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Canadian Rail 498 2004

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Canadian Rail 498 2004

2
ISSN 0008-4875
Pos!al
Penni! No. 40066621 CANADIAN RAIL
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY
BY THE
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY IN WEST TORONTO………………. DEREK BOLES…………….. 3
THE RAILWAY SHOPS
OF MONTREAL, PART 1, CPR CAR SHOPS. MONTREAL HERALD……. 17
THE GREAT COUNTERFEIT STREET CAR TICKET SCARE ………… FRED ANGUS……………….. 24
THE BROWN COLLECTION……………………………………………………..
…. DOUG BROWN……………..
28
AN APOLOGY FOR POOR QUALITY PHOTOGRAPHS…………………. FRED ANGUS……………….. 36
THE BUSINESS CAR ………………………………………………………………
…… . 38
FRONT COVER: Canadian Pacific No. 12, the Toronto section of the Canadian, pulls into West Toronto Station in the late summer
of 1965. A CP freight train has just rumbled by in the same direction while a CN track crew pauses to observe the action. This Larry Fisher painting
is available as a print through Heritage Art Editions of London, Ont, and is reproduced courtesy of Don Davies.
BELOW Although previously reproduced, this photo is significant this year since it was taken exactly one hundred years ago. The
location is Snowdon Junction (now the corner of Decarie and Queen Mary) in Montreal in FebrualJ 1904. A 1032-class car of the Montreal Park
& Island Railway (right) has arrived from downtown, en route to Cartierville, while single-truck car 1014 (left) is
about to leave for Victoria Avenue and a connection with the Montreal Street railway. CRHA Archives, MUCTC Collection
For your membership in the CRHA, which
includes a subscription to Canadian Rail,
write to:
CRHA, 110 Rue St-Pierre, St. Constant,
Que.
J5A 1G7
Membership Dues for 2004:
In
Canada: $40.00 (including all taxes)
United States: $35.00 in U.S. funds.
Other Countries: $68.00 Canadian funds. Canadian Rail is continually
in need of news, stories
historical data, photos, maps and other material. Please
send all contributions to the editor: Fred
F. Angus, 3021
Trafalgar Avenue, Montreal,
P.Q. H3Y 1 H3, e-mail
angus82@aei.ca . No payment can be made for
contributions, but the contributer will be given credit for
material submitted. Material
will be retumed to the contributer
if requested. Remember Knowledge
is of little value unless
it is shared with others.
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: Douglas
N.W. Smith
ASSOCIATE EDITOR (Motive Power):
Hugues
W. Bonin
LAYOUT: Fred F. Angus
PRINTING: Procel Printing
DISTRIBUTION: Joncas Postexperts
Inc.
The eRHA may be reached at its web site: www.exporail.org or by telephone at (450) 638-1522

._—
~ _ .. –
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 3 CANADIAN RAIL -498
The Canadian Pacific Railway in West Toronto
by Derek Boles
This is the second Canadian Pacific Toronto Junction station, built in 1899 to replace an earlier depot located beyond the
Weston
Road bridge crossing over the tracks behind the station. The straight track in the foreground was originally the
Toronto, Grey
& Bruce Ry. The curved tracks running by the station were originally Credit Valley Ry., later CP s Galt Sub.
(West Toronto Junction Historical Society)
One of the busiest railway centres in Toronto was
located in the
west end within a one-mile radius of Keele
Street & Dundas Street West. Three Canadian Pacific and
two
Canadian National subdivisions intersected in a series
of diamond crossings. Both companies had West Toronto
passenger stations, express buildings and freight sheds. The
CPR also maintained two roundhouses, their principal
Toronto freight yards, and a locomotive repair shop. The
Union Stock Yards and several important industries were
located in the vicinity. West Toronto also served as the
eastern terminal for two interurban electric railways that
extended to Guelph and to Woodbridge. The area has had
many official names: first as the village
of Carlton, then West
Toronto Junction, then Toronto Junction and fmally, West
Toronto, though most Torontonians refer to the district
simply as The Junction.
The first railway through the area was Torontos
pioneering Ontario, Simcoe & Huron Railway in 1853. The
OS&H built a picturesque station at Davenport, which
Canadian National replaced in the 1930s with St. Clair station.
However, most
of the railway activity in West Toronto was located six blocks to the west. The Grand
Trunk came through
there in 1856 and established a station at Carlton.
Next came
the narrow-gauge Toronto, Grey & Bruce Railway in 1871.
Then came the Credit Valley Railway in 1879, which provided
the junction that would give the area its name. Finally in
1883, the Ontario & Quebec Railway from Montreal
intersected all four of the existing railways. By 1884, the
Canadian Pacific Railway had taken
over the O&Q, TG&B,
and CV railways, built a roundhouse as well as a station with
a dining room, and called the area West Toronto Junction.
Where the railway went, prosperity followed. An
enterprising real estate developer and speculator named D.W.
Clendenan purchased 240 acres of land for a housing
development south of Dundas St. By 1884, he had laid out
five miles
of streets, planted 1500 shade trees and sold 400
lots. In
an era when most workers lived within walking
distance of their place of employment, CPR employees
occupied many of the new homes in the area. In the 1880s,
the horse-drawn streetcars from Toronto
only came as far as
Lansdowne Ave., but train service to Union Station was fast
and frequent and cost
15 cents.
RAIL CANADIEN -498 4 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
in 1879
Drawings by Omer Lavallee from CRHA News Report No. 100, May 1959.
Until 1892, all CPR passenger trains entering Toronto
from any direction
came through West Toronto. Trains from
Montreal and Ottawa proceeded west along the North
Toronto Subdivision, crossed the junction and then backed
five miles into
Union Station. When eastbound trains left
Toronto, they
made the same movement in reverse, backing
up from Union Station and then proceeding east once they
cleared the diamond at West Toronto. This was not an
efficient way to run a railroad and the CPR sought direct
access into downtown Toronto from the east. Finally, in 1892,
they opened a branch from
Leaside down the Don Valley
and west into
Union Station, eliminating the awkward train
movements
and considerably speeding up travel time.
&:[14 MONTR£A~ TO TORONTO ~E;~~ _________ C;.t.. __ _
; ;;;L~~~~~~:~~:~:::I:::::~:: r~:; >:::;~~ }~:r~~: ~:::~~:::: i i:~;.; :~::::~::
10 Dorvat…….. .•…….••………. . •••. ~ ………….•..• ~ •.•.•••••••………..••.•…•••••••
18 V.lol …………………………………………………. p ………………………….. .
14. Lake.lde .••••..•.•..•.. · ••• ···•· .. ··,· …………………… u ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
:::::::::: ::::.::::: :::::::::: n:iO …… ::::::::::
:::::::::: :::::::::: ::::.::::. 9io·.oi: ::::::::::
.; … ………………….. 910.2t1 ……….. .
These schedules, dated November 30, 1891, show how trains
from
both east and west had to enter Toronto from the west.
The village of West Toronto Junction was formed in
1887 and became a town in 1889. The community offered the
CPR attractive financial incentives and tax concessions to
expand their facilities in the area.
The CPRs main Toronto
shops and yard were still Jocated in the Parkdale facilities at
King and Dufferin Streets that the company had inherited
when they took over the Credit Valley Railway.
In 1890, the
CPR decided to expand in West Toronto and built a 48-acre
freight classification yard, enlarged roundhouse and car and
engine shops west of KeeJe st. between West Toronto St.
and Dundas
st. West. In 1891, the West was dropped from
the name and the community became known simply as
Toronto Junction.
lns CHICAOO AND DIiTROIT I_tern Lou! HJ.xec Bran.h-~/dODtreaI ~~_,
TO TORONTO Exprea!l hpreal Jjxpreal Expreea ……..
.~. ifu~~r:.~:::(>~~W.b7·~:;~: r~~ i;i;;~;i;; ~~:li~ i;;~;;:;
j
CentrSlTime
t
Ar.u.20 ..• ; ……………………… ·7.Marn ……. .
196 Detrolt .. 8l ….. aent.raITtm&SL_V 11.30pm …………………… ~ .• : ••. t12.46pm …….. .
410 London .. 90 ……………….. £z 3.615 0 .•• ! …… 10.16pm …•..•… 5.2:6:: … ~ … .
4.)8 1 Lv 4.00 am t 8 .. 00 &m —•• …….. 6 . .!4 ……. .
11~:i·!llil;1 f;~I:Jni _I~
Ili~II~!I.I!!.i :i~l :11: ~:: 1IIi!!i ::::
623 P.rkd. … :zG …………….. , …….. 8.06& .. 1I.~am ………. 11.25~1~ 8.45 pm ~
lS~ Toronto .. 19 .. Q …………………. -S.168m 1~.OOnn ………. 11.36 am e •. 6i pm .. ;.: … .
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 5 CANADIAN RAIL -498
The complexity of the West Toronto Junction diamond crossings is apparent in this 1923 view looking southeast towards
downtown
Toronto. The two parallel tracks to the right of the tower belong to Canadian National and were acquired from the
Grand Trunk Railway the year this photo was taken. The GTR was the first railway through here,
in 1856, and was originally
laid
to the broad provincial gauge of 5 6. Next to arrive, in 1873, was the line to the left of the tower, and this was originally
the narrow-gauge
3 6 Toronto Grey & Bruce Railway. The track on the far side, paralleling these lines, was originally the
1879 standard-gauge Credit Valley Railway.
In 1883, the Ontario & Quebec Railway built the line crossing in front of the
tower. In 1884 the Canadian Pacific Railway absorbed the CVR, TG&B and O&Q and built the connecting single track upon
which the track gang
is working. On the far right can be seen the platforms of the CPR s West Toronto station.
City
of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1231, item No. 1095
The superior rail facilities at West Toronto had initially
attracted several important manufacturers including the
Heintzman Piano Factory, Wagner & Zeidler Showcases and
the Canada Wire Mattress Company. By the turn
of the 20
h
century, the Dodge Manufacturing Company, the Wilkinson
Plow Company and the Comfort Soap Works had set up
shop in the area.
Among the most important commercial enterprises in
the area were the Union Stock Yards situated north
of the
CPR shops, along the south side of St. Clair Avenue. The
Grand Trunk Railway had long enjoyed a near monopoly on
the handling
of livestock with their Western Cattle Market
located
west of downtown near Bathurst Street. Begun
shortly after the turn of the 20
th
century, the Union Stock
Yards initially occupied 35 acres
of land and were connected
to
the CPR. Live cattle were brought in by rail, then
slaughtered and dressed in meat packing plants such as
Gunns Limited and the Harris Abattoir, which were located
on
the north side of St. Clair Avenue. The American­
controlled Swift Company located here prior to World War 1.
Gunns and Harris were both absorbed by Canada Packers in
1927. By the 1950s the Canada Packers facility had grown
so large that they had 26 tracks on the property. In many ways, the Junction was a Canadian Pacific
Railway company town. The
CPR was the principal employer
in West Toronto, employing more than two thousand men
during the 1920s when it was estimated that one out of
every fifty employees in Toronto worked for the railways.
Municipal bylaws required that a significant percentage
of
CPR workers be residents of the municipality in which they
were employed. The
CPR also required engine road crews to
live within a one-mile radius
of the yards so they could be
summoned for their trains by a messenger or call boy,
whose
job was to roust the crews from their residences when
needed, sometimes
in the middle of the night. The train crews
were made up of engineers, conductors, firemen and
brakemen.
Based in the roundhouse were a wide variety of
specialized employees. Skilled tradesmen who worked in the
shops included machinists, boilermakers, blacksmiths,
carpenters and electricians. Apprentices worked under the
tradesmen while they spent years undergoing training and
writing examinations in order to obtain certification. The
railway also employed hundreds of semi-skilled men and
labourers including engine wipers, engine cleaners, ash-pit
men, light-up men, and trimmers.
RAIL CANADIEN -498
RlGHT This 1997 view
shows a portion of the
machine and erecting
shops built in 1909. The
West Toronto engine shop
was CPs
principal
Ontario repair facility.
During bo
th World Wars,
when Montreals Angus
shops were convelled to
–niilitary production,
heavy duty engine repairs
were
carried out here.
(West T
oronto Junction
Historical Society)
No matter what their skill level, the railway men worked
long and hard. A ten-hour shift, six days a
week was common
until World War II. In the 19
1h
and early 20
th
centuries, working
in a
railway roundhouse was dirty, dangerous and noisy.
Industrial accidents were frequent and occasionally
gruesome. Employees froze in winter and roasted during the
summer.
The roundhouses were sometimes so smoky that
workers needed to carry lights in order to avoid bumping
into each other and falling into the pits. Respiratory illnesses
were common among shop employees. Gradually these
appalling working conditions would improve, especially after
World War
I.
The railway industrys quest for profits could
compromise safety, especially in the early years before trade
unions became influential enough to negotiate safer working
conditions. A foreman
was in charge of the shops and was
expected to keep costs down by insisting on a minimum
turn-around time for locomotives entering the roundhouse.
Repairing a hot engine that hadnt cooled down yet was a
particularly miserable
job, especially in and around the boiler.
6 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
LEFT This 1997 view
shows a portion of the
Ontario & Quebec
Railway roundhouse
built in 1884. This
building was demol­
ished in 1998.
(West Toronto Junction
Historical
Society)
A worker could endure this for about 15 minutes before he
dragged
himself out with red face, gasping breath and bathed
in sweat. His partner would then take his turn in the boiler.
Such working conditions made for
parched employees
and there were six licensed taverns and two liquor stores
in
the area to help slake their thirst. Evidently the arrival of the
CPR pay car on the 17
tit
of each month saw a rise in drunken
behaviour and a temperance movement took hold,
spearheaded by various local churches. In 1904, West
Toronto became completely dry and prohibition would
remain in effect for the remainder of the 20
lh
century.
In 1907, the
CPR closed its redundant Parkdale engine
facilities, although the freight yard
remained in service. The
West Toronto facilities were further expanded with a
rectangular erecting shop for locomotive overhauls, an
engine house, an enlarged machine shop, passenger car
shops, a carpentry shop, freight car repair shop, tender repair
shop, wheel shop, two transfer tables and a new turntable.
With these extensive additions, the West
Toronto facilities
became the
CPRs principal Ontario repair shops.
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004
RIGHT: The West Toronto
roundhouse and turntable,
1915. This shows the full
31
stall roundhouse with its 3-
stall addition on the left.
(ep Archives A.3517)
The Grand Trunk Railway had two lines running
through West Toronto, both of them originally built in the
1850s and each with a passenger station. Unlike their rivals,
the CPR, the Grand Trunk never built shop
or yard facilities
in the area. In 1907 the GTR built a new West Toronto station
on the west side
of Old Weston Rd. south of Davenport Rd.
The
GTR also had two freight and express facilities, one to
tbe north
of the station and tbe otber just north of St>Clair
Avenue on the east side
of Weston Road.
In 1908, Can
ad ian Pacific extended the old Toronto,
Grey
& Bruce line north to Sudbury, giving Torontonians
direct access to the CPR Montreal-Vancouver main line for
the first time. When regular service on the transcontinental
line began
in 1886, CPR trains bound from Toronto to western
Canada had to travel almost as far east as Ottawa before
finally proceeding west. Later the company negotiated
running rights on the Grand Trunk line between Toronto
and
Nortb Bay. Over twenty years after the driving of th~
Last Spike, CPR trains could now travel all the way from
Toronto to Vancouver on company tracks.
The CPRs most
prestigious transcontinental trains would stop at West
7 CANADIAN RAIL-498
LEFT: This 1997 view
across the turntable
is
aligned with a track
running through the
roundhouse and the
entire engine shop. A
portion of this turn­
table survives on site
in 2004. (West Toronto
Junction Historical
Society)
Toronto station for the next seventy years, including the
Vancouver Express, the Trans-Canada Limited, the
Dominion and The Canadian.
Following the Great Fire
of 1904, the city of Toronto
and the railways planned on building a new Union Station
on the burnt-out rubble a block east
of the existing station
on Front Street. The old station had opened
in 1873 and was
expanded
in 1895, but within a few years was overcrowded
and considered hopelessly inadequate. The Canadian Pacific
and Grand Trunk railways were partners in the construction
of the new Union Station and the building itself was
substantially complete by 1920. Unfortunately it would be
another ten years before the railway tracks actually entered
the station.
The City of Toronto insisted on a viaduct that
would elevate the tracks above the numerous roads leading
to the waterfront. The CPR objected to the cost of the viaduct
and
the fact that an elevated right of way would render
obsolete the companys passenger yard and engine servicing
facilities at John Street. Negotiations dragged on until 1924
and the
CPR explored alternatives to a complete reliance on
Union Station as their Toronto passenger terminal.
RAIL CANADIEN -498 8 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
…. ,
Toronto Union Station finally opened:in 1927 after years of delay. This photo was taken during the 192 Os.
Canadian
PacijicCorporate Archives, photo No. 11305
The company planned on using their North Toronto
branch, which had not seen much use by passenger trains
since the line down the Don Valley had opened
in 1892. CPR
timetables from this period show a shuttle train service
operating between Leaside Junction, North Toronto and
Toronto Junction,
providing convenient connections with
principal long-distance trains. The trips took anywhere from
25 minutes to an hour
depending on how long the trains
stopped at North Toronto station. The shuttle trains were a
convenience for passengers who did not want to travel all
the way downtown to Union Station. The Toronto city limits
were rapidly expanding north and the
CPRs more affluent
passengers were moving with them to prosperous new
suburbs such as Lawrence Park.
Following complaints by Junction residents of
increasingly bourgeois sensitivities that the word Junction
was too parochial and suggestive of a grimy railroad
backwater, the town name was changed once again, this
time to West Toronto when the municipality was incorporated
as a city in 1908. The following year, West Toronto was
annexed to the city
of Toronto. Some of the more affluent
West Torontonians already used the frequent train service
to shop in downtown Toronto. Both the CPR and GTR made
these shopping expeditions economical by commuting the
regular fare
of fifteen cents to a nickel, provided passengers
purchased books
of 50 tickets at a time. Local merchants
were chagrined by the loss
of business. One local druggist
experienced a sharp decline
in business when his wife was seen alighting from a CPR train onto the platform at North
Toronto station laden with conspicuous shopping bags from
downtown stores. The majority of West Torontonians,
however, shopped locally or used the streetcar to travel
downtown where stores such as Eatons provided a vast
selection of merchandise and an efficient delivery service.
In 1912, the
CPR introduced the North Toronto
Limited, a prestigious overnight passenger train from
Montreal that entered Toronto by way of Leaside, North
Toronto and West Toronto, completely bypassing Union
Station and downtown Toronto. The CPR complained that
they were frustrated by the interminable delays to the
construction of the new Union Station, even though the
company was more responsible for those delays than any
other agency. The CPR then embarked
on an ambitious plan
to elevate their tracks through
North Toronto and build a
new station at Yonge Street, which was completed
iI1 1916.
In 1911, the CPR built a new West Toronto passenger
station, an attractive structure in the mock-Tudor style then
fashionable for important but suburban depots. This
substantial brick building replaced an earlier wooden
structure 500 feet to the east built in 1899. By this time, there
were
thirty-two daily passenger trains stopping at West
Toronto. When the new North Toronto Station at Yonge St.
and Summerhill Avenue opened in 1916, there was no engine
servicing facility adjacent to the depot. Passenger trains
unloaded at North Toronto, then the locomotives proceeded
three miles to West Toronto for servicing.
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 9 CANADIAN RAIL-49B

CP built the third West Toronto station about 500 feet east of the second station in 1911. At the peak of passenger train travel
in the early 1920s, up to 40 trains a day stopped here. CP demolished this station in 1982. (West Toronto Junction Historical
Society)
The local railway station was far more important to
the surrounding community than simply a place where
passengers boarded or alighted from trains. As West Toronto
evolved from village
to town to suburb to part of the city of
Toronto, the CPR station retained its significance as a
community centre. The grounds were carefully maintained
and
station agents took pride in the appearance of their
depot. The agents sold tickets to anywhere in the CPRs far­
flung transportation empire, which extended from Asia and
eastward across the Pacific Ocean by Empress ocean liner
to North America. CPR tracks then ran from British Columbia
to
Nova Scotia and an additional fleet of Empress liners
crossed the Atlantic Ocean
to Europe. The agents provided
additional services besides the selling
of train tickets. The
small parcel delivery system or express was a virtual
monopoly of the railway companies before that business
was taken over by trucks and airplanes.
The early years of the 20
lh
century were very
prosperous for the CPR and both freight and passenger traffic
increased rapidly. The freight yard and engine shops at West
Toronto were soon inadequate and the company continued
to expand their facilities. In 1912, the CPR began construction
of an extensive locomotive servicing facility and freight yard
at Lambton, two kilometers to the west to relieve the
overtaxed facilities at West Toronto. Both yards were further
enlarged in 1917 due to the increased traffic generated by
World War
1. During the war, the Union Stock Yards were
used by the military as a corral for thousands
of horses that
were moved in and out by train.
The war
had a dramatic impact on the operations of
the CPR in West Toronto. Many skilled employees had
enlisted in the armed forces and there were chronic shortages
of labour. Of the 11,340 CPR employees who fought in World
War I, 10
percent were killed, including Captain Fred
Shaugnessy, son of company president Lord Shaughnessy.
On SeptelT1ber 14, 1915 the funeral train carrying Sir William
Cornelius Van
Horne, who supervised the construction of
the CPR and became the second company president, passed
through West Toronto on its way from Montreal to his
hometown of Joliet, Illinois for internment.
The early 1920 s represented the pinnacle of
passenger train service throughout North America and there
were
up
to 40 trains a day stopping at the CPRs West Toronto
station.
Most mainline express trains had sleeping, dining
or parlor cars, depending on the time
of day they ran, and
almost every train offered the convenience of checked
baggage. Few railway lines were freight only; virtually
anywhere the CPR went, they ran a passenger train. This
RAIL CANADIEN -498 10 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
This panoramic view is looking east towards the Lambton roundhouse in the mid-1930s, and was taken from the 300-ton
coaling
tower. The Lambton facilities opened in 1912 at the southwest corner of St. Clair and Runnymede Avenues, a mile west
of the West Toronto facilities. The tall smokestacks over each stall of the roundhouse were intended to alleviate complaints from
nearby residents about the smoke problem. PlOminent numbers enabled city smoke inspectors to identifY
an offending locomotive.
The presence
of passenger cars is a mystery to the author ,as Lambton was a freight facility. Photo by Al Paterson
prosperity began to change in the mid 1920s as rural short­
haul trains were abandoned
in favour of the automobile and
improved roads. For trains calling at West Toronto station,
this was most noticeable in the services to the Bruce
Peninsula and connecting trains to southwestern Ontario.
In 1924, the adjacent West Toronto and
Lambton
yards
were linked and then operated as one combined facility.
The locomotive shops became more specialized with the
. Lambton roundhouse carrying
out routine maintenance of
engines while the West Toronto shops were devoted to
heavy repairs. Passenger train locomotives on the North
Toronto branch continued to be serviced at West Toronto.
The new downtown Union Station finally opened
in 1927,
although the tracks would remain at the old grade until 1930.
On September 27,1930, the CPR closed North Toronto Station
and transferred its ten trains a day to the downtown terminal.
The Toronto Locomotive and Car Facilities at John Street
had recently been rebuilt and expanded and these became
Torontos principal CPR passenger yard and engine facilities.
As the shop facilities were expanded and renovated
over the years, improved heating, lighting and ventilation
made conditions more pleasant. Trade unions negotiated
better working conditions and salaries. The introduction
of
mechanical devices such as cranes and hoists made the
backbreaking manual labour somewhat easier. Personal
safety equipment was gradually introduced, although hard
hats and reinforced construction boots didnt become the
norm until the late 1970s. Even though West Toronto was the CPRs major repair
facility.
in. southern Ontario, the most extensive repairs, as
well as the building and rebuilding
of locomotives, were still
carried out at the mammoth Angus Shops in the east end
of
Montreal. During both world wars, Angus was converted to
building tanks and munitions and West Toronto
assumed
some of the heavy-duty repairs that would otherwise have
been sent to Montreal.
The prosperity provided by the railways to the West
Toronto community
came at a steep cost. As in downtown
Toronto, the level crossings
of road and railway became
increasingly dangerous as the city grew and traffic increased.
The solution was either a road underpass or a bridge carrying
the road over the tracks. Either of these projects was
expensive and complex negotiations between the city and
the railways were necessary to determine who would pay for
them.
In the 1890s, an underpass had been built at the Keele
Street crossing and a bridge was constructed at Old Weston
Road.
The second problem was environmental. Steam
locomotives burned coal and sometimes over a dozen of
them were steamed up at anyone time. Residential
neighbourhoods were located close to the railway facilities
and noise and pollution became critical points
of contention.
The Lambton roundhouse was the worst offender due to the
high
volume of engine turnover. In 1930, there were 74
locomotives assigned to Lambton. The CPR extended the
height
of the chimneys over each stall so as to better disperse
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 11 CANADIAN RAIL -498
The Old Weston Road bridge provided a fine vantage point for photographing CP 2-8-0 No. 3725 at West Toronto Junction in
1947. The parallel tracks to the left of the tower are part of CPs North Toronto Subdivision, which still carries about 60 trains
a
day. CP demolished the wooden tower in the early 1960s. Photo by Al Paterson
the emissions. Each stack also had a large numeral mounted
on it so that most egregious polluters could be easily
identified by nearby residents and by city smoke inspectors
who monitored industrial emissions t.hJoughout the city.
The usually prosperous Canadian Pacific Railway did
not escape the impact of the Depression in the 1930s.
Company profits plunged from $35 million to $5 million per
annum. Between 1929 and 1935, the number of passengers
riding the rails was cut in half. As freight and passenger
services were cut back, hundreds of CPR employees in the
Junction were laid off or found their working hours and
salaries reduced. The most illustrious victim of those years
was the celebrated Trans-Canada Limited, a lUXury aJl­
sleeping car train that ran from Montreal and Toronto to
Vancouver during the summer months only. In 1930, the
trains last year
of operation, the Limited stopped at West
Toronto at II :20 p.m. outbound and 7:02 a.m. inbound.
The Depression also hastened the demise of the
remaining electric interurban railways in West Toronto, or
radials, as they were known in Ontario. The Toronto
Suburban Electric Railway had been built from Toronto into
the Junction
in the 1890s. It operated as a local streetcar line
until it
was acquired by Sir William Mackenzie in 1911 and
folded into his Canadian Northern Railway empire. Mackenzie
extended the line northwest to Woodbridge
in 1914 and built
a new I ine from Lambton to Guelph, which opened
in 1917.
After 1923, the line was operated as Canadian National
Electric Railways. The CNR built a new entrance east from
Lambton to St. Clair and
Keele via a private right of way with
an underpass under the
CPR. However the era of the radials
was clearly over. The Weston-Woodbridge line was
abandoned in 1926, followed by the line to Guelph in 1931.
In 1936, the CPR celebrated the 50
111
anniversary of its
first
transcontinental train by introducing new trains that
utilized fast streamlined steam locomotives pulling
lightweight smooth-sided passenger cars. This equipment
was assigned to the Royal York between Toronto and
Detroit. For the next two decades, F2a 4-4-4 Jubilee steam
locomotives No. 3000
& 3002 would call at West Toronto on
a regular basis.
As the 1930s
gave way to World War II, rail traffic
significantly increased at West Toronto and Lambton and
further expansions
were made at both facilities. Lambton
received a new longer turntable and the roundhouse was
expanded from 30 to 37 stalls. In 1944, the Ontario
government nationalized the Union Stock Yards, which
became the Ontario Stock Yards. An amusing incident in an
otherwise grim war also oCCUlTed in 1944 when diesel-electric
locomotives operated for the first time in West Toronto
shunting freight cars. The Alco S-2 engines were equipped
with turbochargers, which made a whistling noise that
sounded like bombs falling from the sky. When the freight
RAIL CANADIEN -498 12 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
CP No. 629, westbound for London, pauses at West Toronto in May 1954. The previous year, Rail Diesel Cars had taken over
this run, but heavy weekend traffic required extra coaches and a locomotive. Engine
No. 3002 is a streamlined 4-4-4 Jubilee,
built by the Montreal Locomotive
Works in 1936. On the left CN No. 8202 is running in reverse with some freight cars, while CP
No. 3727 simmers in front of the station waiting for the passenger train to clear the crossing. Photo by Al Paterson
cars banged together, nearby residents thought that the
bombs had landed and that West Toronto was under attack
by the German air force.
After the war, a brick and concrete coaling tower
replaced the wood structure at. Lambton .. and the wooden
water tank gave way to a 60,000-gallon steel tower. West
Toronto received a new transfer table in 1950. These
improvements would prove to be poor long-term investments
for the CPR. In 1949, the last new
steam locomotive was
delivered to the railway and diesel-electric locomotives
would completely replace steam engines within the next
decade. Lambton yard remained busy with over 260 engine
crew shifts scheduled every week.
In 1953, a radically new type of passenger equipment
appeared at West Toronto on the daytime trains between
Toronto and Detroit. The Rail Diesel Cars were self-propelled
coaches with the engines mounted under the floor and were
built by the Budd Company
of Philadelphia. The CPR called
them Dayliners and they would eventually take over most
of
the companys short-and medium-distance passenger trains.
The cars were economical, requiring a smaller crew than a
regular train. They could also accelerate and brake
quickly,
speeding up timetables wherever they ran. The streamlined
stainless steel fluting
of the Dayliners projected a modern
look and attracted many passengers back to the rails.
As
steam gave way to diesel-electric locomotives
during the 1950s, the CPRs West Toronto station remained
a busy place with as many
as 25 daily passenger trains calling
there in 1955. That year the company introduced The
Canadian, a diesel-electric daily transcontinental train with
streamlined stainless steel cars and scenic
domes built by
Budd. By the late 1950s, the CPR had begun to regret their
multi-million dollar investment
in new passenger equipment. Improved highways and faster, more economical airplanes
siphoned away the rail passenger business and the CPR
began canceling passenger trains with depressing regularity.
The shrinking, number of trains listed on the Arrivals/
Departures board at West Toronto station told the story.
In 1963, the CPR discontinued the Bala Weekend,
the last
remnant of a once extensive summer-only train
service that carried vacationers north to Muskoka and
Haliburton resorts on Friday afternoon and returned them
to Toronto on Sunday evening.
In 1964 the CPR converted
the remaining Toronto-Detroit trains to Dayliners. By this
time, the
Budd cars provided 60% of all CPR passenger
service.
One
of the CPRs most unique trains disappeared in
the fall
of 1965. Twice a week throughout the summers, a
boat train complete with parlor car had run from Toronto to
Port McNicoll on Georgian Bay. Passengers then walked
across an immaculately manicured lawn and boarded either
the Keewatin or the Assiniboia, two beautifully
appointed lake steamers that the CPR had operated between
Georgian Bay and Fort William since 1908. This cancellation
brought an end to the last regularly scheduled boat train
in
North America.
On December 31, 1959, the last
CPR tluough freight
with an assigned
steam locomotive departed Lambton for
Montreal, headed by P2g Mikado 2-8-2 No. 5411. The nature
of the freight business had changed as well as the motive
power. The express parcel business was being taken over
by
trucks and airplanes and less than carload freight was no
longer profitable.
Numerous freight houses owned by the
railways were no longer needed, including several
in West
Toronto. The CPR concentrated on what would become the
core
of their business: bulk freight, such as grain, coal and
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 13 CANADIAN RAIL -498
Canadian Pacific No. 20, the overnight train from Chicago, is crossing the Humber River on the last leg of its journey to
Toronto Union Station in June 1955. Pulling the train are original Jubilee No. 3000 and Royal Hudson No. 2856. Just ahead
is West Toronto Junction. Train No. 20 was known as The Canadian before that name was transferred to CP s transcontinental
streamliner just a few months before this picture was taken. The first bridge over the Humber at this location was built by the
Credit Valley Railway
in 1874 and has been extensively rebuilt and upgraded by Canadian Pacific over the years.
Photo by
Al Paterson
timber; and intermodal, which the railway had pioneered in
1952. Intermodal is a system whereby containers
of freight
can be transferred from highway to rail and
back without
being unpacked and with minimal transfer time. Intermodality
enabled the railways
to recapture some of the freight traffic
lost to the trucking industry.
With the disposal of the last steam engines, the
maintenance facilities at Lambton and West Toronto were
adapted for diesels but they were never ideal for such a
completely different form oftecbnology. The CPR demolished
the
Lambton roundhouse in 1960. By the 1960s real estate
values within the city of Toronto had appreciated
considerably and any new railway facilities would be built
well outside the city limits where land was cheaper.
In April 1964, the CPR opened Toronto Yard at
Agincourt, a new freight marshalling yard and diesel engine
facility
east of the city in what were then considered the
rural
wilds of Scarborough. This 432-acre yard was fully
automated, contained 140 kilometres
of track and cost $15 million. Most CPR employees were transferred from Lambton
to the new facility but so many
of them continued to live in
the Junction that the CPR established an employee-only
commuter service between Lambton and Agincourt using a
surplus Budd car.
The West Toronto locomotive shops remained in use
as a local
maintenance facility and a base for the diesel
locomotives used
in yard service and on local freights in the
Toronto area. The local freight train consisted
of a crew with
a small switch engine and caboose shunting freight cars in
and out
of industrial sidings and then bringing them to the
freight yard for marshalling where they were dispersed onto
long distance trains.
By this time local freight trains were
becoming an endangered species. Modern industrial
subdivisions were not being built with railway access and
the CN and CP were
increasingly relying on unit trains,
intermodal terminals and
bulk shippers as the backbone of
their freight service. Even the caboose would be gone by
1990, replaced by an electronic device.
RAIL CANADIEN -498 14 JANVI ER~FEVRI ER 2004
CP No. 26, an all-stops local train from Sudbwy, is seen clattering across the West Toronto diamonds in this 1955 view. G5c
Pacific
No. 1260 was only nine years old when this photo was taken, and it would be scrapped in 1961. Photo by Al Paterson
Since the tum oLthe century, an interlocking tower
had protected the diamond crossing at West Toronto
Junction where four sets of tracks intersected the double
tracks of the North Toronto Subdivision. The two-storey
wooden structure had 38 levers operating switches, derails,
and semaphores.
In 1964 the CPR demolished the tower and
replaced it with Centralized Traffic Control.
One
of the biggest factors in the demise of passenger
service was the cancellation
of lucrative mail contracts that
had kept many lightly patronized trains
in operation. In 1966,
the
CPR discontinued their secondary transcontinental train,
the
Dominion, although it was briefly resurrected during
the summer
of 1967 as the Expo Limited. By 1970, the trains
to
Owen Sound were gone after years of dwindling and
inconveniently scheduled service. In 1971, the trains between
Toronto, London and Windsor were cancelled, ending all CP
Rail passenger service to southwestern Ontario, as well as
the last vestige
of local service at West Toronto station. The
Toronto-Vancouver
Canadian continued to stop at West
Toronto until it was taken over
by VIA Rail in 1978. VIA
rerouted the Canadian to CN tracks within Toronto and West
Toronto station closed to the public after 67 years of
operation, although CP railway offices remained in the
building for some time after.
All
three passenger stations in the Junction have
since disappeared. On the CN Newmarket Subdivision, St.
Clair station was closed in 1986 after VIA
Ra iis rerouted
Canadian no longer stopped there. On February 19, 1997
the building was destroyed by fire. CNs West Toronto
station lasted the longest. CN commuter trains to Guelph were discontinued in 1975 after GO Transit began their service
to Georgetown and Guelph. GO chose not to stop at West
Toronto; instead they built a
station at Bloor St to allow
passengers to transfer onto the TTC cross-town subway
line. The CN West Toronto station was closed and became
increasingly derelict until it was finally demolished in 1999.
It would be the fate of the CP West Toronto station
that was the most contentious. Efforts were made to preserve
the building
by the West Toronto Junction Historical Society.
The city of Toronto was also interested in converting the
structure
to a farmers market. CP made their standard offer
when disposing of old stations; the structure could be
purchased for a dollar, provided it was moved
off railway
property, an expensive proposition. There was no money for
this a
nd negotiations with CP dragged on for three years.
Meanwhile, in 1981, GO Transit began a new commuter
train service to Milton along
CPs Galt Subdivision, the only
GO train operation to
use CP tracks. Due to heavy freight
traffic along this line,
an additional track with a wider curve
was required for the GO trains to pass through West Toronto.
Unfortunately the projected route
of this track ran too close
to the West Toronto station for
CPs comfort. At dawn on
November 25, 1982, a CP demolition crew moved in and began
dismantling the structure. Toronto mayor Art Eggleton
rushed to the scene and arranged for city officials to issue a
stop-work order. The wrecking crew ignored the order and
within hours the building was reduced to rubble. The
Canadian Transport Commission later ruled that CP had
acted improperly.
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004
One positive result of this act of corporate vandalism
was federal legislation that resulted in the Heritage Railway
Stations Protection Act in 1990. Ironically when the
legislation was presented to the Senate, the only senator to
vote against it
was Ian Sinclair, who as CP President had
authorized the demolition
of West Toronto station. The West
Toronto fiasco was a public relations
disaster for CP and
may have partly led to the company
s donation of the John
Street roundhouse and the valuable land it sits on to the city
of Toronto for the establishment of a railway museum. CP
was also currying favour with the city as they were planning
a huge real estate development to the east
of the roundhouse.
In the 1980s the railways withdrew from the untidy
and logistically difficult business
of transporting livestock
by rail and the Ontario Stock Yards were finally closed
in
1995. Lambton had been the base for a number of transfer
and yard
assignments; two or three of them a day had
operated in a circular route around the city. The loss of heavy
industry in the Toronto core and the closing of local
switching yards and freight houses dramatically reduced
the need for these trains. Today, there is very little industrial
rail traffic left within the city
of Toronto.
Lambton was also the base for CPs branch lines
northwest of the city and these unprofitable routes were
abandoned or sold in the 1980s. In 1987, there was an ill­
fated attempt to downgrade the Lambton yard by
consolidating its functions at Toronto Yard in Agincourt.
This scheme was abandoned in 1994.
In the 1990s the LambtonfWest Toronto yard became
a busy freight intermodal centre and extensive modifications
were made to the facilities. The CPR had been seeking ways
to make intermodality more efficient by reducing the amount
of time necessary to carry out the interchange between road
and rail. Two variations
of this were employed at the yards.
One was RoadRailer or Triple Crown where the highway
trailers themselves had railway trucks and wheels attached
enabling them to become rail cars rather than having to be
loaded onto special flatcars. Another variation was the Iron
Highway whereby rail cars could handle a wider variety
of
highway trailers and truck drivers could enter the terminal,
drop
or pick up their loads and leave, all within fifteen minutes.
The Iron Highway was renamed Expressway and transferred
to a
new CP intermodal terminal near Milton in 2000;
RoadRailer was taken over by CN.
Despite these cutbacks, both Lambton and West
Toronto yards continue to see heavy use, with up to 60
freight trains a day passing through. In 1999, CP built a new
connecting track at the junction allowing freight trains
coming south on the Mactier Subdivision to proceed directly
into the yard without backing up. The yards also serve as a
base for several industrial and road switching trains
that
still service industries in the northwest part of the city and
in the Halton and Peel Regions.
In the 1990 s, there were efforts to preserve the West
Toronto engine house, one of only three 19
th
century
roundhouses left in Canada. In 1997, a report was published
by the West Toronto Junction Historical Society, in which
they outlined the history and heritage significance
of the
building. Unfortunately the preservation efforts failed and
15 CANADIAN RAIL -498
the remaining buildings were demolished in 1998, although
the turntable and transfer table remain. A big-box retail
shopping centre now occupies the site, typical of the sad
fate
of so many railway heritage sites throughout North
America.
While passenger trains no longer stop in West
Toronto, several trains pass through the Junction every day.
CNs Newmarket Subdivision, once the route of the first train
in Toronto and later, the
Super Continental to Vancouver,
has had the track lifted north
of Bradford. Three GO trains a
day run in each direction
between Toronto and Bradford.
VIAs
Canadian also uses part of this route three times a
week
in order to perform a complicated maneuver necessary
to position the unidirectional train
in the right direction. A
hundred years ago, CPR trains had to perform a similar
contortion to reach Union Station. Now, ironically, the last
renmant
of a famous CPR train must do so in order to leave
the city.
CNs Weston Subdivision carries GO trains to
Georgetown and VIA Rail trains for Guelph, Kitchener,
London and Sarnia as well as Amtraks International to
Chicago. The Galt Subdivision
is the only CP line to host GO
trains and sees six trains a day
in each direction on the Milton
service. There is no passenger service on the
CPs Mactier
Subdivision.
The community .of West TorontQ, still known as the
Junction, is experiencing a revival. As industrial and railway
jobs left the area, the Junction expetrienced a slow decline.
The prohibition against the sale f)f alcoholic beverages was
not completely repealed until 2000. Now restaurants and
small businesses are starting to flourish in the area. As house
prices have escalated throughout Toronto, homeowners are
fmding West Toronto a more economical neighbourhood to
purchase property.
Acknowledgement
The author acknowledges the assistance of the following
individuals:
Paul
C. Cordingley, shared his insights into contemporary
railway operations
in West Toronto.
Diana Fancher and Ed Freeman of the West Toronto
Junction Historical Society reviewed the article, made some
suggestions
and corrected a few errors.
Raymond
L. Kennedy also reviewed the article and made
corrections. Ray is a retired CP employee and has
extensively researched CP operations in the Toronto area.
Bibliography
Books
Canadian Pacific in Southern Ontario, Vol. 1, 2 & 3
by W.H.N. Rossiter, British Railway Modelers of North
America, 1981, 1983, 1986.
Credit Valley Railway
by James Filby, Boston Mills Press, 1974.
RAIL CANADIEN -498
Engine Houses & Turntables of Canadian Railways: 1850-
1950
by Edward Forbes Bush, Boston Mills Press, 1990.
Four Whistles to Woodup: Stories of the Northern Railway
of Canada
by Frank N. Walker, Upper Canada Railway Society, Bulletin
No.37,1953.
From Abbey to Zorra Via Bagdad
By Dale Wilson, Nickle Belt Rails, 1980.
The Intercity Electric Railway Industry in Canada
By John F. Due, University of Toronto Press, 1966.
Lines
of Country: An Atlas of Railway and Watenvay History
in Canada
by Christopher Andreae, Boston Mills Press, 1997.
The Ontario and Quebec Railway
by Donald M. Wilson, Mika Publishing Company, 1984.
Rails
From the Junction
By James V. Salmon, privately published, no date.
Railway Heritage Study in Toronto
by Christopher Andreae, Historica Research Ltd., 1983.
,!~e Railways of Toronto, Volumes 1 ~ 2
byJohnRiddell,BRMNA, 1991,1994.
Riding the Radials
By Robert M. Stamp, The Boston Mills Press, 1989.
Running Late on the Bruce
by Ralph Beaumont and James Filby, The Boston Mills Press,
1980.
Steam Trains to the Bruce
by Ralph Beaumont, Boston Mills Press, Cheltenham Ontario,
1977.
Tbe Toronto, Grey & Bruce Railway: 1863-1884
by Thomas
F. Mellwraith, Upper Canada Railway Society,
1963.
Toronto: The Way It Was
by Michael Kluckner, Whitecap Books, 1988.
Trainscape Volume One: Diesel-Electric Locomotives Into
Toronto 1968-1979
by Juris
V. Zvidris, BRMNA, undated.
Trainscape Volume Two: Locomotives On CN Lines Into
Toronto 1968-1979
by Juris
V. Zvidris, BRMNA, undated.
West Toronto Junction Engine House
By Anne M. de Fort-Menares, Heritage Research Associates,
1997.
16 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
West Toronto Junction Revisited
by A.B. Rice, West Toronto Junction Historical Society, 1986.
Periodicals
Extension of Canadian Pacific Yards at Lambton and West
Toronto, Canadian Railway and Marine World, November,
1917.
Farewell West Toronto, UCRS Newsletter, January, 1983.
Grooming the Iron Horse by John Thompson, Branchline,
September, 1996.
Lamb ton Freight and Mechanical Yards, Canadian
Pacific Railway, Canadian Railway and Marine World,
November, 1913.
Lambton Roundhouse: 1890-1965 by E.J. Emery & E.
Helmich, Canadian Rail, August, 1973.
West Toronto Postscript. UCRS Newsletter, July, 1983.
Canadian Pacific Railway
Passenger Timetables, Authors
Collection: 1887, 1896, 1906, 1908, 1909, 1917, 1922, 1925,
1927,1930,1936,1941,1948,1950,1953,1955,1959,1960,
1963,1964,1965,1966,1967,1968,1969,1970,1976.
Internet Web Sites
All
AboardToronto: Virtual Exhibition
http://tplcontent.tpl.toronto.on.ca/links _ ho me.htm I
Toronto Public Library
This web site was established to complement an exhibit at
the Toronto Reference Library held
in 2000 and provides a
well-illustrated
and comprehensive history of railways in
Toronto.
Old Time Trains
http://www.trainweb.org/oldtimetrains
Raymond
L. Kennedy
Ray has extensively researched CPR operations in the
Toronto area
and generously shares this information on
his web site.
Rails in Toronto
http://members.rogers.com:81/railsintoronto/
Paul C. Cordingley
Paul provides a comprehensive overview of contemporary
railway activity
in the Greater Toronto Area.
Derek Boles
4003 Bayview Avenue, Apt. 214
Willowdale, Ontario
Canada M2M 3Z8
derekboles@rogers.com
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 17 CANADIAN RAIL -498
The Great Railway Shops of MOlltreal
The recent closing of the Alstom plant in Montreal, the fonner Pointe St. Charles shops of the Canadian National Railways,
and before them the Grand Trunk, marks the end
of an era. Not so long ago, Montreal was home to many large shops which served
the railway industry.
Among these were the main shops of Canadian National Railways and Canadian Pacific Railway, the
Montreal Locomotive Works, the Canadian Car and Foundty plants, the Montreal Tramways Company shops, the Dominion
Bridge and Dominion Engineering,
as well as others, such as Vickers, which made some railway equipment. Today, most of these
great shops are gone, or converted to other uses.
The year 2004 marks the centennial
of the establishment of two of Montreals greatest railway shops; the Montreal
Locomotive Works and the
Angus Shops of the Canadian Pacific Railway. In commemoration of these events, we propose
printing a series
of articles devoted to the railway shops which have existed in Montreal in the past.
To start this series, we will consider one of the earlier shops. Before Angus Shops were built, the CPR had two shop
facilities
in Montreal, one for locomotives at Delorimier and one for cars at Hochelaga. This issue we will consider the Hochelaga
car shop as reported by the Montreal
Herald in its issue of April 24, 1897. The representative of that paper spent an afternoon
touring the facility, and the article that resulted
is reprinted here exactly as it first appeared 107 years ago, before steel replaced
wood as the chief material for car construction. Next issue we plan to feature the Grand TlUnk car shops
of the same era.
C.P.R. CAR SHOPS.
The shops are situated one
block east of the. Street Railway
stables at Hochelaga, and here it
is that all the cars used on the
great transcontinental road, from
the homely but useful flat car to
the sumptuous sleeper, built for
the use of the directors, or for
some special occasion such as
the great Columbian exposition,
are made.
An Afternoon Spent in the Big
Works at HocheIaga.
• • • •
THE ROUND HOUSE
Upon entering the grounds,
the attention is first attracted to
THE VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS
VISITED BY A HERALD.
the round house, a large low
building, the sides of which are
almost entirely made up of
windows. Here the cars are built
REPRESENTATIVE.
Where the Cars of Every Description Are
Built for the Transcontinental Road.
In these days of cheap travel everyone, no
matter what his station in life may be, knows
something about a railway carriage, with its
comforts and discomforts. At the same time, few
may have had an opportunity to examine the
varied operations necessary for the building of
even the simplest car. A Herald representative
called on Mr. Wm. Apps, the master car builder of
the Canadian Pacific Railway, and requested his
permission to take a trip through the shops and
take a few notes of what he saw there. Mr. Apps
kindly consented, and gave every facility for
seeing all the various operations which are
carried on in the works.
and repaired. The building is
circular, with an empty space in
the centre, provided with a turn
table for changing the cars to
different tracks. The size of the
building may be judged from the
fact that the outside measure­
ment is a quarter of a mile.
Inside, it is divided into six sections, in each of
which, with one exception, there are six tracks
converging to the turn table in the centre. On
these tracks the cars are built. On the first two of
No. 1 section of the shed are manufactured the
trucks for the coaches, which are growing under
the hands of workmen in other parts of the
building. The remaining thirty-three tracks are
filled with passenger coaches. Some of them have
already seen service, but the majority are quite
new, and indeed, many are in such an elementary
stage of construction that few but railway men
would know that they were railway coaches at all.
These appear at present just a couple of heavy
RAIL CANADIEN -498
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JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
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t=—.:……—~J….: __ ——~ .. ————__ The framing for a wooden passenger car like those constructed at Hochelaga shops in the 1890s.
beams, to which are fastened a series of uprights;
farther on is one with the roof half on; to the right
is another, recognizable, but with unstained
mahogany sides, while a little farther still is a
splendid sleeping car, which the uninitiated
might regard as ready for the road,but which still
requires a few deft touches to bring it up to the
standard of excellence demanded by the master
car builder.
FITT~D WITH INSIDE BRAKES
Five new first-class coaches have just been
sent out of this building, which are probably as
fine as any ever manufactured on this continent.
They are the standard size, 56 feet long, and will
seat 56 persons, 44 in the main car and 12 in the
smoking compartments. Two arches, handsomely
car
ved, take away the appearance of sameness,
so n()ticeable in the ordinary car. The inside is
finished in quartered oak, with buckram
headlining. The very latest conveniences are to
be found in the toilet rooms, ahd there are catches
in the walls so that tables can be set up for playing
cards or serving lunch. Outside, all is finely
polished mahogany, stained a deep rich brown.
These magnificent cars are equipped with
Westinghouse quick action automatic brakes and
air signals and steam heat, and have the inside
brakes, the first to be used in this country. This
lessens the cost and labor in removing the
wheels, and at the same time prevents the jerking
motion where the brakes are applied and
released. To accompany them are built two
baggage and express cars, two baggage and
smoking cars, and two second-class and chair
smokers.
WORLDS FAIR COACHES
An interesting track was that on which
several of the coaches of the standard train
exhibited at the Worlds Fair four years ago were
being overhauled and refitted. This train has been
used regularly .since the Exposition on the regular
through runs, and when it again leaves the shops
it will be even more handsome than it was when
on exhibition in Chicago.
A car which is being built on entirely new
models is the stateroom car for small parties
traveling long distances. It contains five separate
staterooms with six berths and an elegantly
finished toilet room attached to each. Small
parties traveling from Montreal or Toronto to
Vancouver will doubtless find the new car a great
accommodation.
Forty or more cars are turned out of the shop
every month, some quite new, some old ones
which have been refitted and repaired so as to
almost equal the new ones.
The glass room» is well worth a visit, for it
is here that all the etched windows are made,
and many pretty articles for the inside finishings
may be seen in the varnishing room, where all
the moveable woodwork is finished after being
washed and scraped in another part of the
building.
WHERE THE WHEELS ARE MADE
Leaving the round houses, the visitor
enters what is perhaps the most interesting of
all the works, -the immense foundry. Here all
the moulding is done both for the wheels and the
soft iron castings. The casting of the wheels is a
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 19 CANADIAN RAIL -498
Two cars built by the CPRs Hochelaga Shops in the 1890s. Note the narrow vestibules on first-class coach No. 426.
Photos courtesy
of Canadian Pacific Corporate Archives
very delicate operation when it is taken into
consideration that they are not only one of the
most important items in the make-up of the car
on account of the possible accidents which may
occur if they are not perfect, but also that they
will have to stand a constant strain of wear and
tear. However, these are the wheels which are
used for freight service only, the passenger
wheels, which have the perfect steel rim, being
all imported from the celebrated Krupp foundry in
Germany. To the stranger, the scene in the
moulding room might appear to be one of
confusion, yet not only is everything perfectly
ordered, but it could scarcely be otherwise, for in
a shop where men are wheeling barrows of molten
metal from the huge tanks to the moulds,
confusion would mean death. There is no time
wasted in pouring the metal into the moulds,
twelve seconds only being the allotted time. After
remaining for fifteen minutes in the moulds the
wheels, still red hot, are piled one on top of
another in huge pits. The pits can hold 1,000
wheels at a time, and are kept constantly full.
After
eight days in the pits they are still too hot to
handle, but are ready for use.
THE BEST PAID MAN
The proper mixture of coke and iron is very
important. The rim of the wheel must take the
proper chill so that it will wear well. But the chilled
RAIL CANADIEN -498 20 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
The interior of a first-class CPR day coach and smoking car used in express passenger service between Montreal and
Ottawa
in the late 1890s. The magnificence of the woodwork is clearly visible. Canadian Pacific Corporate Archives
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 21 CANADIAN RAIL -498
Engravings, made by American Bank Note Company, showing the interior ofCPRflrst-class passenger cars built in
J 890 by the Hochelaga Shops. These drawings appeared in a promotional booklet issued by the CPR in J 892.
iron is brittle, and the rest of the wheel must be
such as to give great strength. Five per cent aside
from the proper proportion would make the wheels
useless. The foreman who has charge of this
important department is naturally the best paid
man in the shops.
For the metal used for every third wheel a
test bar is made. It is an inch square on the end,
and is subjected to a pressure of 3,000 pounds to
the inch. At frequent intervals a wheel is tested.
While the Herald representative was in the
building he was fortunate enough to witness such
a test. The wheel was surrounded by a strong
metal rim, about 1 1/4 inches distant. Between
the two was poured molten metal, and the time
was noted till the wheel cracked, which was 1
minute 13 seconds. This wheel, which was being
tested for an outside maker, was not up to the
mark, the average time for the wheels made in
the C.P.R. shops being about 2 1/2 minutes, some
of them standing the heat for almost 3 minutes.
This is the most severe test a wheel can be put
to.
One hundred and twenty wheels are turned
out every day, which replace wheels that have
been broken or become worn out in use on the
many cars on the CPR. This seems an enormous
number of wheels to use in a day, but it must be
remembered that the wheels for the whole system
are made in Montreal.
THE MACHINE SHOPS
The tool shop and machine shop are not
lacking in interesting features. The glare of the
forges and the clang of many hammers are a
change from the uneventfulness of ordinary office
life.
The usual operations in shaping iron are
carried on here, but with all the aids of labor
saving machinery. One heavy machine, the
Bulldozer, as it is called, was busy bending the
red hot metal into all sorts of curious shapes when
the Herald reporter passed through. By merely
changing the iron forms in front of the machine
the shape can be altered at will. Here too, the
axles were being put into the wheels. They are
not locked in, but are simply forced in by a
hydraulic pressure of from 25 to 75 tons. All the
wheels and axles are handled by pneumatic hoists
and the steel rims are placed on the rough iron
wheels by the same power.
THE CABINET SHOP
In the mill and cabinet shop the wood work
for the cars is prepared. Many kinds of wood are
to be seen; British Columbia pine for foundation
and frames, which sometimes comes in lengths
of 70 feet without a knot; tough oak beams for
the trucks, and mahogany, cherry, quartered oak
and prima vera for the inside, and mahogany for
ou tside finishings. There was one magnificent
piece of mahogany in the cabinet shop. It was 48
RAIL CANADIEN -498
inches wide, 14 feet long, and two inches thick,
and not a knot or shake to be seen. Before being
used the wood is left to season for four or five years,
and the fine wood for finishing is usually put in a
drying room for 20 or 30 days.
To complete the equipment there is an
upholstering shop, where all the curtains, carpets
and cushions are made, cleaned and repaired.
Near this is the tin shop, which is devoted mostly
to repairing the lamps and other brass and light
metal pieces used in the cars.
Outside, in the yard, men are also hard at
work. The ordinary freight car coupling has been
the cause of so many accidents that the United
States law now exacts another style of coupler.
The master car builders standard verlute bar is
being put on all the cars. This is arranged so that
by merely turning a handle two cars can be
coupled, without the brakeman going between the
cars at all.
All
the freight cars are now being fitted with
the Westinghouse system of air brakes, so that
they will be under the direct and complete control
of the engineer on the locomotive.
A whole day spent in the shops would be all
too short to see them thoroughly. Hours could be
spent in each of the many departments, especially
if from time to time, Mr. G.H. Eaton, the general
car foreman, could snatch a few moments to call
attention to and explain the most interesting
features of the various sections. A trip through
the whole block of buildings under his guidance
would indeed be a treat.
Three woodcuts showing the interior of older CPR
passenger cars. While not built at Hochelaga, they were
maintained there and kept up
to date with the latest
devices necessary
for safety and comfort.
22 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 23 CANADIAN RAIL -498
THE
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
THE WOqLOS HIGHWAY FROM THE ATLANTIC TO THE PCIFIC,
The Newest, the Moat Solidly Conlltruoted and the Be8t Equipped Transcontinental Route,
PARTICULAR ATTENTION IS CALLED to the PARLOlt, SLEEPING allu ])I:-IING CAR
SERVICE-so particular an acc.ssory upon a railway whose calS run ul>wards of
THREE THOUSAND MILES WITHOUT CHA OE.
T
RESE cars are of unusual strength and size, with berths, smoking and toilet accommodations correspondingly roomy.
The transcontinental sleepiDg cars are provided with BATH ROOMS, and all are fitted with double doors and win·
dows to exclude the dust in summer and the cold in winter. .
The seats are richly upholstered, with high backs and arms
J
and the central sections are made into luxurious sof~s
during the day.
The upper berths are provided with windows and ventilators, and have cllrtains separate from those of the berths beneath.
The exteriors are 0( polished red mahogany and the interiors are of white
mahogany and satinwood elaborately carved; while all useful and decorative
pieces of metal work are of old brass of antique design.
No expense is spared in providing the DININO .CARS with the choice,t
yiands and seasonable delicacies, and the bill of fare and wine list will compare
f~vorably with those of the most prominent hotels.
OBSERVATION CARS, specially designed to allow an unbroken view
of the wonderful mountain scenery, are run on all tran!o;continental trains
between Canmore and Revelstoke, and Lytton and Westminster Junction.
THE FIRST-CLASS DAY COACHES are proportionatelyelabo.
rate in their arrangement for the comfort of the passenger; and for those who
desire to travel at a cheaper rate, OOLONIST SLEEPIIG
CARS are provided without additional charge. These cars are
fitted with upper atid lower berths an: .. r the same general style as
other sleeping cars, but are not upholstered, and the passenger ma.y :-
furnish
his own bedding, or purchase it of the Companys agents at
lermanalstations at nomin-al rat~. ·The entire pa<>senger equipril~nt
is M.<.jICHLESS in elegance and comfort.
FtRST-CLASS SLEEPING
AND PARLOR CAR TARIF.
FOR ON£ LOWER O.R ONE UPPER
DERTH IN SLEEPING CAR
.BETWEBN
H lilfaxand Montreal : -$4 00
Quebec and Montreal – 1 50
Montreal and Toronto . 2 00
MJntreal and Chicago – 5 00
Montreal and Winnipeg 8 0)
Montraal a ld Vancouver 20 00
Ottawa and Toronto 2 00
Ottawa and Vancouver 20 00
fort William and Vancouver 15 00
Taranto and Chicago· 3 00
Toronto and Winnipeg 8 00
Toront~ ald Vancouver 18 50
Boston and Montreal • 2 00
New York and Montreal· 2 00
Boston and St. Paul • 7 00
B )ston and Chicago – 5 50
Montreal and St. Paul 6 00
SI. Paul and Winnipeg 3 00
St. Paul and Vancouver· 13 50
Wlnnlpag and Vancouver 12 00
Between other stations rates are
in proportion.
Accommodation In First·cbss Sleep.
ing Cars and in Parlor Cars will be
sold only to holders of Firot-class
t rn.nsportation. • . . • . • .
A full-page advertisement of 1892, extolling the features of the CPR transcontinental service, and depicting
the interior
of a first-class sleeping car with sofa sections, The maintenance of these beautiful cars to the
highest standards was one
of the major duties of the Hochelaga Shops.
RAIL CANADIEN -498 24 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
The Great COullterfeit Street Car Ticket Scare
by Fred Angus
On Sunday evening, September 12
1897, the receiving girls were counting
and sorting tickets at the central office
of
the Montreal Street Railway. This was a
regular daily
procedure as the leather­
covered hand-held coffee pot fareboxes
were brought in from the cars and their
contents removed. The young ladies were
not only counting and sorting the various
types
of tickets and cash fares, but were
on the lookout for such extraneous items
as
pieces of cardboard, theatre ticket
stubs, tobacco stamps and sundry other
little articles which bear a resemblance
to
a street car ticket or a five cent piece. Once
sorted, the
tickets would be tied up in
bundles for auditing and eventual
destruction.
At that time the fare structure
of
the MSR used four kinds of tickets. Most
common were the 4 1/6 cent blue tickets
sold
in strips of six for 25 cents. Those
who purchased tickets in larger quantities
could get a slight discount and obtain the
4 cent tickets sold in sheets
of25 for $1.00.
Workmen got a better deal, eight tickets
for
25 cents, or 3 118 cents each. These
were only valid from 6 to 8 A.M. and from
5 to 7 P.M., the times when workers would
The headquarters of the Montreal Street Railway as photographed in 1898. It was
here that the counterfeit tickets were discovered on Sunday, Se
ptember 12, 1897.
This 1894 building (with an extra two floors added in 1922) still stands.
be traveling to and from their place of employment. The fourth
type
of ticket was for children under 12 years old; their fare
was 2
112 cents or 10 for 25 cents. No distinction was made as
to whether the child attended school or not. There were also
special tickets for postmen, policemen etc., but these were
not available to the general public. The cash fare was five
cents, usually paid in the form
of a silver 5 cent piece, a small
coin half the size
of the present day cent piece. Money
was
much more stable in those days, and the above fare
structure did not change from June 1892 until October 2, 1918.
On that Sunday evening, as the contents of the
fareboxes were being sorted, one of the girls, more alert than
the others, noticed a blue ticket (one
of those sold in strip of
six for 25 cents) that, as she put it, felt rather strange. She
reported it to
her supervisor who immediately took it to
Duncan l1acdonald, the Superintendent of the MSR, who
carefully examined it and pronounced it
to be a very clever
counterfeit.
It was so good that when placed with genuine
tickets none but those who made the matter a study could
detect the fraud. Immediately the sorted bundles were opened
and all tickets were examined. In twos and threes and fives
the counterfeits turned up, and no less than fifty were found
among those bundles packaged just that evening. It was
obvious that the situation was serious, and a full investigation
was begun at once.
No time was lost, and the Canadian Secret Service
(whose duties included the suppression
of counterfeit money)
was called
in. Mr. Karsch, superintendent of the Secret Service,
organized the proceedings, and on Monday, within an hour
of taking charge of the investigation, had men traveling on
every line on the city purchasing enough tickets to keep a
public school in street car fares for a couple
of years. The
rust break came on the Notre Dame line when one of Mr.
Karschs operatives purchased tickets from conductor No.
340, Eli Harvey, some
of which proved to be counterfeit.
Conductor Harvey was quietly removed from the car, taken
to the police station and locked up. On his person were found
84 forged tickets with a face value
of $3.50. Confronted with
this evidence,
Mr. Harvey confessed, saying that others were
involved but refusing
to name them.
The investigation made considerable progress,
however, and some very clever detective work was done
in
the next two days. At 9 oclock on Wednesday evening,
September 15,
Mr. Karsch was standing near the comer of St.
Catherine and St. Lawrence Main, outside the Theatre
Francais, when he met an old friend who wanted to go for a
walle Mr. Karsch excused himself saying, with some irony,
Excuse me, but here comes another friend
of mine on this
car, and I want him
to go for a walk with me. Along came a St.
Catherine car (unfortunately the car number was not
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 25 CANADIAN RAIL -498
=-.~ …… –.. –
MONTREAL, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 1897.
LEFT: Big news! The headlines that
appeared on the front page of the
Montreal Herald the day the news
of the ticket fraud became public.
COUNTERFEIT CAR TICKETS.
A Big Conspiracy Unearthed
in the City.
fOUR MEN UNDER ARREST·
Originated by Discharged . Employes
found Dishonest.
:DIe lIontrClal Street Railway titood
to Lose Mueh !Ioney-A
Shop Ulrl.
;. .. ..
recorded) in charge of condu~tor No. 680, William McKibbon, who was
suspected
as being the ringleader of the counterfeiters. Mr. Karsch boarded
the car and
in thirty seconds arrested conductor McKibbon and sent the
car on its way
in charge of Superintendent Macdonald who had been
awaiting this move. Although McKibbon had only six of the counterfeit
tickets
in his possession, the evidence, quietly gathered in the preceding
two days, was so strong that he confessed and was locked
up in No.4
police station.
Once the word was out, panic set
in among the public, and also the
conductors. The fear was,
of course, that they might be arrested if they
had counterfeit tickets
in their possession, even if purchased innocently.
Conductors also feared that they would be suspected
if counterfeits were
found
in their fareboxes, even if these tickets had been purchased from
someone else. The company was quick to state that
no innocent persons
would be under suspicion; they already had a good idea as to who was
behind the scheme. They also published a description
of the forgeries so
the public could detect them and turn them
in. All the counterfeits were of
the blue 4 l/6 cent tickets, which at that time had a picture of a street car on
I
the front and the stamped signature of Granville C.
Cunningham (Manager and Chief Engineer) on the back,
together with a serial number. At that time a strip
of six
Au··8 97
n Q SEE OTHER SIDE
ABOVE: A ticket of the type that was counterfeited. This
one
is genuine. None of the 1897 countelfeits is known to
exist, and genuine tickets
of this era are extremely rare.
RJGHT: A transfer issued by the MSR at the same period.
This one
was punched at 8:13 A.M. on August 8, 1897, on a
St. Denis car going north. This type was discontinued later
that year,
as it required the conductor to punch it five times,
while the new one needed only three punches.
RAIL CANADIEN -498 26 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
Open car No .. 147 on Notre Dame Street in the summer of 1898. It was on such a car that the jirstarrest was made in the case
of the counteifeit tickets, when conductor Eli Harvey was .apprehended.
MUNROE Bros. !;
~
Gentle~en:s i
Furnishing I;
~Goods
2246 St. Catherine St. West.
In 1898 the MSR changed their tickets slightly. Gone was
the signature
on the back, and the serial number was now
on the front. Advertising now occupied the entire back,
which dates
this ticket, for Munroe Bros. were only at that
address in 1898 and 1899. About 1900 the ticket was
completely redesigned and the street car disappeare
d.
tickets had three in English and three in French; the reports
indicate that both varieties were counterfeited. The front
was lithographed and well nigh perfect even to the
signature of President L.J. Forget which was just as hard
to decipher on the forgery as it
is on any other document.
On the back, the signature of Mr. Cunningham was applied
with a rubber stamp, the distinguishing features being that
the
M in manager, as well as the & were slightly larger
than usual. The serial numbers were in the 690000 series
which had not been used for six weeks. This suggested
that the counterfeiters had been working on their project
during that time.
The dragnet was closing in. Next
to be arrested was
Alexander McKibbon, brother
of William, who was picked
up in Quebec City as he was about to board a steamship
for
England. The members of the gang fled, but the
telegraph wires were kept busy as they were tracked down
and apprehended. The place where the printing was done
was found, as was a supply
of counterfeits and materials
enough to make many more. In due course the members
of
the gang, eventually amounting to more than twenty, pled
guilty
and were sentenced to prison terms. The great
counterfeit street car ticket scare was over.
As the investigation continued it was soon apparent
that a major fraud, well organized and involving a considerable
number
of persons, had been nipped in the bud. It had only
just gotten under way, but it could easily have cost the
MSR
a great deal of money. The printing plant had a capacity to
print well over a hundred thousand tickets a week, with a face
value
of about $5000. While this does not sound like much
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004
today, in 1897 it was a great deal of money. That year the
MSR had gross earnings
of about $1,300,000, or $25,000
a week. Had the counterfeiters succeeded
in passing only
half the tickets they were capable of producing, it would
have reduced the MSRs gross by 10%. The conspiracy
was hatched by
agang of ex-conductors; ones who had
been dismissed for various reasons, chiefly
di§>honesty.
The plan was to recruit other dishonest conductors who
were still in the companys employ, and use them
to flood
the city with their nefarious product. No one would ever
suspect a street conductor
of selling counterfeit tickets
on the car, and it was hoped that weeks or months would
go by before anyone became suspicious.
By then the
gang would have pocketed their ill-gotten gains and
disappeared. Thanks
to the keen observation of one of
the receiving girls, the scheme came to a quick end and
the company, and the general public, could once again
trust the validity
of their street car tickets.
The
MSR did not change their tickets to make
them less easy
to counterfeit, but changes were, in fact,
on the way. The very next year, 1898, the superintendents
name was removed from the back, and the serial number
moved to the front. The reason was the realization of
another source of revenue; the space on the back could
be sold for advertising. At various times until the late
1920s
Montreals street car tickets carried ads on the
back, Clarks Pork and Beans, and British Consols
Cigarettes being favourites. In 1900 the street car design
disappeared, and the ticket was changed
to an upright
rectangle, a fonnat which lasted until 1966. The old design
of the 1890s appeared once more, in 1961, the centennial
year
of the company; it was placed, in a modified form,
on the back of the commemorative tickets, issued that
year only, complete with the signature
ofLJ. Forget who
had been dead for fifty years
I By then no one remembered
the great counterfeiting scare
of 1897.
27 CANADIAN RAIL -498
ABOVE AND BELOW The newest types of street cars in Montreal
in
1897; both were built in the companys shops that year. Both
cars
had an identical lifespan, twenty-seven years, and were
scrapped
in 1924. However open car 333, below, had been in storage
for quite a few years before that date.
RAIL CANADIEN -498 28 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
The Brown Collection
Doug Brown
Introduction by Peter Murphy and Josee Vallerand
In December 2003 the Canadian
Railroad Historical Association accepted the
donation
of the Brown Collection for the
CRHA archives. This collection was gathered
from about 1920
to 1990 by Robert R. Brown
and his son Douglas Brown. The black three
ring binders,
mostly handwritten, are well
known to railway historians. These are
accompanied by a collection of black and
white negatives, some prints, timetables,
tickets, transfers, books and assorted
memorabilia.
This is an important contribution to
the CRHA archives as Robert
R. Brown was a
founding member
of the CRHA and his early
research on Canadian railways
is well known.
The book collection will be integrated into
the CRHA library (at ExporaiJ) and the
remainder of the collection will be kept intact
and will be known as
the Fond Brown .
We wish to thank Douglas Brown for
this generous donation and we are proud
to
be the recipient of such an important
collection.
We
are pleased to provide the
following thumbnail sketch of Robert R.
Brown as provided by his son Douglas.
ROBERT RITCHlE BROWN
Born: 22 December 1899
Died: 17 April 1958
My fathers library archives has been
donated
to the Canadian Railroad Historical
Association (CRHA) for inclusion in the new
archives facility at Exporail at Delson / St.
Constant, Quebec. I have been asked to
provide a few notes
to illustrate his life-long
work
of researching and recording Canadian
transpOliation history.
The first railway charter by the CRHA was on October 1, 1950. It utilized CNR
self-propelled car
15837 on a trip pom Montreal to Huberdeau, Que. During a
stop-over at
St. Jerome, CNR 1386 provided a proper background for a picture
of left to right -o.A. Trudeau, o.A. Boivin and R.R. Brown.
My Father was born in Toronto but
moved
to Montreal at an early age where he remained except
for a shOli time in Detroit and a world tour during 1915 /
16.
The world tour was made necessary due to an assignment
given to his Father (my Grandfather) by Singer Sewing
Machine Company in India. I have my Fathers diary which
shows
he left, with his parents, from Montreal on July 24,
1915 for
New York City then by ship to Suez Canal-Madras,
India, returning to Canada via Singapore, Hong Kong,
Yokohama to Vancouver (rail) to Montreal. All of this
travelling was by railways and steamships and I am convinced
the
seed for transportation history was planted during
this trip
to India. His attention to detail (in his dry humorous
way)
is shown in the last entry on his return to Montreal on
April
15, 1916 when he stated that the distance travelled was
434,225,904 INCHES and took 21,168,000 SECONDS (this
before the era
of calculators)!
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004
The CRHA was founded on March
15,1932 at the Chateau de Ramezay Museum
in Montreal. Quoting from News Report no.
131
dated March 1962 the following
statement is noted. The desire to form
such a group (the first
in Canada and second
on the continent) arose as the aftermath
of
an exhibition at the Chateau de Ramezay, that
marked the centenary
of the granting of the
first railway charter
in Canada. The exhibitors
thus brought together had a common interest
in railways as a hobby and in railway history
in particular, and it was resolved, through
the
personal efforts of Mr. John Loye to
coordinate the talent which had been
brought together at the exhibition, into a
permanent group. I believe my Father
participated in this early exhibition and
subsequent meeting on March 15, 1932.
Montreal street car 997 on a CRHA excursion during a
rainy afternoon
in November 1957. The occasion was the
last day
of service on St. James Street.
There were twelve Charter Members of the CRHA of
which my Father was one, and, it is interesting to note that
Dr. R.V.V. Nicholls
is the only surviving member of that small
group. The first major project for the CRHA was the
celebration in July 1936 of the centenary of the opening of
the Champlain and St. Lawrence Railroad. A replica of the
locomotive Dorchester was constructed for the celebrations.
My Father was responsible for researching and preparing
plans and drawings to be used by the construction crew
headed by Mr. L.A. Renaud (another Chal1er Member). Also,
my Father obtained the necessary wood from scrap shipping
crates used by the Singer Sewing Machine Company. One
only has
to look inside the fire-box to see the Singer stencil
markings
on the wood! This replica is now a feature exhibit
in the new Exporail pavilion.
Over the years the Editorial Committee
of the CRHA
has been, and continues to be, one
of its strong points and
my Father as a committee member was involved from the
beginning. Bulletin No.
I was published in April 1937 and
my Fathers first contribution was a Locomotive List of the
Dominion Atlantic Railway that appeared in Bulletin No.4
published in February 1938. The Editorial Committee, under
29 CANADIAN RAIL -498
In the next four pages we show (in no special order) a few of
the pictures and documents in the Brown Collection.
Captions are provided where known.
the Chairmanship of Dr. R.V.V. Nicholls, with my Father and
Mr. John Loye as committee members were re-elected for the
year 1938 with an annual budget
of $20.00! The Bulletin
continued to be published with many articles by my Father
but ceased after Bulletin No.
15 in December 1940 due to the
war effort.
In October 1949 the Editorial Committee resumed
publishing with my Fathers first article appearing in News
Report
No.5 dated February 1950. A long list of articles,
both
short and long, such as Street Railways of Eastern
Canada, Canadian Locomotive Builders, Crossing the River,
The Last Broad Gauge, The Ice Railway, etc. appeared on a
regular basis until ill health brought his writing to a halt
in
1957.
My Father was a founding member of the CRHA and
also
became involved in the executive area of the CRHA
serving as Secretary from 1932 to 1934 and Director from
1951 to 1954 and
in 1956.
In addition to his involvement with the
CRHA my
Father was for many years the Canadian Representative for
the Railway
& Locomotive Historical Society of Boston and
wrote many articles for their Bulletin including two full issue
articles on the Champlain and St. Lawrence
Railroad and
Locomotives
of the Canadian Pacific Railway (co-authored
with O.S.A. Lavallee).
The transportation library built up over the years by
my Father consisting
of books, histories, photographs, etc.
has remained intact and, added
to since his death in 1958
but the time has now come to make sure it continues to be a
source of information for present and future railway
historians. Therefore, it is with pleasure that the Brown family
fully
endorses the donation of the library to the CRHA
knowing that it will be yet another addition to the excellent
research library archives located at Exporail.
My Father would have been pleased!
R.D. Brown.
12 December 2003
RAIL CANADIEN -498
CPR No. 29 takes water.
ABOVE: An excursion with A10ntreal Birney cal
200 at
McGill Street by the interchange with the Montreal &
Southern Counties.
RIGHT Montreal instruction car 1054 was used on the first
CRHA charter excursion
in 1948. This photo was taken at
St. Denis car barn.
30 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
An interurban of the Grand River Railway.
An old fashioned ball signal explains the origin
of
the term highball.
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004
RIGHT The only excursion run with the CRHA ~
car 274 was in June 1957. Here we see it at
George
V, the eastern end of the line.
RIGHT Locomotive No. 5 of the
Maritime Railway is not the same
No.
5 that is now preserved at the
Canadian Railway Museum.
31 CANADIAN RAIL -498
LEFT: The old station of the
Temiscouata Railway at Riviere du
Loup before the railway was taken
over by the
CNR.
LEFT: A view from the CPR lake boat at
Port McNicoll, showing the boat train.
RAIL CANADIEN -498
HIStuRreAL IUNUAL
OF
CANADIAN RAILWAYS
oompiled by
Robert R. Brown.
A
oon01s9 arrangement of the dates of the
prinoipal events relating to the oorporate
struoture and physioal property of all Canadian
railways. Exoept tor 0008s10nal referenoes, no
finanoial etatements A.re inoluded.
All statutes relating to railways may be found
in itA. statutory History ot the stem and Eleotrio
Railways ot Canada, 1836-1937
11
, by Robert Dorman,
and published by the Department ot Transport, Ottaw;a.
80 only the most important ones are shown in this
manual.
The 8ylI1bolB relatin8, .to statutes indioate .their.
origin, the year ot the Sovereigns reign and the
ohapter number. ThuB:-
Dom.a6-Vio. ,Cap.?
signifies that the Aot oited was paseed by the
Dominion (Federal) Parliament in the 36th year at
Her }[ajesty, Queen Viotorias reign, and is numbered
Chapter 7 in the Volume of statutes tor that session.
The various Provinoial Aots are similarly designated
by initials indioating the name of the provinoe
(i.e., Q.ue •• N.S., eto.) instead of Dam., whioh
indioates a Dominion Aot. PC signities an Order
of the Privy Counoil.
Looomotive rosters are included when possible.
OF THE
CANADIAN NATIONAL

RAILWAYS
TOP: SAMSON on display at Halifax station.
ABOVE: Some examples
of Robert R. Brown s records and
manuscript on Canadian railway history.
NEXT THREE PA GES: R. R. Brown s first contribution to a
CRHA publication was this roster
of Dominion Atlantic
Railway locomotives. It appeared,
in two installments, in
the CRHA Bulletin in 1938. As it is still interesting and
informative, we reprint
it here in the same form in which it
appeared 66 years ago.
32
….. –
JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
Ant1ooet1 leland RaHway
Pw/-: ~ Wv. ~,
it../!u f/lM< 189&
114
1910
Antioosti leland bought bl, Henri Meunier.
~r~h. ~ t2a~1 f)~
J 1926
COMpletion of 1& ….. 1.08 t 3 ggtllg railway.
opuwZ;:.,.. elM !U1…&;;J.u.,f
Tho
Jdeunier heirs sold the island to a
group of Canadian paper oompanios who
then organized the Antioosti Corporation.
1929
Railway abandoned exoept 4000 feet trom the
wharf to a warehouse.
1.
2 •.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Looomotives
2-4-0
0-4-4-0
0-4-4-0
0-&-0
0-&-0
0-4-0
12:xl6 34 1910 Yontreall:–iSn6
12:xlO 23 Heisler
13>:12 36 Heisler
·17×24· 44 Baldw1n
16X24 67 1904 Rebuilt, FitzHugh,
gas. 1930 Ant1oost1
1 passenger: oar
3 boarding oars
10 tlat cars, steel
215 flat oars, wood
20 dump.oars
1 steam shOTel
Gorp.
1 Industrial orane, 16 tons.
Luther
,fJ~So -.Jnr 1
.:l-8.-;J.. ~7~J_9!.~.3· /717 KIA.I-;,f7o,J
13 . .P. /Jo T)e S3 7.
! ;.
f/,.lIi.T ir:o~ &;Yt9o~n,AJ 1 (JOVCl?A.I~UAJT
~4i< eN~ C/No
!!2..:. .? ~o t —
18.30 3~S0 111ft
;j;SI 3d, II/o
~S_z-32{1~ 1<121 T
JlrSJ 321) ( ~lS..r 3d, N~.
ay.r.r ) I_I,} 11
21J6 3;z.J 100(.r
U.f7 37· . ••.
JJ..r.K· 32-{1 ~ 1/67
1t.r7 Ji..r7 ,.
1160 .~o NGf
)/hl 3).(( //7 …
216;; 3i..2. /1/71
~~ il-~ I 11.7 ….
t1.if ~eY Y7_
l1U· ,>!O(. /0/
*t. hI. 1I7r
JI~1 3;z.47 1«7
-:JJ,y .h.~l 11-77
J169. ,~M 1Y7J
1170 -1.2.,00 1<177
:Ifli 31-7/ 1130
i.tll-> 1~7t.. h(tPl
2i73 J1-13 IIJL.
1.171 3l.7Y I/RJ
If!,J h,r IYJ1V
,/174 )1..7(;, IY3J-
I
f.7J 3l-77 IY%(,
2flR )~li. NF;
lr~? J~7 ,yl,

,;L-,· …
11q
fP~c;
19/-{
L/-if,!?
Y: ljS6
fUr­
IiSS
111£7
ft6
i5f,
I]SS
I/,~·~
.lUi
IiS,
IISS
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 33 CANADIAN RAIL -498
Locomotives of the Dominion Atlantic Railway
Compiled by Robert R. Brown
Q,l_t..!,. Ac.JW.
1855 1869
1855 1869
1851 1869
1869 1869
H
n tr
tr tt
..
it
1853 1872

Winasor and A~Lapo1is Railway (B.G.)
1869-187.3
No. Name
-S ir -C8:.ipard
Jos. Howe
St. Lowrer.,:, e 1
Evangeline
2 Gabrle1
3 Hiawatha
4 B1omidon
5 Grand Pre
6 Gaspereaux
Liphtning
st. Croix
Dia.
~ Qxl.Driv Builder
4-2-0 12×18~Neilson

4-4-0 1Cx?] 66 Portland
1f….:2B 61 Fox. Walker

rr

,.
..

15×24 65 Schenectady
60 Port1nnd
Ex
Ex
Remarks
N.S.R. No.2
No.3
G.T.R. No.4
Ex . G . W . R. No,. 2
Second Hand
Yarmouth and A~~apo1is Ry. (Western Counties Ry.)
1874-1894
1874
1876
1889
1892
1894 1894
1879
1879
1 Pioneer
2 Geo. B, Doa.rls 3
Western
4. Annapo1:i s
5 Yarmoutl 6
Digby
7 W H. Moody)
Re Cerese ) 8
Weymouth
4-4-0 14×22 54
15×22 60
17×24 62

rr to
Portland No.208
340
602
623
14&.18×24 66 Baldwin

16×24 60 Portland
tI

355
354
Windsor Branch Ry. (Western Counties)
1877-1879
1877 Fran, Killam 4-4-0l5x22 60 Portland 341
342
348
344

Halifax rr

Windsor
Yarmouth.
1871 11190 1 Q.ueen Mab
.,
16×24 .

Cornwallis Vs11ey Ry.
1889-1892
4-4-0 12×24 56 Rogers
Windsor and Annapolis Ry. (S G.)
1875-1894
1865
1875
1R66
1875
18b6
1875
1859
1875
1859
1875
1875 1 Evangeline
Rabuil t
1875 2 Gabriel
Rebullt
lFl75 3 Hiawatha,
Rebul1t
1875 4 B1omidon
Rebuil t
1875 5 Grand Pre
Rebuil t
1875 6 Gaspereanx
1875 Rebuilt
1875 1875 7 Basil
I 8 Benedict
11 9 Minne H::l. Ha
1891 1891 10 Kentvil1e
1AA9 1889 11 St Eu1s1 ie
1890 1890 ~ Acadia
? 10992 13 Q.ueen Mab
1892 1892 14 Atalanta
1893 1893 15 Oberon
1893 1893 ~ Titania
1894 1894
1896 1896
1879
Re Vallieres
17 Fortuna
lA RelZino.
19 W H. Moody
Re Cerose 11194
4-4-0 Xinp,ston
Portland
4-4-0 Kln~ston
Portland
4-4-0 Kin~ston
Portland
4-4-0 16×24 60 Fleming

4 -4-0 16×24 60

4-4-0 16×24 62 ~ort1and
If
4-4-0 l6x24 60

It

17×24 66 Baldwin
18×24 62 Portland

..

..

12×24 56 Rogers
17×24 66 Baldwin
18×24

..
4-4-0 18×24 Baldwin

n 16×24 60 Portland
55
63
64
333 334
335
599
603
Re D.A.R. No.2
7
10
15 17
18
Sold to W&.A 19
Re D.A.R. No.8
Sold 1879k1 N.B&C.
..
..
.
..
..
..

..
..
Ex N.B.H. No.30
Ex
Ex
Ex
Ex
Ex
Ex
Ex
I.C.R. no.21
D.A.R. No.14
I.C.R. No.22
D.A.R. No.13
I.C.R. No.23
D.A.R. No.3
E.& N.A.
D.A.R. No.4
E.& N.A.
D.A.R, No.5
I.C .R.
D.A.R. No.6
D.A.R. No.9
D.A.R. No.12
D.A.R.
O.A.R .
D.AR.
D.A.R.
D.AR .
D.A.R.
D.A R.
Y&A
D.A.R.
No.11
No.1
No.16 No.19
No.20
No.21 No.23
No.7
No .22
RAIL CANADIEN -498 34 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
Uldland Ry. of Nova Sc ot ia
Dia.
Bl_t..!., Ac..9…!. No.
1i~~~ ~ lli·
Driv Builder Remarks
1874 1901 1 Truro 4-4-0 17×24 66 Rhode Is. Ex GTR No.421 DAR 31
lR83 1902 2 Windsor

17×22 62 G.T R. Ex GTR No.261 DAR 30
1R?4 1902 3 Brooklyn
17×24 66 Rhode Is. Ex GTR No .420 DAR 29
4 Pioneer 2-6-0 16×24 55 Portland DAR 28
Dominion Atlantic Ry.
lR94-
Prev.No.
1892 1 Queen Mab 4-4-0 12×24 56 Rogers C.V. 1
W.A. 13
1874 1894 2 Pioneer

14xS2 54 Portland Y.A~ 1 1806
1875 3 Hiawatha )

Kingston I.C. 23
lR75
Rebuilt)
Portland Sold N.B.R.
1r.I.A.
3
lR75 4 Blomidon )
It
16×24 50 Fleming ENA
lR75 Rebuilt) Fleming W.A. 4
lR75 5 Grand Pre)

15×24 60
Fleming ENA
lR75 Rebuilt)
Fleming WA. 5
1875 6 Gaspereaux)

16×24 62
Portland I.C.
1875 Rebuilt )
Portland v:r .A . 6
l(V6 lR94 7 Geo.B Doane
It
15×22 60 Portland Y,A. 2
Id9

8 Weymouth
fI
16×24 60 Portland YA. 8
1875 lR75 9 Minnehaha
If
16×24 60 Portland W.A. 9
lR89 1894 10 Western
I
15×24 62 .Portland
Y.A. 3 1;330
1890 11 Acadia
II
lRx24 62 Portland
W A.. 12
11311 1891 12 Kentville
I
17×24 66 Baldwin W.A. 10
18
1
)0 1875 13 Gabriel )

Kingston
I.C. 22
Rebuilt) Portland Sold N .B.R. W.A. 2 1866
1875 14 Evangeline)
4-4-0 Kingston Sold N.B.R.
I.C. 21
1275 Bebuil t ) la.A. 1
18ge 1894 15 Annapolis 4-4-0 17×24 62 Portland Y.A. 4
le~2 1892 16 Atalanta 4-4-0 17×24 66 Baldwin TfI A 14
1894 lR94 17 Yarmouth 440 14 &.
18×24 66 Baldvrin Y.A. 5
1894 1894 18 Digby 4-4-0 18×24 66 BaldV1~n Y A 6
lS<;l3 1893 19 Oberon 4-4-0 18x24 66 Baldwin W A 15
Titania
1893 1893 20 re ) 4-4-0 If1x24 66 Baldwin W A 16
Valliere)
1894 1894 21 Fortuna 4-4-0 1~x24 66 Baldwin WA 17
18?9 lR94 22 W.H.Moody) Portland YA 7
re 4-4-0 16×24 66
189,5 Cerese Fleming WA 19 1896
1896 23 Re~ina 4-4-0 17×24 66 B9.1dv/in WA 18
1898 1898 24 Lady Latour 4-4-0 17×24 66 Baldwin
?ontgrave )
1901 1901 25 Ex ) 4-4-0 lRx24 66 Baldwin
Str::l. thc ona )
President)
1301 1901 26 re
) 4-4-0 18×24 66 Bald71in Gov. Cox
Kent )
1903 1903 2? Canlda 4-4-0 lRx24 66 Ha1dwin
1905 28 Pioneer 2-6-0 16×24 55 Portland Se. 1921 MID 4
18?4 1905 29 Brooklyn 4~4-0 1?x24 66 Rhode I. MID 3
1883 1905 30 Windsor 4-4-0 17×22 62 G.T.R. MID 2
18?4 1905 31 Truro 4-4-0 17×24 66 Rhode I. MID 1
1905 1905 32 Blomidon 4-6 -0 20×24 66 Blldwin
1905 1905 33 Glooscap 4-6-0 20×24 66 B:Ildwin
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004
Q.l_t-!o AcJl…:, No.
1892 34
1892 35
1892 36
1902 37
1902 38
Name
Gaspereaux
(.9. b r i E) 1
Basil
Haliburton
Belr River
1902 39 Benedict
1902 1924 39 Lescarbot
Devonshire)
~
4-6-0
4-6·0
4-6-0 4-6-0 4-6-0
35
Dia.
Q1l.Driv Builder
18×24 62 C. P. R.
18×24 62 C. P. R.
18×24 62 C. P. R.
20×26 63 Schenectady
20×26 63 Soheneotady
4-6-0 20×25 63 Schenectady
4-6-0 20×26 63 Scheneotady
1902 41 re ) 4-6-0 20×26 63 Schenectacy
Grandfonto.ine)
1902 42 DeMonts 4-6-0 20×26 63 Sohenectady
Byng )
43 re ) 4-6-0 20×26 63 Scheneotady
Nionolson)
1902
CANADIAN RAIL -498
Remarks
Sc, 1935
SZO Re
Champlain
Ret.C.P.
1924
C P C P C P C P
C P
310
319
510
520
C P522
C P 508
C T)
C P
C P
c:;0.1
514
517
1902
44 New Yor~er 4-6-0
Poutrincourt
20×25 63 Schenectady Ret. C.P. C P 502
1902
lR97
1897
1897
;J397
1897
lA97
I.902
1902· C
lAment sport)
45 re )4-6-0 20×26 63 Sohenectady
Alexander )
379 4-6-0
380 4-6-0
382 4-6-0
384 4-6-0
385 Grand Pre 4-6-0
387 Cornwallis 4-6-0
500 Membertou 4-6-0
518 Poutrincowffi 4-6-0
19×24 62
19×24 62
19×24 52
19×24 62
19×24 62
19×24 52
20×26 62
20×26 62
Baldwin
BQ.ldwin
Baldwin
Baldwin
Baldwin
BaldWin
Scheneotady
Scheneotady
Ret. Ret.
Ret.
Ret.
Ret.
Ret.
To C
.P.
C.P.
C.P.
e.p.
C.P.
C.P.
C P
C P
C P C P C P C P C P C P
503
379
380
382 384
385
387
500
1903
1903
1903
520 Champlain
521 Halifax
4-6-0 20×26 62 North
replace 44 CP
British Sc 1935
518
520
521
528
1903
1903
1903
1903
1903 1903 1903 1903 1904
528
531
Benedict )
rb )
Hascarene)
532 DAulnay
Evangeline)
re )
Fronsao )
Hebert
53?
544
545
552
Howe
556 Champdore
55? Subercase
530-540-555
502 New Yorker
1936 2552 Hal i burton
1900 6058
1902 6109
1905 6161
1907 6189
NOTES:
4-6-0 20×26 62 North
4-6-0 20×26 62 North
Ex 38 C P
British C P
British C P
4-6-0 2Ox?6 62 North British C P 5:-31
4-6-0 20×26 62 North British Sc 1935 C P 532
4-6-0 20×26 62 North British
4-6-0 20×26 62 Saxon
4-6-0 20×26 p2 Saxon
4-6-0 20×26 62 Saxon
4-6-0 20×26 52 Saxon
4-6-0 20×26 62 Saxon
0-6-0 lRx24 52 C,P.R.
0-6-0 18×26 52 C.P.R.
0-6-0 lRx26 52 C.P.R.
0-6-0 18×26 52 C.P.R.
C P 53?
C P 544
C P 545
C P 552
C P 556
C P 557
1. Re stands for renamed, or renumbered.
2. Numbers in the Builder Column refer to builders numbers.
3. Rebuilt means converted from broadgau~e.
4. Locomotives with numbers higher than 32 are leased from C.P.R.
RAIL CANADIEN -498 36 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
An Apology for Poor Quality Photos
As many readers of Canadian Rail undoubtedly noticed, the photograph reproduction in the November-December 2003
issu,e were of an unacceptably poor quality. The fault appears to have been caused by the wrong screen size being used in making
th()!halftones, as well as computer problems in the preparation of scaMed images. Some of the photos were transmitted bye-mail,
and the digital images did not have enough pixels for first class reproduction. On these two pages we reproduce for of the worst
/ffected photos, especially the maps that went with the article on the Montreal Portland and Boston. The editor apologizes for
/thest technical defects.
. .-
ABOVE: Two views a/the combined Ocean and Chaleur at Mont JoU on August 31,2003. The Ocean is thejirst run
using
the new Ranaissance equipment. Photos by Andrew Morris
OPPOS1TE
TOP: Map a/the Eastern Townships/rom Tackaburys Atlas a/the Dominion a/Canada printed in 1877.
OP POS1TE BOTTOM: Map
0/ the same area from the Home Knowledge Atlas printed in 1888.
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004 37 CANADIAN RAIL-498
RAIL CANADIEN -498 38 JANVIER-FEVRIER 2004
The Business Car
AMTRALS INTERNATIONAL TO BE DISCONTINUED
ON APRIL 24-25, 2004
Daily Blue Water
to connect Port Huron, Flint, East
Lansing, Battle Creek, Kalamazoo and others with Chicago
on convenient schedule LANSING, Mich., and CHICAGO –
Rail passengers will enjoy convenient new service linking
nine Michigan communities with Amtraks Chicago hub when
the Blue Water kicks
off service April 26, Amtrak and the
State
of Michigan allnouncedonFebruary 24, 2004.
People living.along
theP6rt Huron to Niles corridor
will beiiefit from the convenience of the BlueWater
schedule, said Michigan Governor Jennifer M. Granholm.
I am pleased that the Michigan Department of
Transportation is partnering with Amtrak to improve rail
travel options for so many Michigan residents.
We anticipate
the Blue Water route will also bring more
Chicago area
travelers
to enjoy all that our state has to offer.
Together with the state of Michigan, Amtrak is
improving rail service with the Blue Water, said Amtrak
President David Gunn.
It does more than simply replace
the International -it runs a better schedule for Michigan
residents and visitors
to travel within the state, make day
trips
to Chicago, or to connect with long distance trains.
Named for its home region
of Port Huron, the Blue
Water will also serve Lapeer, Flint, Durand, East Lansing,
Battle Creek, Kalamazoo, Dowagiac and Niles, Mich
., and
operate under a contract with the Michigan Department
of
Transportation (MDOT).
The Blue Water will replace Amtraks current
International, which operates over the same route and
continued on to Ontario, Canada. However, the
Internationals scheduled late evening arrivals in Toronto
and Chicago meant the train missed
all daily long-distance
connections at
Amtraks Chicago hub. Ridership on the
International fell
II percent in the last Amtrak fiscal year.
The westbound Blue Water (Train 365) will depart
Port Huron daily at 5:15 a.m., make intermediate stops and
arrive in Chicago at
11: 10 a.m. The eastbound Blue Water
(Train 364) will depart Chicago
at 3 :00 p.m., make intermediate
stops and arrive in Port Huron at 10:50 p.m. (see attached
schedule). Food service
on the Blue Water will feature a variety
of sandwiches, drinks and other snacks in the Cafe
car.
The convenient schedule allows passengers to make
day trips from Michigan
to Chicago and return that evening.
It also enables passengers to connect to Amtraks network
of trains with afternoon departures from the Chicago hub to
hundreds of destinations throughout the country.
This schedule mirrors the operating pattern
of the
Grand Rapids-Chicago Pere Marquette train, which has made
significant ridership gains recently.
The Pere Marquette
(Trains 370 & 371) is also operated by
Amtrak under a
contract with MDOT, with a morning departure
to Chicago
and an evening return to Grand Rapids.
During the past
Amtrak fiscal year (Oct. 2002-Sept. 2003), the Pere Marquette
reported a 22 percent increase in ridership. As part
of the
contract with MDOT, Amtrak will staff ticket offices
in the
East Lansing, Flint and Port Huron stations.
Amtrak Blue Water Service Westbound
Effective 4/26/04
Train 365
Dp Port Huron, MI
5: 15 AM ET
Dp Durand, MI
7: 17 AM
Dp East Lansing, MI 7:58
AM
DpBattleCreek, MI9:09 AM
Dp Kalamazoo;MI9:41 AM
Ar Chicago 11:10 AM CT
Amtrak Blue Water Service Eastbound
Effective 4/26/04
Train 365
Dp Chicago 3:00 PM CT
Dp Kalamazoo, MI
6:21 PM
Dp Battle Creek, MI 7:00 PM
Dp East Lansing, MI 8:08 PM
Dp Durand, MI 8:54 PM
Ar Port Huron, MI 10:50 PM ET
LINDSAY AND DISTRICT
MODEL RAILROADERS
30th Annual Train Show
April 3rd and 4th, 2004
Victoria Park Armory 210 Kent St. West, Lindsay, Ontario
Saturday, April
3. II :00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Sunday, April
4. :00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Admission:
Adults:
$5
Seniors: $4
Students: $4
Children: $2
Information:
Box 452 Lindsay Ont. K9V 4S5
Wayne Lamb (705) 324-5316
Eric Potter (705) 328-3749
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2004
BROTHERHOODOFLOCOMOTNEENG~ERS
THROUCH THE FFH1FTS or BPorHERS [.C­
ANll W.(;.HARV:Y. OIVISJn~i 2. A PFS()U;TION VIA SUB
DELEGATES C.J.IlR A~E~;AC.·.l)IVISION I. F.L.PliTNAM. DlVI
. E.W.[)EXTEH.DIVISIO~ UTO THF. GR.AND INTERNAT
OF THE IlROTIIERHOOI) OF LO(OMOTIVf eNGI
OHIO. WHO ON .J[ iF 1~1I1.1l42. AUTHURlzeD THE ER
MEMORIAL TO (1)1~IEMOfi ATE THE INfllATION
WHICH BEG III-.R[ ANO 11F.SULJED IN THE u~~lvi:If~~Gii~EE:R!.
NOW KNOWJ AS Till nIHlTIIEP,IIOOD m LOCOM0T1VE
H. F. HEMPY
GENEHM SECY.-TRE,\liRER.
A. JOHNSTON
GRAND CHIEF ENGINESfl..
. . . . . . .-. .
ERECTED~AND DE-OleAr D· MAY 8,1943.
4 •. ~.~. _, . _ -• p. •
Two photos of the BLE monument in Marshall Ohio 011 August
11, 2002, showing the GTW 4-8-4. Unfortunately the shadow
of an overhanging tree obscured part of the inscription.
Photos by Fred Angus
The recent amalgamation of the Brotherhood of
Locomotive Engineers with the Teamsters union recalls that
the BLE was founded in 1863 at Marshall Ohio, and the
monument dedicated
in that city in 1943, on the occasion of
the 80th anniversary of the Brotherhood, has a strong Grand
Trunk connection. Carved into the monument are pictures of
a locomotive of 1863 and one of 1943, that of 1943 being a
Grand Trunk Western streamlined 4-8-4, numbered 1943,
identical
to the CNR 6400-class Northems. The building in
which the
BLE was founded is still standing in Marshall. The
inscription on the monument reads as follows:
Through the efforts of W.D. Robinson, an
organization was attempted as early as the year 1855.
Several years
of discouragement followed. On May 8,
39 CANADIAN RAIL -498
1863, at the home of J.e. (Yankee) Thompson, still
standing at the corner of Linden and Hanover streets,
was held the first meeting of the above named locomotive
engineers. At this meeting these men formed an
organization known as the brotherhood
of the footboard.
On May 17, 1864,
in the city of Indianapolis, Indiana,
this was changed to the Brotherhood
of Locomotive
Engineers whose
membership on Jan. 1, 1943 was
70,000.
Endowed with the spirit of these men to improve
their wages and working conditions, this great movement
has been carried on by their successors for the
improvement of transportation service of all mankind. The
purpose
of this organization shall bf~ to combine the
interest of the locomotive engineers or o
;her men in engine
service who are now or may hereafter become eligible to
membership
in this organization, elevate their social,
moral and intellectual standing,
to guard their financial
interests, and promote their general welfare; its cardinal
principals, sobriety, truth, justice and morality. The above
paragraph of the constitution adopted on May
8, 1863,
is still the first clause of the present constitution.
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND PHOTOS WANTED
Allan Graham, P.O. Box 335, Albelion, P.E.I. COB lBO,
phone 1-902-853-3211 is in the beginning stages of gathering
photos
of the railway on P.E.I.-photos that were not in his
volume one of A Photo HistOlY of the Prince Edward Island
Railway. These should be
in black and white but can cover
the railway anywhere between the opening in 1875 and the
closing in 1989. Subjects for which photos are being sought
include stations, engines, freight sheds, roundhouses,
passenger cars, baggage cars, mail cars, nan-ow gauge and
standard gauge box cars, water towers, coal sheds, trains
of
all description as long as they are shown on P.E.I. Hoping to
hear from lots of people who have possible photos and/or
information that could be included in a volume two. Thanks.
Allan
P.S. There are only 100 of volume one left ( $29.95 + $7.00
S.and
H) if anyone is interested. 4400 have been sold.
BA CK COVER TOP: CPR 4-4-0 locomotive 144, built in 1886 on a CRHA excursion around the Montreal terminals on
November
21, 1959. Note the wooden cars in the consist also the street car bridge in the background. This bridge, built in
1896 and double-tracked il1 the 1920s, carried the Cartierville street car line over the CPR tracks. Engine 144 is now at the
Canadian Railway Museum.
BA CK CO VER BOTTOM: Business car British Columbia on an excursion run by the West Coast Railway Association on
August
30, 1964. This car was built for the CPR in 1890 as sleeping car Sherbrooke and is now preserved at Squamish B.C
Both photos by Fred Angus
Tbis issue of Canadian Rail was delivered to the printer on March 10, 2004.

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