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Canadian Rail 536 2010

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Canadian Rail 536 2010

CANADIAN RAILPUBLISHED BI-MONTHL
Y
B
Y THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATIONIS
SN 0008-4875P
ostal Permit No. 40066621 E •SNTAE BELÉISDHNEDOF94
T
ABLE OF CONTENTSThe CRHA may be reached at its web site: www
.exporail.org or by telephone at (450) 638-1522FRONT
COVER: Resplendent in the classic CNR passenger diesel colours of green, yellow and black, new MLW FPA4 6765 pauses at
Moncton,
New Brunswick in August 1959 with the westbound “Ocean Limited”. The outbound engineer, clad in classic garb is striding
alongside
his charge while the fireman waits to hand up the grips, lunch buckets and water pail. D. MacIntosh, Smaill collection, (Thanks
also
to Bill Linley and the Orangedale Station, Nova Scotia gang for saving this image with Exporail in mind)
BEL
OW: The Canadian Government Railways was the first Canadian railway to purchase all steel sleeping cars. The fourteen L class
sleeping
cars were the third lot of such cars built for the CGR and were built by the Pullman Company in 1918 for service on the Ocean
Limited.
These cars with their uncommon 10 section-2 drawing configuration would remain in service until the 1960s. – Library Archives
Canada
PA182692
P
AGE COUVERTURE : Resplendissante dans sa livrée verte, jaune et noire classique des locomotives diesels du service passagers du
CNR,
la FPA4 de la MLW no 6765 est en attente à Moncton, Nouveau-Brunswick, avec l’Océan en direction ouest en ce mois d’août 1959.
Le
mécanicien, vêtu de l’uniforme traditionnel, s’avance vers son poste tandis que le chauffeur se prépare à saisir la boîte à lunch et le
seau
d’eau. D. MacIntosh, collection Smaill (merci à Bill Linley et au personnel de la gare d’Orangedale d’avoir sauvegardé la photo pour
Exporail).
Ci-DES
SOUS : Le Canadian Government Railway (CGR) fut le premier chemin de fer canadien à acquérir des voitures-lits entièrement
métalliques.
Les 14 voitures-lits de classe L faisaient partie du troisième lot de cet ensemble de voitures destinées au CGR. Construites
par
la compagnie Pullman en 1918 pour l’Ocean Limited, ces voitures, avec leurs configurations inusitées de 10 sections et deux
chambres,
demeurèrent en service jusque dans les années 1960. Bibliothèque et Archives Canada PA 182692.History F
ollows The Ocean to the Ocean by Jay Underwood……………………………………………95
CPR
’s Heavyweight Business Car Fleet by Cor van Steenis…………………………………………….107
Stan’s Photo Gallery by Stan Smaill
……………………………………………………………..110
Olympic R
ails by Don Evans…………………………………………………………………..127
Business Car by John Godfrey and David Gawley
……………………………………………………131F
or your membership in the CRHA, which
includes
a subscription to Canadian Rail,
write
to:
CRHA
, 110 Rue St-Pierre, St. Constant,
Que. J5A 1G7
Membership Dues for 2010:

In Canada: $50.00 (including all taxes)

United States: $50.00 in U.S. funds.
Other Countries: $85.00 Canadian funds.Canadian
Rail is continually in need of news,
stories,
historical data, photos, maps and other
m
aterial. Please send all contributions to
P
eter Murphy, X1-870 Lakeshore Road, Dorval,
QC
H9S 5X7, email: psmurphy@videotron.ca.
No
payment can be made for contributions, but
the
contributor will be given credit for material
submitted.
Material will be returned to the
contributor
if requested. Remember “Knowledge
is
of little value unless it is shared with others”.INTERIM CO
-EDITORS:
P
eter Murphy, Douglas N.W. Smith
AS
SOCIATE EDITOR (Motive Power):
Hugues W
. Bonin
FRENCH TRANSLA
TION: Denis Latour,
Michel Lortie and Denis V
allières
LA
YOUT: Gary McMinn
PRINTING: Impression P
aragraph
DISTRIBUTION
: Joncas Postexperts Inc.

RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 201096
When
the “Ocean Limited” was inaugurated in 1904, the Grand Trunk Railway’s Boanventure Station in Montreal was the western
terminus
of this new service. This view shows Bonaventure circa 1890 and before the fire of 1916. The Montreal terminal was
switched
to Central Station when it opened in 1943. Canada Museum of Science and Technology Archives, CN001037.
La
gare Bonaventure de Montréal était le terminus ouest de l’Ocean Limited au moment de l’inauguration de ce dernier en 1904.
Cette
photo, prise vers 1890, illustre la gare avant l’incendie de 1916. Le terminus de Montréal fut transféré à la gare Centrale en
1943.
Archives du Musée canadien des sciences et de la technologie, CN001037. The
passengers on this night have forsaken the
jet
airplane and private automobile — or that antithesis of
long
distance travel comfort, the bus — to ride a train that
now
carries an aura of antiquity with it. This is also a less
hurried
way, as VIA Rail would say “more human way” to
travel,
devoid of the deep vein thrombosis experienced in
cramped
aircraft cabins, or the road rage now becoming
prevalent
on crowded highways.
Indeed,
with VIA Rail operating as a Crown
corporation,
train travel carries a more “royal” cachet
than
any other form available to Canadians…or anyone
else.
Few Canadians realize they are riding aboard the
second
oldest continuously scheduled named train
service
in the world. Not even legendary trains like the
Orient
Express, the California Zephyr, or South Africa’s Blue
Train, can claim to have run without interruption for
as
long as Canada’s premier eastern express.
T
o reach that status required a political gamble
by
then Minister of Railways and Canals Henry Robert
Emmerson,
the Maugerville, New Brunswick Liberal in
Sir
Wilfrid Laurier’s government, who had taken control
of
the government owned railway at a time when costs
were
mounting and public opposition to increased
subsidies
in areas not served by the railway was increasing.
P
reviously the ICR’s only Montreal-Halifax train
had
been the Maritime Express-. Bowing to political
pressure,
the number of stops had increased to the point
where
the train was stopping at even the smallest stations
between
Halifax and Montreal. This made the “Express”
moniker
a joke. More seriously, the Canadian Pacific –
97CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010which
was lobbying to either takeover or secure
running
rights on the ICR’s Maritime lines – was
running
through cars between Montreal and Halifax
using
its Short Line across Maine and the ICR east of
Saint
John on a schedule much faster than that of the
Maritime
Express.
As
its name implied, the Ocean Limited was
planned
to be an exclusive and opulent service.
Initially,
it was scheduled to run only in the summer
months
when vacation and transatlantic traffic
peaked.
Emmerson
knew the railway needed a
flagship,
something to show to the nation and the
world
that the government was determined to make
its
publicly owned railway (a proposition openly
derided
by the robber barons of the privately owned
American
railways) a paying proposition.
T
o do that required a massive
infusion
of money to bring the track,
roadbed
and bridges up to a standard
necessary
to carry longer, faster, heavier
l
ocomotives and their trains, and
Emmerson
told Parliament he intended to
make
the Intercolonial “the great asset of
the
Dominion.”
That
might explain why, as the
train
was being planned in 1901, the
proposed
name was the Imperial Express
which,
as the Railway & Shipping World
magazine
noted in its March 1901 edition,
sounded
too much like the CPR’s Imperial
Limited,
“…and should be changed to
something
original.”
T
he Ocean Limited was
immediately popular, and soon attracted a
regular
clientele. Up to 1912, the
train
operated seasonally and did
n
ot run on Sundays in the
Maritimes
where the Lord’s Day
A
ct was strictly enforced. When
t
he Ocean Limited began
o
perating year-round, the
Maritime
Express faded into a
plodding
secondary train stopping
on
average every 8 miles.Henry
Robert Emmerson (1853-
1914)
The Liberal minister of
r
ailways in the Laurier
government,
he introduced the
Ocean
passenger service to help
make
the Intercolonial a valuable
asset
to the Dominion. (Topley
p
hoto, Library and Archives
Canada
PA 026992)
Henry
Robert Emmerson (1853-
1914),
ministre libéral du chemin
de
fer dans le gouvernement
Laurier
. Il a introduit le service
p
assager Océan afin d’aider
l’Intercolonial
à devenir un atout
de
valeur pour le Dominion. (Photo
T
opley, Bibliothèque et Archives
Canada,
PA 026992)The
Maritime Express in the Wentworth Valley, Nova Scotia in 1903.
Photographer
unknown, Canada Museum of Science and Technology, CN
Collection
000404.
Le
Maritime Express dans la vallée de Wentworth, Nouvelle-Écosse, en 1903.
Photographe
inconnu. Musée canadien des sciences et de la technologie,
collection
CN00404.An
engraving, based on the photo above of the Maritime Express graced a Dominion of Canada $ 5 banknote in 1912. Some
11,019
five dollar Dominion notes were issued bearing the illustration of the Maritime Express between 1912 and 1931. Banknote
number
440167 was bequeathed by Frederick Angus along with many others with railroad motif to the CRHA. CRHA Archives
F
onds Angus.
Une
gravure, inspirée de la photo ci-dessus du Maritime Express, illustre un billet de 5 $ du Dominion du Canada en 1912. Quelque
11
000 exemplaires de ce billet furent imprimés entre 1912 et 1931. Le billet no 440167 fut légué à l’ACHF par Fred Angus, ainsi que
plusieurs
autres avec motifs ferroviaires. Fonds Angus.
98RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
Contrary
to popular belief, the government owned railway could be venturesome. The Intercolonial had a number of firsts to its
credit
including being the first Canadian railway to use 4-6-2 Pacific type steam locomotives. The larger grate area of the firebox ,
made
possible with the use of a trailing truck made the new Pacific type engines the locomotive of choice for ICR passenger trains
from
1905 onward. In fact, the increased schedule of the “Ocean Limited” with advent of steel underframed passenger equipment
made
engines the size of a 4-6-2 an absolute necessity. In this summer 1911 view at Truro, 4-6-2 333 will become the motive power
for
the westbound “Ocean Limited”. Eventually, this engine which began service as 2nd 333 on the ICR was retired in 1942 as CNR
5542.
Sister Pacific 5550 now preserved at Exporail was built by MLW in 1914 for the Intercolonial / Canadian Government
Railways
as that carrier’s no 451. Kenneth S. MacDonald collection.
Contrairement
à la croyance populaire, ce chemin de fer,
propriété
du gouvernement, se révéla une entreprise à
risque.
L’Intercontinental Railway (ICR) fut le premier
chemin
de fer canadien à utiliser des Pacific 4-6-2. À partir
de
1905, l’ICR a privilégié ce type de locomotive qui, grâce
au
support d’un bogie arrière, pouvait comporter une grille
de
foyer plus large. Le recours aux 4-6-2 fut rendu
nécessaire
pour réduire le temps de parcours de l’Ocean
Limited
et tirer les nouvelles voitures de passagers plus
lourdes
à châssis métalliques. Truro, été 1911, la 4-6-2 no
333
sera à la tête de l’Ocean Limited en direction ouest. Cette
locomotive,
la deuxième no 333 pour l’ICR, fut retirée en
1942. Elle portait alors le no 5542 pour le CNR.
Sa sœur, la
P
acific no 5550, actuellement préservée à Exporail, fut
c
onstruite par la MLW en 1914 pour
l’Intercontiental/Canadian
Government Railway et portait à
l’origine
le no 451. Collection Kenneth S. MacDonald.Canadian
National acquired its first 15 Mountain type steam
locomotives
from the Canadian Locomotive Company in
Kingston,
Ontario in 1923. Lanky Mountain 6010 posed on
the
head end of the Ocean Limited at Moncton in 1928. J.
Markham,
Douglas N W Smith Collection.
L
e Canadien National a acquis ses 15 premières
locomotives
à vapeur de type Mountain en 1923 de la
Canadian
Locomotive Company de Kingston, Ontario. La
M
ountain no 6010, quelque peu dégingandée, est
photographiée
ici à la tête de l’Ocean Limited à Moncton en
1928.
J. Markham, collection Douglas N. W. Smith.

100RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
CNR
U2g 4-8-4 6207 was part of an order of “war baby” Northerns built by Montreal Locomotive Works in 1942. As they were
delivered,
they were immediately placed in service between Moncton and Halifax supplementing their older 6100 series sisters. In
1942,
heavy wartime passenger and freight traffic saw the Northerns placed into service on the entire Montreal – Halifax run. In this
postwar
view from August 1949, Northern 6207 has the westbound “Ocean Limited” well in hand leaving Halifax for the west.
Photo:
Kenneth S. MacDonald.
La
locomotive 4-8-4 U2g no 6207 du CNR, construite par la Montreal Locomotive Works en 1942, faisait partie de la commande des
Northern
du temps de la guerre. Au moment de leur livraison, elles furent mises en service entre Moncton et Halifax, en renfort de
leurs
sœurs de la série 6100. On en a observé aussi en 1942, à la tête de trains de passagers et de marchandises entre Montréal et
Halifax.
On aperçoit, sur cette photo d’après-guerre de 1949, la Northern no 6207 à la tête de l’Ocean Limited en direction ouest.
Photo
: Kenneth S. MacDonald.F
rom Montbec (about two miles east of St
Hyacinthe)
to Chaudiere (about two miles west of
Charny,
our train rolls over the former Drummond
Country
Railway. Built in the 1890s, the Intercolonial
acquired
the line in 1898 as part of a push by the Laurier
government
to extend the government owned system to
Montreal.
The receding headlights of private vehicles on
A
utoroute Jean Lesage, which chases the railway
between
Montreal and Quebec City, shows that the
railway
can still beat the horseless carriage for speed and
comfort,
and the train passenger almost feels sorry for the
harried
motorist as he is left behind in his desperate hurry
to
beat the truck traffic.
T
rack abandonments east of Charny ended the
picturesque
run along the banks of the St Lawrence to the
L
evis station and the Ocean now runs inland from the
river.
The Dominion government purchased most of the
section
from Charny to Riviere du Loup from the Grand T
runk Railway in 1879. The Grand Trunk happily turned
over
the under maintained and thinly traffic line to the
ICR
and used the funds to extend its main line from Port
Huron,
Michigan to Chicago.
It
is only at Rivière du Loup that the Ocean
begins
travelling over the original Intercolonial line. A
rail
link to the Maritimes built by the Dominion
government
was one of the main demands of the east
coast
residents made when discussing the confederation
of
the British provinces in the 1860s. While Nova Scotia
and
New Brunswick politicians had espoused the project
for
the previous two decades, the project floundered as
neither
private capitalists or the British government was
willing
to finance on the line through the sparsely
populated
areas of New Brunswick or eastern Quebec.
The
notion of government construction and ownership
came
from the Maritimes that had a tradition of this; the
Nova
Scotia Railway and the European & North
101CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010American
Railway were owned by the two provinces. It
was
agreed that the Dominion government would
takeover
the railways owned by Nova Scotia and New
B
runswick and to extend the them to form an
intercolonial railway system from the St L
awrence River
to
Halifax. Riviere du Loup was designated as the
western
terminus in 1867. Oddly, it took nine years to
complete
the less than 500 miles of new construction
needed
to finish the eastern transcontinental line. The
reasons
centred on political wrangling over the route of
the
line, patronage appointments and construction
materials.
The process sorely tried Sandford Fleming
who
oversaw the surveys and construction of the line as
engineer-in-chief.
W
ith no hope of seeing much along the southern
shore
of the St. Lawrence River before dawn greets the train
beyond the spectacular Matapedia Valley of the
Gaspé
Peninsula, the history of the line and this train is all
there
is to engage the imagination of the wide-awake
traveler.
Bic,
Quebec posed the first of four major
engineering
challenges for Fleming’s crews, requiring the
removal
of half the mountain face along the coast of Otty
Bay.
This feature is lost to the darkness on the current
schedule,
as the train goes by well after 2 a.m.
So
too is the somber rail-side grave of John
F
rederick Darwall, passed by the train shortly after leaves
Causapscal
at four o’clock in the morning. One of seven
engineers
on Fleming’s staff to die at a young age, Darwall
was drowned he attempted to cross L
ac au Saumon on a
bitter
winter night in 1871. He was thirty-six years old.
Again
in darkness, the Ocean crosses the
R
estigouche River on the
border
of Quebec and New
B
runswick, crossing the
river
close to the whirlpool
where
Capt. John Hodges
P
ipon of the Royal
Engineers
lost his life in
1846
as he conducted the
survey
later taken over by
Major
William Robinson,
for
whom this route is
named.
T
he crossing of
the
Restigouche is made
shortly
after Matapedia,
w
here the thrice-weekly
rendez-vous
between the
Ocean
and the Chaleur
takes
place. The Chaleur
wends
its way along the bay
towards
Gaspé, but not on
this
night. Residents of the
communities
along the 325
k
ilometre (203 miles)
r
oute, like so many
Canadians
on other routes,
know
their railway service
h
angs in a precarious
balance
between necessary
subsidy
funding and the
political
will to keep the
route
open.
B
efore reaching
s
un-up at Campbellton,
N
ew Brunswick at 7.22
a
.m., the Ocean passes
t
hrough the only true
t
unnel on Major
R
obinson’s path, the While
the Ocean Limited was an all-sleeping car train from the 1940s through 1958, its consist
often
included long strings of head end cars carrying fresh fish, express and mail. The Alco 244
engined
FPA2’s arrived in 1955 and were a welcome addition to the passenger diesel motive
power
assigned to the CNR’s Maritime passenger services. The 6711 eventually was
renumbered
6756. The later 6760 series FPA4’s powered with the dependable Alco 251 diesel
engines
would replace the FPA2’s after 1959. On April 28, 1956, FPA-4 6711 and FB-2 6807
head
up the eastbound 14 car train at Moncton, New Brunswick. Kenneth S. MacDonald.
Quoique
l’Ocean Limited fût un train exclusivement constitué de voitures-lits entre 1940 et 1958,
on
y ajoutait fréquemment plusieurs wagons pour le transport de produits frais de la pêche, de
colis
express et de poste. L’acquisition par le CNR, en 1955, des locomotives diesel FPA2 avec
des
moteurs Alco 244 fut fort appréciée pour le transport des passagers dans les Maritimes. La
no
6711 fut renumérotée plus tard 6756. Les FPA4 de la série 6760 avec des moteur Alco 251
remplaceront
les FPA2 après 1959. En ce 18 avril 1956, les FPA4 no 6711 et FB2 no 6807 sont à
la
tête du train no 14 en direction est à Moncton, Nouveau-Brunswick. Kenneth S. MacDonald.
T
he two bridges were among the
longest
and most expensive structures on the
entire
line. While Fleming has been given credit
for
their construction, the work was overseen by
Light
— who had far more experience with iron
bridge
construction — and Smellie, who found
the
local stone for the abutments that prevented
the
project from going dramatically over budget
and
pitching Fleming into a political quagmire.
The
City of Miramichi today contains
the
old community of Newcastle, which at the
time
of the 1846 survey for the railway, was the
second-largest
community in New Brunswick
after
Saint John. It was for this reason local
Conservative
MP Peter Mitchell, a perennial
minister
in Sir John A. Macdonald’s cabinet,
insisted
the Intercolonial follow Robinson’s 102RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
Morrissey
Rock tunnel that was built at
the
expense of the lives of two navvies
w
ho were careless with their black
blasting
powder!
A
t about 10: 30 a.m., and with
daylight
now a constant companion along
the
remainder of the route, passengers on
the
Ocean get a good opportunity to
e
xperience the bridges over the
M
iramichi River, the second major
o
bstacle presented to Fleming’s
volunteers
as the line was built eastward,
and
one overcome by his divisional
engineer
Alexander Luders Light, and
district
engineer William Baillie Smellie. Alexander
Luders Light (1822-
1
894): A veteran of New
Brunswick
railway construction,
he
built the European & North
American
line, and was district
engineer
for the difficult work of
the
Intercolonial in Northern New
B
rusnwick. (Jay Underwood
collection)
Alexander
Luders Light (1822-
1894).
Vétéran de la construction
du
chemin de fer au Nouveau-
Brunswick.
Il a construit la ligne
European
& North American et fut
i
ngénieur de district pour
l’Intercolonial
dans la région nord
d
u Nouveau-Brunswick, où il
dirigea
des travaux fort difficiles.
Collection
Jay Underwood.W
illiam Baillie Smellie ( 1830-
1912):
The Scottish-born engineer
was
responsible for the erection of
the
Intercolonial Railway bridges
over
the Miramichi River in New
Brunswick
(Photo courtesy Smellie
family)
W
illiam Baillie Smellie (1830-1912).
Ingénieur
d’origine écossaise, il fut
responsable
de l’érection du pont
de
l’Intercolonial au-dessus de la
r
ivière Miramichi au Nouveau-
Brunswick.
Offert par la famille
Smellie.In
a wonderful image from the mid fifties when the CNR was dieselizing the
Maritime passenger services with a vengeance, the westbound Ocean Limited

and its slower running mate, the Scotian, were photographed at Truro on March
23,
1958. The C-Liners 6705 and 6805 head up the departing Ocean, while the
6511
and 6611 are switching head end cars from
the
Sydney connecting train into the consist of the
Scotian.
Less successful than their GMD and MLW
counterparts,
the often temperamental CLC 6700’s
were
reassigned to Upper Canada after 1958. They
would
make occasional appearances on the”
Ocean”
and the” Scotian” in the sixties, albeit
usually
as trailing units. Kenneth S. MacDonald.
Magnifique
illustration des années mi-1950 lorsque
le
CNR convertit au diesel son service de passagers
dans
les Maritimes. L’Ocean Limited et le Scotian,
plus
lent, photographiés à Truro le 23 mars 1958.
Les
locomotives C-Liners nos 6705 et 6805 se
préparent à tirer l’Ocean tandis que les nos 64-511

et 6611 manœuvrent les voitures de tête du train en
provenance
de la correspondance de Sydney vers
le
Scotian. Ayant moins de succès que leurs
équivalentes
GMD et MLW, les CLC 6700 furent
assignées
à l’Ontario après 1958. Elles apparurent
à
l’occasion sur l’Ocean et le Scotian dans les
a
nnées 1960 comme locomotives d’appoint.
Kenneth
S. MacDonald.
103CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010route
along the province’s north shore.
Ironically
the bridges are now mirrored across
the
river by a new twin lane highway the government of
N
ew Brunswick has committed to build from
C
ampbellton to Moncton, making northern New
Brunswick’s
remote communities less “remote,” and
providing
further private automobile competition for
railway
passenger traffic.
T
wo hours after passing over the Miramichi, the
Ocean
rolls into Moncton, a city that owes its existence to
the
Intercolonial Railway, which called the small town on
the
Peticodiac River its headquarters from 1872 until
Canadian
National Railways was formed in 1919.
T
o reach the station at the far end of the city, the
train
follows track laid down by Alexander Luders Light
for
the European & North American Railway in the
1850s,
and it is this line that lies bare the myth of
Fleming’s
use of iron bridges on the Intercolonial.
C
onventional history records that Fleming
engaged
in a battle with the Intercolonial commissioners
over
the sue of wood or iron structures; Fleming arguing
that
iron bridges would be less susceptible to fire, and that
iron
would be easier to replace in the more remote areas
of
Northern New Brunswick where wood for bridges was,
curiously,
then in short supply.
A
t some point these facts have led to the
assertion
that Fleming was the first to use iron bridges on
Canadian
railways, but Light had used them on the
European
& North American almost ten years before
Fleming
set foot in New Brunswick, and twenty years
before
the Intercolonial was completed.
A
t Moncton, the old headquarters city for the
I
ntercolonial, the largest numbers of passengers
disembark
from the train. During peak travel times,
several
Renaissance cars are cut off the train to be added to
the westbound Ocean that same day. At present, the
Industrial
Rail Services plant in the former Canadian
National
shop at the Moncton freight yard is humming
with
massive contracts from VIA to overhaul the
Bombardier
built LRC cars, upgrade the safety and
accessibility
features of the Renaissance cars and rebuild
VIA
’s RDCs.
Continuing
its run eastward, the Ocean passes
beneath
the daunting walls of Dorchester penitentiary,
the
federal prison that has held some of Canada’s worst
criminals,
and one German war criminal from the Second
W
orld War — Kurt Meyer, the SS commander who
ordered
the execution of prisoners of war, including seven
members
of the famed North Nova Scotia Highlanders
R
egiment at Abbey Ardennes, France in 1944.
The
penitentiary was a gift to the town,
presented
by its most prominent resident, Edward Barron
Chandler,
the Intercolonial Railway commissioner who
had
also insisted the rail way take a sweeping route off the
most
direct line to Moncton so that he might take the train
more
easily between Ottawa and his home. The line also
passed
close to his proposed coal mine, which was never
developed.
The
“Dorchester Diversion” has taken a back
seat
to other similar detours in Fleming’s line, perhaps
because
it was built by the New Brunswick government
under
the charter of the Eastern Extension Railway.
The
Ocean reaches Amherst, Nova Scotia, at a
little
after 1 p.m. and comes to a halt in a town that was
home
to four fathers of Confederation: Robert Barry
Dickey,
Edward Baron Chandler, Charles Tupper and
Jonathan
McCully.
The
station building here is the oldest of any
served
VIA in Nova Scotia, and functions as the gateway
to
the province. Indeed, except for a flag stop at Springhill This
lineup of rail diesel cars
a
waiting overhaul was
photographed
at Industrial Rail
S
ervices in Moncton, New
B
runswick on October 19,
2009.
Visible are: 6212-6128,
6224,
6207, 6137, 6208, 7214.
David
Morris.
Cet
alignement d’automotrices
diesels,
en attente de révision,
fut
photographié à l’Industrial
S
ervices de Moncton au
N
ouveau-Brunswick le 19
o
ctobre 2009. Nous
apercevons
les nos 6212, 6128,
6224,
6207, 6137, 6208 et 7214.
David
Morris.
104RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
the
Canadian Pacific Railway was built through the Rocky
Mountains.
The
next major point of interest is Folly Lake.
O
riginally it was called Folleigh Lake, until a
cartographer
with the provincial department of highways
apparently
decided to change the spelling in the 1930s!
It
was here in the winter of 1929 that the first
aircraft
carrying mail from Truro to Saint John, New
Brunswick
was forced to land on the lake ice and transfer
its
cargo to a waiting Maritime Express. Skeptics might
have
been excused for thinking it doubtful the new flying
m
achine would ever replace the reliable steam
locomotive
to carry the Royal Mail.
A
t 4:35 p.m., the time the Ocean arrives at
Halifax,
the gloaming has pervaded the sky and the view
of
the Bedford Basin; Halifax’s marvelous sheet of
sheltered
water is becoming obscured. As the train passes
t
hrough Rockingham, especially in December,
passengers
should be reminded that it was here — where
Canadian
National Railways still marshals its freight
trains
— that the inbound morning train from Saint John
was
stopped by a timely telegraph, sent December 6, 1917
by
dispatcher Vincent Coleman, warning that a munitions
ship
was about to explode in the
Narrows.
The
Ocean bypasses that fatal
spot,
and reaches Halifax’s 1928 beaux
arts
station designed by John Schofield
to
replace the grand North Street
station
damaged in the explosion. It is a
s
plendid contrast to Montreal’s
terminus,
a style that reinforced the
stability
and permanence of the railway
in
the minds of the travelers and the
shareholders,
which in VIA Rail’s case
are
the same people.
Here
the train will be emptied
and
later turned on the balloon track
that
runs around Halterm, the Atlantic
container.
As part of a seemingly
endless
cycle, the Ocean will start its
r
eturn journey to Montreal the
following
day, as it has for 105 years,
ever
faithful to those who faithfully
believe
in the comfort of railway travel,
and
the tradition of excellence that its
venerable
service still maintains as an
asset
to Canada.
Note:
Reader’s interested in
l
earning more about the Ocean
Limited,
the Maritime Express and
their
running mates are directed to The
Ocean
Limited: A Centennial History
by
Douglas N W Smith. The 128 page
v
olume provides a history of the Rolling
beneath the sturdy ramparts of the Truro’s magnificent stone station (alas
now
only a memory), was the eastbound Ocean on October 4, 1966. The diesel
consist,
which includes a 6800 series “Fairbanks” passenger “B” unit has been
repainted
in the red, black and off-white paint scheme as has most of the trailing
passenger
consist. The Limited appellation was dropped when the railway
adopted
bi-lingual names for its trains in the 1960s. Kenneth S. MacDonald.
L’Océan,
en direction est, le 4 octobre 1966, à la magnifique gare de Truro en pierre
(maintenant
disparue). L’ensemble de traction diesel, comprenant une unité B de
la
série 6800 de Fairbanks, voué au train de passagers, a été repeint avec la livrée
rouge,
noire et crème caractérisant la plupart des ensembles de traction de trains
de
passagers. L’appellation Limited a été retirée après l’adoption de noms
bilingues
pour les trains de l’entreprise ferroviaire dans les années 1960. Kenneth
S.
MacDonald.Junction,
there are only two other operating railway
stations
left in Nova Scotia.
Shortly
after leaving Amherst on the final leg of
the trek to Halifax, the Ocean passes the unmarked spot

where the Intercolonial Railway was born. This is
believed to be close to the salt processing site at Nappan

where a small and exclusive party of local notables and
contractors
turned the first sod of the railway in May of
1869.
That
it has been ignored and left unmarked is
perhaps
testament to the attitude of most Canadians
towards
their railway history, and the railway itself; so
many
preferring private vehicles and jet planes to get
from
Point A to Point B.
The
history, however, remains very much alive
and
might some day provide VIA with a unique selling
proposition
for passengers aboard the Ocean. They might
be
interested to know, as their train climbs into the
Cobequid
Mountains of Cumberland County, that the
embankment
across Smith Brook — from which a
splendid
view of the Wentworth Valley is available when
the
winter has cleared the leaves from the trees — was the
largest
man-made railway structure in the country before
105CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010That is why soldiers from Halifax took this route in 1885
to
fight the uprising in the North West Territories; why
soldiers
from the Central Canada travelled the route to
Halifax
in support of the army sent to South Africa in 1900
to
fight the Boers; why young men took the train to
Halifax
in 1914-1918 to avoid the German “U-boat scare”
in
the Gulf of St. Lawrence; why Canadian heroes from
across
the country rode the rails eastward to meet the
convoys
that were massed in the Bedford Basin in
1939-45.
In more recent times Canadian, British and
W
est German armour travelled by rail from as far away as
Suffield
Alberta, to ships in Halifax waiting to take them
to
the staging points in Saudi Arabia in 1991.
Although
it was conceived in, and designed for
peacetime
purposes, The Ocean travels a route whose
selection
was heavily driven by military considerations.
T
he Imperial Government in London saw the
Intercolonial
Railway as an all-weather route to get
soldiers
to central Canada should American threaten the
nescient
nation. Shortly before Confederation, the
Imperial
Government passed legislation authorizing the
T
reasury to guarantee loans of up to three million pounds
for
the railway provided that the railway would be
available
for all time to transport Her Majesty’s military
personnel
and be built on a route satisfactory to the
British.
One
passenger aboard this Ocean can appreciate
the
value of the line. Andrew is a young airman on his way
home to Nova Scotia from W
innipeg. He can appreciate
that
the railway could not only carry troops to the interior
at
a remarkable rate, but that ports along north shore of
New
Brunswick and the St. Lawrence River could re-
supply
a troop train that travelled far from the border with
the
United States, should American hubris spur thoughts
of
fulfilling the continental “manifest destiny” of which
they so often boasted.
At the end of the American Civil
W
ar in 1865, it was feared that the victorious Union Army
would
be sent north to take Canada as Britain has sides
with
the defeated southern states during the conflict.
While
the railway never had to be used as a
military
conduit against invading Americans, it proved its
value
during times of strife both at home and abroad.
That
is shy soldiers from Halifax took this route in 1885 to
fight
the uprising in the North West Territories; why
soldiers
from the Central Canada travelled the route to
Halifax
in support of the army sent to South Africa in 1900
to
fight the Boers; why young men took the train to
Halifax
in 1914-1918 to avoid the German “U-boat scare”
in
the Gulf of St. Lawrence; why Canadian heroes from
across
the country rode the rails eastward to meet the
convoys
that were massed in the Bedford Basin in 1939-
45.
In more recent times Canadian, British and West
German
armour travelled by rail from as far away as
Suffield
Alberta, to ships in Halifax waiting to take them
to
the staging points in Saudi Arabia in 1991.construction
of the ICR main line, the operations of the
many
Montreal-Halifax passenger trains as well as dining,
sleeping
and observations cars used from the 1870s
through
the Renaissance era, accidents and railway post
office
cars. The volume is heavily illustrated with black &
white
and colour photos, maps and schedules. Copies are
available
at the Exporail boutique.
Riding the R
oute of SoldiersAlthough
it was conceived in, and designed for
peacetime
purposes, The Ocean travels a route whose
selection
was heavily driven by military considerations.
T
he Imperial Government in London saw the
Intercolonial
Railway as an all-weather route to get
soldiers
to central Canada should American threaten the
nescient
nation. Shortly before Confederation, the
Imperial
Government passed legislation authorizing the
T
reasury to guarantee loans of up to three million pounds
for
the railway provided that the railway would be
available
for all time to transport Her Majesty’s military
personnel
and be built on a route satisfactory to the
British.
One
passenger aboard this Ocean can appreciate
the
value of the line. Andrew is a young airman on his way
home to Nova Scotia from W
innipeg. He can appreciate
that
the railway could not only carry troops to the interior
at
a remarkable rate, but that ports along north shore of
New
Brunswick and the St. Lawrence River could re-
supply
a troop train that travelled far from the border with
the
United States, should American hubris spur thoughts
of
fulfilling the continental “manifest destiny” of which
they so often boasted.
At the end of the American Civil
W
ar in 1865, it was feared that the victorious Union Army
would
be sent north to take Canada as Britain has sides
with
the defeated southern states during the conflict.
While
the railway never had to be used as a
military
conduit against invading Americans, it proved its
value
during times of strife both at home and abroad.
106RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
uniform
— are mustering departing passengers, and
m
arshalling the newcomers into their seats, the
m
echanical teams are inspecting the locomotives,
c
hecking fuel and lubricant levels, and cleaning
headlights
and ditch lights.
It
is a choreographed exercise, designed to be
performed
within a fixed time, so that — should the train
have been delayed at any point, and for whatever reason

— the delay is not prolonged on their watch, and that the
departure
time is on time. Their esprit de corps would be
the
envy of any soldier.
The
Canadian had left Winnipeg three hours
behind
schedule, having met with locomotive failure at
P
ortage La Prairie, and plugged toilets at Winnipeg. By
the
time Sioux Lookout was reached, the delay was down
to
two hours; at Hornepayne it was down to one hour, and
further
reduced by thirty minutes when the service crews
hurriedly
prepare the train for an early departure.
By
the time Foleyet is reached, the train is
seventeen
minutes ahead of schedule and would have
been
in Toronto early, had the lengthy boarding at
Sudbury
Junction not delayed the train.
Indeed,
the very nature of railway employment
had
a military imperative from its beginning. The first rule
in
the 1859 employees’ handbook for the Nova Scotia
R
ailway declared:
“Each person employed in the railway service is
to
devote himself exclusively to that service, attending
during
the prescribed hours of the day or night, and
residing
wherever he may be required by those in
authority
over him.”
The
Canadian Rail Operating Rules (CROR)
today
open with the terse general notice:
“Safety
and a willingness to obey the rules are of
the
first importance in the performance of duty.”
As
The Ocean dashes along the coast of
Northern
New Brunswick, Andrew stares out of the
window.
For now he doesn’t have to be a soldier, just a kid
on
his way home for Christmas. Andrew’s
trip is purely peaceful. A qualified
commercial
pilot, he could have flown himself. Spurred
by
his love of the railway, and even though an airplane
might
deliver him home within a day, he takes the four-
day
ride from Winnipeg aboard The Canadian to Toronto,
and
The Ocean from Montreal to Halifax, because he
wants
to experience the journey.
S
leeper accommodation isn’t in a private
soldier’s
budget, so he will spend the entire trip in his
coach
seat, sleeping when fatigue makes it impossible to
stay
awake, but otherwise drinking in all the scenery the
windows
have to offer.
He
also wanted to avoid any possibility of a
weather
delay. As a meteorological technician he knows a
sudden
change in temperature, humidity and wind speed
can
ground a jet aircraft without much notice, but the
train
will battle the snow at ground level, and invariably
win,
so he avoids having long unexpected layovers in
T
oronto or Montreal (since there are few direct flights
from
Winnipeg to Halifax).
H
e also avoids the fate of twenty-three
passengers of a Greyhound bus rescued in the wee small

hours of the morning by The Canadian, after being
unceremoniously
dumped by the bus company in bad
weather
at Sudbury Junction, Ontario.
R
ailways are in his blood. His maternal great
grandfather
was a conductor aboard the first Canadian
National
Railway trains between Halifax and Moncton;
his
paternal grand uncles were signal men on the London
North
Eastern Railway (LNER) — the route of the
famed
Flying Scotsman — in Leicestershire, England.
F
rom Winnipeg to Toronto, Andrew has already
seen
that there is something almost military about the way
in
which a train is managed; from the calculated time
table,
to the routine re-supply at key stations. As soon as
the
train comes to a halt, baggage handlers move to the
cars
to load and unload, and other staff deploy to the
dining
cars to re-supply the kitchen and the lounge car.
All
the while the Onboard Services Staff — in Soldiers
from Quebec prepare to
l
eave Montreal aboard an
Intrecolonial
train as the railway
took
troops to Halifax at the
height
of the U-Boat Scare in
the
Gulf of St. Lawrence in the
First
World War. The Intercolonial
had
been built with a military
imperative,
but that had seen to
send
troops westward to defend
the
colonial possessions, not
e
astward to defend the
homeland!
Library & Archives Canada.
Des
soldats se préparent à quitter Montréal à bord d’un train de l’Intercolonial qui les amènera à Halifax. Ces troupes s’opposeront
à
la menace des U-boat présents dans le golfe du Saint-Laurent pendant la Première Guerre mondiale. La construction de
l’Intercolonial
avait été conçue pour l’envoi de troupes militaires vers l’ouest afin de défendre les territoires de la colonie et non pas
pour
défendre la patrie à l’est.
107CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010by Cor van Steenis Canadian P
acific Railway’s
Heavyweight Business
Car FleetThe
Canadian Pacific Railway has done a
masterful
job of preserving, restoring and operating a
fleet
of heavyweight heritage business cars, some of which
are
approaching the century mark since they were built.
When
one sees these cars today in the consist of the
‘R
oyal Canadian Pacific’ along the Bow River at Morant’s
Curve
near Lake Louise, Alberta, it harkens back to the
days
when CP’s crack transcontinental passenger train,
‘The
Dominion’, travelled through that location behind
the
tuscan and gray F-units of the early 1950’s. All photos by the author unless
credited otherwiseP
ar Cor van SteenisP
arc des voitures
de fonctionL
e Canadien Pacifique a accompli un
magnifique
travail de préservation, de restauration et
d
’exploitation d’un parc de voitures de fonction
patrimoniales,
dont certaines presque centenaires. Voir
de
nos jours ces voitures sur le convoi du Royal Canadian
P
acific le long de la rivière Bow à la courbe Morant près
du
lac Louise, en Alberta, nous ramène au temps où le
CPR
exploitait son train transcontinental, le Dominion,
tiré
par des locomotives grises et rouge toscan du début
des
années 1950. Sauf avis contraire, toutes les
photos sont de l’auteurThe
‘Royal Canadian Pacific’ eastbound CPR Train 11B with CPR 4106, 3084, 4107 and 10 cars at Morant’s
Curve,
Alberta, Mile 113 of the Laggan Subdivision on August 4, 2009.
Le
train Royal Canadian Pacific no 11B du CPR de 10 voitures tirées par les locomotives no 4106, 3084 et 4107
en
direction est dans la courbe Morant à la borne 113 de la subdivision Laggan, Alberta, en ce 4 août 2009.These
cars are used today on the ‘Royal
C
anadian Pacific’ for its summer Rockies tours,
occasional
excursions to Eastern Canada, the annual
CPR
Holiday Trains as well as special assignments such as
the
‘Spiral Tunnels Centennial Special’ in September of
2009. Ces
voitures sont utilisées aujourd’hui sur le
train
Royal Canadian Pacific pour des excursions en été
dans
les Rocheuses ou parfois dans l’est du Canada, ou
encore,
sur le train du temps des Fêtes du CPR ou pour
des
occasions spéciales tel le centenaire des tunnels en
spirale
en septembre 2009.T
raduit par Denis Vallières
108CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010The
‘Royal Canadian Pacific’ with CP
4106,
3084, 4107 and 10 cars
crosses
the 1,200 foot long bridge
(built 1911) over the Little Bow River

at Carmangay, Alberta, Mile 30.5 of
the
Aldersyde Subdivision on July
31,
2009.
Le
Royal Canadian Pacific, constitué
des
locomotives du CP nos 4106,
3084
et 4107 à la tête de 10 voitures,
traverse
le pont de 1200 pieds (365,8
mètres)
au-dessus de la Petite rivière
Bow
à Carmangay, Alberta, à la borne
30.5
de la subdivision Aldersyde en
ce
31 juillet 2009.CPR
9815 is on the point while
Business
Car # 77 Van Horne
brings
up the tail of CPR Business
T
rain 40B-13 with 10 cars en-route
from
Calgary to Montreal one mile
east
of Gleichen, Alberta, Mile 123 of
t
he Brooks Subdivision on
November
13, 2009.
La
locomotive du CPR no 9815 est
en
tête du train 40B-13 et suivie de
10
voitures, dont la voiture de
fonction
Van Horne no 77 en queue.
L
e convoi, en provenance de
Calgary
et en route vers Montréal,
est
à 1 mille (1,6 kilomètre) à l’est de
Gleichen,
Alberta, à la borne 123 de
la
subdivision Brooks en ce 13
novembre
2009.CPR
Train No. 41B-14, returning
from
a Calgary-Toronto charter, with
FP9A
#4107 leading FP9A #4106
and
10 business cars at Indus,
Alberta,
Mile 158 of the Brooks
Subdivision
on October 18, 2008.
Le
train du CPR no 41B-14, de retour
d’un
voyage nolisé Calgary-Toronto.
Il
est constitué des locomotives
FP9A
nos 4107 et 4106 ainsi que de
10
voitures de fonction, à Indus,
A
lberta, à la borne 158 de la
subdivision
Brooks en ce 18 octobre
2008.
109RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
CPR
Train 25B-05, the Spiral Tunnels
Centennial
Special, with CP 4106,
3084,
4107 plus 12 cars, climbs the
grade
on the north track to the Great
Divide
west of Lake Louise, Mile 118
o
f the Laggan Subdivision on
September
5, 2009.
Le
train du CPR no 25B-05, le Spiral
T
unnels Centennial Special,
constitué
des locomotives du CP nos
4106,
3084 et 4107 ainsi que de 12
voitures,
s’engage dans la pente sur
la
voie nord de la Grande Division à
l’ouest du lac Louise, à la borne 118

de la subdivision Laggan, en ce 5
septembre
2009.continued on page 119W
ith the relocation of CPR Business Car No. 83,
LA
COMBE, from Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan to Calgary,
Alberta
in late October 2009, all of CPR’s active duty and
stored
heavyweight business bars are now based in
Calgary.
The cars are:À
la suite du transfert de la voiture de fonction
L
acombe no 83 du CPR de Moose Jaw en Saskatchewan
vers
Calgary en Alberta, à la fin d’octobre 2009, toutes les
voitures
du CPR actives ou entreposées se trouvent
maintenant
à Calgary. Ces voitures sont : 70
ASSINIBOINE 1929Business Car
71
KILLARNEY 1916Business Car (used as crew car)
73
MOUNT ROYAL 1927Business Car (used as crew car)
74
MOUNT STEPHEN 1926Business Car (used as observation day car)
76
SHAUGHNESSY 1917Business Car (not in use)
77
VAN HORNE 1927Business Car
78
ROYAL WENTWORTH 1926Business Car
79
N.R. CRUMP 1930Stateroom Car
82
STRATHCONA 1927Business Car
83
LACOMBE 1921Business Car (not in use)
84
BANFFSHIRE 1926Stateroom Car
85
CRAIGELLACHIE 1931Dining Car
The
following heavyweight official car, currently numbered for work train service as 411752, is still on CPR’s inactive
(stored)
roster but future plans for retention, restoration or disposition of this car are unknown:
21
RIVER FORTH 1929Buffet Solarium Lounge C
AR NO.C
AR NAME BUIL
TTYPE
110RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
Stan’s Photo GalleryLes photos de StanMay – June, 2010
By Stan Smaill
F
rench Version, Michel LortieMai – Juin 2010
P
ar Stan Smaill
V
ersion française : Michel LortieCNR
Folder notes:
In
a publicity folder from 1955 intended for the
British
passenger market, the back cover lists the
passenger
trains available as the transportation means to
travel
Canada. Among the trains mentioned, the Atlantic
Canada
services include the “Ocean Limited”. The photo
shows
CNR FP9 6500 and F9B 6600 in a publicity pose
back
in October 1954. This photo was taken in the
Montreal
area. Engines 6500 and 6600 hauled the first
dieselized
“Ocean Limited” from Montreal to Halifax on
October
5, 1954. Eventually, passenger diesels of Alco
design
would become the usual motive power on all CNR
Maritime
trains until the arrival of the GMD F40’s in
1986.Notes
sur une publicité du CN :
Dans
un feuillet publicitaire datant de 1955 et
destiné
au public voyageur de Grande-Bretagne, on peut
voir
une liste des différents trains disponibles pour
voyager
partout au Canada. On y trouve, entre autres, le
nom
de l’Océan Limitée, illustré par une photo prise en
1954
montrant la FP9 6500 et la F9B 6600. Cette photo
avait
été prise dans la région de Montréal. Les deux
locomotives
avaient tracté le premier convoi de ce train
confié
à des diésels le 5 octobre 1954. Par la suite, les
diésels de marque Alco eurent le monopole en direction

des Maritimes et ce, jusquà l’arrivée des GMD F40 en
1986.

119CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010Continued from page 109
CPR
Business Car assignments
It
is perhaps appropriate to explain the
different
terminologies used for these non-revenue
passenger
cars. In North America several terms were
used
such as Business Cars, Office Cars, Official
Cars.
Private Cars. etc. Canadian Pacific had a
specific
pair of definitions. Cars used for Company
purposes
were Business Cars. Cars owned by
individuals
or corporations were Private Cars. Thus,
the
CPR Business Car Shaughnessy was the Private
Car
Cromarty when owned by J.K.L Ross.
The
CPR included in its Business Car fleet
not
only cars assigned to Superintendents, General
Superintendents
and more senior officers, but also
cars
designed for specific purposes such as Air Brake
I
nstruction Cars, Mechanical Instruction Cars,
Medical
Cars, Rules Instruction Cars, etc. When I
joined
the Company in 1947 there were 93 such cars
on
the roster.
Each
President of the Canadian Pacific
R
ailway had his choice of Business Car for use during
his
tenure, cars were assigned as follows:
L
ord Mount StephenMatapedia
Sir
William Van HorneSaskatchewan
L
ord ShaughnessyKillarney
Sir
Edward BeattyThorold
D’Alton
C. ColemanMount Royal
W
illiam A. NealCraigellachie
W
illiam A. MatherAssiniboine
Norris
R. CrumpLaurentian
Ian
D. SinclairAny available car
F
rederick S. BurbidgeAny available car
W
illiam S. Stinson Any available car
R
ussel S. AllisonAssiniboine
Information
courtesy Ronald S. RitchieAssignation
des voitures de fonction du CPR
Il
est approprié, je crois, d’expliquer la
terminologie
liée à ces voitures de passagers. En
Amérique
du Nord, plusieurs termes furent utilisés
tels
que voiture de fonction, voiture officielle, voiture
privée,
etc. Le Canadien Pacifique a retenu voiture de
fonction
pour celles utilisées par la compagnie et
voiture
privée pour celles qui appartiennent à des
individus
ou à des corporations. Ainsi, la voiture de
fonction
Shaughnessy du CPR était la voiture privée
Cromarty
appartenant à J.K.L.Ross.
L
e CPR a inclus dans son parc de voitures de
fonction
non seulement celles qui furent assignées aux
superintendants,
superintendants en chef et cadres
supérieurs,
mais aussi celles qu’on affecta à des tâches
particulières
: voitures d’instructions pour les freins à
air,
la mécanique ou les règlements, voitures pour
soins
médicaux, etc. Lorsque j’ai joint la compagnie
en
1947, il y avait plus de 93 voitures dans ce parc.
Chaque
président du Canadien Pacifique a
eu
le loisir de choisir sa voiture de fonction pendant
son
mandat. Ces voitures furent assignées ainsi :
L
ord Mount StephenMatapédia
Sir
William Van HorneSaskatchewan
L
ord ShaughnessyKillarney
Sir
Edward BeattyThorold
D’Alton
C. ColemanMount Royal
W
illiam A. NealCraigellachie
W
illiam A. MatherAssiniboine
Norris
R. CrumpLaurentian
Ian
D. Sinclairtoute voiture disponible
F
rederick S. Burbidgetoute voiture disponible
W
illiam S. Stinsontoute voiture disponible
R
ussel S. AllisonAssiniboine
Source
: offert par Ronald S. RitchieNine
of these cars (plus Generator Car # 95),
which
are used in the consist of the ‘Royal Canadian
P
acific’, are housed today on two tracks in the ‘Great
Hall’
adjacent to the CPR’s ‘Pavilion’ in downtown
C
algary. The three other cars (ASSINIBOINE,
LA
COMBE, and SHAUGHNESSY) are kept in the
compound
at Ogden Yard, Calgary, that houses the
CPR
’s 4-6-4 Hudson ‘The Empress’ and its consist.Neuf
de ces voitures et le wagon de groupe
électrogène
no 95, utilisés sur le convoi du Royal
Canadian
Pacific, sont entreposés actuellement sur deux
voies
dans le grand hall adjacent au Pavillon du CPR au
centre-ville
de Calgary. Les trois autres voitures,
l
’ASSINIBOINE, la LACOMBE et la
S
HAUGHNESSY, sont au complexe ferroviaire
d’Ogden
à Calgary, tout comme la Hudson 4-6-4 du CPR,
l’Empress
et ses voitures.
120RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
The
west wing of the CPR
P
avilion in Calgary, (the 152
meter
long Great Hall), which
houses
the 10 heritage cars of
the
Royal Canadian Pacific
when
it is in Calgary. The
photo
was taken on July 14,
2009.
L’aile
ouest du Pavillon CPR à
Calgary
(le grand hall de 152
mètres
de long) qui abrite les
10
voitures d’époque du Royal
C
anadian Pacific lorsque
celui-ci
est à Calgary. La
photo
fut prise le 14 juillet
2009.Opened
on 14 February 2000,
t
he 12 meter high glass
rotunda
of the CPR Pavilion
crosses
over 1st Street at 9th
A
ve. SW, Calgary, Alberta.
The
Palliser Hotel is on the left
and
Royal Canadian Pacific
O
ffice the right. The
photograph
was taken on July
14,
2009.
La
rotonde de verre de 12
mètres
de hauteur du Pavillon
CPR
au-dessus de la 1re Rue
près
de la 9e Avenue SW à
Calgary
, Alberta, a été ouverte
le
14 février 2000. L’hôtel
P
alliser est à gauche et le
bureau
du Royal Canadian
P
acific à droite. La photo fut
prise
le 14 juillet 2009.VOITURE
DE FONCTION ASSINIBOINE NO 70 : L’Assiniboine
fut
construite par le Canadien Pacifique en 1929 et mise à la
disposition
des cadres supérieurs ou utilisée pour des
événements
spéciaux. Nous l’apercevons ici sur le train
Spirit
of 150 à Ogden, Calgary, Alberta, le 27 septembre 2008.
L’Assiniboine
fut la voiture de queue du voyage inaugural de
la
locomotive restaurée, la Hudson H1b no 2816 du CPR, de
V
ancouver à Calgary en septembre 2003. La voiture porte le
nom
de la tribu Assiniboine des Prairies de l’Ouest.The
history of each of the cars follows (except as
noted,
all images are taken in the consist of the ‘Royal
Canadian
Pacific’ at Banff, AB., on July 31, 2008):Ci-dessous,
historique des voitures de passagers;
sauf
indication contraire, les voitures illustrées sont celles
du
Royal Canadian Pacific garées à Banff, Alberta, le 31
juillet
2008.CPR
BUSINESS CAR # 70 ASSINIBOINE: built by Canadian Pacific in December 1929 as ASSINIBOINE, this business car is used
mainly
in executive service and on special event trains; shown here in the Spirit of 150 consist at Ogden, Calgary, AB., on
September
27, 2008. The ASSINIBOINE was the tail end car on the inaugural run of the CPR’s restored 4-6-4 Hudson H1b #2816
from
Vancouver to Calgary in September 2003. The car is named after the Assiniboine Tribe of the western prairies.
121CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010C
PR BUSINESS CAR # 71
KILLARNEY
: built in 1916 by Pullman
as
Florida East Coast WHITEHALL,
acquired
by CPR in February 1918 and
named
KILLARNEY, the second car to
c
arry that name. The car today
features
four rooms for the ‘Royal
Canadian
Pacific’ train service crew.
VOITURE
DE FONCTION KILLARNEY
NO
71 : Elle fut construite en 1916 par
P
ullman et nommée WHITEHALL pour
le
Florida East Coast, puis acquise par
le
CPR en février 1918 et renommée
KILLARNEY
, la deuxième à porter ce
nom.
La voiture abrite actuellement
quatre
chambres pour le personnel de
bord
du Royal Canadian Pacific.CPR
BUSINESS CAR # 73 MOUNT ROYAL: built in October 1927 by Canadian Pacific as MOUNT ROYAL, became the ONTARIO
in
October 1969, renamed MOUNT ROYAL again in 1989. In the 1990s the car carried the initials ‘StL&H’ (for St. Lawrence and
Hudson
Railway, a CPR subsidiary) on the letterboard. The MOUNT ROYAL is used today as a service crew car for ‘Royal
Canadian
Pacific’ staff. The MOUNT ROYAL was in the consist on the inaugural run of the CPR’s restored 4-6-4 Hudson H1b
#2816
from Vancouver to Calgary in September 2003.VOITURE
DE FONCTION MOUNT ROYAL NO 73 :
Construite
en octobre 1927 par le Canadien
P
acifique, elle fut renommée ONTARIO en
octobre 1969 pour redevenir MOUNT ROY
AL en
1989.
En 1990, les initiales ST&H (St.Lawrence
and
Hudson Railway, une filiale du CPR) furent
ajoutées
au nom. La Mount Royal est réservée
de
nos jours au personnel du bord du Royal
Canadian
Pacific. Elle fut utilisée pour le voyage
inaugural
de la locomotive restaurée, la Hudson
H1b
no 2816 du CPR, de Vancouver à Calgary en
septembre
2003.CPR
BUSINESS CAR # 74 MOUNT STEPHEN: built in December 1926 by Canadian Pacific at their Angus Shops in Montreal as
the
CPR Directors’ Day Car MOUNT STEPHEN; the name has remained to this day. This car was used by the Prince of Wales (the
future
King Edward VIII) on a visit to his private Bedingfield Ranch near Pekisko, Alberta in 1927. This car was also in the consist of
the
1939 Royal Train for the Canadian tour of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. The car is named after Sir George Stephen, first
President
of the CPR (1881-1888). The MOUNT STEPHEN is today used as an observation day car and contains a dining room
that
seats 14 persons.VOITURE
DE FONCTION MOUNT STEPHEN NO 74 :
Construite
en décembre 1926 aux ateliers Angus à
Montréal
pour les directeurs du CPR, la Mount
S
tephen a gardé son nom d’origine jusqu’à
aujourd’hui.
Cette voiture fut utilisée par le prince de
Galles
(futur roi Édouard VII) lors d’une visite à son
ranch
privé de Bedingfield près de Pekisto, en Alberta,
en
1927. La voiture fit aussi partie du train royal de
1939
lors de la tournée canadienne du roi George VI et
de
la reine Elizabeth. Elle fut nommée d’après George
Stephen,
premier président du CPR (1881-1888). Elle
est
utilisée de nos jours comme voiture d’observation
et
elle comprend une salle à dîner de 14 places.
122RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
CPR
BUSINESS CAR # 76 SHAUGHNESSY: built in 1917 by Pullman and Canadian Pacific as the private car CROMARTY for J.K.L
Ross,
a Director of the CPR. This private car was also used in the 1919 Royal Train for the tour of Canada by the Prince of Wales
(future
King Edward VIII). It was acquired by CPR in 1921 and renamed HOCHELAGA. It was named THOROLD in 1924 marking
the
second time that this name was used on a CPR business car. Lastly it was named SHAUGHNESSY in 1967 after Thomas
George
Shaughnessy, third CPR President (1899-1918) and Chairman of the CPR Board (1918-1923). The car is not in active use.
In
August 2008 it was moved from Alyth Yard in Calgary, where it had been stored for a number of years, to Ogden Yard in Calgary
where
it was photographed on August 31, 2008. It appears that extensive restoration work would be needed to make it
operational.
VOITURE
DE FONCTION SHAUGHNESSY NO 76 : Portant le nom de CROMARTY à l’origine, cette voiture fut construite en 1917 par
P
ullman et le Canadien Pacifique pour servir de voiture privée pour J.K.L. Ross, un directeur du CPR. Elle fut utilisée aussi sur le
train
royal lors de la tournée canadienne du prince de Galles (futur roi George VIII). Elle fut acquise par le CPR en 1921 et renommée
HOCHELAGA
, puis THOROLD en 1924, deuxième voiture à porter ce nom pour une voiture de fonction. Enfin, elle prit le nom de
SHAUGHNES
SY en 1967 d’après Thomas George Shaughnessy, troisième président du CPR (1899-1918) et président du conseil
d’administration
du CPR
(1918-1923).
La voiture
n’est
plus utilisée. Elle fut
déplacée
en août 2008 de
la
cour Alyth, à Calgary, où
e
lle était entreposée
depuis
plusieurs années,
v
ers la cour Ogden
également
à Calgary Elle
y
fut photographiée le 31
août
de la même année. Il
semble
que d’importants
t
ravaux de restauration
soient
nécessaires pour la
remettre
en état de rouler. CPR
BUSINESS CAR # 77 VAN HORNE: built in May 1927 by Canadian Pacific the car has carried this name since it was built. As
General Manager of the CPR from 1882, W
illiam Cornelius Van Horne oversaw the construction of the transcontinental line; he
was
President of the CPR from 1888-1899; Chairman of the CPR Board from 1899-1910. The car features a lounge area, a dining
area,
two twin staterooms and an open observation vestibule. VOITURE
DE FONCTION
V
AN HORNE NO 77 :
Construite
en mai 1927 par
le
Canadien Pacifique, la
v
oiture porte son nom
d
’origine. William
Cornelius
Van Horne fut le
directeur
général du CPR
dès
1882, au moment de la
construction
de la ligne
t
ranscontinentale, puis il
présida
la compagnie de
1888
à 1899. Il fut ensuite
p
résident du conseil
d’administration
de 1899 à
1910.
La voiture comporte
un
salon, une salle à dîner,
d
eux compartiments
jumelés
et une plateforme
d’observation
ouverte.
123CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010CPR
BUSINESS CAR # 78 ROYAL WENTWORTH: built in August 1926 by Canadian Pacific’s Angus Shops in Montreal as
WENTWORTH; named after Edward W
entworth Beatty, CPR President from 1918-1943. This car was in the consist of the 1939
Royal
Train for the Canadian tour of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. It was renamed in 1999 to ROYAL WENTWORTH to
mark
60th anniversary of its service on the 1939 Royal Train. The car features a lounge area, a 12 seat dining area, two twin
staterooms
and an open observation vestibule.
VOITURE
DE FONCTION
ROY
AL WENTWORTH NO
78
: À l’origine baptisée
W
ENTWORTH, du nom
d
’Edward Wentworth
Beatty
, président du CPR
de
1918 à 1943, cette
voiture
fut construite en
août
1926 dans les ateliers
A
ngus du Canadien
P
acifique à Montréal. Elle
fit partie du train royal lors

de la tournée canadienne
du
roi George VI et de la
reine
Elizabeth en 1939.
Elle
fut renommée ROYAL
W
ENTWORTH en 1999
pour
commémorer le 60e
a
nniversaire de son
service
sur le train royal de
1
939. La voiture
comprend
un salon, une
salle
à dîner de 12 places,
d
eux compartiments
jumelés
et une plateforme d’observation ouverte.CPR
STATEROOM CAR # 79 N.R. CRUMP: built in 1930 by the Canadian Car & Foundry and Canadian Pacific as CPR Parlour Car
#6758;
converted in 1967 to Instruction Car #53; then CPR Safety Car #1; converted in 2000 to Stateroom Car N.R. CRUMP. It is
named
for Norris Roy Crump, CPR President 1955-1964 and Chairman of the CPR Board 1961-1972. The car features four twin
and
two single guest rooms.
VOITURE
DE LUXE N.R. CRUMP NO 79 : Construite en 1930 par la Canadian Car & Foundry et le Canadien Pacifique, elle fut
d’abord
la voiture-salon no 6758, puis elle a été convertie en 1967 en voiture d’instructions, la no 53. Elle devint plus tard la voiture
de
sécurité no 1 et
e
nfin la voiture à
c
ompartiments de
luxe
N.R. CRUMP. Ce
nom
évoque Norris
R
oy Crump,
président
du CPR de
1
955 à 1964 et
président
du conseil
d’administration
de la
compagnie
de 1961
à
1972. La voiture
c
omporte quatre
chambres
doubles et
d
eux chambres
simples.
CPR
BUSINESS CAR # 83 LACOMBE: Built in Aug 1921 by the Canadian Car & Foundry and CPR Angus Shop in Montreal as 10-
Compartment
Sleeper GLEN ROY and rebuilt in April 1943 as Business Car LACOMBE. It was photographed at Walkley Yard in
Ottawa,
ON. on September 8, 1997 by Raymond S. Farand used with permission. Note the ‘CP Rail’ logo on the letterboard. The
car
is named after Father Albert Lacombe, Oblate priest, who negotiated a right-of-way for the railway through Blackfoot lands in
Alberta
in 1883 with Chief Crowfoot. The car is not in use today. As of October 29, 2009, it is stored at Ogden Yard in Calgary.
V
OITURE DE FONCTION
L
ACOMBE NO 83 : Voiture
construite
en août 1921 par la
CC&F
et les ateliers Angus du CPR
de
Montréal. Portant le nom de
G
LEN ROY à l’origine, cette
voiture-lits
de 10 compartiments a
é
té convertie en voiture de
fonction
en 1943 et renommée
LACOMBE
. La photo fut prise à la
cour
Walkley à Ottawa, Ontario, le
8
septembre 1997 par Raymond S.
F
arand. À noter, le logo CP RAIL
au-dessus
des fenêtres. Son nom
f
ait référence au père Albert
Lacombe,
le prêtre oblat qui a
négocié
en 1883 avec le chef
amérindien
Crowfoot le droit de
passage
du chemin de fer au
travers
des terres des Pieds-Noirs.
Depuis
le 29 octobre 2009, la
voiture
est entreposée à la cour
Ogden
de Calgary.124RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
CPR
BUSINESS CAR # 82 STRATHCONA: built in 1927 by CPR’s Angus shops in Montreal and painted Pullman green as
T
oronto, Hamilton & Buffalo Railway’s HAMILTON. In 1950 it was sold to CPR and named KINGSMERE. In 1972 it was renamed
STRA
THCONA. The car is named after the CPR financier and director Donald Smith, later Lord Strathcona; he drove the last spike
in
the transcontinental railway at Craigellachie on November 7, 1885. The car features a lounge area, a dining area, two double
and
two single guest staterooms and an open observation vestibule. The car is regularly used in the consist of the ‘Royal
Canadian
Pacific’ and has also been seen in the consist of CP 2816, the ‘EMPRESS’. It was photographed at Ogden Yard, Calgary
in
May 2008.
VOITURE
DE FONCTION STRATHCONA NO 82 : Cette voiture fut construite en 1927 par les ateliers Angus de Montréal et peinte
avec
le vert caractéristique de Pullman. Elle reçut le nom d’HAMILTON pour le Toronto, Hamilton & Buffalo Railway. En 1950, elle
fut
vendue au CPR et renommée KINGSMERE. En 1972, elle prit le nom de STRATHCONA d’après Donald Smith, Lord Strathcona,
c
elui qui enfonça le
d
ernier crampon du
t
ranscontinental à
C
raigellachie le 7
n
ovembre 1885. La
v
oiture comprend un
salon,
une salle à dîner,
deux
chambres doubles
et
une chambre simple en
p
lus d’une plateforme
observatoire.
Elle est
r
égulièrement utilisée
pour
le Royal Canadian
P
acific et fit partie de
l’Empress
tiré par la 2816
du CP
. La photo fut prise
à
la cour Ogden de
Calgary
en mai 2008.
125CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010CPR
STATEROOM CAR # 84 BANFFSHIRE: built in 1926 by National Steel Car and CPR as CPR 14-section Tourist Sleeper
#6232.
In 1951 it was named GOLDEN. Converted in 1961 to Work Service as Cook-Diner-Sleeper #10232 and later renumbered
#411316.
In 2003, it was converted to STATEROOM CAR #84 BANFFSHIRE. The Banffshire is named after the Scottish birthplace
of
two of the original investors in the CPR syndicate: George Stephen and Donald Smith. The car has six guest rooms.
VOITURE
DE LUXE BANFFSHIRE NO 84 : Cette voiture construite en 1926 par la National Steel Car et le CPR était à l’origine la
voiture-lits no 6232 de classe touriste comprenant 14 compartiments.
En 1951, on la renomma GOLDEN. Elle fut convertie en
1961
en voiture cuisine/salle-à-dîner/lits no 10232 pour le service d’entretien et renumérotée plus tard 411316. En 2003, elle fut
c
onvertie en
v
oiture de luxe
c
omprenant six
c
hambres et
r
enommée
B
ANFFSHIRE no
8
4. Ce nom
renvoie
à la localité
écossaise
où sont
n
és deux des
i
nvestisseurs à
l
’origine de la
fondation
du CPR :
George
Stephen et
Donald
Smith.CPR
DINING CAR # 85 CRAIGELLACHIE: built in 1931 by CC&F and CPR as CPR 14-section Tourist Sleeper #6243. In 1951, it
was
named GREELY . Converted in 1966 to Work Service as Diner #10241and later renumbered #411687 when assigned to the
Calgary
Auxiliary. In 2003 became DINING CAR 85 CRAIGELLACHIE. The CPR named the location of the driving of the last spike
‘Craigellachie’,
in B.C after the village of Craigellachie in the former County of Banffshire in Moray, Scotland. This was the ancestral
home
of Sir George Stephen, an original investor and the first president of the Canadian Pacific Railway. The car seats 32 guests
for
dining.
VOITURE
-RESTAURANT CRAIGELLACHIE NO 85 : Cette voiture, à l’origine la voiture-lits de classe touriste de 14 compartiments no
6243,
fut construite en 1931 par la CC&F et le CPR. En 1951, on la renomma GREELY. Elle fut convertie en 1966 en voiture-salle à
dîner
(no 10241) pour le
service
d’entretien et porta le
no
411687 lorsqu’elle fut
a
ffectée au secteur de
Calgary
. En 2003, elle devint
l
a voiture-restaurant
CRAIGELLACHIE
no 85. Le
CPR
a nommé Craigellachie
l
’endroit en Colombie-
Britannique
où a été enfoncé
le
dernier crampon. Le nom
renvoie
à un village du comté
de
Banffshire dans le Moray,
en
Écosse, lieu d’origine de
George
Stephen, un des
investisseurs
d’origine du
Canadien
Pacifique et son
premier
président. Cette
v
oiture peut recevoir 32
personnes
pour un repas.
126RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
The
most recent excursion undertaken by the
heritage
cars was to carry the Olympic Torch on the railing
of
the observation deck of the MOUNT STEPHEN from
R
evelstoke to Craigellachie, British Columbia. The
‘Olympic
Express’ departed Calgary on 26 January 2010
and
arrived in Vancouver on January 27, 2010 where it
remained
in the downtown Vancouver Yard as a
hospitality
centre for Canadian Pacific for the duration of
the
Olympics. Photos of this move appear in this month’s
Photo
Gallery.
A
special treat is in store for all rail history
aficionados
later in 2010: the Canadian Pacific’s heritage
business
cars are slated to run behind CPR’s restored
steam
engine ‘The Empress’, CPR Hudson H1b # 2816,
on
three runs in September and October from Calgary to
V
ancouver and return; the train will be named the ‘Royal
P
acific Express’; harkening back to the day in 1886 when
the
first transcontinental passenger train, Canadian
P
acific’s ‘Pacific Express’ ran from Montreal’s Dalhousie
Square
Station to Port Moody, B.C., in seven days. This is
bound
to be a spectacular event to behold – a tribute to
Canadian
Pacific and its staff!
R
eferences:

Canadian Trackside Guide

Canadian National in the East, Volume One, J.
Norman
Lowe, BRMNA, 1981

http://www.royalcanadianpacific.com/index.html

http://www.railfame.ca/sec_main/en_default.asp

http://thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index

http://www.railways.incanada.net/circle/
R
oyal_Trains.htmlL
’excursion la plus récente entreprise avec ces
v
oitures patrimoniales? Le transport du flambeau
olympique
sur la plateforme d’observation du MOUNT
STEPHEN
de Revelstoke à Craigellachie en Colombie-
Britannique.
L’Express olympique partit de Calgary le 26
janvier
2010 et arriva à Vancouver le lendemain, où il
demeura
dans la cour ferroviaire du centre-ville pour
servir
de centre d’accueil du Canadien Pacifique pendant
les
Jeux olympiques. Des photos de cet événement font
partie
des Photos de Stan de la présente édition.
D’autres
événements s’ajouteront plus tard dans
l’année.
En effet, ces voitures de fonction du Canadien
P
acifique participeront à trois excursions en septembre et
o
ctobre entre Calgary et Vancouver derrière la
locomotive
à vapeur Empress, la Hudson H1b no 2816 du
CPR.
Le train portera le nom de Royal Pacific Express,
évoquant
le premier voyage transcontinental du Pacific
Express
du Canadien Pacifique en 1886 entre la gare de la
p
lace Dalhousie de Montréal et Port Moody en
Colombie-Britannique,
voyage qui dura sept jours. Ce
seront
des événements inoubliables en hommage au
Canadien
Pacifique et à son personnel!
Sources
:

Canadian Trackside Guide

Canadian National in the East, Volume One, J.
Norman
Lowe, BRMNA, 1981

http://www.royalcanadianpacific.com/index.html

http://www.railfame.ca/sec_main/en_default.asp

http://thecanadianencyclopedia.com/index

http://www.railways.incanada.net/circle/
R
oyal_Trains.htmlThe
Dominion, CPRs tuscan red
trans
Canada train rounding a
curve
eastbound along the Bow
River
west of Massive, Alberta in
1952.
Nicholas Morant, CPR
Archives.
L
e /Dominion/, un train
t
ranscontinental canadien du
C
PR dans sa livrée rouge
toscan,
amorce une courbe en
direction
est, le long de la rivière
Bow
, à l’ouest de Massive,
A
lberta en 1952. Nicholas
Morant,
Archives du CPR.
127CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010Olympic Rails
in V
ancouverThe
Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympic Games
touched
just about every aspect of life in the Vancouver –
Whistler,
B.C., area, and the railways were no exception.
F
rom special security rules to special trains to some
embargoes
in highly secured places, it was not business as
usual.
Here are just a few of the interesting highlights as
observed
during the lead-up to the games and during
F
ebruary 2010, when the games were held. The Games
were
a very special time for Vancouver and for Canada.
P
aving of the CN mainline at Porteau, B.C.
One
of the commitments made by the Province
of
B.C. to the International Olympic Committee was the
u
pgrade of Highway 99, between Vancouver and
Whistler,
to at least three lanes. A major upgrade of the
highway
cost nearly $1 billion, and accomplished this
requirement
with one short exception – a stretch of just
under
1 km at Porteau, B.C. Here the highway hugs a
towering
rock wall on the east side with the railway on the
west
side against both the highway and the ocean.
The
solution was to pave about 800 meters of
track,
making the railbed into a temporary roadbed.
During
the Games, the paved over portion of the rail line
was
used for an extra lane of highway traffic, except when
trains
passed. Trains had priority and access to the track
was
patrolled at both ends 24 hours a day. When a train
came,
barriers were manually moved, opening the tracks
for
the train; following passage, they were moved back re-
opening
for highway traffic. Les chemins de fer
olympiques de V
ancouverP
ar Don Evans
T
raduit par Denis VallièresW
est Coast Railway Association’s
Royal
Hudson #2860 train had a
chance
to try this out, pictured
h
ere on January 16, 2010
southbound
for Vancouver. Ken
Storey
.
Le
16 janvier 2010, la locomotive
R
oyal Hudson no 2860 de
l’Association
West Coast Railway,
en
direction sud vers Vancouver,
expérimente
le passage de cet
endroit
inusité. Ken Storey.L
es Jeux olympiques de Vancouver ont touché à
plusieurs
aspects de la vie dans les villes de Vancouver et
de
Whistler en Colombie-Britannique, et le secteur
ferroviaire
ne fut pas en reste. Des règles de sécurité
exceptionnelles,
des trains spéciaux et l’accès limité aux
endroits
désignés à haute sécurité perturbèrent les
affaires
usuelles. Voici quelques faits intéressants
observés
en février 2010 pendant les temps forts des Jeux,
l
esquels constituèrent un moment privilégié pour
V
ancouver et pour l’ensemble du Canada.
L
e pavage de la voie principale du CN à
P
orteau, C.-B.
U
n des engagements de la Colombie-
Britannique
envers le Comité international olympique fut
d’améliorer
l’autoroute 99 reliant Vancouver et Whistler,
en
y ajoutant au moins une troisième voie de circulation.
Ces
travaux majeurs se chiffrèrent à près d’un milliard de
dollars
et respectèrent l’engagement, à l’exception d’un
tronçon
de moins d’un kilomètre à Porteau. À cet
endroit,
la route et le chemin de fer sont enclavés par un
massif
rocheux à l’est et par l’océan à l’ouest.
L
a solution pour remédier à cet étranglement fut
de
paver temporairement la voie ferrée sur une longueur
de
800 mètres. Ainsi, pendant la durée des Jeux, cette
voie
fut partagée entre le chemin de fer et l’autoroute.
Cependant,
les trains avaient priorité et l’accès était
surveillé
24 heures sur 24 à chacune des extrémités. Lors
de
l’arrivée imminente d’un train, une barrière était
descendue
manuellement pour être ensuite relevée
après
le passage du convoi.By Don Evans
T
ranslation by Denis Vallières
128RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
R
oyal Hudson #2860 to White Rock, Olympic Torch
R
un event
The
West Coast Railway Associations Royal
Hudson
2860 got out for a run. She departed Squamish on
January
16th. on a live steam move to Vancouver. The
engine
stayed there for three weeks before operating a
two
day excursion on February 8th and 9th over the BNSF
to
White Rock and return. Sponsor BNSF added shiny
ES44A
C #6422 and the train made a lovely sight along
the
White Rock waterfront. The train carried a good load
of
passengers and was seen by thousands. The run kicked
off
White Rock’s winter festival and also was at the
Canada
– U.S. border for the Olympic Torch ceremonies
t
hat took place there the morning of
F
ebruary 9. T
he Olympic Line – Olympic Streetcar
Demonstration
Line
T
he City of Vancouver and Bombardier
sponsored
the “Olympic Line”, a demonstration streetcar
line
that operated between the new Canada line Olympic
V
illage Station and Granville Island. Bombardier
brought
over two “Flexity” trams from Brussels, Belgium
for
the service. They operated on the same route as the
restored
interurbans of the Downtown Historic Railway
usually
use. Vancouver spent more than $8 million
upgrading
the tracks to top standards, with new concrete
ties
and welded rail.
The
Olympic Line was very popular, and
operated
more than 18 hours each day from January 21 to La
ligne olympique – Circuit du tramway de
démonstration
olympique
L
a ville de Vancouver et Bombardier
commanditèrent
l’Olympic Line, un circuit de tramways
de
démonstration qui reliait l’île de Granville à la
nouvelle
gare du Canada Line au Village olympique. La
firme
Bombardier avait fait venir deux tramways Flexity
de Bruxelles, en Belgique, pour les installer sur le même

circuit que les voitures interurbaines restaurées du
Downtown
Historic Railway. La Ville de Vancouver a
consacré
8 millions de dollars à la restauration de cette
voie,
dont l’installation de traverses de béton et de rails
soudés.
Cette
ligne, exploitée 18 heures par jour entre le La
Royal Hudson no 2860 à White Rock, cérémonie
du
flambeau olympique
L
a locomotive à vapeur Royal Hudson no 2860
de
l’Association West Coast Railway a quitté Squamish le
16
janvier à destination de Vancouver, où elle est
demeurée
trois semaines. Après ce séjour, elle fut
requise
pour une excursion aller-retour de deux jours, les
8
et 9 février, en empruntant le réseau du chemin de fer
Burlington
Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) jusqu’à White
R
ock. Le BNSF avait ajouté au train sa rutilante
locomotive
diesel ES44AC no 6422, donnant ainsi une
vue
splendide du convoi le long des berges de White
R
ock. Le train transporta un grand nombre de passagers
et
fut admiré par des milliers de gens. L’excursion
coïncidait
avec le Festival d’hiver de White Rock et la
cérémonie
du relais de la flamme olympique à la frontière
du
Canada et des États-Unis, celle-ci ayant eu lieu le
matin
du 9 février.Robert Hunter
129CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010Greg Shevchenko
Don EvansMarch
21, 2010, carrying tens of thousands of people.
Rides
were free and the hopes are that this technology will
be
used for an expanded streetcar system in the city in the
future.21
janvier et le 21 mars 2010, fut très populaire auprès de
dizaines
de milliers de personnes, d’autant plus que le
passage
était gratuit. Les citadins espèrent que cette
technologie
sera utilisée pour une expansion future du
système
de tramways de la ville.CPR
and KCS Business car trains at Vancouver
W
aterfront
Both
Canadian Pacific and Kansas City Southern
b
rought their business car trains (equipment was
deadheaded
in) to Vancouver for the 2010 Winter
O
lympics. The trains were positioned in CPR’s
W
aterfront yard for the duration of the Olympic Games,
and CPR constructed quite an elaborate pavilion for the

trains under the SeaBus Bridge at Waterfront. The trains
were
connected to power and water, and served as a base
for
clients and guests of the two railways to enjoy the
games.
Guests stayed and dined aboard, and buses took
t
hem to Olympic events. During the games, the
W
aterfront Yard was embargoed for any freight traffic,
leaving
it open for special passenger trains and West
Coast
express trains during February.V
oitures de fonction du Canadien Pacifique et du
Kansas
City Southern au Waterfront de Vancouver
L
e Canadien Pacifique et le Kansas City
Southern
amenèrent leurs voitures de fonction (sans
passagers)
à Vancouver à l’occasion des Jeux olympiques
de
2010. Les trains furent installés durant les jeux au
triage
Waterfront du CPR sous la passerelle menant au
Seabus
et le CPR y aménagea des accès couverts. Les
trains
furent branchés par la suite à une alimentation en
eau
et en électricité, puis accueillirent les invités des deux
compagnies ferroviaires pour qu’ils puissent profiter des

événements olympiques. Ces personnes dormaient à
bord,
y prenaient leurs repas, et des navettes les
amenaient
sur les sites des Jeux. Le trafic de
marchandises
fut suspendu au triage Waterfront pendant
la
durée des Jeux, laissant tout l’espace disponible pour
les
trains du West Coast Express et pour les trains
spéciaux.
130RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
W
est Coast Express Expanded Service
T
he West Coast Express
expanded
its service during the Olympic
G
ames period from February 12th
through
February 28th. There were
several
extra trains each weekday as well
a
s special weekend service. WCE
normally
operates only five trains each
weekday
in the rush-hour direction.
This
marked the first time that the
c
ommuter service offered regular
weekend
service. It was very heavily
used.
During the Olympic period, WCE
ran
225 scheduled trains compared with
the
normal 110, and there were also
three
instances when passengers were
allowed
to ride on a deadhead move,
making
a total of 228 passenger-carrying
trips.
The
Alberta Train – a great ticket
The
Province of Alberta had
t
he showstopper train during the
Olympics,
chartering a 13- car consist
from
Rocky Mountaineer and operating
i
t daily from North Vancouver to
Whistler
and return. The consist was
powered
by a trio of GP40-2 units and
included
a generator car at each end, six
double-decker
Gold Leaf domes and
several
single level lounge and support
cars.
Most of the cars received a “wrap” treatment of
various
colours featuring the Alberta name and graphics,
making
the train a colourful sight.
The
train departed North Vancouver around
6:30 each day and arrived at Whistler around 9:30. After

the days events, the train left Whistler around 1800 and
reached
North Vancouver around 2100. On board, super
deluxe
service with food and beverages was enjoyed by the
i
nvited
guests.Service
élargi du West Coast Express
L
e West Coast Express (WCE)
a
élargi son service durant les Jeux
olympiques,
soit du 12 au 28 février, en
ajoutant
des départs aux cinq déjà
existants
pendant les heures de pointe
en
semaine et en implantant pour la
première
fois un service de fin de
s
emaine. Le réseau fut
particulièrement
achalandé. Pendant
cette
période, le WCE a fait rouler plus
de
225 trains comparativement à 110
pour
une même période en temps
normal.
À trois occasions, des passagers
purent
monter à bord de trains qui
roulaient
normalement à vide, pour un
t
otal de 228 déplacements avec
passagers.
The
Alberta train – un billet de
grande
valeur
À
l’occasion des Olympiques,
l’Alberta
a nolisé un train sensationnel
de
13 voitures du Rocky Mountaineer
pour
offrir un service quotidien aller-
r
etour entre Vancouver Nord et
Whistler.
Le convoi était constitué d’un
trio
de locomotives diesel GP40-2, d’un
wagon
de groupe électrogène à chaque
extrémité,
de six voitures Gold Leaf à
d
eux niveaux avec dômes
panoramiques,
de voitures-salons à simple niveau et de
voitures
de service. La majorité des voitures étaient
recouvertes
d’une pellicule colorée illustrant des noms et
des
motifs albertains.
L
e train quittait Vancouver Nord tous les jours à
6
h 30 pour arriver à Whistler vers 9 h 30, puis retournait à
V
ancouver à 18 h, arrivant à destination vers 21 h. À bord,
le
service de luxe, comprenant la distribution de
nourriture
et
d
e boissons,
é
tait fort
a
pprécié des
v
oyageurs et
l
e train fut
m
ême
q
ualifié par
les
médias de
«
meilleur
billet
pour les
Jeux
»!W
est Coast Express special weekend
train
W2 arrives at Coquitlam Central
Station
at 14:46 on Sunday, February 21,
with
cab car 103 leading the nine-car
train
westbound. Ian Smith.
Le
train spécial W2 de fin de semaine, en
direction
ouest, entre à la gare centrale
de
Coquitlam à 14 h 46 en ce dimanche
21
février 2010 avec ses neuf voitures,
dont
la voiture de tête no 103 avec
cabine
de conduite. Ian Smith.T
revor Mills
131CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010May – June 2010BUSINES
S CARBy John Godfrey
Edited by David GawleyOn
February 28, 1910, saturated 2-6-0 Grand
T
runk Railway E8 1006 was shipped from the Canadian
L
ocomotive Companys plant in Kingston, Ontario. At a
cost
(then) of $14,784 the Mogul was built under serial
#919.
GTR had the 2-6-0 superheated and converted to
electric
lights at its Stratford shop in February 1919 and
re-classed
it to E12. The Mogul became CNR E-10-a 908
sometime
after March 1, 1920 until February 1952, when
it
was renumbered to 86.
The
veteran was retired on April 30, 1958, and
put
on display in London, Ontario at the Western Fair
Grounds
on July 6, 1958. Proposals apparently are
underway
to move the steamer west of its present location
and
to be put under open cover. Hopefully some of this
will
come to pass in order to save this century-old Mogul
from
rusting to the rails.
CN
86 was one of 25 Grand Trunk Railway E8
class
Moguls numbered 1000-1024 delivered between
F
ebruary 3 and June 9, 1910. Between 1910 and 1923 all but
six (GTR 1010-11, 1015-16 and 1018-19) were
superheated
and rebuilt by GTR to E12 specifications
which
included the installation of piston valves.
In
1923 all 25 became CN E-10-a 902-926.
Beginning
in 1923, all but four (904, 906-908) were
equipped
with the Casey-Cavin reverse gear. The six
which
were never rebuilt or superheated (that became
CN
912-913, 917-918 and 920-921) were scrapped
between
1930 and 1935. Other than 916 and 922 scrapped
in
1936, the remaining 17 were renumbered in 1951 to CN
80-96
to clear the 900-series for the new Y-4 (GR-12)
NF110s
for the Newfoundland lines.
Only
the 925 was scrapped in 1954 without
receiving
its assigned number 95. The remainder were
retired
for scrap between 1955 and 1961. This group has
the
highest preservation rate of any Canadian locomotive
class
– seven out of 25 survive – 28% of the order
Other
surviving Moguls current homes are:

81 was put on display in Palmerston, Ontario at
Norman
and Main Streets in November 1959;

86 was put on display in London in April 1958;

87 was donated to the St. Lawrence Seaway Museum in
July
1957 and put on display as GTR 1008 in
Morrisburg,
Ontario at the Chrysler Farm Battlefield
P
ark;

89 was sold to Steamtown USA in August 1961 and was
operated
as Green Mountain Railway 89 between April
1965 and June 1972 before being sold to the Strasburg

Rail Road Company of Pennsylvania, where it is still
under
steam;

91 was sold privately to Charles A. Matthews, Longstaff
(Ontario)
before being sold in December 1984 to
M
iddletown & Hummelstown Railroad of
Middletown,
Pennsylvania.

92 was sold to Thomas Marshall, Wilmington Delaware
in
July 1959 for the Wilmington & Western Railway
Corporation
of Elsmere, Delaware.

96 was sold to Steamtown USA, (Edaville Railway
Museum)
in June 1959 and was operated as Green
Mountain
Railway 96 between 1973 and 1986 before
being
sold privately and returned to Brantford,
Ontario.
Privately re-sold in November 1994, it
currently
operates on the Ohio Central Railroad at
Coshocton,
Ohio.
E
xcerpt from McQueen & Thomson,
Constructed
In Kingston – A History of the Canadian
L
ocomotive Companies, 1854 to 1968. (Don McQueen &
T
empo Junior)
Olympic
tram sparks rail envy south of the Fraser
River
, where B.C. Electric interurbans used to roll
The
sleek new European trams that operated
over
the Olympic Line in Vancouver during the Games
had
Fraser Valley passenger rail supporters drooling. The Happy Birthday 86HERIT
AGECNR
86 photographed at Owen Sound, Ontario in the early
1950’s.
Patterson–George, CRHA Archives, Fonds Corley
La
locomotive à vapeur CNR no 86 photographiée à Owen
Sound,
Ontario, au début des années 1950. Patterson-
George,
Archives ACHF, Fonds Corley.
132RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
new
2010 streetcar that ran along False Creek is just the
sort
of service they had hoped would by now be rolling
along
at least part of the old Interurban electric rail
corridor
through Surrey to Chilliwack.
T
hey had even proposed a cheap-to-start
demonstration
run between Surreys Scott Road SkyTrain
station
and Cloverdale. This or something similar to it is
an
excellent solution for south of Fraser areas, specifically
as
a way of connecting the growing Surrey Metro centre to
o
ther regions of Surrey and Langley, Surrey
transportation
advocate Peter Holt said after touring the
Olympic
line. He noted the estimated $9M cost of setting
up
the streetcar on existing tracks proves similar
technology
can be used in the eastern suburbs at a fraction
of
the $100M per kilometre cost of using SkyTrain.
Holt
blames former transportation minister
Kevin F
alcon for blocking an expedited push to launch a
modern
service on tracks once used by the British
C
olumbia Electric Railway’s Interurban trains to
Chilliwack.
It makes abundant sense, added Langley
T
ownship Mayor Rick Green, who has assembled a task
force of area mayors to press for community rail service.

You could put a new technology diesel unit on these
tracks
today and have no problem.
Hundreds
of people lined up January 21st, to be
among
the first to ride the Olympic Line streetcar that
zipped
along a rail line between Granville Island and the
Canada
Line. The free electric tram service ran 18 hours a
day
until March 21 on a 1.8-kilometre route that
connected
to the Athletes Village station at 2nd and
Cambie.
P
assengers praised the smooth six-minute ride.
The
two Bombardier-built Flexity streetcars on loan from
Brussels
were returned after the Games. Supporters say
the
route should be continued and extended through
downtown.
(BC Local News)
C
hung Collection illuminates the Chinese
experience
in BC building CPR
One
night, on the lower floor of the Irving K.
Barber
Learning Centre at UBC, a reception was held to
c
elebrate the Chinese New Year and the Chung
Collection.
W
allace Chung, a retired vascular surgeon who
was
born in Victoria and grew up in his fathers Chinatown
tailor
shop, donated to the university, the collection which
tells
the story of what it was like to be of Chinese descent
in
British Columbia in the last half of the 19th century.
The
collection tells the history of the Chinese
vanguard
in BC who came seeking gold in the mid-1800s.
Thousands
later built dangerous stretches of the CPR as it
reached
westward through the Interior and the Fraser
Canyon.
Some recent immigrants dont know too much
about
the past here, Chung said at the end of the evening,
organized
by York House School. BC may promote its
Asia
Pacific Gateway as a newfangled concept, but many R
estoration of New Brunswicks McAdam
R
ailway Station moved a step closer to completion
recently
with the unveiling of a meeting room set in the
1900s.
The repairs and renovations were paid for by
community
donations and funding from the federal and
provincial
governments. But Greg Davidson, CEO of the
McA
dam Historical Restoration Commission, said its
not only the money thats bringing the villages history to CPR Archivesof Chungs keepsakes, especially the ones collected from
CPR
and Canadian Pacific Steamships, are reminders
that
people and trade to and from Asia have been flowing
for
much more than 100 years.
T
wo years ago, Chung and his wife, Madeline, a
r
etired obstetrician, moved their collection of 25,000 items –

including documents, rare books, maps, posters and other
a
rtifacts recording early Chinese immigration to BC — to
t
his permanent location at the University of British
C
olumbia where it is open to the public and on most days.
A
t the heart of the collection is a tribute to CPRs
once
grand fleet of luxury liners that carried goods and
people
across the Pacific, linking Vancouver to Hong
Kong,
Shanghai, Yokohama, and Nagasaki until the start
of
the Second World War. Chungs mother arrived in
Canada
in 1919 aboard the companys Empress of Asia
steamship
and, for many years, there was a poster of it
hanging
in his fathers shop. This inspired him to
obsessively
and painstakingly spend some 4,000 hours
over
six years restoring a model of the ship.
In
another corner, there is a nod to CPs first
ocean-going
ship. In 1886, just weeks after the first trans-
Canada train made it from Montreal to P
ort Moody, the
W
.B. Flint arrived from Yokohama with more than one
million
pounds of tea aboard. This was immediately
transferred
from ship to train for destinations in Eastern
Canada,
the United States and Europe. So began a large
and
profitable ocean trade for the Canadian Pacific
R
ailway Company. (Vancouver Sun)
O
ne of your co-editors visited this exhibit in 2009.
T
his phenomenal collection of CPR memorabilia and
d
ocuments is displayed in a very lavish and spectacular
m
anner. Any member of the Association who visits
V
ancouver should see this exhibit. (Douglas N. W. Smith)
R
estoring piece of railway history in NB
133CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010life.
We cant do this without the funding, but what really
makes
this place breathe history is the memories and
stories
of those who used to work in the station,
Davidson said. Thats why this place is so authentic and

true to its original architecture.
W
e are blessed to have people in our community
who
remember the station when it was in all its glory.
The
heritage railway station attracted about 11,000
tourists
last year, and as the restorations continue,
McA
dam Mayor Frank Carroll hopes to see those
numbers
double. (Woodstock Bugle-Observer)
Canadian
Museum of Rail Travel news
Construction
of the interior galleries at the
Canadian
Museum of Rail Travel has been significantly
advanced
thanks to the current Museum Job Creation
P
artnership on-going from August 2009 to May 2010. The
five
galleries are intended for temporary exhibitions of
local
and touring history and art and are located on the
upper
level of the historic Freight Shed adjacent to the
museum
entrance hall.
When
completed with the proper facing, nails
and
screws can be placed for the hanging of any items, be
it
historical photos or objects or art works. There will be
over
600 linear feet of exhibition wall space when the galleries
are complete, and their arrangement allows
either
casual access or controlled access depending on the
type
of exhibit. The five galleries can have one large
exhibition
or five smaller ones running concurrently. With
an
overlapping exhibition schedule, the galleries will
provide
a constant source of changing displays for local
residents
and visitors.
O
nce the 3000 square foot galleries are
completed
and staffing arranged, there will always be
something new to see. It enhances the local cultural role

of the Museum in addition to its tourist role.Another
project completed was the installation of original
seats
in first class car 621 – part of the Soo-Spokane Train
Deluxe.
Un
autre projet a consisté à installer les sièges d’origine dans
la
voiture de première classe no 621 du Train de luxe Soo-
Spokane.This
photo shows the installation of original seats in first class
car
621. This car was found being used as a country cottage
(without
wheels or interior furniture), near Bragg Creek, south
east
of Calgary in the late 1980’s. It was brought to Cranbrook
by
truck in 1989, but was stored at the city works yard until
2003, when it was moved to the new site in the lineup of the

Trains Deluxe set.
Cette
photo illustre l’installation des sièges d’origine dans la
voiture
de première classe no 621. Cette voiture avait été
transformée
en maison de campagne (roues et mobilier en
moins),
près de Bragg Creek au sud-est de Calgary à la fin des
années
1980. En 1989, elle fut transportée par camion à
Cranbrook
et entreposée dans une cour des travaux publics
de
la ville jusqu’en 2003, puis déménagée au nouvel
emplacement
de l’ensemble du Train de luxe.In
the fall of 2008, original seats were found in
Scranton,
Pennsylvania and obtained. They were stored
until
the summer of 2009 when they were finally installed
in
coach 621. While the interior panelling of the car is
unrestored,
the seats are a major visual improvement for
train
tours. (Garry Anderson)
Our
‘National Dream’
T
en days before he died in 2007, Fred Angus of
W
estmount told Exporail, the Canadian Railway
Museum
on the South Shore of Montreal, about an
important
document that he wanted to bequeath. It was
his
great-grandfather R.B. Anguss copy of a contract
between
the Dominion of Canada and the Canadian
P
acific Railway syndicate to build a railway across
Canada.
The contract set out to fulfill what has become
134RAIL
CANADIEN • 536MAI – JUIN 2010
known
in Canadian history as the national dream – a
transcontinental
railway to unify the sparsely populated
country.
Canada that had been born in 1867 as a result of
the
British North America Act. But to get British
Columbia
to join Confederation as the sixth province in
1871,
an amendment to the BNA Act entrenched a
federal
promise to BC to create a transcontinental rail
link. Study
of Chelsea, Quebec steam train station
contracted
A
group of consultants has been hired to do a
feasibility
study on a Chelsea station for the Hull-
Chelsea-
Wakefield steam train. The federal government
will
pay $206,550 of the studys $275,400 cost. The study
will
examine the impact of a proposed train station on the
environment,
local economy, drainage, water and sewer
services
and transportation.
Surveys
and other field work started during the
last
week of November. Tim Kehoe, study director, said
the
station could provide Chelsea with some economic
benefit
if passengers visit Old Chelsea shops and
restaurants.
Innovation Chelsea, a business group, has
proposed
locating a steam train station on a 50-acre site it
owns
that includes a medical clinic.
Community
Table Outaouais, a group that helps
d
evelop economic opportunities for West Quebec
residents,
is participating. Other groups contributing to
the
study include Caisse Desjardins de Hull, Centre local
de
développement des Collines-de-lOutaouais, Hull-
Chelsea-
Wakefield Steam Train and Tourisme Outaouais.
Chelsea
Mayor Caryl Green said the former passenger
rail
station north of Old Chelsea played an important role
in
the community until it closed during the 1960s. (Ottawa
Citizen)
Glorious
railway relic sits on track to nowhere in
AjaxConstruction
of that link was completed as a
r
esult of an 1881 contract between the federal
government
and the seven members of the new Canadian
P
acific Railway syndicate. Then, as now, parties to
contracts
were entitled to their own original copies. As
one
of seven original investment partners in the CPR
syndicate
and one of four original company directors,
R.B.
Angus received his own handsome leather-bound
copy.
This
copy – the same one that Fred Angus told
Exporail
president Stephen Cheasley about – is the only
original
copy known to exist today. This copy was part of
the
museums temporary exposition titled “What’s In The
Box?”.
The exposition, which ran at Exporail until April
11,
featured the best of Canadian railway memorabilia
donated
or bequeathed to the museum during the last
five
years. The title refers to the many precious items that
were
mailed / delivered / or picked up by the museum in
little
boxes. (Montreal Gazette) A
railway spur line that slows down traffic in Ajax
may
be in a state of disrepair, but not the marvellous
passenger
train car that resides at the end of it. The spur
that
crosses Dowty Road, near Highway 401 and Westney
R
oad exists to permit the switching of an opulent
passenger
car, the Pacific, to and from the CN.
The
Pacific was built by the Canadian Car &
F
oundry Company for the CNR in 1924 with six
c
ompartments, a buffet, lounge and observation
platform.
The car was originally built for charter service
to
private parties. It was part of the royal train operated
for
King George VI in 1939 and the whistle-stop
135CANADIAN RAIL • 536MA
Y – JUNE 2010BACK
COVER TOP: CPR GE ES44AC 8875 leads train 31B-26 “the Olympic Express” westbound at Morant’s Curve, mile 113 of
the
Laggan Subdivision on January 26, 2010. The first publicity stop will be at Craigellachie on the mountain Subdivision for an
appearance
at an Olympic Torch relay event on January 27, 2010. Cor van Steenis.
C
OUVERTURE ARRIÈRE : La locomotive diesel GE ES44AC no 8875 du CPR est en tête du train 31B-26, l’Olympic Express, en
d
irection ouest à la courbe Morant, borne no 113 de la subdivision Laggan en ce 26 janvier 2010. Le premier arrêt promotionnel se
f
era à Craigellachie, à la subdivision Mountain, à l’occasion du passage de la flamme olympique le 27 janvier 2010. Cor van Steenis.
BACK
COVER BOTTOM : Business car “Mount Stephen” heels to Morant’s Curve at mile 113 of the Laggan Subdivision as the
“Olympic
Express” makes its way westward to Craigellachie, Vancouver and ultimately Olympic glory for Canada at the 2010
Olympic
Winter Games. Cor van Steenis.
COUVER
TURE ARRIÈRE : La voiture de fonction Mount Stephen à la courbe Morant de la subdivision Laggan au moment où
l’Olympic
Express se dirige vers l’ouest à Craigellachie et Vancouver pour souligner les Jeux olympiques d’hiver du Canada de
2010.
Cor van Steenis. campaign
train for Prime Minister John Diefenbaker and
entourage
in 1957.
The
Pacific was purchased from CN in 1972 by
P
aul Higgins, owner of the Mother Parker coffee and tea
conglomerate,
who kept it in immaculate condition and
used
it for personal travel and to entertain guests.
Higgins
died in 2004 and Pacific was passed on to
his
sons, Michael and Paul Jr., who now operate the well-
known
hot beverage business and store the private car at
their
plant on Mill Road in Ajax.
In
an interview, Michael Higgins said they pay
CN
an annual fee, the amount of which he did not
disclose,
to maintain the spur line, adding it is not their
responsibility
to keep the level crossing in a state of good
repair.
He
was also concerned that an earlier column
may
have led some people to think the Pacific, which his
father
valued at more than $1 million in a 1985 interview
with
the Star, has been slowly crumbling in its repose.
“W
e’ve kept it in perfect condition and we hope
to
use it to promote the 100th anniversary of our
company
in two years,” said Higgins, adding that after the
original
column, he got phone calls from people who
wanted
to buy it. (Toronto Star)
C
anadian hall of fame honors two former
railroaders,
a city and a technology
The
Canadian Railway Hall of Fame recently
announced
2009’s inductees in the leader, heroes,
community
and technology categories.
In
the “leader” category, the hall inducted
Major
J.L. Charles, a former Grand Trunk Pacific
R
ailway and CN executive who played a role in shaping
the
Canadian railway network. He directed engineering
projects
and operations for CN, and was involved in the
construction
of both the Hudson Bay Railway line from
The
Pas to Churchill, Manitoba, and the Great Slave
L
ake Railway from Roma Junction to Hay River,
Northwest
Territories.
In
the “heroes” category, the hall inducted Paul R
oy, who served Canadian Pacific, CN, the Northern
Alberta
Railway, Pacific Great Eastern and BC Rail Ltd.
during
his 35-year career. He contributed to various
r
ailway preservation projects in British Columbia,
arranged
for the donation of a former BC Rail electric
locomotive
to the Prince George Railway Museum and
created
a mini-rail system to introduce railroading and
rail
history to youngsters.
In
the “community” category, the hall inducted
W
innipeg, Manitoba, which in the late 1800s worked to
become
a terminus for a CPR branch line. The city
provided
the railroad land for yards and a perpetual tax
exemption
in return for making Winnipeg a divisional
point
and location for mechanical shops.
Finally,
the hall inducted light-emitting diodes
(LEDs)
in the “technology” category. Approved by
T
ransport Canada in 2003 for use at grade crossings,
LEDs
help enhance safety because they are visible from a
long
distance, according to the Hall.
The
virtual Canadian Railway Hall of Fame was
created in 2002 by the R
ailway Association of Canada in
conjunction
with its members, the Canadian Northern
Society of Alberta and Canadian Association of R
ailway
Suppliers.
(Progressive Railroading On-line)
Uxbridge
tourist railway on track with grant
Uxbridges
heritage train group has received a
sizeable
grant to help keep the organization on track.
Denis
Godbout, president of the York Durham Heritage
R
ailway, said the group recently received news of a
$158,200
Ontario Trillium Foundation grant, to be paid
out
the next three years. Godbout said the funds will be
used
to hire a program coordinator to develop marketing
opportunities and program development, while cash will

also be injected into website enhancement and signage in
order
to improve public awareness of the railway as a
major
tourist attraction. Godbout hopes the awareness
campaign
will increase ridership, with any additional
revenues
going toward maintenance and restoration of
rail
equipment. (Uxbridge Times-Journal)

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