwood cars
from tho CPR although ve now have our own Crossen-built freight equipment .

Traffic on tho l1uskog Limit od, as tho train is known, usuall y is ninety
per-cent. c
ord-wood for the Hinnipog markct., which brings in good revenue for
i
t he system. I;
,~
Our DOWaccountant and of fice manager , Hr. Cecil Friend, est imates tho
car rri .nge of t ho line sat about ~j;60 , 000 annuall y and a.lthough for tho first
throo years no intorest paymeht .s are requirod, so far ..J8 have been able t o
p
ay al1 fixed charges out of rovcnue, This is to cvoryono I s credit . We all
iI
·~po rato .
As a small but striki ng example, thoro Has tho accident up near Plumas
some wooks ago that nettod the Treasury four doll ars . A heif er vas kil.Lcd
by the regul ar train and the brakeman, Who had been a butchor bcforo taking
Up rui lroad i ng, s.laught.crcd the animal , sold the carcass and hi de, and paid
tho farmors clai m in full wi.t.h prof i t to sparo, Of such aro great rail­
roads mado! It i s t o bo hopod t ho.t as the System groHs in size i t Hill not
1080 the unity of purposo among al l ranks that is our mai n advantage at the
moment _
… suporvtsors and staff Worki ng togothor as associates, rather than
~s boss and subordi Dct os.
vJe have recently boen i nt roduced to a Mr.NacLeod of the Canadian Pacific.
Ho is a construct.ion ongineor and I beliove he w ~ill bo vIi th the Canadian Nor ­
thern bofore long. ~.Ji t.h his abil ity and experience, he ought to do 1JOnders
for the syst om, which I vi suaLi.zo now 0.8 stretching ubi qui t ousl y throughout
tho fortH o Hcstorn pl o.i ns of tho Dominion.
(
The second J
in a series on
TI-JE CANADIAN NORrIERN RAILvJAY
uy Anthony CleGg.
LAlill MANITOBA liAIUiAY & CANAL CO.
MANITOBA SOUTH EliGTERN RY.
. .
March 31st,1900.
This has certainly been a month. to go down in history. Messrs. Mack-
e
nzie and Mann have announced the formation of The CANADIAN IJORTI-lEIlN RAIL­
vJl.ylI.
The new organization will consolidate the future rail lines built by
Mackenzie and Viann under one managemont? and the Lake Manitoba line and the
Manitoba South Eastern have been placed under its jurisdiction. Jl.1r. Hanna
is
still our superintendent but it looks like it will not be long before he
be
comes Vice President.
The
original line has no,v grown by some eighty five miles and regular
service is provided as far as SWl.l1 River ~ while the Manitoba South Eastern
s,;ction~ cast of v.Jinnipeg, extonds to a place called Warroad in Jviinnesota.
It s)oms that laying rail around the south (Americaili) side of the Lake – of­
tho-1·Jood3 is tho easiest and most cODv(~nient way to reach Pt. Arthur on Lake
Superior.
f.s I mentioned previously, Mr. Mackenzie acquired the charter for the
Mani toba South Eastern t,~o yce.rs ago and oponed the part to Marchand on the
28th of November, 1898. For ecoJIDomys sake, we had to use a typm./ri tten
timetablo at first, and (iven had to unofficially borrow some cordHood cars
from t.ho CPR although VEl no,,: havo our own Crossen-built freight oquipment.
T
raffic on tho tfl1uskog Limi tad, as tho train is 1m a ,-./n, usually is ninety
percent cord-wood for tho Hinnipog market, which brings in good revenue for
the system.
Our nO-./ accountant and office manager, Mr. Cecil Friend? estimates the
earnings of tho lines at about ~~60?OOO annually and although for the first
threo years no int~rest paymebts are required, so far l.Je have been able to
pay a11 fixed charges out of revonue. This is to overyono s credit. We all
~porate.
As a small but striking example, thore ..]as tho accident up near Plumas
some woeks ago that netted the Treasury four dollars. A heifer l,Jas killed
by the regular train and the brakeman, who had beon a butcher before taking
up
railroGding~ slaughtered the animal, sold the carcass and hide, and paid
the farmer is claim in full l,Jith profit to spare. Of such aro great rail­
rOGds madol It is to bo hoped that as tho Systom grOl:ls in size it Hill not
1080 the unity of purposo among all ranks that is our main advantage at the
moment _ … supcrdsors and staff working togother as associates, rather than
L:S boss and subordinG.tos.
He havo rocontly boen introducod to a Mr.MacLeod of the Canadian Pacific.
Ho is a construction ongineor and I boliove he will be Ii th the Canadian Nor­
thern before long. ~.fith his [cbili ty and experience, ho ought to do 1-./onders
for tho systc;m, which I visualize now ClS strotching ubiquitously throughout
tho fortilo Hostorn plains of tho Dominion.
I
f.
,.
r–•
r
J L~te s ar:.d NeHs .
P~C0s
~r,8 r a~j expr ess ser vice on the 82 mile Temiscouata Subdivisi on of
t he
(; f,:, ;-, is DO,! provi ded by dies81-elect:tic motor unit 15831, which makes
t he Tcuni i. :::~.p E~ :Le~~8 du Loup -Edmundston run daily except Sunday. Regular
f r
eich ;: ,)e · ~
i.c:l is provi.ded bysteampower of the 1100 class, whi le the 1000
cl ass Locomot.Lves (f or mer Termi scouata Rai.Lway power) are used only as extras.
C.P.R. jice Presi de nt N.R.Crump says the roads nell Budd-builttrains of
14 cars each ,d l1
cut many hours from the present 87 hour lVJ.ontreal -Van­
COt.V(?l t.inrs, when t hey go i nt o ser vice next ·year . Al though no schedul es
ha
ve be ell snnounced, :Lt is possible that they may come close to mat chi ng the
67 hour run of CN15820 twenty ni ne years ago.
The Clm Mu
seum Tr ain has been on a six-weeks tour of Southern Ont ario,
including 2 weeks at the St rat ford Shakesper ean Festi val , and another fort­
night s stop i n Ot t atca, Al though not as ext ensive as last years tour, the
journey will enable thousands of Canadians to inspect this valuable record
of Canada s rai l way pr ogress .
Also on a tour of Ont ar
io is CN15021, the IIConservat i on Car donated
by the
r-ai.Lvay to the Oanad.i.an Forestery Association. It is a tr avelling
lecture room and mobi le theat re, and is open to the public at all stops.
The CNRs second and
third Budd RDC I S were placed i n MU operatdon on
July
lS., 195h between Lev.is and Hiviere du Ln11p. D- 200 a RDe-l seati ng 89
t
pas sengor-s and D-1[;0, a RIle-·J.). (mai1–baggage-expres s) replace a steam-powered
I
tr a:Ln -vhich pr-evi.ous.Iy oper at ed on the same schedule.
r
It fs repor-t.ed thJ,t the Ont ario Northland Hai l way is planni ng to bui l d
I
its own r ol ling stock i n t he O.N. ll. shops at Nort h Bay.
~I
A
C~) ~Gi ~g to newsp~pe r repor ts fr omLondon, Ontar io, the Canadian Nat ­
:I
i onal Rai Iways arc; consLder ing taking over the London and Port Stanley Ry.
It is sai d t;lat the Nat:Lonal System want the lucrative I&PS fri.ehgt business
Hi
i~hout t;18 r-esponsibiLi.t.Les of passenger service, whi le the citizens of
Loude n under-st.andab
.Ly des ire to keep their fi ne el ectricline int act.
Duri ng the past summer months, all MTC trai ling uni t s have been out
of ser vice, due t o s e ~1vic e reducti ons. The remaining units of this type
wi ll be
returned to U S 3 as traf fi c conditions war rant.
C_N.
IL subur-ban servi.ce in the JV10ntreal electri f ied area is now back
:.0 Dermal wi th the return to service of all Multi ple Unit sets. Tr action
mot.ors howe been r e-insul ated and other ad.just.ment .s made t o t he eLect .ri.ca.l,
syst.ems of t.hese cars. 20·1-0. and z-L.-::t locorr.otives are being equipped
Ij -::;1 n8W pant.agraphs as they go through the fillps dur i ng their periodi cal
cver-hauL, The n (;lrJ over-head collector s are similar to the type in use on
::he Z·5-a class locomotives and on the mult iple-unit coaches,
During June, 195h, British Rai.Iways opened thei r new double-track
t
11Lnel under the Pe nni nes, known as The Third Woodhead Tunnel . It is used
by the electri c operations bet ween Manchester and Penist one, for which
service the or iginal single bor es, compl eted i n 18L.5 and 1852 were un­
sui.t .ab
Le , It Ls interesting to note that the new tunnel is the same length
wi t hi n a
few yards, of t.he Mount Royal Tunnel at Ivlontreal.
J
r~——————~
I rlotes acd Nes.
Pl.c,ssnr,er a!11 express service on the 82 mile Temiscouata Subdivision of
the Gt:J, is [10,,[ pro-v-ided by dies81-electric motor unit 15831, which makes
the
Guni i.:::··~_p R.. vie~~8 du LOllP-Edmundston run daily except Sunday. Regular
freigh ,)e~iric, is pr::Jvided by steam povmr of the 1100 class, while the 1000
class locomotives (former Termiscouata Raihlay power) are used only as extras.
C, P. R. 1/ice President N. R. Grump says the roads new Budd-built trains of
14 cars e0i8l .dll c~ lf
from the present 87 hour l1ontreal -Van­
COt.VPl tim3., l-Jhen they go into service next ·year. Al though no schedules
hav.) ]-Jecll 2nnounced, it is possible that they may come close to matching the
67 hour run of CN 15820 twenty nine years ago.
The Clm Museum Train has been on a six-weeks tour of Southern Ontario,
including 2 weeks at the Stratford Shakesperean Festival, and another fort-
nights stop in ottatva. Although not as extensive as last years tour, the
journey will enable thousands of Canadians to inspect this valuable record
of Canadas railway progress.
A
lso on a tour of Ontario is CN 15021, the Conservation Car donated
by the raihJ3Y to the CanJ.di:J.n Forestery Association. It is a travelling
lecture room and mobile theatre, and is open to the public at all stops.
The C
NRs second and third Budd RDCs were placed in MU operation on
July J-S 195h betvJeen Levis and F?ivi.ere du Luup. D-200 a RDC-l seating 89
paSS3ngorE 3.nd ll-lr;o, a RIlC-·J.). (maLl··baggage-express) replace a steam-powered
trai.n T..Jhich pJ:8viously operated on the snrne schedule.
It js renorted that the Ontario Northland Hailway is planning to build
its mm rolling stock in the O. N. R. shops at North Bay.
Ac~ ;:..(;ir..<;; to newsp!1per reports from London, Ontario, the Canadian Nat­
i
onal Haihvays are consj_dering taking over the London and Port Stanley Ry.
It. is said tj}.3.t ·t,he Nat:Lonal System want the lucrative I&PS friehgt business
Hii~hout t;18 respoGs:i.o:i.lities of passenger service, while the citizens of
LO:1dcn ur.darstan(~doly desire to keep their fine electric line intact
During the past summer months, all MTC trailing units have been out
of service, due to 8e~vice reductions. The remaining units of this type
will be returned to U83 as traffic conditions warrant.
C w No R, subl}rb:=m service in the JIlontreal electrified area is now back
to I1crmal with the return to service of all Multiple Unit sets. Traction
motors h,.18 been re-insulated and other adjustrrents made to the electrical
3JstO;TlS of tbese cars. Z··l-a and Z-4-a locorr.otives are being equipped
.j -::;1 n8vJ p:mtaf:~r8phs as they go through the Iillps during their periodical
,;vernTL1.L The nC1rJ overh3ad collectors are similar to the type in use on
::he Z-5-a class locomotives and on the multiple-unit coaChOtlo
During June, 19:~h, British Raill..Jays operJe6 their new double-track
tULnel under the Pennines, knmvn as The Third Woodhead Tunnel. It is used
by the electric operations between Manchester and Penistone, for which
~
:ervice the original single bores, completed in 18L.5 and 1852 were un­
suitable. It is interesting to note t.hat the new tunnel is the same length
within a few yardS, of thE: Mount Royal Tunnel at I1ontreal.
The Canadian Pacific Rai}way will begin a fast RDC Dayliner
service
between Toronto and Peterborough on September 27th next. It
is expected
+;hat the cars will make the 77 mile trip in sO minu+.es and
provide additionalT,ransportation facilities between the two Onbar.io centres.
This run will`mr2ke more intensive use of the RDC units at present in the
Detroit-Toror.to
Sei-vice.
C.P. 905!+ and 9055 (RDC-l units) which wer`e received from
the Budd Co.
eariy in August, ar`e now on display at various points on We
stern Lines. They
ar`c f or` service in the Prairie Provinces, in all probability
the Edmonton to
Calgary runs.
The recent abandonment of C.P. steamship services on the Arrow
Lakes in
B.C® has brought.a wave of protest from the isolated commun
it,ies and the Cit-
izens of the area. The British iGolumbia government has pr
omised a subsidy
if so!neone can be found to operate a service with Federal an
d Provincial
backing, but up to the present no substitute for the SS. Min
to has been put
into operation.
The Pacif ic Great Eastern Railway plans to operate a daily tr
ain service
be.tw€en Vancouver and PÏ.ince George, as soon as the l
ink between Squamish
£-Lnd Nort.h Van. is completed. Work on this southern
extension is proceeding
according to schedule, and now proposals are before the Gover
nment of Br`itish
Columbia for the northward extension of the railway, not only
to the Peace
hiver I)istr]..ct as suggested heretofore, but also through nor
`thern B.C. and
Yukon as far as Alaska.
miile reporting news of north-ward rail extensions, mention
should be
made of the recent linterestn of Premicr Duplessis in the bui
lding of a
railroad frc)m Mont Laurier to Rupert House on Hudson Bay.
It is reported
that E.F.Kaiser, son of Henry Kaiser, the Àmerican industria
list, is conn-
ected with the propos€d venture, which would tap the vast n
atural resources
of northern Quebec.
The last C.N.R. Mogul in regular service on the Montreal Dist
rict —
G.T. 7i3 –has now been stored at lsland Pond, Vt. It w
as previously on
the Danville Jct.-Lewiston, Me. , branch, but recently was repla
ced by a
Consolidation type locomotive. C.N. 67h, which is assig
ned to the Mus-
eum Train, may be on stand-by service at Montreal during the
winter months.
Scheduled passenger service on the Maritime Railway, operating
between
the Cm at Maccan, N.S. and Joggins, has been entirely discon
tinued. The
hospitable little line nc>w joins the rari{s of the Freight O
nly carriers.
Several di.esel-electric llÂW u`riits foi the metre-gauge line
s of the
Æastern Bengal iüilway were shipped during the surmer mont
hs f rom Montreal
to Chittagong. The diminutive units, numbered in the 2000
sories, wcr`e
built by General Motor.s Diesel Ltd at London, Ontario, and
were t,i.ansi,c`T+or3
to the Montreal Harbour on heavy-duty flat cars.
Specially-built light-weight diesels of the Road-Switcher type we
re
delivered during June and July by G.M.D..L. to t,`ne Canadian
Nat,ional for use
on the Lynn Lake line. Numberéd CN 767o -767L (incl)
, they are 875 H.P.
units ol` 23# rating and are designated as Class ¥-6-a.
The Montreal Transportation Commission will shortly undertake con
struction
of a new autobus garage on Buchan Street,, between Na.mur and
Mountain Sights.
The directors of the L.& P.S. have recomnended the purchase
of a I)iesel
locomotive for freight service!
New Stations on the
(
Canadian National.
The C.N.R. l1agazine recently carried an announcement concerning the naming
of twelve new stat i ons on the recently-completed rail line to Lynn Lake in the
nort hern part of Manitoba .
Thefollowingis ali stoftheplaces,theirmilea,ge ontheSubdivision,
and the significance of the chosen name,; ~ .:
53.5 Ruddick The f amily name of the local administrator at Lynn Lake and
64.7 7) .4 Takipy
Cha
rles
a former mayor of
A nearby l ake.
I n honour of Fl t . Sgt .
Tha Pas.
J.H.Charles, RC AF, killed in action at
Koln and the son of J.lJOCharles, chief engineer of t he
8h.5 Rafter C.
N. R. Western Region.
The l
ate T. Rafter Has f or many years in charge of brigges
on the Hudson Bay Railway.
94.1 Pawistik The Cree Indian word f or Falls. Pawistik is locat ed where
t he line crosses t he Churchi l l River.
9902 Pukatawagan Fal l s This station i s near t he I ndian vi l lage of same
111.7 Heaman J. {. Heaman was f ormerly chief engineer of t he name .
G.T.P. and Asst .Chi ef Engineer of t he C.N.R.
122.0 Jetait Af ter Capt. J.E. Tait, VC, of Hudson Bay Rail way.
134.2 Hone Sqd.Ldr. J. Hone, :_LCAF, was a weI Lr-known northern pi l ot of
Nor thern JVIani toba.
145.7 Harr i ot Pr of. G.1-1. Herriot , one of the original sur veyors i n Huds on
Bay t
erritory.
157.5 Drybrough John Drybrough, a pro min er~ mi ni ng engi neer .
170.8 McVeigh Austin McVeigh was t he prospector who di scovered t he rich
Lynn Lake miner al deposit3.
Commut e
rs.
Oakville Onto commuters achieved one of their object i ves last July 27
when the CNll placed t en r ebuilt coaches on t he Toronto-Hamilton suburban
run. The e
quipment which was r ebuil t in the CNR shops from Itormer Col­
onist Cars, has been designed to fill the needs of commut ens, and carry
lee passenger s each.
,.s soon as the announcement was made of improved faci l iti es to the west
of Toront o, the
eastern suburbs which at present have no commuter-ser-v.ices,
co
mmenced a campaign for a local serv.l-re between Toronto and the Scarborough
and
Pickering areas .
Comm
uters everywhere were none too happy about the recent announcement
of
the Board of Transport Oommi.a s.i.one.ra incr easing local rai l fares by 100%.
The present announcement concerned t h~ Toronto distri ct only, but it was
fe
lt that a pat tern was being set, which would be fol lowed in other areas .
IllThile most travellers agreed that sorre upwar d r-evi.s .i.on to r ates was due, the
dou
b
ling of present tariffs wi thout a hope of better service was a rather
bitter pill. The quest ion was al so r ai sed as to whet her commuter servi ce
s
hould be made t o pay i t s ,ray when ot.her t ransportation services performed
by
C~nad
ian rail l ines did not even att empt to do so ; -the carrying of low­
rate bulk commodit ies by freight t r r.Ln is admit tedl y subsidized by t he more
valuable light-weight f J:eight t.raffLc, The Tor onto newspaper-s .repor -e that
the Boards ru:1:ifug -will be app e al~~. to t.ho Feder al Cabinet .Ln the hope-.of .:
mod
erating the ,iIDor~ase t o a mQre ~ea sonable figure.
(
Now Stations on the
Canadian National.
The C.N.R. l1agazine recently carried an announcement concerning the naming
of twelve new stations on the recently-completed rail line to Lynn Lake in the
northern part of ]1ani to ba.
The following is a list of the places, their mileage on the Subdivision,
and the significance of the chosen name ..
53.5
64.7
75.4
9902
111.7
122.0
134.2
145.7
157.5
170.8
Ruddick The family name of the local administrator at Lynn Lake and
a former mayor of The, Pas.
Takipy A nearby lake.
Charles In honour of Flt.Sgt. J.H.Charles, RCAF, killed in action at
Koln and the son of J.IJOCharles, chief engineer of the
C.N.R. Western Region.
!lafter The lata T. Rafter was for many years in charge of brigges
on the Hudson Bay Railway.
Pawistik The Cree Indian word for Falls. Pawistik is located where
the line crosses the Churchill Itiver.
Pukatav-ragan
Falls This station is near the Indian village of same
Heaman J .{. Heaman was forffii.3rly chief engineer of the name.
G.T.P. and Asst.Chief Engineer of the C.N.R.
Jetait After Capt. J.E. Tait, VC, of Hudson Bay Railway.
Hone Sqd.Ldr. J. Hone, :.~Ci.F, ;Jas a wall·-known northern pilot of
Northern Manitoba.
Herriot Prof. G .1-1. Herriot, one of the original surveyors in Huds on
Bay t
erritory.
Drybrough John Drybrough, a prominent mining engineer.
11cVeigh Austin HcVeigh was the prospector who discovered the rich
Lynn Lake mineral deposit3.
Commuters.
Oakville Onto commuters achieved one of their objectives last July 27
when the CNll placed ten rebuilt coaches on the Toronto-Hamilton suburban
ruYl. The equipment which was rebuilt in the CNR shops from [hormer Col­
onist Cars, has been designed to fill the needs of commute13s, and carry
lee passengers each.
As
soon as the announcement 1-Jas made of improved facilities to the west
of Toronto, the eastern suburbs which at present ha;-e no eommuter servIces,
commenced a campaign for a local servi·;e between Toronto and the Scarborough
and Pickering areas.
Commuters ever;y-where were none too happy about the recent announcement
of the Board of Transport Commissione~:,s increasing local rail fares by 100%.
The present announcement concerned th~ Toronto district only, but it was
felt that a pattern was being set, which would be followed in other areas.
lhile
most travellers agreed that SOITe upward revj_sion to rates was due, the
doubling of present tariffs without a hope of better service was a rather
bitter pill. The question was also raised as to whether commuter service
should be made to pay its v.ray when o-Lber transportation services performed
by CSYladian rail lines did not even attempt to do so; -the carrying of low­
rate bulk commodities by freight tr.in is admittedly subsidized by the more
va
luable light-weight f~eight traffic. The Toronto neuspapers .report·that
the Boards ru:1:ingwill be appeal~f, to the Federal Cabinet .in the hope of _.
moderating the,imcre,ase to a mQre ~easonable figu~e.
.iNOTHER PLAN
f or r apid transit
in Mont real area.
One of
the most cont r over sial subjects in the Mont r eal area of recent
(
year s has been the proposal to est abl i sh rapid transit facilities for the
benefit of l1ontreal tram and bus travellers. Subways have been planned –­
but only planned. Elevat edO$.pressways have been seriously t alked about –­
but only t alked about . ~ nd numerous variations on these subjects have been
taken under consideration, but nothing has come of them.
And
now the Mont real Met ropolitan Commission is actually going to spend
thousands of dollars on a superhighway across the Island WITHOUT incorporating
rapi d transit facilities for the benefit of the general public!
The
present plans call for a mul t i -lane highway to funnel thousands of
addi ti onal cars and trucks to the centre of the city and to further reduce the
effect iveness of public transpor tation, when with a little f orethought to the
needs of the future, a double-track rapid transit line could be i ncorporated
into the design and the construction. Wi th an immediate transfer to the CNR
commuter services north of Mount qoyal and a future connection with the pro­
posed subway at St.Lawrence Blvd (or St.Denis or wherever the line would be
crossi ng under the Metropol i tan Blvd) it woul d provide Mont real with as eff­
i
cient and as effect ive a transportation system as possessed by any other
Canadian City.
The hea
vily-populated part of Mont real does not at present extend much
beyond Cremazie Blvd (the approximate location of the proposed Met ro .Bl vd. )
but it does not require much clairvoyance to seo the day when the whole central
part of the Island wi l l be thickly-se:ttled .and the rapid-transit facilities
al ong the Metropol i tan Blvd.(if built) wi l l be playing a major role as the
east –
west Backbone of a fine transport ati on system.
B
etter still, make provision for four trlcksl
.
LAST HINUTE
NEWS ITEHS .
l
i
On Friday, August 27, the C.P. R. operat ed one of their Scenic Dome cars,
Pri nce Albort Park on train #40 between Montreal and Saint John, N.B. The
sp
ecial run was adver t i sed for t he public, but i s not yet a regular feature
of
this daily train. The Prince Albert Park ret urned on train #39, arriving
Montreal on Sunday monning. A second not able item in connection with the re­
turn of t he 13 car train was the motive power vcst of :Megant i c – CP Hount ai n
type 3101.
This engine had previously taken #42 (16 car s) to Megantic on F
riday eveni ng. The
Dominion Atlantic Raailway have announced the withdrawal of sleeping­
car service from the night trains, #99 and #100, between Yarmouth, Digby and
Halifax, N.S . The move was ef fect ive August 30th.
Dios
el locomotives 1818 and 1819 have been received and pl aced in oper­
ation by tho Canadian Nat i onal . Those two new 1600 hp road-swit cher units
of Alco design wore built by Montreal Locomotivo Works duri ng August, 1954,
but specifications and assi gnment s arc not yet availablo. Their numbering
and classification indicate that a major re-numbering plan for CNR road-sw­
it chers
is immi nent. Complete detail s of the chango will bo included in the
next issue of the News Report.
Nows Report, published by the Canadian Railroad Historical Association, Inc.,
O.S .A.Lav
allee -Editor D. Brown ~ Assistant Editor
Editorhal Office –6959 de lEpee Avenue , Mbntro al~ 15, Queboc., Canada.
A. Clegg -Tempor
ary Acting Editor.
(
_~NOTHE17. PLAN
for rapid transit
in Montreal area.
One of the most controversial subjects in the Montreal area of recent
years has been the proposal to establish rapid transit facilities for the
benefit of Montreal tram and bus travellers. Subways have been planned –­
but only planned. Elevated 8$.pressways have been seriously talked about —
but only talked about. ~nd numerous variations on these subjects have been
taken under consideration, but nothing has come of them.
And now the Montreal Metropolitan Commission is actually going to spend
thousands of dollars on a superhighway across the Island WITHOUT incorporating
rapid transit facilities for the benefit of the general public!
The present plans call for a multi-lane highway to funnel thousands of
additional cars and trucks to the centre of the city and to further reduce the
effectiveness of public transportation, when with a little forethought to the
needs of the future, a double-track rapid transit line could be incorporated
into the design and the construction. With an immediate transfer to the CNR
commuter services north of Mount qoyal and a future connection with the pro­
posed subway at St.Lawr€nce Blvd (or St.Denis or wherever the line would be
crossing under the Metropolitan Blvd) it would provide Montreal with as eff­
icient and as effective a transportation system as possessed by any other
Canadian City.
The heavily-populated part of Montreal does not at present extend much
beyond Cremazie Blvd (the approximate location of the proposed Metro.Blvd.)
but it does not require much clairvoyance to see the day when the whole central
part of the Island will be thickly-settled ,and the rapid-transit facilities
along the Metropolitan Blvd. (if built) will be playing a major role as the
east-west Backbone of a fine transportation system.
Better still, make provision for four trlcKsl
LAST HINUTE
NEWS ITEHS.
On Friday, August 27, the C.P.R. operated one of their Scenic Dome cars,
Prince Albort Park on train #40 between Montreal and Saint John, N.B. The
sp
ecial run was advertised for the public, but is not yet a regular feature
of this daily train. The Prince Albert Park returned on train #39, arriving
Montreal on Sunday monning. A second Datable item in connection with the re­
turn of the 13 car train was the motive powor west of :Megantic -CP Mountain
type 3101. This ongine had previously taken #42 (16 cars) to MGgantic on
Friday evening.
The Dominion Atlantic Raailway have announced the withdrawal of sleeping­
car service from the night trains, #99 and #100, between Yarmouth, Digby and
Halifax, N.S. The move was effective August 30th.
Diosel locomotives 1818 and 1819 have been received and placed in oper­
ation by tho Canadian National. Those two new 1600 hp road-switcher units
of Alco design wore built by Montreal Locomotive Works during August, 1954,
but specifications and assignments arc not yet available. Their numbering
and classification indicate that a major ro-numbering plan for CNR road-sw­
itchers is imminent. Complete details of the change will be included in the
next issue of the News Report.
News Report, published by tho Canadian Railroad Historical Association, Inc.,
O.S.A.Lavallee -Editor D. Brown ~ Assistant Editor
Editorhal Office –6959 de lEpeo Avenue, Montreal~ 15, Quebec., Canada.
A. Clegg -Temporary Acting Editor.
.
L
!

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