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Canadian Rail 043 1954

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Canadian Rail 043 1954

CÂNADIAN RAILROÆ IHSTOHCAL AS SOCIATI0N
ÏNCORPORÆD.
NET,JS ji,EPORT NO. 43
NUTICE OF IuïEHTIIJGT,`[ARCIÏ 1954
Thc llarch me(i-;ting will bc held following,
thc Annual Banquet, which will take plac`ein a Canadian Nationa,l Piailways dinirig carto be stationccl in Ccntral Station. Those
attenclirig thc banquût aï.c askcd to bc present at the
stat,ion, at
the Gr.een Light, riot later than 7 PM on Tu`Jednesday,
March 10th,1954oFollowing the meal, the meeting will be hclcL in one of t
he new CNR
coaches, and Mf .Ii.R.Bi-om will relate a few dining car a
necdotcs.- -, Iœl -1 – – – _ – _
An or`Fanization bearing this tit,le
has been for`med in Toronto for` tlie
purpose of owning and oper.atingelectri.c street- a.nd interur.ban r`ail-
way rolling stock. Whi.l_e therc a.re- __
–_ _ _ __1
L
___
– – _ __ _
severai such organizations in thè United~States, this is th
e firsb
at,t,empt Lo be made in Canada to organize such a gr
.oup. ld`Jte ar.e
±riformed that, the O.E.R.ll.jni.o has obtained a piece
of property
which includes a half-mile segment of abandoned r`ailway £
3:rade, inthe Torortto ar`ea, and plans to s+,art rehabilitatinf the r`
oadbed toallow eventual relaying of ,,rails will be impleriiented in the
Spring.Thus far, the society has acquired one unit of rolling st
ock fr`om
the Elistc>ricc?.1 Sollc?,ction oI` the Toronto Tr`anspor`ta
tic)n CommissionoThis car is No.1326, a double truck wooden car c>f the
familiar type
built by the Tor`ont,o Railway. No.1326 is the sole s
ur`vivor oÉ` a
type or]ce common in Tor`onto, and in several other Cana
dian cities
t,o wliich a number o±.` the cars were soldo
Thg group -is in t;he process of formal organization, and
it
is the int,ention of the di.rectorate tc) seek a Provincial
Charter.Iriquiries foi. member`ship or cont,ributions to help defr`ay in
it,ial
expenses will be wclcome, and persons interest,ed ar`e ur`ge
d to wr`ite
T-` 1 m _ _____.__ __
l de Road, Tor6nto 18,
dusky, `+L`t.R.#6, Braripton,
in its encleavour.gh
ont.-. ijè wish tiiis orga.niz7,ation much success
+r* _ _ _ _ -.—-

Soifie reference works state
that the fir`st locomotivebuilt in Canada was built
in 1$50 by Fleming: & Humüber`t, but this false clairriis based only on a paint-inçJ- of their second locolto+t,lie President,1.Ir. Johri Mills,11
0nbario, or` the Secretar`y, Mr. Robert
CAIJAiJIAN LOCO.Î`/10TIVE BUILDERS
– l`Lober`t, R. Broim
IV. -Fleming & Humber`t,Phoenix Foundr.y, Saint John, NB
motive, t,he Ossekeag, and the picture bear`s the date
1850.
ï{3¥:¥Ê:àgfî #râ¥eb:LÊÎ: EËeï3;;:î
naï ïedger ent,ry show+ng that, t,he
)
The Phoenix foundry and Machine
Shop was
founded in 1835 by
Fleming, Barlow & Stewart; some years later the nane was changeu to
Gleming and Humbertm
and still later to Geo. Fleming & Sons. The
business
still operates
on a very reduced scale. In addition
to
building
ne, locomotiv
es, D. great many were
repaired
and rebuilt
for the Intercoloni
al Railway and other ~~ritime
lines, and this
activity
continued
until 1914.
I visited the office of the foundry in 1929 and met a Oeorge
Gleming, who then o~med the business
. He informed
me that there had
been a book listing all the locomotives
and marine en~ines built
by t.he firm, and showing builders
numbfrs Cind all principal
dimen_
sions, but that about 1924, one of the Fleminls had
taken a;lay the
book to California
and all trace of it had been lost. I was pressed
for time that day and merely looked through some of the ledgers
and found that they contained
so much information that it would be a
simple matter to reconstruct
the roster from that source. Mr.
Fleming
sugr,ested
that on my next visit, that I make a detailed
examination
of the ledgers. i
This was arranged
. Unfortun-
!
ately, five years passed before
I returned
to 3aint John and by
that time, all the Flemin!s
had
withdrawn
from the business
and
DORCHESTER
ST
(Abandoned)
,
I
t

,
FOUNDRY
I
MACHINE
SHOP
it was being operated
by the B
form~r bookkeeper,
who proved
to be very uncooperative. The
OFFICE
following
roster, compiled
from
other sources, may not be com­
plete, but diligent
search has
failed to unearth any other
,
,
I I
BOILER
SHOP

POND STREET
engines, and it is not likely
~-r+~~ ·1-~-,
, ,-
/L
that there arc more than one or—-~~~~~~~O=~7hl~
two enrines missing, if any. Sketch of shop p..an ( Not t:OSCaleY
The shops were on Pond
Street at the foot of old Dorchester
Street (since diverted)
and close to the old station of the Euro­
pean & North American
Railway. There was a two-
storey brick office
building
; a large wooden boiler and tender shop with drawing office
and pattern shop upstairs;
a larr-e brick building
with a three-stall
erectinr
shop in front and machine
shop at tho back. A covered paSSa[;bvlay
led to a courtyard
and foundry at the back, and tracks
led from the stalls of th~ erectinF-
shop along Pond Street to the
raihlay.
The
early Fleming eng-in(;s we
re very ell-built machines
which
rave good service for many years, but by the mid-::ifhties
, the qual­
ity deteriorated
; several ere rejected
by purchasers
and finally,
the boilt::rs of two comparatively
new enp-ines
exploded
and that put
an end to locomotive
buildinr
in Saint John.
Lxplanation
of initials
E&NA Luropean
e:, North American
ST.S St. Stephen Branch ny.
lCR Intercolonial
Railway
r·l&.B ii{oncton & Buctouchc
Ry.
CRG Cumberland H-8.i.1vlilY &. G<..,ql
Ry.
r,n _
COR Canadian
Covernment
Rys.
EB Elgin Branch Ry.
CER Canada Eastern Ry.
JR Joc-r:ins Ry. (now i~1ri time R
NBPEI New Brunswick
& Prince
Edward Isl.qnd F.y.
S~,J.!;.q)j~bll-Y &. A1.b,~rl. t?,v.
(NOTË: Number`s before each engine are iridex riumb
ers orily and must
not be considered as builders number`s.)
4-4-0 14×22 66w
1. AU8. L858 Ëgï;£:#ÊCÈ 7#Î?SË8;Ë
î:Î sba.ndard gauge; i882 scrappedo
2. June l859
3. Aug.1859
4. Feb. 1860
5. Nov.1860
6. Julyl86l
7. 1867
8. 1868
9. 1869
10. 1880
11. 1880
12. 1880
13. 1881
14. lJ 1881
15. 1881
16. 1881
17. 1881: 1890: New Brùnswick Rya i)`15;
: scrapped.4-/+-0 15x22W 66w
ÏÏJ§P;Î;/:Î:nîiïî§iî:ÏÎÎÎ:gî
:aï;:iï/Î4:a#gîo£:go#=Ve°
Ïg?ê :#ÏSR-#;,3?oÏ3#standa#Ègug:;xîsë8: gg:apped
.
Ïg;£: #È??R-#;,;;iï3,5?fsltJâ:lâ:::d È;:È: ;
Ïâg,?scîâËped.
4-4-0 16×22 6om
bïîïî;,;`iîË:Îîiirîî;ÎÎÏÏ,.rï
;;l:Îga#,g`3%Îânânîf`gtîTeïsïjî.
Ïg?ê : ##R-#;,;ïiï3,5,:ilÊ:ârqËa±à4;gug:;xÎ
3;8 s:Î:pped.
SToS # fSt. James 4-4-015X22î.
, É3_ ,/Tr.
1880: stanciarci
1891: CFR #.4,92;g,Îté§;
Ïgp7J?;l:#È5RÎg9:rE8#dÈ:âïda:à4Ègug:îàï
êg3s:Î:pped.
Ïël;â:#ÏâR-#;îg:aïë7* standa:à4ë:ug:î
àï3gë sâî:pped o
::ROL#à±g; L899: scr`apped. 2_6„ ïsx24,„
54„
ICR #120 2-6-0 lsx24
, 54
1912: CGR #1017; re 0-6-0; 1917 scrapped.
2-6~0 18×24~ 54ît
E887#:ï3:id to M&B; igi4: wrecked.
2-6-0 18×24 54
:gRoïàîg; |9|2: CGR #|ol8; scrapped c®1917®
2-6-0 18×21+ 5/+
::Ro7ÉÈÎ3; igi2: cGR #ioig; scrapped c.1917.
2-6-o 18×24,Î 54
Egï2flgàR #1o2o; 1017 scrapped.
ICR #125 2=6-018×24
54, Scr.1890`.
ICR #126 2-6-018×24,
54
1912: CGR #1022; r`e 0-6-0; sc.r`apped c.1917.
.J.3. 1881
19.
20.
21
22
2) •
24.
26.
21.
2$.
29.
30.
31.
32.
33.

)4. 1$84
35.
36.
37.
3$ .
)9.
40.
41.
42.
4).

18$5

1$$6

lCR #l27 2-6-0 18×24 54 1912: cca i1022. Scr.c.1917

12$
129
1)0
131
1)2
1))
134
1 )5
1)6
1)7
142
143
141,
145
4-4-0

17×24

69

69
60

1397 rebuilt.
1$94 rebuilt.
Scr. c.1910.
1912: CCR #111
Scr. c.1917
1895 rebuilt. 1912: CCR #111~­
Scr. c.1917
1895
rebuilt. Scr. c.1912
1$95 rebuilt. 1912: CCR #lnl:
Scr. c.1917
1885: destroyed in wreck.
1$94 rebuilt. 1912: CCR #1115
Scr. 1917. 1$97
rebuilt. 1912: CCR #1072
Scr. c.1917
1901 rebuilt. 1912: CGR ,fl073
1920: CNR ,~1l8.
1$95 rebuilt. 1912: CCR #1071,
Scr. 1917
scrapped c.1910
1896 rebuilt. Scr. c.1910.
scrapped c.1910.

CliC 1/3 ref/6 2-6-0 1$x24 54 1909 sold to Hdanus, contrac­
tor on National Transcontinen­
tal Ry. 1914 to WeB as 2/#1.
Scrapped 1918.
S&A 112

lCR
ICB
lCR

JR
)
11)0
112
1/170
171
172
17)
4-4-0 17×24 60

2-6-0 1$x24

4-4-0 17×24
1912: CCR iI1071.
190): scrapped.
Scr. c.1917
Refused by lCR. 1895 sold CER
as #17; 1904: lCR #))0.
191.2: CCR ,,11121. Scr. c.1917.
1887:
Boiler exploded.
1$92:
scrapped.
1$99:
Sold NSSCo. #5.
1$92: Boiler exploded.
Scrapped c.1922.
L+L. 1887 CRC #7
45. 1898 i,Æi&B #2
46. NBPEI#3
U7. CRC#82-6-018×24 54 1913 scrapped.
4-4~017×24 60 1918 scr`appod.
4-4-017×24 60 1914.: CGR #1176; 1917 scrappctij
2-6-0 lsx2/+ 60 1918 scrapped.
ooooc>o000000oooooo
Several issues back, we carr`ied a riote to t,h€
effect t,hat CPR en,`fj.ine #3011, last 2-6-0 on tlit:
system had beeSn re.[ioved to +infus Shops, foriwetitual scr`apping, a.îter hciving been out of
. r` __ __ _ ^1 ~t -___-___
-_
I
1, V ~-, J. lJ ,Ll^- -__ `-L_ J-_ (=J ,
service at Smiths Falls for sor.ie time. One of our re
sdeis informecl usÜhat, this engine, contr`ai-y to our report, was in regu
lar service uritil
early in November`o
rJanac)iaii Pacific ilailway ha5 ordered an addit,ional Budc.
RDC car, of
+Jnc RDC+ all-passenger type. It is t,o be designated #
9053, and will-oe added to t,he t,wo similar units presently in the Tor
onto-ïjetroit, €`ervit.
,i`vTli€n œomplcted, the new Canadian National hotel
in Mc)ntr`eal will st.€`,al
-ïli.gËlg:S:aâ:Î:1PÎ:ifà:,ÎriË:I:În:;1:liJilË
:ïÎIYPJ:làelI:ÉetietË3t:it;i:soÎoËh:s
•/et been r.eleasecï. (Æcl. note: How about
HOTEL BON4^ivENTURË ?)
Cariadian Nationtil Railways has taken a one-yea.r op+.ion to
purchase the
for.iïier British Columbia Electric Ry. Burnaby Lake line,
for industri€,ldevelop.r,ient purposes. Rajl passenger service ori t,his li
ne -^ dis-
continucci by BCüR in 1953.
In con]iection with or`ders for new dieselHelectric locomotives
, Canadian
:lââifÈ:gÈcÎ+r:ÎËu#::i:gg¥Ùmî£93:hiË
;t:âàgËiË:-e,s+gz3-#or?n.;?ht4o8;:1s+84umably, t,hey will eventually b(3 placed in passenger service
, probablyin the transcontir].ental route.
Às a r`esult of serious service inter`ruptions arising fro
m breakdowns,
CiÏP. Vice President S.F.JJin€f.,1e announced on Febru
ary 17th, during worstsnowstcfi.m of wint,er in Montr`eal area, t,hat CLi multiple
-unit clectr`iccars lU to M-8, and Tnl to T-18 would be withdrawn from s
er`vice untilÎthe company is assur`cd that reliable operation can b(?
maintainedL
They havc been replacecl by regular passenger cars, hauled b
y elect,r.ic].ocomotives. Failure has been attributed tD deficiency in th
c electricdrive of the cars, emer`ging under snowy winter condit,ions.
On January 26th, the Senate gave second readinr -. appr`o
val in principle
– to a bill aut,hor`iz,ing the Cianadian Pacific Railway to
constr.uct a
15-mile br.anch line fr`om Nephton to Havelock. It, is d
esigned to impr`ove
àïàrel:p::Ëî:iî:ef;?;ÈÈiEÈeîu::â EË
epîrââ:È:ÎgnN:-Fh:-ÏÈ:: g:àlp;:ït€#â:
Neph-
Ë:r::Ë:eErâ:s£?âsaË-TÎÆo:ncî.njràlÈâ
â;:nl:Œàr:flp3%#anîÈ:j:È:cwà: ::rnÊÎ:È:g

fouï-years at a cost of t`ri58,500,000.
Recently, a scheme wcrLS outlined in Vancouver foi` a rri
onorail systemto link Vancouver lsland wit,h certain of the Gulf lslands at
a cost
,
of approximately ,.115,000,000. One route would extend from Nanaimo
across Dodds Narrows to Cabriola Island, and then in succession to
Valdez, Galiano, I·1ayne, Samuel and Saturna islands. A branch would
extend from Mayne Island to North and South Pender islands. There
would be another line extendiIlE. fran Duncan, BC to Salt Spring island
crossing Sansum Narrows by means of a stiff rail suspension span
equipped with double tra.ck. It is claimed that these two systems
would bring the various is13nc.s within 15 to 20 minutes commuting
distance of the respectiv~ terminals and would double the population
in five yoars tn at least 30,000 people. A compAny has been formed
to procure n~cessary funds for a preliminary surveY, knovm as the
Gulf Islands Development Company, Limited. The biggest Sp3.n involv~d
in the undertaking would be across Navy Channel from Mayne Island
to North Pender.
In the same vein, it is reported that the British Columbia Electric
is having a survey conducted by General I-1anorail Corparntion, for
a monorail line fram Vancouver to Chilliwack.
00000000000000
)
.1-TRAVlcLLIt!G BECUMES
TRAVilL LIVING
0
1
-.:-Ull THE CANADIA/J NATIllllAL
by Lorne C. Perry
The Canadian National hes embarked on
a major improvement program for all
of its passenpcr tr~ins. This pro­
gram has really been under way to
some extent, ever since the war, but
last year received added impetus
throufh the orderinp of 359 new pasc­
cnger carrying cars. These cars embrace all of the conventional types:
including coaches, parlour cars, dining CD.rs and various types of
sleeping cars, but some new types are included in this larrest of all
Canadian passenger car orders. The Dinette car will soon be appearing
for the first time on crack CNR passenger trains, and the all-new
l;.-8-4 typc~ cars (four sections, eight duplex roomettes, four double
bedrooms) are already being placed in ser~ice.
In placinr these huge orders, Canadian National officials decided
on a plan to modernize all passenger services to a certain extent,
rather than brine selected runs up-to-date at the cXpense of others.
When deliveries are completed later on this year, 16~~ of all coaches
and 24;b of all other types of passenger cars will be brand new. Taking
into consideration the nwnber of existing cars vlhich can still be con­
sidered mod~rn, Clnadian IJational will really be able to provide
travel living II on a grand scale.
Heretofore, CNs regular pA.ssenger trains on main line runs have
been up to the mark in comfort and modernity, but when pC3.k loads re­
,!uired extra sect.lons or specials, the bottom of the pasGenger car
blrrel had to be scraped. Sometimes the dregs were none too good. A:1.cient
colonist cars were often pr8ssed into foach service during peak
oeriods on the assumption that passengers would rather sit down, no
matter how hard the seat, than r~main standing for their trip. But
with the new er,3 all this will bo past history_ The proverbial bottom
of the proverbial barrel …. dll always yield sOIll.ething fairly modern to
satisfy the demands of rush periods.
Canadian National awarded contracts for these cars to two builders.
The 21B coaches are beine built in Canada by the Canadian Car & Foundry
C.odlpany at 14ontreal. DeliVeries have started (lnd will be continued
!It. t,hl> I::!t.1> of t.wn r;:.I<:; npY w()Ikinll rl,Qv. P1111m::ln_.lt.Qnrl.e.rn in r:hir.;:jDo
).9 i,)~lilding th..:.: rBMp.1n1ne 141 cars at the r·lte of one per workin
b
C3·
To properly usher in this nevl era of iltravel living I! the CNR ha?
decided upon a new exterior colour scheme of blsck, gold and green.
lhls modern dress is ~: far cry from the brirht canary yellow coache~;
of the last century which prevailed upon nl.!arly all of the first rai-,
way lines in Canada .:mti m~ny in the United States. The prevalence 0
yellow was due to the fact tht yellow pirment was the cheapest goi!1~~.
hmone tho forerunners of thiJ Canadian National which used yellO·:
pc.int at on.::! time were the Grand Trunk dailway, until about 1880 wh::!:
it chan,E!ed to Cl brick red, .qnd the Intercolonial RailfJay in thE.: r-iari­
timC::!s, in thG early days of its operation. About 1900, these compan··
ies chareed to green. The Canadian Northe;rn had already adopted grecp
as its standard colour and. it was continu~d by the Canadian Nation.,,).
3.ftcr the.. al:1slgam1tlOn of the lines. An unusual exterior colour idea
11.8.3 formulated by the Canada Atlantic llailway about 1$90. It merely
stained thl! natural WQod and covered it with clear varnish. ToJayfs
1JW dt:sign consiDts of a black roof, a green upper sidewall with a
s~parE inb Eold band between it and the roof and a black lower side!al~
From th..:. base of the windows doffi, also separated by a t1o-inch band
of [,old patnt. h. third strip of gold acts as the hem line at the base
of the sidewall; at each end of the car, set against the black, is th~
bright red maple leaf CNR monogram. .
The new passenger e~uipment is beinp: delivered with this colour
~ (h~mG alrt:!ady applied, a:lu thf::! older cars /i11 be rep:tintcd to con­
form as they go in for shopping. Followinr are descriptions of the
~ifferent types of car orders, and lists of n~mes appliud to first
-::lvsn eqUipment.
f 218 HEW CNR COACHLS I. Canadian Nationals nON coaches, numbered
C~~~~~~~~:=J 5437 to 5654 arc the latest thing on rails.
Tastefully &ppoint~d in a variety of brirht colours, the interiors pre­
St:nt Fl particularly p+casing appeurance. fhe walls and ceiling arc
finished in nellol,,rtonc plastic, and no paint is used at all inside.
For riding comfort, they are hard to beat. Trucks are of the
four-whcl:l type, the first such built for th~ Canadian National. Thoy
arc equipped with bolster anchors to control longitudinal movement.
Ontside hangers and coil sprine: suspension reduce car body roll and
a~sure a smooth ride at all spLeds.
Automatic and thcrmostatl.cally controlled heat.inp and electro­
nechanical air conditioning appear for thcl first time on CNR coaches.
ThL electric cooling system for drinking Jater means that the icc man
has one: less chore.
j~iFhty people will be able to find scats on enterinp one of these
cars, t
if::nty eirht of them iII the smokinp section. The sects are of
the; H.:.!YViooJ-
!keficld 31ee py Hollow
l
! variety. They rotate easily, and
the backs ar8 adjustable.
Passengers will welcome the Glcctro-pncum~tically
i, slirht push on th.: handl€~ and the door swinr s wide.
ste81 cars vreight approximately 130,000 pounds and are
10~ inches long.
operated doors.
These new a11-
84 foet,
I
I
For the f,· rst tl· me, CNR h
52 lIEyj CNfl 1,-8-4 TYPE 3LEgPING CAftS
_ sleep~rs with four 5ection~)
eifht duplex roomett~s ~n1
four double bedrooms. Th0se cars, numbered 1110-1161, were deeigne;l
for runs handlir.lrt only one or tVo slc~ping cars, so that 3. va~ictf
of space could 00 offered. The first two have p-one into serVlce on
the Montreal-Chicoutir.1i run, whIJre fOrJilCrly a tv;enty-four roomette
car was used.
Foam rubber mRttr~sse5 J indi.ridually operated air-conditioninr,
fold-away upper berth ladders and directiona.l reading lifhts ar~
features of the .3c(tion acco!llodation. Bedroom~ feature; convertlbh.
Nash basin-dress inc table, ·;o.tcr temperature pre-selector control,
-,-lardro bes, ampl~ lu[gage space and personal control of heat, light
and :.dr-conditioning. ·Bedrooms are arranged in pairs, so that to
h.1VB Cl double bedroom the dividing VIall is jU5t foldeod out of Sight.
Th e DuplBx Roomette features cconomi cnl pri VilCy. …ny time, day or nig··t
tile bed easily slides into position for a nap or sleep.
Drinking w,tcr in these cars is electrically cooled; picture
windows are kept free of mist or frost by an ingenious defrosting SY5-
tum not unlike that in an auto. For any person unfortunate enollCh
t.-l h.?ve to travel in a stretcher, Can::tdian Na,tiona,l provides a nelJ
convenience. Une windovy in each car can be opened on hinpcs to pcr­
.:lit easy adrission of C1. stretcher.
These 85-foot cars are named after Canadian cities Rnd towns, all
….. e-inning with tht: letter tiE ?ond are listed belm …. in t he order in
;hich they are being built:
:·C2 stport
.!.nstview
.l::;dcnwold
Edr.oley
Lamonton
Edmundston
Bdson
l!;C;wardsville
Eycrton
.ckhart
Cl cott
L:lderbank
Bldorado
Elgin
Elizabeth
Ellerslie
Elliston
Blmira
Elmsdale
Llnora
E.lroase
Emerald
LmE-rSOn
:emperor
Endako
l-.:ndcliffe
Endeavour
Enfield
f.:nplee
Ennishore
Enterprise
Lntrance
Eotwhistle
Equity
Lrickson
Erinvicw
Ernestom
Erwood
Escuminac
Essex
Estcourt
Ethelbert
Euclid
Eureka
Evandale
Evangeline
Evanston
Evelyn
EVIJrutt
Excelsior
Exeter
Extew
(Note: Mr. Perry f s story of the new Canadian National passen{!cr
equipment, ,-Jill be continued in the May r~e.rs ,Leport. J
000000000000000000
C.11 JLiJIiiN MILROAD HIJTORICAL AJJvCIATION INC.
IIblI3 ltt:PORT
Published by the Bditorial Committe!;.
editorial Office: 6959 Je lEpee Avenue,
lt10ntrual 15, Canaua.
Subscription: :WI.50 per annwn, Canadian funds. Orner S
.A. Lavallee,
Editor. R.
Douglas Brown,
Assistant Editor.
NaT NONTH: Bulletin 17, the story of the electric lines in Halifax.

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