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Canadian Rail 537 2010

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Canadian Rail 537 2010

CANADIAN RAILPUBLISHED BI-MONTHL
Y
B
Y THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATIONIS
SN 0008-4875P
ostal Permit No. 40066621 E •SNTAE BELÉISDHNEDOF138
T
ABLE OF CONTENTSFRONT
COVER: Colourful Grand River Railway car 864 leads the four car (864, 848, 937, 862) National Railway Historical Society’s final
excursion
before discontinuation of interurban passenger service. The train is street running in Waterloo, Ontario on May 1, 1955. These
four
cars were stored in Preston until they were eventually scrapped in 1956. CRHA Archives, Fonds Bailey C1-22.
BEL
OW: Preston & Berlin Railway car 61 posed at the Preston Car and Coach Company yards in 1910. The car was actually built by the
Ottawa
Car Company, possibly subcontracted out by Preston because of a heavy workload in 1910. Note the ‘Royal Mail’ designation,
the
car was scrapped in 1935.
P
AGE COUVERTURE :
La
voiture no 864 est en tête d’un convoi de quatre voitures (864, 848, 937 et 862) du coloré Grand River Railway. Le train roule dans les
rues
de Waterloo, Ontario, en ce 1er mai 1955. Les quatre voitures ont été par la suite entreposées à Preston jusqu’à leur démantèlement
en
1956. Archives ACHF, Fonds Bailey C1-22.
Ci-DES
SOUS : Cliché de la voiture no 61 de la Preston & Berlin dans la cour de la Preston Car and Coach Company en 1910. La
compagnie
étant submergée de commandes cette année-là, la construction de la voiture fut confiée en sous-traitance à la Ottawa Car
Company
. À noter, l’inscription « Royal Mail ». Le véhicule fut démantelé en 1935.Dernière
excursion de la National Railway Historical Society avant l’abandon du service interurbain de passagers. Canadian P
acific Electric Lines, By Robert Sandusky…………………………………………………139
F
orster Kemp’s Legacy, By Peter Murphy…………………………………………………………146
Eleanor Nicholls 1913 – 1920
…………………………………………………………………..153
Stan’s Photo gallery, By Stan Smaill
……………………………………………………………..154
Book R
eviews………………………………………………………………………………167
Business Car
……………………………………………………………………………….177F
or your membership in the CRHA, which
includes
a subscription to Canadian Rail,
write
to:
CRHA
, 110 Rue St-Pierre, St. Constant,
Que. J5A 1G7
Membership Dues for 2010:

In Canada: $50.00 (including all taxes)

United States: $50.00 in U.S. funds.
Other Countries: $85.00 Canadian funds.Canadian
Rail is continually in need of news,
stories,
historical data, photos, maps and other
m
aterial. Please send all contributions to
P
eter Murphy, X1-870 Lakeshore Road, Dorval,
QC
H9S 5X7, email: psmurphy@videotron.ca.
No
payment can be made for contributions, but
the
contributor will be given credit for material
submitted.
Material will be returned to the
contributor
if requested. Remember “Knowledge
is
of little value unless it is shared with others”.INTERIM CO
-EDITORS:
P
eter Murphy, Douglas N.W. Smith
AS
SOCIATE EDITOR (Motive Power):
Hugues W
. Bonin
FRENCH TRANSLA
TION: Denis Latour,
Michel Lortie and Denis V
allières
LA
YOUT: Gary McMinn
PRINTING: Impression P
aragraph
DISTRIBUTION
: Joncas Postexperts Inc.The CRHA may be reached at its web site: www
.exporail.org or by telephone at (450) 638-1522
139RAIL
CANADIEN • 537JUILLET – AOÛT 2010
History Overview
By R
obert J. Sandusky Canadian P
acific Electric Linesc
arry both passengers and freight and provide a
connection
with the Canadian Pacific Railway. It opened
on
July 26, 1894, connecting both the Grand Trunk and
Canadian
Pacific stations in Galt with Preston.
The
name was changed to Galt, Preston and
Hespeler
Street Railway in 1895 and a branch to the latter
town
was opened in 1896. The Preston and Berlin Railway
was
organized in 1894 and constructed between 1900 and
1902
in close affiliation with the GP&H.In
the latter half of the 19th Century the Grand
River
watershed contained several medium-sized towns
and
small cities based around both light and heavy
m
anufacturing. Major railways such as the Great
W
estern, Grand Trunk and Canadian Pacific were already
p
resent and eventually the prospects for electric
interurban
traction looked favourable as well.
The
first such initiative of this type was the Galt
and
Preston Street Railway Co., organized in 1890 to Dignitaries
pose beside double truck car 23 of the Galt and
Preston
Street Railway Company probably at the inauguration
of
service in 1894. The initial roster of the company consisted
of
Ottawa built single truck car 22, double-truck combine 23,
and
three single truck open cars purchased second hand from
Brooklyn,
New York. These three cars were converted to
trailers
by Patterson & Corbin of St. Catharines before arriving
at
Galt. CRHA Archives, Fonds Corley.
Des
dignitaires sont photographiés ici, probablement le jour de
l’inauguration
du service, près de la voiture interurbaine à
double
bogie no23 de la Galt and Preston Street Railway
Company
. À l’origine, le parc de véhicules de cette compagnie
comprenait
la voiture no 22 à bogie simple construite par la
Ottawa
Car, la voiture combinée no 23 à double bogie et trois
voitures
à bogie simple achetées d’occasion à Brooklyn, New
Y
ork. Ces trois dernières furent converties en remorques par la
P
atterson & Corbin de St. Catharines avant d’être livrées à Galt.
Archives
ACHF, Fonds Corley.Galt
and Preston express motor 20
was
built in 1895 and is pictured
here
‘as built’ in 1908. Hauling
f
reight was important to the
interurban
system from its earliest
d
ays. CRHA Archives, Fonds
Corley
.
L
a motrice express Galt and
Preston
no 20 fut construite en
1895
et est ici photographiée en
1908
avec son allure d’origine. À
l’époque,
la traction de wagons de
marchandises
était une activité
i
mportante pour le réseau
interurbain.
Archives ACHF, Fonds
Corley
.

141RAIL
CANADIEN • 537JUILLET – AOÛT 2010
While
the 600-volt, 17 route mile Grand River
R
ailway was a very early Canadian interurban, the Lake
Erie
and Northern Railway (LE&N) was almost the last.
In
1910 Brantford interests promoted a steam road south
to
Lake Erie as an outlet for local industries and a source
for
coal imports from the United States. A Dominion
charter
was obtained in 1911 but the CPR, who already
had
a half interest in the nearby Toronto, Hamilton &
Buffalo,
moved in immediately to purchase control of the
project.
They reconfigured the original plan into an
upgraded
electric railway reaching Galt at one end and
the
Port Dover car ferry terminal at the other. Built to
handle
heavy freight traffic moving to and from the CPR,
there
was no street running through any towns.its
newest. Overhead wiring was built to the same high
standards
as other recent interurbans such as the London
&
Port Stanley and Toronto Suburban. The use of
pantographs
was considered, but never got further than
short-term
use on a few freight locomotives.
A
wooden 8-car fleet had been built by the
P
reston Car and Coach Co. for the 1500V LE&N in 1915.
A
new 1500V steel fleet from Preston followed in 1921 (8
cars
for the GRRy and 2 for the LE&N) and at that time
the
GRR voltage was converted to 1500. (Previously, any
LE&N
cars running over the GRR did so at reduced
voltage.)
Several former GP&H 600V cars were retained
but
only 3 were converted to 1500V. This fleet of 21 cars
served
the system through to the end of World War II.
Substations
were located at Preston shops, Brantford car
barn
and Simcoe station.
V
oltage uniformity meant that equipment of
both
railways could be inter-mixed with running crews
working
both. The Grand River and Lake Erie &
Northern
Railways finally formed the 68-mile Canadian
P
acific Electric Lines with headquarters in Preston. While
legally
separate railways, they still operated as one under
the
CPEL terminology.
The
growing CPEL freight traffic eventually
required
3 LE&N and 7 GRR freight motors; all
equipped
for multiple unit operation and it was common
to
see them working together. Many freights were
operated
with sufficient regularity to be assigned run
numbers.
All train movements on both railways were
dispatched
in a regular steam road manner from the
dispatch
office at Preston.Galt
Preston & Hespeler car 205 poses on King Street in
Preston
around 1915. This car was built by Preston in 1912 for
600
volt operation. It was later rebuilt for 1500 volt operation
and
renumbered as Grand River Railway 826. CRHA
Archives,
Fonds Corley.
Le
tramway no 205 du Galt Preston & Hespeler rue King, à
Preston,
vers 1915. Ce véhicule, fonctionnant avec 600 volts,
a
été construit par Preston en 1912. Il fut reconstruit plus tard
pour
fonctionner avec 1500 volts et renuméroté 826 pour le
Grand
River Railway. Archives ACHF, Fonds Corley.Construction
began in 1913 with management
being
integrated with that of the Grand River Railway.
T
here was already a competing and lightly-built
interurban,
the Grand Valley Railway that had been
running
between Galt and Brantford since 1904. It had
been
in receivership from 1912 so its owner, the City of
Brantford,
was quite amenable to selling the unprofitable
Galt
to Paris portion to the LE&N whose own line was
advancing
southward. Fate took a hand in February 1917
when
Grand River flooding forced closure of the GVR
near
Galt and the LE&N was able to commence service
prematurely
on February 7th.The southern end of the
LE&N
opened in later stages, the final one being to the
G
TR station in Port Dover on July 8, 1917. With the
completion
of the 51-mile Lake Erie & Northern,
Canadian
Pacific could boast of having one of the
country’s
first interurban lines (GP&H) as well as one of Lake
Erie & Northern Railway freight motor 333 and outside
braced
box car, street running in Waterloo, Ontario on
September
9, 1948. Here, the locomotive was painted kaki
green with plain yellow lettering. Compare this with the view

of the same locomotive on the back cover. M. D. McCarter
N29988,
CRHA Archives, Fonds Bury.
La
motrice pour train de marchandises no 333 du Lake Erie &
Northern
Railway et le wagon couvert à charpente externe
roulent
dans une rue de Waterloo, en Ontario, en ce 9
septembre 1948.
La locomotive était peinte de couleur kaki
avec
lettrage jaune. Comparez cette photo avec celle du
même
véhicule sur la couverture arrière du présent magazine.
Archives
ACHF, Fonds Bury, M.D. McCarter N29988.
142CANADIAN RAIL • 537JUL
Y – AUGUST 2010The
maintenance shop in Preston was well
equipped
at an early stage to handle significant repairs
and
reconstruction. They fabricated the trucks for the
steel
fleet constructed by Preston Car & Coach, built car
and
overhead parts, finished off locomotive shells and
rebuilt
equipment as required. A storage barn was also
maintained
at Brantford.
The
key railway stations on the system were
Kitchener
Queen Street, Preston, Hespeler, Galt Main
Street,
Glen Morris (actually an old, stone dwelling),
P
aris, Brantford, Mount Pleasant, Waterford, Simcoe and
P
ort Dover Chapman Street. (From 1917 to 1946 the
Grand
Trunk/Canadian National Port Dover waterfront
station
was the terminus.) Most important flag stops were
equipped
with typical wooden keyhole shelters.
The
13 mile line between Galt and Paris was a
beautiful
run that paralleled the Grand River but
generated
little traffic. However, the area between B
rantford and Port Dover was a well-populated
agricultural
region ideal for growing tobacco, fruits and
vegetables.
The fish industry and Ivey’s Greenhouses at
P
ort Dover helped generate express revenue for the line.
These
products would be transported to market via the
CPR
mainline passenger train connections at Galt. The
beach
at Port Dover also generated much passenger
traffic
in the summer months.
P
assenger service frequency over the GRR was
initially
every 30 minutes between Galt and Preston and
hourly
to Kitchener and Hespeler. On the LE&NR it was
roughly
every 2 hours. A new bus subsidiary named
Canadian
Pacific Transport Company Limited began a
half-hourly
service between Galt and Preston in 1925 and
a
less frequent one to Kitchener in 1926. This reduced
electric
service somewhat, but protected the company’s
competitive
position. Connections were made with the
Kitchener-
Waterloo Street Railway, the CPR at Galt and Southbound
car 842 was built by Preston in 1921. It is pictured here southbound loading express at Brantford’s unusual ‘run
through’
station in 1950. Patterson George Collection, CRHA Archives, Fonds Bury.
Cet
interurbain no 842 en direction sud fut construit par Preston en 1921. On l’aperçoit ici au moment du chargement des colis
express
à la gare quelque peu inusitée de Brantford, en 1950. Archives ACHF, Fonds Bury, collection Patterson George.
143RAIL
CANADIEN • 537JUILLET – AOÛT 2010
the
600-Volt Brantford and Hamilton Electric Railway
(who
shared access to the LE&NR’s Brantford station
from
1917 to 1929).
In
the years after 1921 ongoing improvements to
the
system brought it up to a higher standard. Track
relocations
were done in Preston, Galt, on the approach
to
Kitchener and for most of the riverside line to
Hespeler.
In some cases double tracking was required.
Street
running for passenger services between Galt and
P
reston was finally eliminated by 1939. Freight traffic
gradually
increased to serve some 450 customers over the
years.
Even after the end of World War II the tonnage
continued
to grow until 1955 when figures ceased to be
readily
available. Notwithstanding that there were still
operating
losses about 50% of the time. Unfortunately
passenger
traffic was another story. The LE&N section
was
never a heavy carrier in either tons or passenger
miles.
The entire CP Electric system had a passenger peak
in
1944 of 1,680,000 (almost double any other best year),
but
it declined after that.
There
was still optimism in 1946 because all of
the
1921 steel cars were cycled through the CPR’s Angus
Shops
for upgrading. There they received stronger
motors,
higher speed gearing and refurbished interiors.
F
reight locomotives also were beefed up or completely rebuilt
in the Preston shop while 3 more locos were
obtained
from the Salt Lake & Utah Railway. A new
express
combine ordered from National Steel Car in 1947
turned
out to be the last interurban built in Canada and
had
a short life of only 8 years. As late as 1952 a new
express
office was erected in Brantford to keep pace with
increasing
business. It was a full time job for an express
motor
to load up there each weekday afternoon then be
added
to a late day northbound train for a run to the CPR
station
at Galt. Cargo space was in demand and even two
1915
combines had their passenger capacities reduced to
make
room for more express. Given these improvements
the
fleet was looking pretty good.
In
spite of the improvements, passenger traffic
continued
its decline. In April 1950 the first application to
discontinue
that service was made to the Board of
T
ransport Commissioners. Permission was refused. CP
Electric’s
appeal was denied. Thus passenger service had
to
continue ‘indefinitely’. However, many runs deemed to
be
“non-paying” were soon cancelled and the previous
street
car type of service frequency could no longer be
said
to exist. (Paradoxically, the railway was still reporting
that
freight and express businesses were at the highest
level
in its history.)Express
passenger car 626 was built by National Steel Car in Hamilton, Ontario in 1948. It was the last electric interurban car built
in
Canada. It is pictured here on May 1, 1948. The car was scrapped in Preston in 1957 when it was less than ten years old! CRHA
Archives,
Fonds Corley.
L’express
passager no 626, photographié ici le 1er mai 1948, fut construit par la National Steel Car à Hamilton, Ontario, la même
année.
Ce fut le dernier véhicule interurbain construit au Canada. Il avait moins de dix ans lorsqu’il fut démantelé à Preston en
1957.
Archives ACHF, Fonds Corley.

145CANADIAN RAIL • 537JUL
Y – AUGUST 2010The
final demise of passenger service on this
efficient
electric railway came as no surprise. The 1946
modernization
program for the passenger service had
produced
practically no new traffic. Patronage dropped
off
steadily in post-war years as it did with most other
railways
for all the obvious reasons. The growing express
service,
which had been physically part of the passenger
operation,
was converted to trucking. On March 1, 1957,
the
CP Transport bus business at Preston was sold to The
Canada
Coach Lines Limited of Hamilton, Ontario. Canada
Coach continued to operate the Kitchener – Galt
CPR
train connection until June 19, 1961.
E
lectric freight operation continued until
October
1, 1961 when diesels of the Canadian Pacific
R
ailway replaced the electric freight motors. The day
before
that another farewell run saw two electric
locomotives
pull a train of conventional CPR passenger
equipment.
All freight motors, but two, were either sold
or
scrapped.The
last Canadian Pacific Electric Lines passenger run was on September 30, 1961. A chartered train organized in Toronto saw
CPR
FPA-2 4095 pulling baggage car 4266, baggage-buffet 3053 and coaches 2200, 2285, 2257 and 2229 to Galt whence they
travelled
over both the Grand River and Lake Erie & Northern trackage behind GRR motor 228 and LE&N motor 337. This runpast
took
place beside a tobacco farm near Oakland on the LE&N between Brantford and Waterford. John M. Mills, Robert Sandusky
collection.
Le
dernier train de passagers des Canadian Pacific Electric Lines, le 30 septembre 1961. Un convoi nolisé de Toronto comprenant
la
locomotive FPA-2 no 4095, le fourgon à bagages no 4266, la voiture bagages-buffet no 3053 et les voitures coach 2200, 2285,
2257
et 2229 s’est dirigé vers Galt, puis, de là, les motrices no 228 du GRR et no 337 du LE&N circulant sur les voies du Grand River
et
du Lake Erie & Northern ont pris la relève. Ce passage-photo (runpast) eut lieu près d’un champ de culture de tabac à Oakland
sur
la ligne du LE&N entre Brantford et Waterford. John M.Mills, collection Robert Sandusky.T
rackage south of the Canadian Pacific Railway
in
Galt was removed after July 1990, as were the rails of
the
Hespeler Branch and those beyond the Kitchener
CNR
interchange to Waterloo. The only surviving part of
the
system today is CP Rail’s 11.2 mile Waterloo
Subdivision
stretching from the CPR Galt interchange to
the
connection with the Goderich and Exeter (ex-CNR)
Huron
Park Spur in Kitchener. The traffic is basically
automotive.
Most of the Lake Erie and Northern right of
way
between Galt and Simcoe can be travelled to-day as a
s
eries of linked bicycle trails developed since
abandonment.
Sources:
Upper Canada R
ailway Society Newsletter: July 1950;
A
ugust 1950; November 1950; April 1955; May 1955.
John F
. Due. The Intercity Electric Railway Industry in
Canada. T
oronto: University of Toronto Press, 1966
T
raction on The Grand, John M. Mills, Railfare Enterprises, 1977, ISBN: 0-919130-27-5.
R
ailfare DC Books will be reissuing Traction on the
Grand by John Mills later this year. This new edition

will have an expanded photo section; many photographs

will be in colour.
Canadian P
acific Electric Lines, George Roth and
W
illiam Clack, BRMNA Publications
T
rackside Guide, Edited by Earl Roberts and David P.
Stremes, Bytown RR Society
P
ersonal observations; 1950-2010.
Brantford Public Library.

http://brantford.library.on.ca/images/genealogy/headers/
section.png
W
illiam E. Miller. General History, Grand River
R
ailway and Lake Erie and Northern Railway.
http://www.trainweb.org/elso/grr.htm#history

http://www.trainweb.org/elso/len.htm#history
CANADIAN RAIL • 537JUL
Y – AUGUST 2010146
By P
eter MurphyF
orster Kemp’s Photographic LegacyF
orster Kemp came by his railroad interest
naturally.
His parents lived in Como, Quebec (near
Hudson
just west of Montreal) and his pregnant mother
c
ommuted by train to Montreal for doctor’s
appointments
and other activities. A year after Forster
was
born in 1932, the family moved to McAuley Avenue
in
Saint Lambert where they resided for two years.
Living
on the west side of town, his babysitter walked
young
Forster by the Montreal & Southern Counties
carbarn
to reach downtown St. Lambert. His fascination
with
railways started at an early age!
Because
of an annoying basement flooding
problem,
Forster’s parents moved back to Como in 1935.
His
father was an insurance company executive and
commuted
by train to Montreal on weekdays. Dad came
home
on the 5:15 PM limited stop train from Windsor
Station.
Forster recalls meeting dad at 6:10 PM at the
Como
station on many an evening. A G2 class 4-6-2 CPR
locomotive
hauled the nine wooden cars. These engines
were
equipped with an auxiliary generator to power the
electric
lights in the wooden cars using a train line (some
cars
were still gas lit, others were electric).
In
1937, the family purchased a vacant lot on
Bedbrook
Avenue in Montreal West. A two story brick
home
was constructed; it bore civic number 185.
Montreal
West was (and is) a beehive of railway activity.
Every
passenger train departing Windsor Station passed
through
Montreal West, located just east of Ballantyne
Junction
between the Winchester and Adirondack
Subdivisions.
Montreal West was also home to many
Canadian
Pacific Railway employees – the houses on the
opposite side of the street from the Kemps were owned

by the CPR. F
orster Kemp signing the Donation Contract for the turnover of
his
photographic and railroadiana collection on June 10, 2009.
P
eter Murphy.
F
oster Kemp signant l’acte de donation de sa collection de
photos
et de documents ferroviaires en ce 30 juin 2009.
P
eter Murphy.Montreal
& Southern Counties suburban car 105 is heading ‘to the
barn’
in this September 18, 1953 view. This scene was little
changed
from that which Forster saw, and was influenced by, as
an
infant in 1932 – 1934. Peter Murphy collection.
La voiture interurbaine no 105 du Montreal
& Southern Counties
se
dirige vers le hangar en ce 18 septembre 1953. La scène
diffère
peu de ce qu’a pu voir Foster, et qui l’a probablement
influencé,
alors qu’il était enfant dans les années 1932-1934.
Collection
Peter Murphy.One
of the many photos Forster took in and around Montreal
W
est, Quebec, southbound freight with engine 2407 near
North Junction on January 1, 1956. CRHA Archives, F
onds
K
emp 39.
L’une
des nombreuses photos prises par Foster à Montréal-
Ouest
au Québec et dans les environs; un train de
marchandises
en direction sud près de North Junction, tiré
par
la locomotive no 2407 en ce 1er janvier 1956. Archives
ACHF
, Fonds Kemp 39.
RAIL
CANADIEN • 537JUILLET – AOÛT 2010147
Canadian
Pacific Railway Vice Presidents.
One
was Gordon Leslie, his father was Eric
L
eslie, Vice President, Finance; the other was
David
Evans, whose father F.C.S. Evans, the
V
ice President, Law. At that time Mr. Evans
was
assigned to represent Canadian Pacific at
the
Royal Commission of Freight Rates
hearings. Mr. Evans spent a lot of time away

from home albeit travelling in a private
railway
car.
Other
neighbours who worked for
the
CPR included: Barny Remillard, the
gardener
at CPR’s Montreal West station.
F
orster still remembers the greenhouse that
was
part of Barny’s property. There was Mr.
F
ranklin in the Accounting Department and
of
course the Leslies and Evans mentioned
above.
As
luck would have it, Forster’s
house
was located within sight of the North
Junction
lead to the access track to the
A
dirondack Subdivision. He fondly
remembers
attending school and watching
every
morning for the daily ‘Farnham Turn’ to
arrive
from Farnham, hauled usually by an
N2,
3600 series locomotive. Consist was
usually
about 20 cars including 6 cars of
Bedford
limestone destined for Shawinigan
F
alls. Timing was such that the train had to
stop
outside his school and wait for Train 354,
‘The
Frontenac’, to clear for Quebec City.
Once
clear, the Turn would struggle against
the
curve and grade, and with a great cloud of
steam,
smoke and cinders blanketing the
school
(and Montreal West) would struggle
on
to Outremont yard. From birth he was
always
within the sight, sound and smell of a
railway.
In
the late 1930’s the family spent
two
weeks annually in a rented farmhouse
near
the beach at Scarborough, Maine, just
s
outh of Portland. This was another
opportunity
for Forster to hone his rail
enthusiast
interest as his father took him for a
ride
on the Portland Railroad; the local
streetcar
system was abandoned in 1941. On
another
occasion he recalls being in the
barber’s
chair at Biddeford (where mother
shopped
for linens) and nearly jumping out of
the
chair when an open trolley rolled by on
the
Biddeford & Saco Railway Company.
Little
did he know that the Seashore Trolley
Museum
at Kennebunkport, Maine was
being
formed at this time. Seashore’s first
acquisition was Bideford & Saco car 31, a 12

bench open car acquired in 1939! Car
31, of the Biddeford and Saco Railway Company at Old Orchard Beach,
Maine,
taken in the late 1930’s. The buildings in the background still stand
today
. It was this type of car that Forster saw rolling by as he got his hair cut in a
trackside
Biddeford barber shop! Car 31was the first car in Seashore’s
collection,
and is believe to be the first streetcar saved anywhere in the world
by
volunteers for preservation and operation. Seashore Trolley Museum
collection.
Photo
du tramway no 31 de la Biddeford and Saco Railway Company à Old
Orchard,
dans le Maine, prise à la fin des années 1930. C’est ce type de
véhicule
que voyait circuler Foster lorsqu’il se faisait couper les cheveux au
salon
de coiffure pour hommes de Biddeford situé le long de la ligne! Le
tramway
no 31 fut la première acquisition du musée Seashore et, semble-t-il, le
premier
au monde sauvegardé par des bénévoles à des fins de préservation et
d’exploitation. Les bâtiments en arrière-plan existent toujours.
Collection du
Seashore
Trolley Museum.The
Farnham Turn with Bedford stone cars operating as Extra 2212 North and
pusher
6920 which has just cut off, on the grade at Montreal West on August
25,
1951. Ronald S. Ritchie.
Le
25 août 1951, le train extra 2212 Nord, en provenance de Farnham a gravi la
côte
en direction de Montréal Ouest. On vient de découpler la locomotive
6920
qui poussait le train. Ronald S. Ritchie.F
orster attended Elizabeth Ballantyne School that was located
beside
the CPR’s Adirondack Subdivision tracks. It didn’t take long for
him
to make friends with his classmates, two of which were sons of
148CANADIAN RAIL • 537JUL
Y – AUGUST 2010impressive
CNR facilities. He recalls seeing five CNR
U2’s
(4-8-4), three of them with broken main rods. Ernie
Modler
told him in later years that this was a problem with
these
locomotives. He took the afternoon CNR local back
to
Pointe du Chene. This train consisted of 7 wooden cars,
including
a combine car at either end. Because the consist
was
not turned, the combines acted as buffer cars in either
direction.
F
orster was obviously infected with the travel
bug
at an early age. He spent the next twenty five years of
free
time travelling and photographing all forms of rail
operations
in Canada, the USA and abroad. This was
helped
along with his CPR’s employee pass, and half fare
orders
on other railways.
In
1950, at age 18, Forster got a summer job in
the
General Passenger Agent’s office in CPR’s Windsor
Station
in Montreal. In 1951 he was hired permanently.
He
worked as a shed messenger at the Place Viger freight
terminal.
His job was to bring the shipping bills up to the Same
spot, different era – Bill Linley caught VIA’s Ocean passing Painsec Junction in
December
1978. Bill Linley.
Même
endroit, autre époque : Bill Linley a capté l’Océan de Via Rail à la Painsec Junction en
décembre
1978. Bill Linley.office
where the billing clerks would process them. Place
V
iger was then a bustling terminal. With 4 tracks
accommodating
20 cars each, 80 cars of ‘less than carload
lot’
freight could be handled at any one time. He also
worked
for a short time as a ‘carbon boy’, inserting reused
sheets
of carbon paper between the sheets of freight
waybills
(an early form of recycling). He made the rounds
of
the CPR Montreal facilities serving as call boy, car
c
hecker, yard-clerk at the Angus Shops and the
Outremont,
Mile End, Hochelaga and St. Luc Yards.His
father rented a
bicycle
for Forster’s use on his
Maine
vacation as he was
more
interested in pedalling
to
the Boston & Maine and
Maine
Central train stations
to
see the local railway action
t
han going to the beach.
F
orster recalls discovering an
open
platform boarding car
attached
to the Grand Trunk’s
P
ortland auxiliary train. This
turned
out to be an early
Grand
Trunk coach built in
1859.
It was later given a new
lease
on life as part of the
CNR
’s Museum Train in the
1950s.
It was in Portland,
Maine
that Forster saw his
first
diesel locomotive – the
P
ortland Terminal Company
was
dieselized in 1936. Trips to
Maine
were suspended during
t
he war years because of
b
order restrictions and
currency
controls. The next trip to Maine would be in
1945.
In
1947 the family went on a trip, by automobile,
to visit his uncle at P
oint du Chene, New Brunswick. His
bicycle
had been shipped by express and was waiting for
him
at the Pointe du Chene station. Forster frequented
the
local station and still remembers the CNR 10 wheeler
assigned
to the old Intercolonial branch line between
P
ainsec Junction and Point du Chene. One day, he rode
the
noon train into Moncton where he explored the P
ortland Terminal Railway dieselized early, here ALCO
HH600
diesel switcher 1002 is busy switching on August 16,
1937.
Denver Public Library, Otto Perry collection, call
number
OP-14520.
Le
Portland Terminal Railway a tôt fait de se convertir au
diesel.
Nous apercevons ici la locomotive diesel de
manœuvre
Alco HH600 no 1002 en plein travail en ce 16 août
1937.
Bibliothèque publique de Denver, collection Otto Perry,
no
OP-14520.
149RAIL
CANADIEN • 537JUILLET – AOÛT 2010
In
1951, the National Railway Historical Society
(
NRHS) held its annual convention in Montreal.
W
orking night shift as a car checker at St. Luc, he signed
up
to attend the NRHS convention by day. This was the
ultimate
rail enthusiast experience with a full agenda of
steam
excursions, charter streetcar trips in Montreal and
Ottawa,
a 6 car charter on the Montreal & Southern
Counties,
and so on!
In
late 1951, Forster signed up for an apprentice
electrician’s
training program at Angus Shops. This was a
two
year program. One of the side benefits was the ability
to
wander around the shops during lunch hour – a great
advantage
to a rail enthusiast. One lingering memory is
seeing
Belpaire boilers that had been brought in for
scrapping.
Three of these were from Class F1a and F1b
A
tlantic type locomotives built for the CPR in 1899.
These
locomotives had been withdrawn from service and
scrapped
in 1917, but the boilers were salvaged and served
as
stationary boilers. Two were
u
sed to heat the Outremont
roundhouse
and the other the
F
arnham roundhouse. The
boilers
still had their original
locomotive
builder’s plates at
time
of scrapping in 1951.
W
hen the apprentice
course
was completed, he was
required
to serve one year in a
r
unning shop servicing diesel
l
ocomotives. He spent from
January
to December 1954 at
Chapleau,
Ontario, where the
running
shop was servicing 20
F
A1’s (4008-4027), 10 FB1’s
(
4404-4413), 10 FA2’s (4042-
4
051) and 4 RS2’s (8400’s)
assigned
to that division. The
Schreiber
Division of the Algoma
District
was dieselized in 1950.
C
hapleau, Ontario being the
main
terminal for steam power, Diesels
arrived in Chapleau in May, 1950 for the RS-2’s and June 1950 for the FA-1’s, here
we
see FA-1 4019 outside the diesel shop in the 1950’s. ‘Skippy’ Ketterer, CPR Chapleau
retired.
Les
locomotives diesels firent leur entrée à Chapleau en mai 1950, pour les RS-2, et en juin
de
la même année pour les FA-1. Ici, nous apercevons la FA-1 no 4019 à l’extérieur de
l’atelier
diesel dans les années 1950. « Skippy » Ketterer, retraité du CPR de Chapleau.A
view of Place Viger’s 80 car capacity freight terminal in
1940.
Canadian Pacific Archives.
V
ue de du terminus Viger avec sa capacité de 80
wagons,
en 1940. Archives du Canadien Pacifique.was
selected as the maintenance point for the diesels. A
run-through
servicing shop incorporated a drop table for
t
ruck, wheel and traction motor change-outs was
constructed
adjoining the roundhouse in 1950. It had two
run-through
tracks plus two others for the drop table. A
ten-ton ground controlled overhead crane was provided.

Originally, 50 road diesels were assigned to Chapleau, 40
Alcos
and 10 GM’s. By the time Forster arrived in
Chapleau,
the CPR had dieselized the Rockies and pulled
the
10 GM units from Chapleau and sent them west to
Calgary.
In
1954 east and west bound mainline passenger
trains
through Chapleau were still steam hauled because
of
the steam heat requirement . An H-1 4-6-4 Hudson
T
ype was kept at Chapleau in steam, as a protection
engine
for mainline passenger trains. One other steamer
was
in standby service for work / ballast trains, otherwise
all
freight operations through Chapleau were dieselized.
150CANADIAN RAIL • 537JUL
Y – AUGUST 2010F
orster was required to spend time during his apprenticeship as a CPR electrician at one CP’s diesel shops. Forster chose
Chapleau,
Ontario in northern Ontario one of CPR’s first such facilities. CPR’s first FP7’s were briefly assigned to Chapleau before
being
transferred west to Alyth diesel shop in Calgary. A brand new FP7 4029 heads up westbound train 903 at Agincourt, Ontario
on
a test run in 1950, the van behind 4029 is for mechanical department personnel observing the performance of 4029 before she
heads
north for Chapleau. R. Post collection, from David Shaw – Smaill collection.
F
oster devait faire son apprentissage en tant qu’électricien du CPR dans un atelier diesel de son choix. Il choisit celui de Chapleau,
au
nord de l’Ontario, l’une des premières installations du genre. Les premières locomotives FP-7 du CPR furent brièvement
assignées
à Chapleau avant d’être transférées dans l’Ouest à l’atelier Alyth de Calgary. Une FP-7 neuve, la no 4029, est ici en tête
du
train no 903 en direction ouest à Agincourt, Ontario, lors d’un test de parcours en 1950. Le fourgon de queue derrière la 4029
permet
au personnel du service de la mécanique d’observer le comportement de la locomotive avant que celle-ci ne soit dirigée
vers
le nord à Chapleau. Collection R. Post de la collection David Shaw-Smail.CPR Chapleau Diesel Shop
Extract
from Schreiber Division information sheets circa 1959 courtesy Darcy Furlonger
A
t the present time 19 diesel locomotives can be housed under cover. Under emergency conditions, additional
space
can be found for 23 locomotives by removing wheels and diesel trucks from storage tracks.
The
purpose for which each stall is used is as follows:
Stalls
1, 2 and 3 – Complete service facilities for diesel locomotives.
Stall
4 – Whiting drop table and wheel lathe.
Stall
5, 6, 7 and 8 – Dismantled and stalls 4 and 9 joined 10’ wide corridor, wheel storage bays.
Stall
9 – Lubricating oil storage, two 5,000 gallon tanks.
Stalls
10 and 11 – General work area.
Stall
12 – Overhauling and testing of steam generators and parts storage.
Stall
13 – Storage and repairing of diesel locomotive batteries, approximately 40’ of track to store two diesel
locomotive
trucks.
Stall
14 – machine shop and work benches, spray booth for treatment of diesel locomotive components.
Stall
15 and 16 – Ordinary diesel locomotive service stalls.
Stall
17 – Load testing mechanism.
Stall
18 – Diesel locomotive cleaning track. High level walkways permit washing of upper structure of diesels.
Stall
19 – Tracks removed to permit space for cleaning of diesel locomotive components.
151RAIL
CANADIEN • 537JUILLET – AOÛT 2010
CPR
FA1 4011 and an identified FB1 are brand new as they prepare to couple on to a westbound test train at Sortin Yard in 1950.
After
the road test to Smiths Falls, both units will head north and be maintained at the Chapleau diesel shop. Paterson – George
collection,
Smaill collection.
La
locomotive FA-1 du CPR no 4011 et une FB1 non identifiée flambant neuves se préparent à s’accoupler à un train-test en
direction
ouest à la cour Sortin en 1950. Après le test de parcours vers Smith Falls, les deux unités seront dirigées vers le nord pour
subir
un entretien à l’atelier diesel de Chapleau. Collection Paterson-George de la collection Smaill.CPR
FA1 4008 was the first FA1 built in Canada by
ML
W and is seen here westbound at Baie D”Urfe,
Quebec
in June 1950. The 4008 and her B unit will
transfer
to Chapleau, Ontario where she will be
worked
on by a young electrician by the name of
F
orster Kemp. AL Paterson photo – Smaill
collection.
La F
A-1 no 4008 en direction ouest à Baie-D’Urfé,
au
Québec, en juin 1950. Ce fut la première FA-1
construite
par MLW. Elle sera transférée, avec son
unité
B, à Chapleau, Ontario, où elle sera
entretenue
par un jeune électricien du nom de
F
oster Kemp. Photo Al Paterson, collection Smaill.CPR
4042 was the first FA2 on the Canadian Pacific
system,
it was built in July 1951and was also
assigned
to the Chapleau diesel shop during
F
orster’s time. With FB1 4418 trailing, 4042 powers
an
extra west at Lorne Park Ontario in 1955. Al
P
aterson-Smaill collection.
La
locomotive no 4042 fut la première FA2 acquise
par
le CPR. Elle fut construite en juillet 1951 et
assignée
elle aussi à l’atelier diesel de Chapleau du
temps
de Foster. Accompagnée par l’unité 4418, la
4042
est en tête d’un convoi extra en direction ouest
à
Lorne Park, Ontario, en 1955. Collection Al
P
aterson-Smaill.
152CANADIAN RAIL • 537JUL
Y – AUGUST 2010Esquimalt
& Nanaimo and other smaller railways. In 1956
he
also went back to the Maritimes with his cameras and
recorded
the railway action there including activity in
P
rince Edward Island and Newfoundland. He also found
time
to take several trips overseas, especially to Great
Britain
where he recorded many a great photograph.
His
first CRHA excursion was the CRHA oil
electric
trip to Huberdeau with CNR 15837 in 1950. This
was
the CRHA’s first railroad excursion charter! He was a
CRHA excursion regular, seldom missing a trip. He also

participated in other charters operated by the UCRS out
of
Toronto, and various organizations in the USA.
F
orster married Frances Youngman on June 12,
1976.
They adopted a son Nicholas in 1980. He retired
from
Canadian Pacific in 1992 after 42 years service.
F
orster and his wife live in Montreal and he still enjoys
keeping
track of happenings in the railway community.
Over
his career Forster created an impressive
legacy
of railroad photographs and printed materials.
This
includes 6000 colour slides, 30,000 feet of 8mm
movie
film, uncounted black and white negatives, over
1000
timetables, a collection of early topographic maps
and
some 100 books. We are very honoured and pleased
that
Forster has chosen the CRHA Archives as the
permanent
home for his railroad collection.
On
behalf of the railway heritage community, we
sincerely
wish to thank Forster for his generous donation
to
the CRHA Archives.He
was allowed one trip home per month on his
pass.
Forster used the opportunity to spend some free
time
in Toronto where he tied into the Upper Canada
R
ailway Society and their activities. Through this
connection
he met John Mills, Ron Cooper, Bob
Sandusky
and others who founded the Ontario Electric
R
ailway Historical Association, which he joined. He was
present
in 1953 when the group inspected and selected
T
oronto Civic Railway wooden car 55, the second
OERHA
car to be preserved (after TRC 1326).
In
December 1954 he returned to Montreal’s
Angus
Shops and worked as a maintenance electrician.
He
was soon assigned to the car and then diesel shop
w
here he worked on generators, traction motors
(including
rewinding), dynamic braking grids, etc.
When
he made his first solo trip to the Maritimes
and
Newfoundland in 1953, he didn’t own a camera.
F
ortunately he purchased his first camera shortly
thereafter.
By 1954 the writing was on the wall – diesels
would eventually replace steam, and subways and busses

would eventually replace most streetcars. Forster had a
broad
railway interest, but his greatest passion was for
steam
powered branch lines. Armed with a black and
white,
colour slide, and an 8 mm movie camera, he
proceeded
to capture the great railway transition years on
film.
He travelled out west in 1954, 1955 and 1956,
covering
CNR and CPR mainlines and branch lines as
well
as the Northern Alberta, Pacific Great Eastern,
153RAIL
CANADIEN • 537JUILLET – AOÛT 2010
Those
who knew Nora
N
icholls saw a lady with a
beautiful
spirit shining through.
W
ith great energy, warmth and
l
aughter, she gave gifts of
encouragement,
advice, support,
and
fun. She inspired with faith
and
hope. Who can forget the
sparkle
in her blue eyes, the
kindness
in her voice and the
impish
smile hovering at the
corner
of her mouth.
N
ora inherited the
wonderful
qualities of her parents: William Harlow
Miner
and Mabel (May) Chambers Miner. She carried on
their
values in life: hard work and honesty, honour to
family
and a commitment to community and country. Her
personality
was an amazing blend of her father’s
determination
to bring about progress and her mother’s
quiet,
deep sympathy for others.
Nora
combined her abilities by choosing a career
in
teaching. She graduated from McGill with a B.A. and
then
qualified as a teacher with the first thesis on teaching
with
audio-visual technology. During the Depression, she
was
able to get a job teaching in Shawinigan, Quebec. She
courageously
went off to teach students some of whom
were
older than she was.
Next
Nora undertook to work as a volunteer for
the
Red Cross in the War effort. She went overseas and
worked
for several years in the F.A.N.Y. Corps, Transport
Service.
She was chosen for a special assignment but at
that time she sensed that her mother was not well so she

chose to go home. Nora returned home to find that
indeed
her mother was seriously ill, but her mother was
able
to see her daughter married.
R
obert Nicholls was a founding member of the
Canadian
Railroad Historical Association in 1932, he
married
Nora in 1945. From the day they met, Nora was
always
at Robert’s side supporting him fully in his CRHA
endeavors.
Nora was part of the CRHA family, ever the
gracious
hostess whether it be for committee meetings or
social
gatherings related to fundraising for the Exporail,
the
Canadian Railway Museum, project. The Nicholls
family
was extremely generous, their generosity helped
solve
many an emergency that arose over the years as our collection
was assembled and the
m
useum built. Their greatest
commitment
was to the CRHA
Archives,
the Exporail archives
are
suitably named The Nora and
R
obert Nicholls Archives.
Wherever
Nora saw a
n
eed she used her abilities
energetically.
In Montreal, Nora
used
her energies as a member
and
on the executives of the
M
cGill Womens Associates,
W
omen’s Canadian Club, the National Canadian Club
Council
and the Red Feather Campaign. In Merrickville,
Ontario.
Robert and Nora were founding trustees of
Heritage
Merrickville to preserve historic buildings; they
were
active in creating community events and in church
work.
Nora
had a wonderful sense of beauty and with
her
vision and hard work houses became beautiful homes.
She
had an unfailing eye for colour, a broad knowledge of
antiques
and art, was a gardening magician. And what a
wonderful
purpose she and Robert made their homes
serve:
entertaining family, friends, students, new arrivals,
those
on their own, community organizers. And so much
friendship
was given back to the Nicholls family. Nora all
her
life had very close friends. She let them know that they
were
a great blessing to her and she loved them dearly.
And
yes, we should speak of the great love of
R
obert for Nora. He admired her and was thrilled with all
the
good things she made happen. He proposed to her by
telegram
sent while Nora was oversees in Scotland
causing
a happy sensation in the town. They were married
on
Nora’s return to Montreal. Nora’s love for Robert
helped
him in all his work and special interests. Robert
thrived
on her love throughout his life and managed to
have
a long happy life due to her care.
It
is hard to adequately describe the love Nora
gave to her family. She was a vital part of the lives of her

daughters, her grand-daughters and their families. She
appreciated
the support of special nephews, nieces and
her
sister-in-law. Her gift of love during her life on earth
will
continue to grow, since we are so grateful for her
spirit.Eleanor (Nora) Nicholls 1913 – 2010
154RAIL
CANADIEN • 537JUILLET – AOÛT 2010
Stan’s Photo GalleryLes photos de StanJuly – A
ugust, 2010
By Stan Smaill
F
rench Version, Michel LortieJuillet – Août 2010
P
ar Stan Smaill
V
ersion française : Michel LortieIntroduction
In
this issue of ‘Canadian Rail’, Stan’s Photo
Gallery
is pleased to present the photography of Forster
Kemp,
a legendary icon of the Montreal’s and, indeed,
Canada’s
railway enthusiast community. Forster recently
donated
his collection of colour slides, black and white
negatives, timetables, books and early topographic maps

to the CRHA Archives at Exporail. This donation also
included
over 30,000 feet of 8mm railway movie film!
F
orster started travelling all across Canada in
1953
on a quest to cover as many ‘off the beaten track’
branch
lines, local and mixed trains as possible as even at
that
early date it is was apparent that these were living on
borrowed
time. Forster’s jaunts in search of the unusual
were
assisted by the pass privileges he enjoyed as a
working
railroader for the CPR. Let’s ride with Forster as
we
cross Canada in those years when the old ways on
Canada’s
railways had yet to change. Highball back to
yesterday
– Thanks, Forster!A
vant-propos
Dans
ce numéro de Canadian Rail, nous sommes
fiers
d’exposer le travail photographique de M. Forster
Kemp,
bien connu des amateurs de la chose ferroviaire de
Montréal
et même de tout le pays. M. Kemp a fait don
récemment
aux archives de la SCHF et du Musée
Exporail,
de toute sa collection de photos noir et blanc et
d
e ses diapositives couleur. Il a aussi offert sa
bibliothèque
contenant de nombreux horaires et cartes
topographiques
d’époque, et plus de 30 000 pieds de
pellicule
8 mm portant sur des sujets reliés au chemin de
fer.
F
orster Kemp commença en 1953 à sillonner le
pays
d’un océan à l’autre, en quête d’images des petites
lignes
de chemin de fer dont l’existence était menacée par
la
rationalisation des réseaux. En tant qu’employé du
Canadien
Pacifique, il pouvait voyager à sa guise et à
moindres
frais sur tout le réseau. Transportons-nous avec
lui
à une époque où les chemins de fer avaient encore une
allure
de début de siècle. Mille mercis à Forster Kemp!F
orster Kemp donated some 4000 black and white
prints
/ negatives. Here we see Montreal Transportation
Commission
one man car 1998 on Mount Royal Avenue
in
August, 1955. This car was one of the class (Nos.
1965
to 2004) delivered in July 1929.The
crew inspects Northern Type 4-8-4 locomotive
6153
at a photo stop on the CNR / CRHA End of
S
team excursion Montreal to Ottawa on
September
4, 1960.

Maritime
Railway No. 5’s birthplace demolished177CANADIAN RAIL • 537JUL
Y – AUGUST 2010July – A
ugust 2010BUSINES
S CARBy John Godfrey
Edited by David GawleyHERIT
AGET
he birthplace of one of Exporail’s treasured
locomotives
has been demolished. The Pittsburgh
L
ocomotive Works on Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania’s North
Side,
where steam engines were made from 1865 to 1919,
had
been declared unsafe and beyond repair by its current
o
wner, Duqesne Light. One of the locomotives
manufactured
there was Maritime Railway number 5, a
classic
ten-wheeler (4-6-0) now owned by Exporail. ,
A
t this location, some 2,400 steam locomotives had
been
built by the time the company merged with seven
other
plants to form the American Locomotive Company
(ALCO)
in 1901. Its locomotives pulled trains on many of
the
US’s most prominent railroads, from the Atchison,
T
opeka & Santa Fe, through the Baltimore and Ohio,
the
Manhattan Elevated to the Union Pacific as well as on
trains
in Asia and Central and South America.
P
ittsburgh Locomotive Works was one of the first to
produce
really huge locomotives’ according to the website
of
the Smithsonian Institution Archives Center, where
the
company’s records are housed. At its peak, the
company
employed as many as 1,500 people.
Exporail’s
Maritime Railway number 5 was built by
P
ittsburgh Locomotive Works in 1885 for the Pittsburgh
&
Lake Erie Railroad. After a stint on the P&LE, it was
sold
to contractors E.F. & G.E. Fauquier who used it on
t
he construction of the National Transcontinental
R
ailway. The Maritime Railway acquired the locomotive
in
1920 to haul coal and mixed trains between Joggins and
Maccan,
Nova Scotia. Today it is a prized piece in the
CRHA
’s collection and is one of the few late nineteenth
century locomotives to remain essentially unmodified. It

is presently undergoing a complete cosmetic restoration
in
the Exporail shops.
Other
Pittsburgh locomotives are preserved, at
Buffalo,
Wyoming, the Lake Superior Railroad Museum
in
Duluth, Minnesota, the Nevada Northern Railway
Museum
(No. 93, made for the Nevada Northern Railway
in 1909), and No. 29, built in 1906 for the L
ake Superior
and
Ishpeming Railroad, and now in operation on the
Grand Canyon R
ailway in Williams, Arizona. (Adapted
from
the Pittsburgh Post Gazette)
T
rain station joins historic places register in NB
F
redericton city council has added the former York
Street
train station to the citys local historic places
r
egister. The register is a list of buildings and
archaeological
sites, areas or spaces that council deems to
be
of local historical significance, said Mayor Brad
W
oodside. We are very pleased to see the work that is
currently
underway to restore and preserve this historic
property
for future generations. Its the second historic
designation
for the building as previously it was protected
from
demolition by the Federal Heritage Railway
Stations
Protection Act
The
two-storey station was constructed by the Maritime
Railway No. 5 in service on that Nova Scotia coal
road,
note the unmodified flat valve gear and wooden cab!
CRHA
Archives
Locomotive
Maritime Railway No. 5 en service en Nouvelle-
Écosse
pour le transport du charbon, notez le système de
distribution
à tiroir plat et la cabine en bois!Maritime
Railway No. 5 being pulled from Exporail building 6
in
late 2009 to undergo a complete cosmetic overhaul in the
Exporail
shop. Charles de Jean.
Locomotive
Maritime Railway No. 5 sortit à lextérieur du
bâtiment
6 dExporail à la fin de 2009 afin de partir en
restauration
dans latelier du Musée. Charles de Jean.
178RAIL
CANADIEN • 537JUILLET – AOÛT 2010
Rhodes-Curry
Company of Amherst, NS, in 1923 for
Canadian
Pacific Railway. It replaced the original
wooden
station that was built in 1869. CPR withdrew its
remaining
operations from the building in 1990 and sold it
to
the New Brunswick Southern Railway, a subsidiary of
J.D.
Irving Ltd., in 1995.
F
eatures of the building are: a decorative tapestry
brick
exterior, erected atop a sandstone foundation; a
two-storey
central section with a medium-hipped roof; a
projecting
entrance canopy with a gable roof supported
by
brick columns; and a variety of window openings,
including
large rectangular windows and round, arched
windows.
In
September, the Province of New Brunswick
reached
an agreement with J.D. Irving Ltd. to lease the
property.
Under the deal, J.D. Irving Ltd. is restoring the
exterior
of the station and leasing the refurbished
building
for 20 years to NB Liquor. The interior brick
walls
will remain intact, and the historical detail will be
incorporated
in the interior decor. (Fredericton Daily
Gleaner)
CN
contracts Roche Ltd. to inspect historic Quebec
Bridge
CN
recently awarded a contract to Roche Ltd.
Consulting
Group to perform an engineering inspection
of
the Quebec Bridge, which spans the St. Lawrence River
between
Quebec City and Lévis, Quebec.
CN
officials said in a prepared statement that
engineering
firm Modjeski and Masters performed the
last
comprehensive inspection of the structure in 1994,
prior
to major rehabilitation work that was completed
b
etween 1997 to 2005. CN later inspected the
superstructure
and has performed annual periodic
inspections
of the bridge’s railway portions. In 2006, an
independent
audit conducted by Modjeski and Masters
determined
that the bridge is in good structural condition
and
will remain a viable structure for the long term.
Over
the summer, the latest inspection will provide
the
engineering department a detailed assessment of the
bridge
and its structural components, including an
ultrasonic
inspection report.
CN
has maintained the historic bridge since
1923.
However, the railroad is a minority user of the
structure;
only four CN trains cross the bridge daily versus
eight
VIA Rail Canada Ltd. passenger trains and about
35,000
motor vehicles. (Progressive Railroading On-line)
Last
train to Rigaud, Quebec
T
rain service between Montreal and Rigaud,
Quebec,
has been in place since the original station was
built
in the late nineteenth century, but the service ended
July
1, 2010 after Rigaud announced it could not afford
the
$300,000 a year the Agence Métropolitaine de
T
ransport (AMT) demanded to keep the service alive. In recent
years, the payment was $160,000 per year.
Marc
Chouinard, a regular commuter, says
there’s
a good reason why only a handful of people used
the
Rigaud commuter train: It was served by only two
trains
per weekday one to and one from downtown
Montreal.
“If they actually provided service, more people
would
use it,” said Chouinard, who takes the 90-minute
trip
daily from his home in Rigaud to his information-
technology
job in downtown Montreal. About 15 to 20
people
boarded the train every day at 6:40 a.m. and return
on
the 5:20 p.m. train from Montreal, he said.
W
ith a housing boom in the region, it doesn’t
make
sense to kill the service, said Chouinard, who fears
the
tracks will be removed, making an eventual revival
difficult. L
ast year he started a blog www.st nrigaud.com
in
a bid to rally support.
The
line through RIguad was once part of CPR’s
passenger
line from Montreal to Ottawa; the line beyond
RIgaud
was abandodned several years ago. Rigaud,
population
7,500, is 66 kilometres west of Lucien-LAllier,
the
downtown Montreal terminus. Hudson, 13 km east, The
morning sun illuminates the front of AMT locomotive
1328
just prior to departure from Rigaud, Quebec at 6:40 AM,
W
ednesday, June 30, 2010. Peter Murphy.
Lumière
matinale illuminant lavant de la locomotive 1328 de
lAMT
juste avant son dernier départ de Rigaud, Québec, le
mercredi
30 juin 2010 à 6h40. Peter Murphy.
179CANADIAN RAIL • 537JUL
Y – AUGUST 2010will
be the new end for what is now known as the
Dorion/Rigaud
line, a service heavily used by West Island
commuters.
One station east of Hudson is Vaudreuil, the
line’s
western hub, which every week day originates 12
trains
and receives 13.
The
AMT, Montreal’s regional public transit
authority,
said Rigaud was asked to pay more because it is
not
part of the Montreal Metropolitan Community,
which
helps finance AMT service via property taxes and a
gas
tax at the pumps. The AMT had offered to increase
service
to Rigaud but only if the town joined the 82-
municipality
MMC, said AMT spokesperson Martine
R
ouette.

The direct costs are too high for the
community’s
capacity to pay,” Rigaud town manager
Chantal
Lemieux said of the AMT’s demand for more
money.
“There is a certain nostalgia to see the end of rail
transport
on our territory; it is not a decision we made
lightly.”
L
emieux said commuters from the Rigaud train
station
won’t be left stranded. The town is in negotiations
to
replace the train with a bus that would take passengers
to
the Vaudreuil train station,.
Chouinard,
who bought his house in Rigaud in
2006
in part because of the train service, said buses to and
from
Vaudreuil station aren’t a solution. The drive
between
Rigaud and Vaudreuil, normally a 20-minute
trip,
can take twice that long because of traffic.
The
town of Rigaud does not know what will
happen to the train tracks between Hudson and Rigaud,

Lemieux said. “There had been talk of making it into a
bicycle
path, but it is not our property,” she said. “It
belongs
to CPR and I don’t think they’ll be dismantling
the
tracks any time soon.” CPR spokesperson Michel
Spénard
did not return calls seeking clarification of CPR’s
position.
Unlike
Rigaud, Hudson, a town of 5,000, is a
member
of the MMC. “The AMT is keen to keep Hudson
on
the line,” said Hudson Mayor Michael Elliott. Elliott
said
the AMT is considering increasing weekday service
to
his community to three trains per weekday, up from the
current
one. “We’re pushing for three and we’ve been told
that’s
a possibility,” he said.
Before
that can happen, though, $3.4 million
would
have to be spent on improvements, including
upgrading
railway crossings and the signalling system,
said
Rouette of the AMT. Elliott said there is also hope
that
a new station may eventually be built between his
community
and fast-growing St. Lazare to replace
Hudson’s
current station. If that happens, service could
be
increased to six trains daily, he added.
“W
e’ve got this excellent railbed and we should
be
using it,” Elliott said. Rigaud and Hudson are the least-
used
stations on the Dorion/Rigaud line. In 2008, the last
year
for which statistics are available, Rigaud station was used
by 8,800 people (4,400 in each direction), while
Hudson
was used by 30,500. That compares to 353,000
people
who used Vaudreuil station in 2008. (Montreal
Gazette)
The
Ingersoll cheese and agricultural museum
The
Ingersoll Cheese and Agricultural Museum
is
putting a call out to railway history buffs for help in
creating
a new, permanent exhibit showcasing the impact
of
rail transportation on the community. Everything
changed
the day the first train arrived in Ingersoll in the
1850s,
said curator Tricia Smith. It was a significant
turning
point for the town, she said.
And
it almost didnt happen. Initially, rail
surveyors
decided to bypass the town when the tracks
were
being built but local business owners and politicians
campaigned
against the plan. They succeeded in getting
the
tracks diverted through Ingersoll. The Noxon
I
mplement Company and local dairy and cheese
producers
were among those who benefited from rail
access.
Businesses,
including hotels, also popped up
around
the tracks. Reflecting the historic connection
between rail transportation and the community, the new

display will include a large mural of a train station behind
a
recreation of a station platform. We are on the hunt for
a
really good quality photograph or drawing of the
Canadian
Pacific Railway or Grand Trunk station, Smith
said.
The museum is also looking to local rail enthusiasts
f
or input. Wed love to have the expertise and
knowledge,
said Smith. We want to be authentic.
(Ingersoll
Times)
Steam
Locomotive on the move in GuelphOn
June 15 and 16, 2010, Canadian National
steam
locomotive 6167, which made countless trips
through
Guelph to the Maritimes and back, and shuttled
soldiers
to Halifax during the Second World War, made
one
more trip. The Northern steam locomotive, one of
only
a handful of such specimens remaining in Canada,
travelled
a couple of hundred metres from its current
home
beside the Guelph downtown bus station to the
other
side of the tracks. Ron Krampien
180RAIL
CANADIEN • 537JUILLET – AOÛT 2010
T
he move was necessary, because once the citys
n
ew transit terminal is open on Carden Street, buses will
r
oll through the area where the locomotive was inside a
f
enced enclosure. The city awarded a $275,000 contract to
P
NR Railworks, which has an office in Guelph. to oversee
W
estern Mechanical Service’s who were responsible for
t
he move. This involved the use of a crane to lift the 30-
t
onne engine onto a special flatbed trailer. From there,
6
167 made a short trip over a temporary bridge to the south
s
ide of the tracks, where the crane lifted it from the trailer
a
nd placed it on a specially constructed concrete platform
r
oughly across from the current Travelodge parking lot.
Al
Fredericks, a local train enthusiast, is happy
the
city intends to keep the old steamer. But he warns if
the
city is serious about keeping 6167, it better be serious
about
maintaining it as well. The state of locomotive 6167
has
been an issue almost since its arrival in Guelph in
1967,
seven years after it was retired from active service.
Over
the years, citizen volunteers and even Guelph
Correctional
Centre employees have cleaned and painted
the
engine, but decades of sitting outside in extreme
weather
have taken their toll. Andrew Janes, Project
Manager
for the City, stressed the city is committed to the
old
engine. (Guelph Mercury)
City
closes Canadian Pacific Railway station deal in
Owen
Sound
It
took nearly two years, but Owen Sound,
Ontario
now owns the derelict former CPR station near
the
east harbour wall. Owen Sound purchased the vacant
station
and its property for $153,500, which will be paid
over
three years. The city plans to seek proposals from
developers
interested in transforming the 1940s station
into
a business.
S
teve Furness, manager of economic
development,
said the purchase and redevelopment of
the
property is part of the citys effort to improve Owen
Sounds
harbour area. The city first expressed an interest
in
buying the station in 2008. It conditionally purchased
t
he property in January 2009. An environmental
consultant
hired by the city declared the site clean enough
for
commercial use in February 2009. He also declared
the
building to be structurally sound.
Hurdles
in transferring the property from the
federal
government to the city delayed the deal from
closing
for 15 months. The closing deadline was extended
several
times. Part of the challenge related to the
buildings
national heritage protection. The city had to
enter
into a heritage easement agreement with the
Ontario
Heritage Trust before the deal closed. The city
must
protect certain features of the station forever.
(Owen
Sound Sun Times)
H
istoric train may ride the rails of Barrie
Collingwood
shortline
In
its long-term transportation plan, Simcoe
County,
Ontario, hasnt written off tourism potential for the
Collingwood-Barrie railway. Barries Mitchell Wilson
is
a driving force behind a group, the Barrie &
Collingwood
Heritage Railway, which would like to see
passengers
on the rail. The proposed mission of The
Barrie
& Collingwood Heritage Railway is to teach the
public
about the importance of the railway in the
development
of the City of Barrie and the Town of
Collingwood.

At the same time, the railway will also attract
tourists
to both communities and, through stop-overs,
allow
tourists from one community to visit the other,
W
ilson said. The BCHRY would begin operating
excursions
using a vintage diesel or gas locomotive and
circa
1920s steel coaches with windows that open. The
train
would make several narrated round trips between
B
arrie and Collingwood each day, he said. At
Collingwood,
there could eventually be other railway-
related
activities and exhibits in the park adjacent to the
train
station/museum.
In
Barrie, the city is working with the YMCA of
Simcoe-Muskoka
and its development partner, the
Correct
Group of Companies, on a mixed-used project
that
would combine retail, hospitality and office uses with
a
state-of-the-art YMCA, a restored station and
programming
that would highlight the Allandale station
heritage
and local arts activities. Possibilities include a rail
museum
and perhaps returning a restored engine to the
site.
Wilson suggests the train would travel at about 30-
kilometres
per hour but that would require expensive
track
upgrades. (Barrie Advance)
Wi
nnipeg, Manitoba inducted into Canadian
Railway
Hall of Fame
R
ailway Association of Canada President Cliff
Mackay
recently presented a commemorative plaque to
C
ouncillor Grant Nordman, St. Charles Ward,
recognizing
the City of Winnipegs induction into the
Canadian
Railway Hall of Fame for the year 2009 in
recognition
of outstanding achievement as a community
in
the Canadian railway industry.
The
Canadian Railway Hall of Fame honours
C
anadian achievement in the railway business –
specifically related to the development and ongoing role

of Canadas vibrant railway industry. It fulfills a need to
r
ecognize various technology, communities and
i
ndividuals that have been instrumental in the
development
of this vital Canadian transportation
system.
The Hall of Fame generally selects four members
each
year.
M
odern day Winnipeg is an important centre for
C
anadas two transcontinental railways, CN and CPR, VIA
R
ail Canada and for short line railways, such as the Central
M
anitoba Railway. The citys history as a railway centre is
b
ased on Winnipeggers decision in 1879 to build a major
b
ridge over the Red River and provide station grounds for
181CANADIAN RAIL • 537JUL
Y – AUGUST 2010t
he CPR. This action also resulted in Winnipeg becoming
t
he terminus for the CPR branch being built from Emerson
o
n the US border. Two years later, Winnipeggers provided
t
he railway with grounds for freight yards, a divisional point
a
nd site for their railway shops.
T
he arrival of a Northern Pacific Railway
s
ubsidiary in 1888 broke the CPR monopoly and, in 1901,
l
aid the groundwork for the expansion of the Canadian
N
orthern Railway into a transcontinental line from
M
ontreal to Vancouver. By 1915, Winnipeg was on three
t
ranscontinental railways. (Railway Association of Canada)
W
orking on vintage steam train keeps volunteers on
track
in Manitoba
V
olunteers with the Vintage Locomotive Society
are
gearing up for what they hope is a busy summer. The
non-profit
group that operates the Prairie Dog Central
R
ailway hopes to capitalize on Manitobas Homecoming
and
the 100th anniversary of the railways Inkster
Junction
station — a milestone to be celebrated July 24,
2010.
Doug Belcher has been a volunteer with the
organization
since 1992. The position allows him to still
be
around the trains he loves so much after retiring from a
27-year
career with CPR. He serves as a porter, conductor
and
brakeman on regular trips made by the vintage steam
train
from its station on Inkster Boulevard to Warren.
B
elcher loves helping preserve Manitobas
history.
Its part of our heritage, said the West Kildonan
grandfather, noting nearly 10,000 people rode the steam

train last year. Without the railway, it would have been
very
difficult to have what we have today as Canada — it
tied the country together. Bob Goch feels the same way

after retiring from a 42-year career with the military. The
former
model railroader agreed to join the Vintage
L
ocomotive Society to work on trains on what he calls a
one-to-one
scale. Belcher and Goch both help make
repairs
and do maintenance on the machines during the
off
season. They said its a great way to pass the time and
gives
them something to do in retirement.
Goch
stressed volunteers do not need to have
experience
with the railroad. What I always say to people
who say they dont have any railroading skills is Can you

plane a piece of wood or can you drive a hammer?
Belcher
said the Vintage Locomotive Society is looking
for
volunteers who can assist on the trains or as gift shop
attendants
and ticket sellers. Those interested in learning
more
about the organization can visit their website
www.pdcrailway.com.
(Winnipeg Free Press)
Heritage
society in AB wants to purchase used
railway
track
E
ast Central Alberta Heritage Society’s
fundraising
efforts to restore a line from Stettler to
Donalda
are chugging right along, but finding track is
another
matter. “I guess our biggest problem right now is f
inding rail that we can salvage.” said society
administrator
Bruce Gartside. “We need to run rail for 20
miles,
which means acquiring probably about 30 miles of
rail.”
said the Donalda resident, adding that extra rail is
needed
because not all recovered track can be reused.
I
nquiries have already been made to CN and CPR
t
o see what opportunities exist to bid on contracts to
s
alvage the many sections of abandoned rail in Western
C
anada. So far, the society hasn’t heard back. Drumheller-
S
tettler MLA Jack Hayden and Crowfoot MP Kevin
S
orenson have been asked to help get the wheels turning.

We’re not asking for free rail, were just asking to be
a
llowed to bid along with other salvage companies.”
On
the fundraising front, the news is more
positive
with about $3 million lined up. The project was
given
a major boost last year with the announcement of
$2.6
million in funding from the federal government. The
money
came from Western Economic Diversification
Canada
through Canadian Badlands Ltd., a group
committed
to boosting tourism in the region.
Corporate,
municipal and individual donors
have
also stepped up and a number of applications are
still
outstanding. “We are still waiting to hear from the
province
of Alberta”, he said, adding they have a couple
of
funding applications in. The complete project would
cost
about $3.9 million. But this can reduced by $600,000
if
work on building sidings at Donalda and Red Willow is
postponed
until later. (Red Deer Advocate)
F
irst car turned on West Coast Railway
Association’s
turntableRuss Grycan
182RAIL
CANADIEN • 537JUILLET – AOÛT 2010
An
historic day for the West Coast Railway
Association
occurred Wednesday, June 23, 2010 when the
first
car, the 1890 built Canadian Pacific Railway car 16
British
Columbia, was turned on the newly installed
turntable
and moved into track 2 of the new CN
R
oundhouse and Conference Centre.
As
the first piece ever acquired for the WCRAs
collection,
it was fitting that car 16 was the first car. An
account
of the move by Chief Mechanical Officer Russ
Grycan
follows:
A
safe, historical move was made at the WCRAs
W
est Coast Railway Heritage Park in Squamish, BC
W
ednesday. A group of professionals did their very best
to
position the 1890 vintage British Columbia Business
Car
through the turnouts, onto the new turntable and into
T
rack # 2 of the CN Roundhouse and Conference Centre.
The
move was made under the direction of Conductor
R
oy Crowston and Engineer John Jellis. Lloyd Daniels
(carman)
and Randy Lucas offered guidance during the
move
as did Mike Lloyd. Andy Faris assisted with spotting
#
2 during the move and watching the coupler joints, and
with Mike of Duro, helped manually swing the turntable

from the lead track position to Track 2. The move took
about
6 minutes but the time required will improve when
the
electric drive is connected!
The
process of bringing the car British Columbia
into
the shop wasnt glamorous, a forklift was used, but the
results
were spectacular, and a culmination of thousands
of
hours of work in fund-raising and construction. (Russ
Grycan)
Quebec
North Shore & Labrador Locomotive
1112
was hauled into Exporail’s then building number 1 in
the
early 1960’s by L.A. Hebert Company’s bulldozer,
welcome
to the club! (Editor)
Alberni
Valley could become Mecca for train
training
in BC
The
guys who like tinkering on old trains have
turned
their steamy, diesel-stained hobby into a money
maker
for the Alberni Valley in BC. The Western
V
ancouver Island industrial Heritage Society is best
known
for its antique machinery, most of which was once
used
for logging. Staff at the society are volunteers and
the
old equipment is either salvaged or donated. The
money
to restore it to near-new condition comes in part
from
the societys collaboration in the Conductor
T
raining Course offered by the British Columbia Institute
of
Technology.
Students
of the course each pay about $8,000 and
spend
some four months learning to conduct trains. In
addition
to practical knowledge, the course teaches them
the
business of railways, dealing with railway customers,
tracks
and communications and what the railways are
about,
said Monica Serbanescu, chief instructor of
BCITs
Railway Conductor Program. The BCIT program each
year sends up to two classes of between six and 14
students
to get hands-on experience in the Valley. Each
one
does a week-long practicum learning the ropes on the
V
alleys railway playground.
“Thats
good business for the community that
supplies
food and accommodation for the students,” said
Kevin
Hunter, president of the Industrial Heritage
Society. W
e parlayed a strictly volunteer group into one
that
earns its keep, Hunter said. And the money we earn
goes
back into restoration of equipment. The reason
BCIT
chose to base the practical portion of its training in
P
ort Alberni is because the city offers some unique
attributes.
It has in place rail infrastructure thats mostly
unused
and offers students an opportunity to practice
driving
trains over several kilometres to McLean Mill and
back. Before students graduate theyre typically hired on

by some of the big freight railway companies like CN and
CPR.
Meanwhile,
two gangs of Industrial Heritage
Society
volunteers have been working on the railroad for
the
past weeks. One group, the rock gang, has been
clearing
up several rock falls on the track above the
Cameron
Valley, while the second group has been
clearing
the brush that has grown up on the right-of-way
in
the eight years since rail freight shut down in 2001.
More
than 500 volunteer hours were put in by the rock
gang
and a similar amount by the brushing crew. (Alberni
V
alley Times)
F
ull steam ahead for Alberni Pacific Number 7
P
ort Alberni, British Columbia’s iconic steam
train
is back on the rails for another season. The Alberni
P
acific Railways Number 7 Baldwin locomotive may be
81
years old, but its in excellent operating condition,
according
to officials from the Industrial Heritage
Society.
The former logging train engine underwent an
annual
boiler inspection recently, at the hands of boiler
safety
officer Don Bishop of the BC Safety Authority. Its
part
of a switch in jurisdictions, Bishop said. Weve taken
over
steam locomotives. Inspection used to be handled by
the
provincial railway branch, but they dont do steam
boilers,
he said. (Alberni Valley Times)
Last
North American interlocking plant dismantled
O
n Sunday, May 2, 2010 Union Pacific
maintenance
personnel removed from service the single
r
emaining mechanically-operated switch and its
accompanying
facing point lock at Ridgely Tower in
Springfield,
Illinois. With this retirement, there are no
longer any interlocking plants in the US
A which operate
switches
connected via iron pipe to the towers strong-arm
levers
referred to as “Armstrong by some because of the
manual
strength required to move the lever.
The
principle of centralizing the operation of
switches
and signals first originated in Britain in the
183CANADIAN RAIL • 537JUL
Y – AUGUST 2010BACK
COVER TOP: The Canadian Pacific Electric Lines were major freight haulers. Lake Erie & Northern steeple cab
333
posed in front of the Preston shops on June 5, 1950. The 333 was built by Baldwin – Westinghouse in 1915, it was
rebuilt
in 1952 and became Cornwall 15 in 1962 and was scrapped in Longueuil, Quebec in 1973. CRHA Archives,
F
onds Bailey.
C
OUVERTURE ARRIÈRE : Les lignes Canadian Pacific Electric furent grandement utilisées pour le transport de
m
archandises. On voit ici la motrice no 333 devant les ateliers Preston en ce 5 juin 1950. Construite d’abord par
B
aldwin-Westinghouse en 1915, elle fut reconstruite en 1952 pour devenir la Cornwall no 15 en 1962 avant d’être
d
émantelée à Longueuil, au Québec, en 1973. Archives ACHF, Fonds Bailey.
BACK
COVER BOTTOM : Again colourful, car 848 with a newly painted checker board pattern applied to the car ends
for
increased visibility, was captured at Port Dover on June 16, 1951. The CNR train on the adjacent track was a
charter
organized by the Central Ontarto Train Trip Committee. The excursion was running 2 hours late and was held
at
the LE&N yard until switching operations were completed down at the CNR station. CRHA Archives, Fonds Bailey.
COUVER
TURE ARRIÈRE : Encore une fois, le coloré interurbain no 848 à Port Dover en ce 16 juin 1951, arborant une
nouvelle
livrée en damier sur le devant pour être davantage visible. Le train du CNR sur la voie adjacente est un convoi
nolisé
par le Comité d’excursion ferroviaire de la Central Ontario. Ce train avait un retard de deux heures et attendait
dans
la cour du LE&N la fin des opérations d’aiguillage de la gare du CNR. Archives ACHF, Fonds Bailey.1850s,
and the principle of interlocking them to prevent
unsafe
sequences of operation followed soon thereafter.
The only form of power found practical in the beginning

was provided by the human body; as the towerman
operated
a lever, the motion was transferred in an iron
pipeline
through bell cranks, slides, pulleys, etc., running
up
to several hundred feet to the signal or switch operated
by
the lever. The pipeline had to be compensated for
thermal
expansion and contraction as the ambient
temperature
changed, and it had to be regularly
lubricated
and adjusted.
D
erailments could put the pipeline out of service
o
r knock the pipes out of alignment, making them difficult
t
o operate. Snow along the pipeline would often thaw and
t
hen freeze, causing difficulty. Proper maintenance worked
w
onders, but even in the best of condition, the leverman
n
eeded a strong back and strong arms to do his job hence
t
he nicknames given to these levers.
O
ver the years, the author had the opportunity to
o
perate a number of mechanical switches. The best
o
perated with just a modest effort, but I can attest that the
w
orst were backbreakers. Sometimes it wasnt the sheer
f
orce that mattered, but the right twist on the lever as it
m
oved through its quadrant. After being slightly short of
b
reath after lining a dozen hard-to-throw switches a few
h
undred feet away from the tower, it was rewarding to pull
t
he last lever and watch out the window as the semaphore
b
lade moved skyward with the motion of my hands.
As
various state legislatures passed laws in the
late
1880s and 1890s requiring a stop at crossings and
junctions
that werent equipped with interlockings, the
number of interlocking plants proliferated. A
t the top of
the
list was Hammond, Indianas State Line Tower, built in
1897 and having 224 levers the largest mechanical
interlocking
in North America.
By
the start of the 20th century, hydraulic,
pneumatic,
and electric power was being harnessed to
operate
railroad switches and signals. As late as 1990,
several
dozen towers using brute mechanical force to
throw
switches and clear signals remained in service. One
by
one they disappeared: Chicagos 75th Street in 1997,
T
ate Line in 2000, East Chicagos Grasselli in 2007. With
the
closing of CSXs towers in Hancock and Eyser, West
V
irginia in 2008, Springfields Ridgely Tower became the
unlikely
holder of the title Last Mechanically Operated
Interlocking
in the USA.
But
now there are none. There are a few
remaining
towers that still use the old strong-arm levers;
Dolton
and Calumet are the last two in the Chicago area,
and
there are a couple more scattered around the
country.
However, the mechanical pipeline at these
towers
was severed long ago, and the old levers at these
locations
do little more than open and close electrical
circuits
that operate the switches and signals at trackside.
Ridgely
Tower itself exists on borrowed time.
T
he removal of the last mechanically-operated
appliances
was necessitated by the work underway to
rearrange
the crossing and interchange tracks between
UP (ex-GM&O) and I&M (ex-CI&M), and to eliminate

the tower. The tower operators have been served the
formal
notice required by their contract, stating that their
jobs
will be abolished.
My
hat is off in salute to those who designed,
maintained,
and operated this fascinating equipment that
played
a significant role in the history of railroading. (Jay
Underwood)

Demande en ligne