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Canadian Rail 491 2002

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Canadian Rail 491 2002

202
ISSN 0008-4875
Postal Permit No. 40066621 CANADIAN RAIL
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY
BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
FIFTVYEARS OFTHE RAIL DIESEL CAR IN CANADA ……………………………………………………. . COMPiLATION …………………………. ..
A NOTABLE NEW SELF-PROPELLED RAILWAY CAR. …………………………………………………… .. CANADIAN TRANSPORTATION … ..
ROSTER OF RDC5 IN CANADA ……………………………………………………………………………………… . COMPiLATION ………………………….. .
THE 19505 ……………………………….
…………………………………………………………………………………….. .
THE 19605 ………………………………….
………………………………………………………………………………….. .
THE 19705 …………….
……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. .
THE 19805 ………………..
……………………………………………………………………………………………………. .
THE 19905 …………………………………………………
………………………………………………………………….. ..
THE20005 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… . 203
206
214
220
224
232
239
246
249
FRONT COVER: The first RDC on the roster of the Pacific Great Eastern Railway (now BC Rail) was BC-lO, a 1956 RDC-1 of the
New Look type. This car rema
ined in service for the entire Budd car era on BC Rail which ended at the end of October 2002. This
photo was taken on May 8,1967 at Lillooet. BC-10 was the rear car of the train that had just arrived from North Vancouvel:
BELOW: Train-Touristiques St. Francois car 6121 at East Angus, Que. on May 17, 2002. This RDC-1 has had a most varied history.
Built
in 1953 as an RDC-3, it was Canadian Nationals first Budd car, D-100. 1n 1956 it was renumbered D-300, and in 1961 it
became
D-354. Renumbered 6354 in 1969, it was later rebuilt as an RDC-1m (an RDC-1 with a snack bar). Sold to V1A in 1978, it
became
6121, It then was sold to the Quebec North Shore and Labrador in 1994, and later came to the Quebec Central and its
present o
wners. Both photos by Fred Angus
For your membership in the CRHA, which
includes a subscription to
Canadian Rail,
write to:
CRHA, 120 Rue St-Pierre, St. Constant,
Que.
J5A 2G9
Membership Dues for 2003:
In Canada:
$40.00 (including all taxes)
United States: $35.00 in U.S. funds.
Other Countries: $68.00 Canadian funds. Canadian Rail is continually
in need of news, stories
historical data, photos, maps and other material.
Please
send all contributions to the editor: Fred
F. Angus, 3021
Trafalgar Avenue; Montreal, P.Q. H3Y 1 H3,. e-mail
angus82@aei.ca No payme-nt can be made for
contributions, but the contributer will be given credit for
material submitted. Material
will be returned to the contributer
if requested. Remember Knowledge is of little value unless
it is shared with others.
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO·EDITOR: Douglas N.W. Smith
ASSOCIATE.EDITOR (Motive Power):
Hugues
W. Bonin
LAYOUT: Fred F. Angus
PRINTING:
Procel Printing
DISTRIBUTION: Joncas Postexperts
Inc.
The eRHA may be reached at its web site: www.exporail.org or by telephone at (450) 638-1522
IlOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002 203 CANADIAN RAIL -491
Fifty Years of the Rail Diesel Car in Canada
Compiled by Fred F. Angus
Fifty years ago a new means of rail travel became available to Canadians. On February 2, 1953 Budd RDC 2960, the
demonstrator car built and owned by the Budd Company
of Philadelphia, began an ex.perimental run, with passengers, on the
Canadian Pacific line between Montreal and Mont Lamier. It was not the first time 2960 had visited Canada, for early in 1951
it had been tried on Canadian National lines.
However these runs were made without passengers, so the real beginning of
passenger travel by ROC in Canada was ex.actly half a century ago. To commemorate this anniversary, we are devoting this
entire issue
of Canadian Rail, the largest Canadian Rail ever, 52 pages, to the Budd Car era in Canada. Although the heyday
of the RDC is past, eight cars are still in operation, in widely separated locali ties, so this era still continues.
In the second half
of the 1940s it appeared as if a new
prosperous era was beginning for railway passenger service.
World War II had ended, and the railways were getting back
to
peacetime operation. This meant that long-deferred
improvements could at last go forward. The 1930s had seen
the development
of the first lightweight streamlined trains,
. and it was ex.pected that this new technology would be greatly
ex.pandedin the postwar years. Unfortunately competition
from automobiles and airlines almost wiped out rail
passenger service in the nex.t quarter century; however this
was not immediately apparent, and the decade from 1945 to
1955 saw a great deal
of modernization and improvement to
passenger trains and schedules.
Among the foremost promoters
of modern passenger
equipment was the Budd Company of Philadelphia which
had built the first streamlined
Zephyr for the Burlington
Railroad in 1934. In 1949 they introduced something new;
a self-propelled car built
of stainless steel, using the Shot
Weld process which had been so successful with the Zephyr
and its successors. However this new car had many
improvements over the Zephyr, improvements which had
been
developed for military use during the war. Like the
Zephyr the new car was lightweight, fast and smooth running.
One great feature was its f1ex.ibility
of service; since it was
designed for multiple-unit operation it could be run as a
single car or in a train
of as many cars as the traffic requi.red.
Since it was a double-ender it did not need to be turned at
the end
of its run. This new car was termed a Rail Diesel
Car, or RDC for short.
It was not long, however, before most
people, railroad officials and public alike, coined a new
nickname. To them it was a
Budd Car pure and simple.
The fact that Budd built many other types
of passenger cars
did
not seem to matter; a Budd Car was an RDC and that was
that!
The concept of a single-unit self-propelled passenger
car goes back,
of course, to a time long before 1949. In the
nineteenth century there were quite a few steam-powered
passenger units in service. One of the earliest was in use
during the American Civil War; a photo taken in 1862 shows this
car quite clearly, it appears to be a standard length
combine car with a steam power unit in what would normally
be the baggage section. During the 1880s a steam passenger
dummy made regular trips between Fort Erie and Buffalo
over the International Bridge. There were also numerous
inspection locomotives which included a passenger section;
these were used by officials inspecting the lines. In the first
decade
of the 20th century, both CPR and Grand Trurlk built
steam passenger cars and, with the development of the
internal combustion engine, self-propelled cars became more
common. Some, such
as the McKeen car, were developed by
manufacturers and sold to the railways, while others were
built by the railways themselves
to their own designs. In the
1920s many railways built or bought self-propelled cars,
or
doodlebugs as they came to be called. Among these
pioneers was Canadian National Railways which designed
several types
of these cars. Most famous of these early CNR
units was 15820 which made the memorable 67-hour run
from Montreal to Vancouver
in 1925.
Although basically an old concept, the RDC was new
from the ground up.
It has been said that comparing an RDC
to a doodlebug is something like comparing a Mercedes
Benz
to a Model T! Both did the same thing, but there was
little comparison in the smoothness and comfort offered by
the two kinds
of vehicles. Certainly the future looked bright
for the
new ROC and the Budd Company went to great
lengths to publicize the many new features of the equipment.
It was not long before the basic RDC-1 was supplemented
by the RDC-2 and RDC-3 both
of which had non-passenger
accommodation in various configurations. The RDC-4
consisted entirely of non-passenger space.
In 1950 the first sale
of an RDC to a railway was made
(M-450
of the New York Central), while Budd retained 2960,
the first unit, and used it as a demonstrator.
It was not long
before
Canadian railways became interested in the new
technology and eventually they acquired, either new or
second-hand, no less than 116 RDCs. Since the total number
constructed was 404, it means that more than 28%
of all
Budd Cars built came
to Canada.
RAIL CANADIEN -491
2960 at the time of its test runs in Canada
Early in 1951 the 2960 came to Canada for tests on
Canadian National Railways. Although it did not carry
regular passengers it still underwent considerable testing
during the winter months along several lines, including the
Montreal and Southern Counties interurban. A rare account
of one of the test runs was written by our member Anthony
Clegg and published
in the March 1951 (issue No. 17) CRHA
News Report, predecessor
of Canadian Rail. The following
is taken from that account:
It was my good fortune to be present on one of the
test runs
of this car between Montreal and Coteau, Que. -a
trial simulating a regular run
of a local commutation train,
and allowing sufficient time at each stop for mythical
passengers to embark or detrain. Promptly at 12:00 oclock
noon,
the car left the engine-change tracks at Turcot East
and seven minutes later made the first stop at Dominion.
The other suburban stations were reached
and left behind
in quick succession, and we arrived at Vaudreuil four minutes
early -12:46 p.m. Throughout the trip the predetermined
schedule was maintained or bettered –
in fact our time could
have been reduced by at least twelve minutes and a
scheduled arrival made at Coteau.
Leaving Vaudreuil at 12:50 p.m, an acceleration test
was made ascending the grade west
of the station. The car
reached
47 mph one minute after departure, 60 mph forty­
five seconds
later, and 65 mph before reaching the highway
crossing.
Top speed on the outbound trip was 75 mph reached
near mile post
34 between St. Dominique and Wilsonvale.
This was bettered by another
3 mph on the return run -78
mph between Cedars and Vaudreuil, but the latter spurt
was on the descending grade just west
of Vaudreuil station.
At Coteau, between 1:14 and 1:45, we had an
opportunity to photograph the car and inspect the
motormans controls, Possibly this was the most surprising
item on the car -the ease with which the unit can be operated.
The
controller consists of a small handle set into an
extension of the win.dow sill and is pushed forward to
accelerate and pulled backwards to shut
of! po wei; similar
to the movements required in
operating a 2650 or 2850
type of M. T C. tram. A regular airbrake is provided for
stopping the train, and a pedal which must be depressed by
the operators foot supplies the dead-man control feature,
Nothing more
to it than that, The adjustments usually made
by the operator are provided for automatically and function
without attention,
204 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
On the return trip, we left Coteau at 1:45 p.m. and
arrived at the required stops consistently early. In fact after
our dash down Vaudreuil Hill, we had sufficient time to
spare to enable the crew
of the regular local train waiting
at the station
to inspect the cm: From here to Turcot East the
trip was interesting but uneventful
and we arrived at the
engine-changing tracks at
2:56 p.m. From this poin.t the car
was switched to the electric locomotive shop and put away
for the day.
Altogether the car pelformed well and should find a
place on certain runs in a country as large and diversified
as ours. Its
chief weakness would seem to be its inability to
haul a trailer to take care of heavy traffic demands and for
this reason its efficiency in suburban service is doubtful. Its
acceptance by the railways will depend, no doubt, as much
on economic considerations as upon traffic and mechanical
features, but from an operational point
of view the future of
the RDC seems as bright as did that of 15820 a quarter
century ago.
Following the tests on the CNR, 2960 returned to the
United States, but less than two years later
it was back again,
this time on the Canadian Pacific Railway.
In the intervening
two years the
RDC had made a name for itself on numerous
railways as far away as Australia and Saudi Arabia. On January
26, 1953 the
2960 arrived in Montreal and began tests on
the CPR. Among these tests was a run to Mont Laurier (163
miles
of mountain terrain) in 4 hours and 50 minutes. In
another test, to Ste. Anne de Bellevue, a speed of 81 miles an
hour was reached. The car was exhibited
in Windsor Station
on January 31 and February
I, and then on February 2 went
into passenger service on the Mont Laurier run, This was the
first time
in Canada that anyone could ride an RDC in actual
passenger service. So began the era of the Budd Car in
Canada, an
era that continues, on a greatly reduced scale,
until the present time.
All
went well until February 21 when, at a level
crossing just outside of Mont Laurier, the 2960 hit a tractor­
semi-trailer and suffered considerable damage.
It was then
sent to the
CPRs Angus Shops where it was repaired and
returned
to service. Later it went back to the Budd Company
where
it continued in its role as a demonstrator car. However,
as
f,U as the CPR was concerned, the test had been a success.
The first order by a Canadian railway for an RDC was
placed in
September 1953 by the CPR. This was for four
cars, three RDC-I type (numbered 9050 to 9052) and one
RDC-3 (9020). Two months later, November 1953, the CNR
ordered one RDC-1 (D-IOO, later renumbered D-300).
Interestingly, the latter car, now numbered 6121, is still in
use
in a tourist operation at East Angus, Quebec. The CPR
called their RDCs Day liners, a name that appeared
prominently on the car side in front of the number. CNR
named theirs Railiners, but this name did not actually
appear on the car.
From 1953 until 1959 CPR acquired 55 RDCs while
CNR bought 28. In the 1 960s, CN bought an additional 19
cars second hand, including the famous 2960. This brought
their total to 47,
only eight less than CPO Also during this
period the Pacific
Great Eastern (now B,C. Rail) bought 7
RDCs, followed
by another 7 second-hand in the 1970s and
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
A group inspecting the Budd Self-propelled Car on the
C.N.R. in February
1951. From left to right appear E.R.
Battley, Chief of Motive Power and Car Equipment, C.N.R.;
G Bettle, Jr. of the Budd Co., Philadelphia; Donald Gordon,
c.M.G, C.N.R. Chairman and President; S.F Dingle, Vice
President, Operation, C.N.R.; S. W. Fairweather, Vice
President, Research and Development, C.N.R.
1980s, for a total of 14. Thus a total of 116 Budd Cars were
purchased by Canadian Railways. Other companies, notably
VIA Rail
and the Quebec North Shore & Labrador (QNS&L)
also ran RDCs, but these were all second-hand from either
CN or
CP and so are included in the 116. In fact, out of the
116 cars, fully
91 saw service, at one time or another, on VIA
Rail. In
1962 the Budd Company outshopped their 404th,
and last, RCD of the traditional type. The era of new Budd
Cars had ended. A new generation RDC, the SPV-2000,
was introduced in 1977, but only
31 were built and none
came to Canada.
From the very start the RDC was hailed as the savior
of branch lines with low traffic density. At first this was, to a
certain
extent true, and it is likely that the RDC prolonged
the life
of many of these runs by several years. During the
1950s many old branch line trains, often steam hauled, were
replaced by RDCs, often with a (temporary) increase in
ridership. As the old trains vanished, some enthusiasts looked
back nostalgically
to the old days which were l-efened to as
the
BBC days. This did not stand for British Broadcasting
Corporation,
but rather Before Budd Cars! However in
the 1960s it
became obvious that nothing could save these
branch line runs; the automobile competition was too much.
As trains disappeared, RDCs started showing
up in service
never planned when they were new. Many found their way
to commuter runs; one train that your editor remembers very
well was the 4:40
P.M. out of Montreals Windsor Station. It
was usually 7 RDCs, headed by the oldest Budd on the CP
system, 9116, the former Lehigh Valley 41. The extreme
came on Christmas Eve 1969 when a Christmas Special
commuter train out of Windsor station consisted of TWELVE
Budd Cars, all fully loaded with commuters!
205 CANADIAN RAIL -491
During the 1960s, in an effort to encourage passengers,
CN refurbished their Budd Car fleet and purchased a number
of second-hand cars from American railways. Their new
vestibules and comfortable seats made the refurbished cars
much more suitable for long-distance travel. Some had snack
bars installed, although there was never an
RDC dining car.
The D- series cars were renumbered into the 6000s.
With the coming
of VIA Rail in the 1970s, the great
majority of Canadas Budd Cars passed to that company.
Most that were acquired from
CN retained their CN numbers.
CPs Budd cars were renumbered from the 9000s to the
6000s
to make them fully compatible with those from CN.
The real decline of RDC service began in 1981 with
the large cutbacks in VIA service
on November 15 of that
year. Although some major trains, notably the Toronto –
Kingston Ontarian continued
to be RDC, the handwriting
was on the wall. The cutbacks
of 1990 saw many more trains
eliminated and many RDCs sold
or stored. Some found new
careers elsewhere
in Canada. Six went to the QNS&L in 1994
where they were used
in that companys passenger service.
Often they would be operated as coaches in a conventional,
locomotive-hauled, train!
However these cars were sold, in
2000, and are now on the revitalized Quebec Central Railway
(QCR).
Four are in storage, but two (6121 and 6125, nee
CNR D-100 and CPR 9199 respectively) are in use on a
tourist operation on the
QCR at East Angus, Que. One other
RDC is on the QCR, number 6140 (ex CPR 9194) which is
being converted to an official car for the owner, 1.M. Giguere.
A major blow
to the Budd Car enthusiast was the end
of all passenger service on B.C. Rail at the end of October
2002. This run, from North Vancouver
to Prince George, was
one of the most scenic ,anywhere, and there were also
occasional excursions run far nOith of Plince George, to the
farthest limits
of B.C. Rail. All this is now a thing of the past,
and the RDCs are for sale (rumor has it that some might go to
VIA). However there is one happy note. VIA is completely
refurbishing
six cars for its two remaining RDC runs; Victoria
to
Courtenay B.C. and Sudbury to White River Ontario.
While the former run is greatly endangered, at the present
time (December 2002) it is still running. So there are three
places in Canada where
one can still ride one of the eight
remaining Budd cars, and experience this unique means of
travel. It is a far cry from the great days of the 1950s and 60s,
but it
is still a Budd Car ride. Long may they continue.
Note: No major article on Budd Cars in Canada
would be complete without mention of the late Murray Dean,
who was a great RDC enthusiast, and sometimes wrote under
the nom de plume
of R.D. Carr. CRHA members will likely
recall his column Power which appeared regularly in
Canadian Rail in the 1960s. The masthead of this column
was not one of the new Second-Generation diesels, but, you
guessed it, the humble Budd Car We have copied this
masthead from Canadian Rail files, and are using it for the
sub-headings
of this issue. For these reasons, we dedicate
this special Budd Car issue to the memory of MWTaY Dean.
NEXT FOUR PAGES: An article which appeared in Canadian Transportation for December 1949. It describes many of the
technical details
of the RDC. Following this is an advertisement which appeared in 1953 when the CPR ordered its first four
Budd Cars. These were numbered 9050, 9051, 9052 (all RDC-ls) and 9020 (an RDC-3).
RAIL CANADIEN -491 206 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
A Notable New Self-Propelled Railway Car
Experience and knowledge gained in wartime, in the powering, driving and controlling of heavy vehicles
such as tanks, have enabled The Budd Company to design and build a self-propelled passenger car for railway
service, different from and superior to any unit of similar function available heretofore. The new car, while of
comparatively light weight, meets all A.A.R. requirements for main line service:
It is 85 ft. long, seats 90
passengers, and
is powered by Diesel engines.
Before the car operated under its own
power from the Budd plant
in Philadelphia, to
Chicago,
it had been tested thoroughly on the
Pennsylvania Road Delaware Division, and
the tests demonstrated a maximum speed
of
83 m.p.h., with very rapid.acceleration.
The
Budd Model RDC-t, Stainless Steel, Diesel-powered Se/f­
propelled Car Profitable Performance Sought -When
Budd engineers approached the design of the
new
RDC-1 car, their goal was the attainment
of high performance and the greatest possible
revenue capacity at the least possible cos!.
High performance was achieved by holding
the weight of the standard 85-foot car to a
minimum, which, combined with adequate
power, gives a high
power-weight ratio,
General
G. M. Barnes, Budd Vice President in
The accompanying illustrations show a new
Diesel-powered self-propelled car for railway service,
designated the RDC-1, which has been designed, and
built of
stainless steel, by The Budd Company,
Philadelphia. This company, as readers are no doubt
aware, is the
builder of many of the distinguished
streamlined trains which have been placed in service by
the railways
in the United States during the past 15 years.
The new car
is powered by twin 275 h.p. General Motors
Detroit Diesel engines.
It employs torque converter
transmission
built by the Allison Division of General Motors
Corp., which is wartime development, tested and
perfected for use in heavy tanks. Cars of the new type
may be operated singly, or in multiples as a train. It is
operated
by a single engineman. There is a vestibule cab
at each end of the car.
In presenting the new car before a group of railway
officials in
Chicago recently, Edward G. Budd, Jr.,
President, The Budd Company, stated: This, our newest
development,
is ready for main line and branch line
operations, and
is being offered to the railroads for use in
many services where it can improve the net revenues.
The
Budd Company believes the new car offers very real
possibilities
in making more profitable many railroad
passenger operations.
R.K. Evans, Vice President, General Motors Corp.,
whose Detroit Diesel Engine and Allison divisions co­
operated
in the development of the complete power plant
for the car, and its controls, was in the group with Mr. Budd
when
the car was presented at Chicago, and said: -The
RDC-1 is a
new conception in railway passenger
transportation, with its high power-weight ratio and its
effective drive. The simplicity of
the p·ower controls made
possible through
the use of the modern torque converter
will, I
am sure, prove as useful in the RDC-1 as it has in
automotive applications. charge of Engineering, pointed out, adding: -Our other
most important achievement came about because
we
chose to take advantage of the latest developments in
Diesel engines and the torque converter type of power
transmission, the latter now coming rapidly into wide
use
in the automotive field. These developments allowed us
to design great simplicity in the controls. In addition, the
decision to build a self-propelled car permitted us to offer
the railroads the greatest possible flexibility of operation
at the least
cos!.
Budd Light Weight Design -The car is of light
weight, high strength design, of similar construction
to the
cars Budd has been building since 1934 for fast main line
service. Stainless steel, with its great strength,
is used
exclusively
in the car structure. The Budd Shotweld
process
is employed in its fabrication. The bare structure
weighs only 21,000
lb ..
The car meets the full strength specifications of
the Association of American Railroads for unrestricted
service.
As a consequence, the RDC-1 is expected to be
found profitable for operation, singly or in multiples, on all
runs except those now served by deluxe blue ribbon
equipment
in overnight express service.
The RDC-t Self-propelled Car Interior
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
Three Interior Arrangements
Planned -The full length of the car is
available for
revenue purposes, either
passengers, baggage or mail. This results
from the fact that the two engines and drive,
the 250-gallon fuel tank, the batteries and
the cooling-water tanks are all mounted
under
the floor.
207 CANADIAII RAIL -491
Three types of interior arrangement
will
be available. One, the type demonstrated
recently,
is a passenger car with seats for 90.
Another is a car with a 17 -foot baggage
compartment and seats for
71 passengers.
The third
has a 17-foot baggage
compartment, a 15-foot railway mail service
compartment, and seats for 49 passengers.
The Type of General Motors Two-cycle, 275 h.p Diesel Engine Used to
Power the Car
Engine cooling-water radiators are located in a
blister
on the roof. A lavatory and electric locker are
placed
at each end of the car.
The passenger spaces are attractively decorated.
The appointments are simple and practical,
in keeping
with
the type of services for which the car is intended.
The Diesel Engines -The engines which power
the car are a 6-cylinder, two-cycle postwar Diesel
development of General Motors engineers. Each engine
drives a single axle of the adjoining truck. The engines
are housed in compartments which are coated with
neoprene synthetic rubber
to absorb engine noise.
The
engines are cooled normally through
insulated water tanks hung beneath the floor. When water
temperatures rise, the hot water
is shunted to the cooling
radiators on top of the car, the whole process being
thermostatically controlled. Tests during record heat
waves throughout the past summer showed
the cooling
adequate.
To cushion vibration and further minimize noise,
the engines are rubber-mounted at three points. The fuel
tanks carry 250 U.S. gallons, sufficient for
12 hours of
normal operation.
There
is nothing unusual in the fact that the car is
powered by two engines. During the war, multiple
installations of Diesel engines were employed frequently,
to power tanks, landing craft and other items of military
equipment, and these applications met
with such success
that they have been continued commercially since the
war ended. The engines
used in this new self-propelled
car, operating on the two-cycle priniciple, are each of 275
h.p. It would not have been possible
to secure enough
power for the car with a single engine, without using
revenue space, but, with
the double engine installation,
each engine
is kept clear of revenue space, and is located
near the axle which
it drives, thus simplifying the drive
from engine
to axle. Also, with each engine much smaller
and lighter than a single unit of required power would be,
there is less difficulty in removal for maintenance. The
engines
are built with six cylinders in line, with the cylinders
inclined at
20 degrees from the horizontal. The power
output
of 275 h.p. is developed at governed speed of
1,800 r.
p.m.
As stated, the engine-cooling radiators are located
in the blister on the car roof. They are connected by
piping with the water tanks under the car, and the exhaust
pipe and water connections from each engine
run in ducts
forming a bulkhead near
the center of the car. In cold
weather,
the water from the engine passes through the
reservoir below the car body only, but, in warmer weather,
thermostatically-operated controls cause the reservoir
to
be bypassed, and the water is passed through the roof­
mounted radiators.
If the water temperature exceeds 160
degrees
F, the motors for operating the cooling fans on
the roof, which are thermostatically controlled, begin
operation automatically; thus
these motors and fans
operate only when required,
as determined by cooling
water temperature.
The Allison Torque Converter Transmission –
The
torque converter drive was selected for the car not only
for its great efficiency,
but also for its considerable saving
in weight. The Allison drive essentially is a combination
of converter
and fluid coupling. The car starts smoothly
and accelerates
rapidly. As the engine speed picks up,
maximum efficiency is exerted through the converter.
Finally, when the car approaches cruising speed, the
transmission system locks automatically into direct drive.
Thus, the torque converter
is utilized during periods of
acceleration
only. Reversing is carried out by the use of
two sets of constant-mesh helical gears. For each direction
of movement, one
of these is engaged with an extension
of the
engine shaft by a clutch which is actuated
hydraulically.
Cooling
is provided for the torque converter fluid
and also for the engine lubricating oil. The pump
circulating the water for engine cooling does not take it
direct
from the reservoir below the car body or from the
roof radiators, as the case may be, direct to the engine
water jacket.
It is first delivered to the heat exchanger for
the torque converter fluid and then to the heat exchanger
for
the lubricating oil.
In the power plant, provision is made so that in
case of failure, the part will fail safe. There is automatic
protection of the engine against excessive speed,
overheating and lubrication failure. This is provided
electrically,
the pilot switches employed being connected
in parallel and so arranged that the closing of a switch
stops the engine. Also, provision is made for manual
RAIL CANADIEN -491 208 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
idling of the engine and manual
LI,. .. I. I I ,
;
I I operation of the transmission
in the ~
i.>..l.,,]..:
1.. ..
. I I
. i
event of trouble on the road. The car
! I
;
i
carries two 64-volt 10k. w. generators,
1
. I
!
I i
I
I

I,..

I,..,
one with each power plant. The
!
i
batteries are located under the car floor.
I
£JpL
~c
~J
I i I ~
, ,
1=,
I
!
-f
I
Heating of the passenger
I
J I
I:
I ! I
!_
compartment is effected by circulation
TI~ts
-f-
f 0 I
of hot water, through finned pipes at
~r
-,
o . a: 1–
~
=P-:-
! I floor level, along the car sides. Water
i ,
:>

;;;–~ .. –
~
is supplied from the engine cooling
1.–..-
-i-t
I

I
f—–
~J
,5
I
system, and when the roof radiators are
..
1/
:.p
I I
,
cut out,
their place is taken by the
~5
/
I
I
finned piping employed for car heating.
:i
II
I ! I
The water is circulated through the
1/
II
>-
pipes by pumps which are controlled
I
thermostatically. When the car is
2
h h:
standing in a yard during freezing
, i
I
.. iJl
pl~ I
weather, freezing is guarded against by I
f
I
I T. M.
connecting with a live steam line in the
s. cb~.l) I
yard. The finned piping used for heating
Time-speed and Distance-speed Curves for the New Car
is protected by stainless steel guards.
Remarkable accelerating ability is shown, with a speed of 75 m.p.h. attained in
Water for wash bowls and toilets is
carried
in a 75-gall. stainless steel tank
190 seconds and a speed of 80 mp.h. attained in four miles.
mounted overhead.
The car is air-conditioned, the equipment deceleration rate of 2.8 miles per hour per second, and
employed being a product of the General Motors Corp. emergency stops were made at a deceleration rate of 3.5
Frigidaire Division. This electric-mechanical system with m.p.h. per second. With such high rates of deceleration, a
equipment weighi
ng seven tons was specially designed device to prevent wheel sliding is required, and this need
for railway use. is supplied by the fitting of Budd Rolokron anti-slide
Trucks -The car body is carried or two four-wheel devices on each axle. These are inertia devices, so
trucks of drop equalizer type, these being of special light arranged that an excessive
deceleration rate closes
weight construction, with frames built
up by welding and electrical contacts, operating an electric solenoid valve
wi
th tubular side rails. The equalizers, under which coil with the effect of releasing air from the brake cylinder; a
springs are used, are forged I beam sections. Truck time relay operates
to reopen the circuit and again admit
wheelbase is 8
ft. 6 in. The wheels are 33 in. in diameter, air to the brake cylinder after one second has elapsed.
and journals are 5% x 10
in. with SKF roller bearings This same device controls the use of sand
in the event of
employed. The inside axle of each truck is the driving
an emergency application of the brakes. There are two
ax
le, and each is connected through universals to the sandbox
es, each of 100-lb. capacity. In addition to the
torque converter of the adjacent engine by splined driving
automatic sanding, sand may be applied to the rail
sha
ft and Spicer drive assembly. Lateral motion of the manually, by operating
push buttons at the operators
engine
is compensated for by a torque arm, connected position.
resiliently to the truck transom. There is control equipment at each end of the car,
Brakes -The trucks are equipped with Budd disc with the operators position at the right side of the vestibule.
brakes, which are standard equipment on many of the In addition to the master controller, brake valve, bell
newest streamlined trains built by the company. These operating valve and whistle cord, there are an electric
give the greatest possible effective control over the car, heater, windshield wiper and defroster. The left handle of
and enable the operator to bring
it to a stop from high the master controller has three positions, one providing
speed in minimum time. The brakes are operated
by New forward movement, one for no movement and one for
York type HSC air brake equipment, with D22 control valve. reverse. The right handle has five positions, viz., off, idle,
There are two cast iron discs for each axle, against which second, third and fourth, with the latter three positions
the brake shoes, equipped with asbestos composition
providing respectively one-third, two-thirds and all
lining, operate. The shoes are operated on the tong crankshaft torque. The electrically controlled circuits are
principle, with the long arms forced apart by brake cylinder so interlocked that the right handle cannot be moved from
pressure. The brakes are self-cooled by ventilating fins off position until the left handle has been set for either
cast into the discs. This arrangement ensures minimum forward or reverse movement. A foot-operated dead man
wear and upkeep, and obviates heat damage to the control
is installed.
wheels. Tests of the brakes demonstrated that emergency After
the new car was shown at Chicago, it began
stops could be made from 78 m.p.h.
in 1,250 ft. Without a tour of the United States, on which it is being shown to
sand, service stops were made from 85 m.p.h. at railway officers in many cities.
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002 209 CANADIAN RAIL -491
RDC-Car with a Future for Canadas Future
The Canadian Pacific-worlds greatest travel system-has just bought
four Budd stainless steel RDCs. (The letters
RDC stand for Rail Diesel Car.)
The cars were bought because
of their proved ability to reduce costs,
improve service and attract traffic. But also with an eye to
Canadas growth,
which presages an increase in the need for transportation as Canadas vast min­
eral, oil and natural resources are developed.
Operating experience with
RDC usually reveals potentialities not originally
envisioned. Nobody has yet found their limit, though
RDC is now operating in a
searching range
of services in Australia, Cuba and Saudi Arabia, as well as on our
own countrys leading railroads. The Budd Company, Philadelphia, Detroit, Gary.
IJ II
Automobile and Truck Bodies and Wheels, Railway Passenger Cars and Piows • .,
RAIL CANADIEN -491 210 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
HDC
With the New Look
CANADIAN LICENSEE: CANADIAN CAR & FOUNDRY COMPANY. LIMITED
What

IS RDe?
The letters R-D-C stand for rail diesel car. ROC is the generic name for the self-propelled.
stainless steel cars designed, developed and built by
The Budd Company. Canadian Car &
Foundry Company, Limited has been appointed Canadian Licensee by The Budd Company and,
in conjunction with The Budd Companys Engineering and Design Departments, will produce
these cars in
Canada to fully meet Canadian operating conditions.
There are four models, all of standardized construction and equipment and with established
prices.
The cars are built io lots of varying quantities in advance of orders. Consequently
the interval between the placing
of an order and delivery of the car may be a matter of weeks.
All the
ROC models-ROC-I, 2, 3 and 4-are powered by two 300-horsepower diesel engines.
The cars operate in either direction as single units, or in any required multiple, all controlled
from a single station. Seating capacity
of the first three types of RDCs varies. ROC-I, 90
passengers;
ROC-2, 71 passengers and a 17 foot baggage-express compartment; ROC-3.
49 passengers, and compartments for baggage-express and mail; RDC-4 carries baggage­
express and mail only. All models are equipped with Budd railway passenger
car disc
brakes, and all but
ROC-4 are air-conditioned.
The illustrations 011 this and the Ilext three pages were
taken from literature produced
in the 1950s by the Budd
Company and the Calladian Car alld Foundry
Company.
LEFT: A view
of the controls of an RDC.
OPPOSITE TOP: An artists cOllception
of the interior
of one of the New Look Budd cars.
OPPOSITE BOTTOM
LEFT RDCs under construction
at the Budd factory ill Red Lion Pennsylvania.
OPPOSITE BOTTOM RIGHT: The Budd Car comes
to
Canadian Pacific.
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002 211 CANADIAN RAIL -491
B.U D D
R D C
comes to
RAIL CANADIEN -491 212 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
– T – -~ —TFMCD. tW;s … —…. —+—–~—t—-+ —-+—–+-riIIG:, ~.)-…. —-.. —
~!~;)ow
_ll1T~T-~– —~ —… !~t5U~ __ .. ~ __ +-_
/
-……… -;;..~:~ ;;~:,r—. —-T —….. —-;-.–+-
COA~~9 ~~~~;ON
Hk-I—-+—–t-.!,A–~l-~~l–.. —-+—… —–+—-+_-+–1–_H+_i ~-J;=lr.:–
IJOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002 213 CANADIAN RAIL -491
L~~+–lttt+i–….. —,,-l.–r—,.-~ -~—.r -l: -1—-… –
C04CH SECTION (44PASS)
The Basic Configurations of the RDC
OPPOSITE TOP: The RDC-1 is strictly for carrying passengers. It seats 90 in walkover seats. It weighs 113,200 Ibs. light,
118,000 ready to run and 131,900 when canying 90 passengers.
OPPOSITE MIDDLE: The RDC-2 combines passengers and baggage-express.
It seats 71 passengers and has a 17-foot baggage
compartment.
It weighs 114,200 Ibs light, 119,000 ready to run and 139,900 when carrying 71 passengers and 9900 Ibs. of
baggage.
OPPOSITE BOTTOM: The RDC-3 combines passengers, baggage-express and mail. It seats 49 passengers, with a 17-foot
baggage-express compartment separated by a bulkhead with a creep door from a IS-foot railway mail compartment.
It weighs
117,900 lbs light, 122,700 ready
to run and 143,400 with 49 passengers, 5000 lb. RPO load and 8000 Ibs. of bagage.
THlS PAGE TOP: The RDC-4
is for mail and baggage-express exclusively. It is 73 feet 10 inches long and contains a baggage­
express compartment
of 31 feet, separated by a bulkbead and creep door from a mail compartment of 30 feet. It weighs 109,200
Ibs. light, 113,800 ready to run and 144,300 when carrying a 10,000 lb. RPO load and 20,200 Ibs. of baggage.
THlS PAGE ABOVE: The RDC-9
is not designed for independent operation, but is controlled from a regular RDC. It has one
300 h.p. engine and carries 94 passengers.
RAIL CANADIEN -491 214 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY RDCs
NUM RDC BLDR DATE DATE SUBSEQUENT IDENTITIES NOTES
BER TYP. NUM. BUILT LNSVCE.
9020 3 5909 Oct 1953 Oct 1953 CN 2250M Retired by VIA.
9021 3 6018 Mar 1955 Mar 1955 VIA 6222 Conv. to ROC-2m.
9022 3 6019 Mar 1955 Mar 1955 VIA 6216 Conv. to ROC-2m.
9023 3 6021 Mar 1955 Sep 1955 VIA 6224 Conv. to ROC-2m.
9024 3 6305 lui 1956 Aug 1956 VIA 6223 Conv. to ROC-2m.
9049 6220 Aug 1955 May 1958 VIA 6124 To Cuba Ex. DSS&A 500.
9050 5816 Oct 1953 Oct 1953 VIA 6137 CPRs first ROC.
9051 5817 Oct 1953 Oct 1953 VIA 6128 B.C. Rail BC-16 Retired 1995.
9052 5913 Oct 1953 Oct 1953 Wrecked lun. 17, 1972.
9053 5918 Mar 1954 Mar 1954 VIA 9053 Wrecked Nov. 18, 1978.
9054 5916 lui 1954 lui 1954 CP 86 META 54
9055 5924 lui 1954 lui 1954 VIA 6132 To Cuba
9056 6221 Aug 1955 Aug 1955 VIA 6129 To Dallas
9057 6223 Sep 1955 Sep 1955 VIA 6130
9058 6317 lui 1956 Aug 1956 VIA 6133 Originally lettered D.A.R.,
In service (Vancouver Island).
9059 6318 Aug 1956 Aug 1956 VIA 6126 To Dallas Originally lettered DAR.
9060 6322 Aug 1956 Aug 1956 CP 87 VIA 9060 To Dallas
9061 6611 Jan 1957 Jan 1957 VIA 6142 To Dallas
9062 6612 Jan 1957 Jan 1957 VIA 6127 To Dallas
9063 6617 Feb 1957 Feb 1957 VIA 6123 To Dallas
9064 6619 Feb 1957 Feb 1957 VIA 6139 To Dallas
9065 6706 Feb 1957 Feb 1957 VIA 6134
9066 6707 Feb 1957 Feb 1957 CP 88 VIA 9066 MBTA 66
9067 6708 Mar 1957 Mar 1957 VIA 6136
9068 6709 Mar 1957 Mar 1957 CP 89 VIA 9068 META 68
9069 6809 lun 1957 lun 1957 CP90 Intended to be preserved.
9070 6903 Oct 1957 May 1958 VIA 6131 To Dallas Finished by Can-Car.
9071 6904 Nov 1957 lun 1958 VIA 6141 Finished by Can-Car.
9072 6905 Nov 1957 lun 1958 VIA 6135 Finished by Can-Car,
In service
(Vancouver Island).
9100 2 6014 Mar 1955 Mar 1955 CP 9307 VIA 6147 To Cuba Conv. to ROC-5, later ROC-I.
9101 2 6016 Mar 1955 Mar 1955 Wrecked October 24, 1959.
9102 2 6229 Sep 1955 Sep 1955 CP 9300 CP92 VIA 6146 Conv. to ROC-5, later ROC-I,
Wrecked March 23, 1983.
9103 2 6308 lun 1956 lun 1956 VIA 6213
9104 2 6309 lun 1956 lui 1956 CN 6207 VIA 6207
9105 2 6310 lun 1956 lui 1956 VIA 6212
9106 2 6311 lun 1956 lui 1956 VIA 6214 Conv. to ROC-5.
9107 2 6312 lui 1956 lui 1956 VIA 6215 In service (Sudbury).
9108 2 6313 lui 1956 lui 1956 CP 91
9109 2 6314 lui 1956 lui 1956 CP 9309 VIA 6138 Conv. to ROC-5, later ROC-I.
9110 2 6503 Sep 1956 Oct 1956 CP 9303 VIA 6145 To Dallas Conv. to ROC-5, later ROC-I.
9111 2 6504 Oct 1956 Oct 1956 VIA 6219
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER2002 215 CANADIAN RAIL -491
9112 2 6607 Feb 1957 Feb 1957 VIA 6211
9113 2 6608 Feb 1957 Feb 1957 CN 1400
9114 2 6609 Feb 1957 Feb 1957 CP 9305 VIA 6148 Cony. to RDC-5, later RDC-l,
In service (Vancouver Island).
9115
2 6913
May 1958 May 1958 VIA 6217 Finished by Can-Car.
9116 2 5416 lun
1951 Sep 1958 CP 9306 VlA 6143 Ex LV 41 (1958),
Cony. to RDC-5, later RDC-l.
9194 2 6906 Sep
1957 Mar 1958 CP 9308 VIA 6140 Finished by Call-Car,
Cony. to RDC-5, later RDC-l.
9195 2 6907 Sep
1957 Feb 1958 CN 6208 VIA 6208 Finished by Can-Car.
9196
2 6908
Oct 1957 Feb 1958 CN 6209 VlA 6209 Finished by Can-Car.
9197
2 6909 Oct 1957 Feb 1958
CN 6210 VIA 6210 Finished by Can-Car.
9198 2 6910 Oct 1957 Feb
1958 Finished by Can-Car,
Wrecked 1973.
9199 2 6911 Oct
1957 Feb 1958 CP 9302 VIA 6125 QNS&L 6125 Finished by Can-Car,
QCR 6125 Cony. to RDC-5, later RDC-l,
In service (East Angus).
9200 4 6231 Sep
1955 Sep 1955 VIA 9200
9250 4 6306 lui
1956 lui 1956 VIA 9250
9251 4 6307 lui 1956 lui 1956 VlA
9251
CARS RENUMBERED ON CPR
86 5916 See 9054.
87 6322 See 9060.
88 6707 See 9066.
89 6709 See 9068.
90 6809 See 9069.
91 2 6313 See 9108.
92
2 6229 See 9102.
9300 5 6229 See 9102.
9302 5 6911 See 9199.
9303 5 6503 See 9110.
9305
5 6609 See 9114.
ABOVE: CP Rail 9110 and an unidentified RDC-1 at London
9306 5 5416 See 9116.
on March 31, 1967.
9307 5 6014 See 9100.
BELOW: CP Rail RDC-2 9110 and 9111 at London on June
9308 5 6906 See 9194.
18, 1971.
9309 5 6314 See 9109.
Both photos by Don McQueen
RAIL CANADIEN -491
NUM RDC BLDR DATE
BER TYP.
NUM. BUILT
D-IOO 3
D-IOI
3
D-I02
D-I03
D-I04
D-IOS
D-I06
D-I07
D-I08
D-I09
D-110
D-Ill
D-I12
D-l13
D-114
D-llS
D-1l6
D-I17
D-1l8
D-ISO 4
D-ISI 4
D-200
D-201
D-201 2
D-202 2
D-203 2
D-204 2
D-20S 2
D-206 2
D-2S0 2
D-301 3
D-302 3
D-303 3
D-3S1 3
D-3S2 3
D-3S6 3
D-401 4
5910 lun 1953
6022 Mar 1955
6618 Feb 1957
6805 lun 1957
6806
6807
6808
6901
6902
6222
2960
6106
6105
lun 1957
lun 1957
lun 1957
Apr 1958
Apr 1958
Oct 1955
lui 1949
Apr 1955
Apr 1955
6114 Apr 1955
6116 May 1955
6111 Apr 1955
6102 Mar 1955
6103 Apr 1955
6101 Mar 1955
5904 lun 1953
6230 Sep 1955
5923 luI 1953
6218 Aug 1955
6912 May 1958
6915 May 1958
6916 May 1958
6814 lui 1957
6914 May 1959
6003 Ian 1955
6002 Ian 1955
6602 Dec 1956
6702
lun 1957
6704 luI 1957
6701 Mar 1957
6703
lun 1957
6301 luI 1956
6803 May 1957
216 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS RDCs
DATE
IN SVCE.
Dec 1953
Oct 1955
Feb 1957
lun 1957
lun 1957
lun 1957
lun 1957
Apr 1958
Apr 1958
Aug 1964
luI 1965
luI 1965
lui 1965
luI 1965
luI 1965
luI 1965
luI 1965
lui 1965
May 1966
lun 1954
Sep 1955
lun 1954
Aug 1955
May 1958
May 1958
May 1958
lui 1957
May 1959
May 1966
Ian 1955
Dec 1956
lun 1957
lui 1957
Mar 1957
lun 1957
Aug 1965
May
1957
SUBSEQUENT IDENTITIES
CN D-300
VIA
6121
CN D-354 CN 6354
QNS&L 6121 QCR 6121
CN D-350
CN 6102
CN 6103
CN 6104
CN 6105
CN 6106
CN 6107
CN 6108
CN 6109
CN 6110
CN
6111
CN 6112
CN 6113
CN 6114
CN 6115
QCR 6115
CN 6116
CN 6117
CN 6118
CN D-400
VIA 6453
CN
0-450
VIA 6250
CN
0-100
To Oallas CN 6350
VIA 6102
VIA 6104
VIA 6105
VIA 6106
VIA 6107
VIA 6108
VIA 6109
VIA 6110
VIA 6111
VIA 6112
VIA 6113
VIA 6114
VIA 6115
VIA 6116
VIA 6117
VIA 6118
CN
0-453
CN 6450
CN 6100
CN 0-101 CN 6101
QNS&L 6101 QCR
6101
CN 6201
CN 6202
CN 6203
QCR 6203
CN 6204
CN 6205
CN 6206
CN
0-200
CN 6122
VIA 6202
VIA 6203
VIA 6204
VIA 6205
VIA 6206
CN 6200
CN
0-355 CN 6355
QNS&L 6218 QCR 6218
CN 6302
CN
0-353
CN 6351
CN 6120
CN 6356
CN 6401
VIA 6220
CN 6119
VIA 6225
VIA 6120
VIA 6221
VIA 6401 VIA 6144
BCRaiIBC-15
To Oallas
To Dallas
To Cuba
To Oallas
QNS&L 6115
CN 6453
VIA 6450
VIA 6100
VIA
6101
VIA 6122
QNS&L 6203
VIA 6200
VIA 6218
VIA 6119
To Cuba
NOTES
First 0-100,
Cony. to ROC-1m,
In service (East Angus).
Cony. to ROC-1m,
Wrecked luly 24, 1985.
Wrecked 1969.
Finished
by Can-Car.
Finished
by Can-Car.
Ex C&EI 1964
Original Budd demonstrator.
ExB&M6111.
Ex B&M 6110.
Ex B&M 6119
Ex B&M 6121
Ex B&M 6116.
Ex B&M 6107
Ex B&M 6108.
Ex B&M 6106.
In service (Sudbury).
First 0-200, second D-100.
First 0-201, second
0-101.
Finished by Can-Car,
Second 0-201,
Cony.
to ROC-1m.
Finished
by Can-Cm·.
Finished by Can-Car.
Ex GTW 0-204.
Finished
by Can-Car,
In service (Sudbury).
Ex B&M 6200.
Second 0-200.
Ex DW&P 0-301,
Cony.
to ROC-2m.
Cony.
to RDC-2m.
Ex GTW 0-303,
Cony.
to RDC-1 m.
Cony. to ROC-2m.
Cony.
to ROC-I m.
Ex MKT 20,
Cony.
to ROC-2m.
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
D-402 4
D-451 4
D-452 4
D-500 9
D-501 9
D-502 9
D-503 9
D-504 9
D-505 9
D-506 9 6804 J un 1957
680
I May 1957
6802
May 1957
640
I Aug 1956
6402
Aug 1956
6403
Aug 1956
6416
Sep 1956
6420 Oct 1956
6421
Oct 1956
6426 Oec 1956
Jun 1957
May 1957
May 1957
Jul 1965
Jut 1965
Jut 1965
Jul 1965
Jul 1965
Jul 1965
Jul 1965
CARS RENUMBERED ON CNR
0-100(2) 1
0-101(2)
1
0-200(2) 2
0-300 3
0-350 3
0-353 3
0-354 3
0-355 3
0-400 4
0-450 4
0-453 4
D-475 4 5923
6218
6002
5910
6022
6704
5910
6602
5904
6230
5904
6804
See 0-200.
See 0-201.
See 0-250.
See 0-100.
See 0-101.
See 0-303.
See 0-100.
See 0-301.
See 0-150.
See 0-151.
See 0-150.
See 0-402.
CN 0-475
CN 6451
CN 6452
CN 6000
CN 6001
CN 6002
CN 6003
CN 6004
CN 6005
CN 6006
217
CN 6475
VIA 6000
VIA 6001
VIA 6002
VIA 6003
VIA 6004
VIA 6005
VIA 6006
VIA 6475
CANADIAN RAIL -491
Wrecked 1969.
Wrecked 1969.
Ex. B&M 6900.
Ex. B&M 6901.
Ex B&M 6902.
Ex B&M 6915.
Ex B&M 6919.
Ex B&M 6920.
Ex B&M 6925.
ABOVE: Canadian National RDC-1 number D-200 and an unidentified RDC-4 (probably D-150) operating on a test run prior
to the inauguration
of service between Riviere du Loup and Levis Quebec.
BELOW-Canadian National RDC-3 D-352 at Spadina (Toronto)
in April 1961.
Photo by Don Gard. collection
of Don McQueen
RAIL CANADIEN -491 218 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
NUM
BER
BC-I0
BC-l1
BC-12
BC-20
BC-21
BC-22
BC-30
BC-31
BC-31
BC-32
BC-33
40
41
42
BC-14
BC-
15
BC-16 RDC
TYP.
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
PACIFIC GREAT EASTERN / BC RAIL RDCs
BLDR DATE DATE SUBSEQUENT IDENTITIES NOTES
NUM. BUILT INSVCE.
6319 Aug 1956 Aug 1956
6320
Aug 1956 Aug 1956
6321 Aug 1956 Aug 1956
7003 Nov 1962 1984 BC-14 Ex RDG 9155 & SEPTA 9
155.
7004 Nov 1962 1983 Ex RDG 9156 & SEPTA 9156.
7008 Dec 1962 1983 Ex RDG 9160 & SEPTA 9160.
6508
Sep 1956 Sep 1956
6509
Sep 1956 Sep 1956 Wrecked November,
1973.
6302 Jul 1956 Oct 1976 2nd. BC-31. Ex GN 2350.
6510 Sep 1956 Oct 1956 Wrecked Febl1lary 1960.
6601 Dec 1956 Dec 1956
6017 Mar
1955 Dec 1975 (not used) To VIA for pmts. Ex NP B-40. For parts only.
6507 Sep 1956
Dec 1975 (not used) To VIA for parts. Ex NP B-41. For parts only.
5701
Dec 1952 Dec 1975 (not used)
To VIA for parts. Ex DM&1R I. For parts only.
CARS RENUMBERED ON BC RAIL,
OR ACQUIRED FROM OTHER CANADIAN RAILWAYS
7003
6618
5817 See BC-20.
See CN D-102.
See CP 9051.
BC-12 and BC-14 at Lillooef on July 2, 1985. Photo by Don McQueen
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2002 219 CANADIAN RAIL -491
VIA
NUMBER
6000
6001
6002
6003
6004
6005
6006
6100
6101
6102
6104
6105
6106
6107
6108
6109
6110
6111
6112
6113
6114
6115
6116
6117
6118
6119
6120
6121
6122
6123
6124
6125
6126
6127
6128
6129
6130
6131
6132
6133
6134
6135
6136
6137
6138
TABLE SHOWING ORIGINAL IDENTITY OF VIA RDCs
BUILDERS
NUMBER
6401
6402
6403
6416
6420
6421
6426
5923
6218
6618
6806
6807
6808
6901
6902
6222
2960
6106
6105
6114
6116
6111
6102
6103
6101
6704
6703
5910
6912
6617
6220
6911
6318
6612
5817
6221
6223
6903
5924
6317
6706
6905
6708
5816
6314
ORIGINAL
IDENTITY
B&M 6900
B&M 6901
B&M 6902
B&M 6915
B&M 6919
B&M 6920
B&M 6925
CN D-200
(1)
CN D-201 (1)
CN D-102
CN D-104
CN D-105
CN D-I06
CN D-I07
CN D-108
C&EI RDCl
BUDD 2960
B&M
6111
B&M 6110
B&M6119
B&M 6121
B&M 6116
B&M 6107
B&M 6108
B&M 6106
GTW D-303
CN D-352
CN D-100 (1)
CN D-201 (2)
CP 9063
DSS&A 500
CP 9199
CP 9059 (DAR)
CP 9062
CP 9051
CP 9056
CP 9057
CP 9070
CP 9055
CP 9058 (DAR)
CP 9065
CP 9072
CP 9067
CP 9050
CP 9109
6139
6140
6141
6142
6143
6144
6145
6146
6147
6148
6200
6202
6203
6204
6205
6206
6207
6208
6209
6210
6211
6212
6213
6214
6215
6216
6217
6218
6219
6220
6221
6222
6223
6224
6225
6250
6401
6450
6453
6475
9053
9060
9066
9068
9200
9250
9251
6619
6906
6904
6611
5416
6022
6503
6229
6014
6609
6002
6915
6916
6814
6914
6003
6309
6907
6908
6909
6607
6310
6308
6311
6312
6019
6913
6602
6504
6702
6301
6018
6305
6021
6701
6230
6803
5904
6804
5918
6322
6707
6709
6231
6306
6307
CP 9064
CP 9194
CP
9071
CP 9061
LV 41
CN D-101 (1)
CP 9110
CP 9102
CP 9100
CP 9114
CN D-250
CN D-202
CN D-203
GTW D-204
CN D-205
B&M 6200
CP 9104
CP 9195
CP 9196
CP 9197
CP 9112
CP 9105
CP 9103
CP 9106
CP 9107
CP 9022
CP 9115
DW&P D-301
CP 9111
CN D-302
MKT 20
CP
9021
CP 9024
CP 9023
CN
D-351
CN D-151
CN D-401
See 6250
CN D-150
CN D-402
CP 9053
CP 9060
CP 9066
CP 9068
CP 9200
CP 9250
CP 9251
RAIL CANADIEN -491 220 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
CNR D-102 and an RDC-3 at Edmonton in August, 1959. Photo by WG Shaw, collection of Don McQueen
CNR D-200
(2) (nee D-250) at Pointe St. Charles, Montreal on April 9, 1958. Photo by Don McQueen
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
CJJMDUN PJ..CIFIC RiJIW;.Y COMPANY
FF:CJf
Montrosl, December 12th, 1905
file 4-16-1/55-A
.IRJ>NSPORTJ..TIQ; OF SKIS ON LtmEUTr..~ JR.;.DlS.
Mess.r8~
R. 1.11100., Terminel Pea3~Dger J..:;;~ot
A. Harper,
J .R. ;.bbott,
For your Infonne.tlon bgoln this YI1l)t.er, skiers mey
transport. tbeir slt1s into the [)aYl1~er 609 well aa in the 22001 end
2100 series couches ogereted on Laurentian trains.
Consequently, there ere no rE:strictlona on the trf.one­
portet.1on of skis in bo.y LaurGntieo. train equipment including the
I)Iyl1ner, and trein crews ere bsing so informed by the Operet1ng
Cepartmso. t.
Naturally, thiS will not be given {Iide publ1city (ls…:e
do not Iieh to crowd these fine c&rs with skiers (p£rtlcuhrly when there
ure other Cl:rs 011 train) but this snould beve thG ereect of eliminating
critICism which the bt1Clning of skis in these C(lrs would bring.
~han InspectIng equiprr,eot, pla&se be sure and advise if
yOU find that CHS bre being dameged oy ski equipment..
Please 6lso note that agein this yeer, sOllJe of our
woodeD. coaches operated on waek-end treins to the Laurentians will be
equipped with ski racks for the convenience of skiers.
r. ilYl-~
District Passenger .!sent
oc-Messrs: ___
Ji,J. kahoD.
F.)..-. Pouliot
J.U. Brez.e€.u -Please instruct troin crews accordinglY·
J • .Ii.. Lemire
D. Guenett6
J .E.. Lacesse
G. Brc,ely
Information Bureeu, .S.
F.T.E.B •
./.gents, t.i.ontre&l to l:.Ont L&urier iact.
l.LR. Martln
niPROVED D.ULY SE!lVICE :E{:EE!I CAWARi AltO E!:UClMON
Iot.roduct.lon or ne.,,: lUX: t.roins 529-530
As you e1resdy know, 0 di&t.inct tDprflvc;nent ;as mede in cur
serviC6 botcheen Celgery and t.dnonton w.t.h t)le intr06uctl<:>D on NO16P.lbor
12th or HE .&!..U! RrC trains 529-5:50 on the rollo,rlng schedulas:-
~
Lv. Calgary 1.35 RJ !~T I Lv, E~O.t:Iton 5.30 ru L!T
J,r. Ed/.lOotOD 5.10 RJ !.IT AI. Celgory 8.55 F: I..:T
(lI,nklng Sllr.a st.ops us Trole 52S} (stopping o.t St. Ed/aont.on &. Red Daer only)
It ….. 111 be Doted that f..Ki t.rflle 529 prolidee an excelleDt. connect.loD I
from Train 1 Tho Canadian ror POIOt.S :orth of CSlge.ty. j
Train SY.) also eon.o.sot.s w.t.h lUX: t.retn 542 y:-btch nOl{ leaves
Calgary at. 9.05 PIl for Fort. !,loLood., Lethbrldge and int.erme-di;t8 stet-ioD&.
?hls ill an excellent. ssnion and ples80 bo sure e.nd ecqu81nt. 011
~seengerg going t.o the Cal~~~~o ~ar,-,,~.I..;!!.b-!I,,,—______ _
221 CANADIAN RAIL -491
CANADIAN PAClrIC RAILWAY COMPANY
Mont.real, July 24th, 1956.
Fil.,-3/5&-B.
II DAnDIER 11 S~VICE TO AND FROM THE LAURENTlANS ,
To Agents
Montreal to Hont-Laurier.
VIe are sending you a small supply of a dodger announcing our
DayUner Service II to and from the Laurentians.
,/e wish to make this service as widely knOV/ll a5 possible and,
with .this end in view, will you please dist.ribute the dodger to Post Offices,
.;,
Hotels, Merchants, etc., in fact in all qUArters where you t.hink it would
be productive of additional traffic.
F. Fortier
DISTRICT PASSENGER AGENT.
wI/MD.
Copies Messrs:-B. Mulroy, ( 100 )
c.A. Jennings, ( 100 )
E.J. Burke -Montreal lest, ( 100 )
J.H. Renaud -Wes.tmount, ( 100 )
M. Roch -Park Avenue, ( 100 )
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILy/I,Y COMPANY
MONTREAL, Decembel 51st, 1957.
FILE NO. :-4-16-1/57-B
TIlANSPORTATION OF SKIS ON LAURENTIAN TRAINS
Agents -Montreal to Mont Laurier incl.
Terminal Passenger Agents, W.S. (3)
For your information, please note that again this
Winter, skiers may transport their skis into the ltDayliners
ll
as
well as in other coach equipment operated on Laurentian trains
LCt.I/am
cc:-~.essrs:­
A.J. Mahon
F .1.. Pouliot
F. FORTIER
DISTRICT PASSENGER AGENT.
J.J. Presley -Please instruct train crews accordingly.
J.A. Lemire
J.E. Lacasse
G. Brady
R.O. Taillon
Infonnation &reau, V!.S.
P.T.E.D.
M.R. lJartin
Some documents relating to the RDC Dayliner service on
the CPR line from Montreal to the Laurentians.
They were
company notices sent to the agent at Shawbridge,
Que. This
was the line where the first RDC. number 2960, was tried
out
in 1953 and it remained a mainstay of the Budd Car
until passenger service ceased
in 1981.
Collection
of Peter Murphy
RAIL CANADIEN -491
RIGHT: Pacific Great Eastern
BC-32 heads the northbound
passenger train at Ullooet on
September 20,
1959. Only a few
months late/; on February 8,
1960, this car was wrecked and
burned at Canim,
B. C.
Photo by Fred Angus
BELOW: Car 9060 leads CPR
train
276 at Montreal West on
May 6, 1959.
Photo by Stan Smaill
222 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
LEFT: Pacific Great Eastern car
BC-3J (1) at Prince George in
August 1959. This car was wrecked
near Ullooet 011 November 26,
1973
and scrapped. Another car
with the same number took its
place in 1975.
Photo by W
G Shaw, Collection of
Don McQueen
BELOW: An interesting pun from a
Budd Company
ad of the 1950s.
II BUDDS nre blofSOlIlIllg nil over
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002 223 CANADIAN RAIL -491
Je(jtJBr~ CANADIAN PACIFIC HrAt IN CA
DOMINION
ATLANTIC
Now enjoy streamlined,
air-conditioned travel aboard
new Canadian Pacific Rai) Diesel
Cars-the lalest type of all-stainless­
steel passenger cars specially designed
co give speedy, comfonable rail rcavel
[or business and pleasure.
With these Budd ROC cars Canadian Pacific
sels a new siandard of comfo and convenience
in tcain travel in Canada, featuring:
• TIME-SAVING SERVICE
DAYLINERS
R,41/ up
Train Troln Trlln
61$ 631 630
Ex, SaL SaL Ex.
& Sun, only Sun.
~
~
.u.
3.55 1.30 Ly •. TORONTO … AI. 10.20
4.05 1.42 …….. West Toronto ….. 10.09
4.43 2.25 .. ….. Guelph Jet …
5.00 2,45 ……. ….. Galt. 9.14
5.32 3.18 ….. Woo~slock … 8.43
6,00 3.45 Ar . ……. Lon~on .. ….. Ly. 8.15
6.15 4.00 Ly .. …… Lon~on . ….. Ar. 8.05
7.15 4,58 ………… Chatham … 7.06
7.31 5.20 . Tilbury 6,44
8.00 6.00 Ar,. ….. Wln~sor.. Lv: 6.15
8.05 6.05 Ly .. …… Windsor. … .Ar. 6.10
8.15 6.15 Ar •. …. DETROIT. …. Ly. 6,00
, ….
.M. A.M.
Dayhners offer dally service eJcspt Sun~ay
ESQUIMALT & NANAIMO RAILWAY
FAST, DEPENDABLE
DdifliNlt,
PASSENGER SERVICE
FAST EVANGELINE
D~
PASSENGER SERVICE
between
VICTORIA -NANAIMO
COURTENAY
Effective
Oct. 26, 1969
.. Prine ….. Ferri •• Nanaimo to Vancouver
connect with The Canadian and The
Dominion Eastbound.
SMOOTH DIESEL POWER
RAIL CANADIEN -491
ABOVE AND RIGHT Two scenes
on an excursion
from Ottawa to
Maniwaki on February 3, 1963,
just before regular CPR passenger
service ceased on that line.
Photos by Fred Angus
224 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
LEFT: A two-car CPR train at London
West on August
22, 1963.
Photo by Don McQueen
IJOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
(2ue!J.ec CWAJ
Railway Company
DAYLINER
BETWEEN
QUEBEC
AND
ET
AUTORAll
ENTRE
SHERBROOKE
The Quebec Central had Dayliner service until 1967,
although no
RDC was ever lettered for that line. Today a
tourist line on the QCR still runs Budd Cars.
ABOVE: The special train, headed by 9057, at
Wakefield station on February 3, 1963.
RiGHT: 9109 at Westmount station, about to depart
for Megantic at 7:20 A.M. on September 26, 1964.
Both photos by Fred Angus
225 CANADIAN RAIL -491
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY
~~
-.. ~
,.~~,)..St..ler()QcI.
…… ~lfrbrlds:o,
tont. Rolland,
!)te l!BtiPIeri t.e,
n ..
3/61-1 ••
:sIout-reol, ,A.prll 4t.h, lJ61.
fAU, Ci:WG3 OY rn-:.:< -1961.
Conduotor j; … 1. BO$uchar:tp,
Conduet.ore Roca,
tHndlior SaUoo..
It hall noll bella dogldod too operata t18.1n8 175 Illld 170 between L(ontreel end
St. …. A3e.th~. ~ondAyo to FrldQ)1J wlt.h one HOO.2 only, lIII:oept. dur1ll8 t.be .ootha ot
luly aad ,w&l8t whero t.rottlo trill .traoi operotion of t..o (2) UJllte. Lbo 8obed.ule
ill bit es tOHOl8:-
n. ~t.J8r Sho. .. brldg8
1lt.. ROl1tHld
St& lnrsuer1ta
u.ont. HQ11Wld
..
Sba .. brldee
$t.Joronc
L!ont.ro.r.1 (1(:3) ..
9 • .24 1111.
9.fl lin.
10.02 &c.
10.12 u.
10.35 aa.
11.19 0:..
11.WllA.
11.41 8JiI.
U.56 a.m..
1.00 PIl.
;0 hope
tbat you, gentlemon, ….. 111 publlolu t1110. trnln 60nl08 IUld 1t!9Je.t..e
upon t.ho SlMrol fUbHe t.h. neo.acHy of potronlt.lug the60 tllO trai.na, 1.0., 11ti
end 110 ae ve will oheo.ll t.hesa trtl1116 ol
atully 1n &li!r.&r aud it …. 6 do not.. OhO~i
ll.Qy lnorulso In )ualnotlG, 1 8l.; afrilid t.lvtt _0 IflU havo to ebandou oporl.Jon at
these t1{() trelos 10. t.he. Wl.
Ho publlolty to be ginn .l:UI tJa~1l1n.3 [-ubJ.1o ,.at Wltll you loar turt.hor
froG t.l118 oftico.
ltia/1e
By 1961 the decline had begun as we see from the
penultimate paragraph of this letter to the agent at
Shawbridge. Collection of Peter Murphy
RAIL CANADIEN -491
RiGHT: The last day for the Megantic Budd
was
March 27, 1966. Here we see 9107
l
eading a two-car train, at Megantic station
on the
last day.
ABOVE: Two RDCs, the second of which is 9066,
pass the site
of the Canadian Railway Museum en
route
to Farnham on July 8, 1966.
RiGHT: Quebec Citys Palais Station is the scene for
this photo showing
RDCs 9071 and 9068, on April
9, 1967. The 9068 is about to leave for Sherbrooke
via the Quebec Central. Lest than a month later the
service ended.
226 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
LEFT: On October 28, 1965 a
special charter train, consisting
of
RDC 9106, brought visitors to the
Canadian Railway Museum at
Delson. This photo
is taken beside
what is now called Building
No.1.
The person standing beside 9106 is
Jack Beatty, CPR passenger
representative and long-time CRHA
membel; who organized the trip.
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
RIGHT: An unscheduled stop for 9102 on the Esquimalt
and Nanaimo after hitting an object on the track on
May
5, 1967. The engineer is under the car checking for
damage while the
conductor and a passenger look on.
There was no damage
and the train soon proceeded.
BELOW: Arrived at Victoria on the same day, 9102
is
seen at what was then the southern terminus of the run.
ABOVE AND RIGHT: Two views at
Lillooef on May 8, 1967 en route to
Prince George.
All photos
on these two pages by Fred
Angus
227 CANADIAN RAIL -491
BELOW: At North Vancouver on the morning
of May 8, 1967, the Caribou Dayliner of
the Pacific Great Eastern is about to leave
for Prince George.
RAIL CANADIEN -491
ABOVE: A brief stop at Williams Lake as the
Caribou
Dayliner continues north.
RIGHT: Arrival at Prince George was on time in
the evening
of May 8, 1967, just after sunset.
BELOW A CN two-car RDC train headed by number
D-355 prepares
to leave Richmond, Que. on July 2,
1967.
228 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
ABOVE: A stop at Ayres
Cliff, Que. on a
special
CRHA excursion on
March
2, 1968. Car 9105
displays the CRHA
insignia.
LEFT: Crossing the
trestle at North Hatley on
the same day. This line,
from Sherbrooke to
Newport Vt., is now
abandoned.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER2002
RIGHT: A rUl1past through the woods on
the Massawippi Valley excursion, March
2, 1968.
BELOW: 1ts Christmas Eve 1968 and the
early-afternoon Lakeshore commuter
train consisted of eleven RDCs, headed
by 9100. In this photo it is stopped at
Lakeside
to let off passengers. A year later
this train would be one car longer
l
RIGHT: Shawbridge station was a stop
on a CRHA excursion on March
2, 1969.
229 CANADIAN RAIL-491
LEFT: 9022 coming around a curve
on the Laurentian line on the
same
CRHA excursion, March 2, 1969.
All photos on these two pages by Fred
Angus
RAIL CANADIEN -491
BELOW: Crossing a bridge on the
Laurentian line, March 2, 1969.
Photo by Fred Angus
230 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
LEFT: Looking down on 9111 at a rUl1past on
March
2, 1969.
Photo by Sian Smaill
BELOW-A stop at
Ste. Agathe on the same trip.
Photo by Fred Angus
ABOVE: Labelle station, also on March
2,
1969.
Photo by Fred Angus
LEFT: Car
9196 is the entire consist of the
train from Medicine Hat
to Lethbridge Alberta
on this day
in March 1969. The Canadian
has
just arrived and passengers are about to
transfer to the Dayliner for the trip to
Lethbridge.
Photo by Stan Smaill
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
LEFT Esquimalt & Nanaimo No.2 at Mud
Bay, B.C. in March 1969.
Photo by Stan Smaill
Below: A three-c
ar excursion special going
down the main street
of Wakefield Que. on
October
5, 1969.
Photo by Fred Angus
RIGHT Oldest of the CPR s Budd car fleet
was
9116 which was built in 1951 as Lehigh
Valley No.
41. It was remembered by
commuters for its low-back seats. In this
photo it heads a three-car commuter train
on December
6, 1969.
BELOW: What may well have been the
longest RDC train ever run
in Canada was
this twelve-car Christmas Eve special seen
at Montreal
West on December 24, 1969.
Both photos by Fred Angus
231 CANADIAN RAIL -491
RAIL CANADIEN -491
ABOVE AND RIGHT: 9057 at Digby on June 27,
1970.
At that time the train went right out on to the
wh(llj. Note the
Princess of Acadia in the
background. This ship offered a direct connection
to Saint John
N,B., across the Bay of Fundy.
Both photos by David Morris
232 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
LEFT CP Rail train 272 at Montreal West,
June 1970.
Photo by Stan Smaill
BELOW,
LEFT AND RIGHT: Two photos
ay Yarmouth
N.S. on the Dominion Atlantic
on June
27, 1970. Note that 9057 is not
one
of the two RDCs (9058 and 9059)
lettered Dominion Atlantic.
Photos by David Morris
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002 233 CANADIAN RAIL -491
When CP Rail moved RDCs from Montreal to New Brunswick it would sometimes attach them to the rear of the Atlantic
Limited. These photos, taken at Montreal West on August
2, 1970, show just such a move as car 9111 is being brought up from
the Dominion Atlantic. For the record, the consist
of the train is: 4067, 4248, 2277, Chateau Denonville, Chateau Marquette,
Imperial, Palm Grove, Elm Grove, and
9111 on the rem: Photo by David Morris
RIGHT: London, Ontario
JuLy 14, 1971.
BELOW: Hamilton Junction, October 31, 1971.
Both photos by Don McQueen
RAIL CANADIEN -491
RIGHT: The last run of CP train 337 at
London on July
2, 1971.
Photo by Don McQueen
RlGHT CP train 153 at North Junction, near
Montreal West in July 1971.
Photo by Stan Smaill
234 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
LEFT: Three RDCs deadheading on the
back
of freight train 951 from Farnham in
Decembel; 1970.
Photo
by Stan Smail!
LEFT CP 9110 on the last run of train 338
at London on July
3, 1971.
Photo by Don McQueen
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
RIGHT Farnham, Quebec, October 1971.
Photo
by Stan Smail!
BELOW eN 6118 leads a 3-car train at
Hyde Park, Ontario, January
20, 1974.
Photo by Don McQueen
BELOW North Junction, Que., July, 1971.
Photo by Stan Smail!
BELOW RIGHT:
eN 6401 is the lead unit of a 5-car train
at Hyde Park, Ontar
io, February 2, 1975.
Photo by Don McQueen
235 CANADIAN RAIL -491
ABOVE: eN 6115 and two others at Komoka, Ontario,
October
26, 1974.
Photo by Don McQueen
RAIL CANADIEN -491 236 NOYEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
LEFT: CN 6203 at Komoka on
October 20, 1974.
Photo by Don McQueen
BELOW: CN 6110 at St. Pauls,
Ontario on February 19, 1978. This
historic car
is none other than former
Budd demonstrator 2960, the first
RDC ever buill.
Photo by Don McQueen
LEFT: CP 9103 crossing the
Niagara Gorge viaduct on
Vancouver 1sland
on July 31, 1976. This structure is the
original
1884 Fraser River bridge, later moved to Vancouver
Island.
BELOW: CN 6302 and train at Egerton
St., London Ontario
on February
18, 1978.
Both photos by Don McQueen
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
RIGHT VIA car 6109 at London
on December
2, 1978.
BELOW: VIA 6115 at London
on October 26, 1978. Check the
coffee urns on the stove.
Both photos
by Don McQueen
RIGHT:
VIA 6117 at London
on December
2, 1979.
Photo by Don McQueen
237 CANADIAN RAIL -491
RAIL CANADIEN -491 238 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
Another move of an RDC on the rear of the Atlantic Limited. This time it is car 9055 moving from Montreal to Saint John. The
first photo shows the train about to leave Montreals Windsor station on August
14, 1977. Note the different pattern of stripes
on the car ends. The other photo shows the same train at Fredericton Junction the next morning. The consist was: 1800, 2702,
Draper Manor,
515, 123, 2772, and 9055.
Photo by David Morris (who rode the RDC all the way from Montreal to Fredericton Junction!)
RIGHT CN 6106 at London on January 2, 1979.
Note the Christmas decorations.
Photo by Don McQueen
LEFT: Having
just left some passengers at
Shawbridge Quebec, CP Budd car 9302 heads
north towards Mont Laurier on a rainy October
1, 1978. 9302 is one of the cars CP rebuilt in
the 1970s,
and was formerly 9199. Later it
became
VIA 6125, and is presently in use on a
tourist train at East Angus, Que.
Photo by Fred Angus
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
June 7, 1980 was the last day
that the Budd cars on the
Dominion Atlantic met at Digby.
These three photos were taken
by David Morris that da
y.
RIGHT: GK. Skinner issues the
last
orda
FAR RlGHT: Looking accross a
maze
of switches at 9050 in the
streets
of Digby.
BELOW:
The last meet at Digby
-cars 9050
and 9072.
RIGHT: VIA 6204 at Jordan, Ontario
on July 24, 1980.
BELOW: VIA 6213 leads a train at Spadina (Toronto) on
August 25, 1981.
Both photos
by Don McQueen
239 CANADIAN RAIL -491
/
RAIL CANADIEN -491
ABOVE: 6138 and 6140 passing Westfield
B
each on the initial deadhead run to
Fredericton, November
15, 1981.
BELOW After the big snowstorm of February
3, 1982, cars 6200 and 6206 needed a bit of
help from the CP switcher to break loose from
the ice and to get turned.
Both photos by David Morris
240 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
When VIAs Atlantic was discontinued on November 15,
1981, a Budd car train was inaugurated between Halifax
and Fredericton. This was
the first passenger service on the
Fredericton Branch
for many years.
BELOW: Some
of the crowd at Fredericton station on the
Photo by David Morris
CPRailB
Form 19Y . /
-::z I 0 ~ JIIl2,/ 15..3J
ABOVE: A crewman clears snow from the air horns as 6206 and 6200 start
loading passengers at Fredericton
on February 3, 1982.
LEFT: As the photographer stood on a snowbank at a road crossing in
Fredericton, on February 3 1982, the bank collapsed just as 6206 and 6200
approached. However
he managed to get the photo! Photos by David Morris
/
I
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
RIGHT Another view of the Budd cars
at Frederictoll after the storm of
January 3, 1982.
BELOW: Conductor Vince Doherty
from McAdam checks the tickets on
train 158 from Fredericton on
February 7, 1982. The cOllsist was
6219, 6130, 6140.
BELOW R1GHT: The snow drifts that
piled up after the storm
of January 18,
1982 were too much for RDCs 6214
and 6107. They needed help from CP
Rail locomotive 8023, as we see
in this
photo
of the train leaving Fredericton.
1t was cold! The thermometer read
minus 25 Celsius (13 below, Farellheit).
All photos by David Morris
BELOW:
V1A 6221 crossing the Miramichi bridge
at Newcastle N.B. on July
11, 1982.
Photo by Don McQueen
241 CANADIAN RAIL -491
ABOVE: V1A 6001, an RDC-9, at Sr. Marys,
Ontario on July
7, 1983. 1t was rare to see this
kind
of car at the end of the train.
Photo by Don McQueen
RAIL CANADIEN -491
BELOW: VIA RDC9 6002 at Spadina (Toronto) on
July
31, 1984.
BELOW RIGHT: 6114 leads a four-car train at
London on
April 19, 1986.
Both photos by Don McQueen
RIGHT:
Across the country, B.C. Rail car
BC-12 enters the tunnel at mileage 55.2,
Swift,
B. C. on July 2, 1985.
Photo by Don McQueen
, .
242 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
Until 1990 VIA operated an RDC train between Halifax
and Sydney, Nova Scotia. These two photos were taken on
August 21, 1982.
LEFT: Crossing the Canso Causeway on to Cape Breton,
Budd car 6141 seems very small as it runs along the side of
the road.
BELOW
6141 makes a brief stop at Havre Boucher.
Both photos by Fred Angus
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER2002 243 CANADIAN RAIL -491
On January 27, 1985 a pick up truck rem into the side of car 6142 as it was leaving Fredericton. The only damage to the RDC
was a propane tank
knocked off; fortunately the tallk was empty. The resultant half-hour delay caused the meet with the
inbound train
to take place CIt Fredericton Junction. This was the first, and only, time the two trains met at Fredericton Junction
during the entire
four years (1981 to 1985) that the trains rail. The photo on the left shows the crew examining the damage,
(note the dislodged tank) while that on the right shows the one-and-only meet at the junction. Photos by David Morris
September
14 1985 was the last day for the Fredericton
Budd
CCl1: The last car was 6128. These three photos were
taken by David Morris on that
day.
TOP: Conductor Vince Doherty copies the last clearance
for a passenger train at Fredericton station.
ABOVE: Conductor Doherty collecting the tickets on car
6128 on the last
run.
RIGHT: The conductor checks his watch while engineer
Murray Oliver looks
on, just before the last run. The sign
Freds Last Budd was
an abbreviation for Frederictons
last
Budd Car. The Fredericton Branch is now
abandoned.
ABOVE: On June 1, 1985, in the midst of a heavy rainstorm,
the revived Atlantic arrived
at Saint John. Here it meets
the Budd car on that morning. The Budd would continue to
run
until September 1985, and the Atlantic until
December 1994.
Photo
by David Morris
RAIL CANADIEN -491 244 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
Another group of Ontario scenes in the 1980s.
UPPER LEFT:
VIA 6205 crossing the bridge at
St. Marys on October 7, 1985.
ABOVE: VIA 6211 crossing Wetland lock 6 on
December
3, 1987. Photo by Chris Martin
LEFT:
VIA 6211 seen from Dundas mountain
on October
12, 1985.
BELOW: VIA 6206 and others at London on
February
27, 1988.
All photos by Don McQueen unless indicated
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002 245
On December 9, 1988 a happy occasion occurred at Brownville
Junction Maine. It was the lOath anniversary
of the driving of the
Last Spike
of CPRs Short Line at nearby Packard Brook. Two
RDCs were present for the occasion, CP Rail
91 (ex CPR 9108) and
VIA 6128 (ex CPR 9051). The 6128 was brought from Halifax the
night before on the rear
of the Atlantic.
As part of the ceremony, invited
guests rode on
6128 to Packard
Brook, where a commemorative
plaque was unveiled.
ABOVE LEFT The Atlantic
at McAdam on the night of
December 8, with 6128 coupled
behind the
Park CClI:
ABOVE R1GHT The u.s. Cust­
oms agent boards 6128 at
Vanceboro.
R1GHT: 6128 making the
special run to Packard Brook. 1n
the background is Mount
Katahdin.
BELOW: Four views of the
special cars at Brownville
Junction.
Al! photos by David Morris
CANADIAN RAIL -491
RAIL CANADIEN -491
RIGHT Budd cars as locomotives!
QNSL Roadrailer 1705 is set to
make its maiden run from Sept
Isles, Qc for Labrador City, Lb on
the evening
of August 18th, 1998
on the rear
of the QNSL Express
comprised
of three ex-Via RDCs.
Photo by John Godfrey
BELOW: A QNS&L three-car
train, led by 6203, at Labrador
City on December 15, 1999.
Photo by Fred Angus
BELOW RIGHT 6101 is part of a
very long train that has just
arrived at Shefferville from Sept
Isles in the evening
of December
16, 1999. The reflective area
indicates the emergency exit.
Photo by Fred Angus
246 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
LEFT Five-sixths of the QNSL
RDC fleet cools its wheels at Ross
Bay Jet, Labrador on August
20th, 1998 as the companys dome
car they ferried from Sept Isles
joins their lone sibling for the
short hop over to Labrador
City,
Labrador. Within minutes, the 5
car train will be northbound to
Schefferville, Quebec.
Photo by John Godfrey
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002 247 CANADIAN RAIL -491
TOP AND ABOVE LEFT: Two views of Ihe
weekly passenger Irain about to leave
Shefferville for Sept Isles on December 17,
1999.
1t consisted of RDCs, coaches, baggage
cars
and freight cars, and il· was full!
ABOVE: Inside car
6218 about fifteen minutes
before departure. The vacant seats
in the photo
were full well before the train left.
LEFT: Unloading baggage at Sept Isles after
arrival on December
17, 1999.
All pholos this page by Fred Angus
RAIL CANADIEN -491
RIGHT VIA 6205 at Sudbury on
September
11, 1999. Notice the
canoes. It
is amazing how many
canoes can be ·-loaded in the
baggage section
of a Budd car!
Photo by Don McQueen
248 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
LEFT: VIA 6112 and 6129 at
Mimico on October
15, 1994.
Photo by Don McQueen
LEFT VIA 6215 and 6205 at White
River, Ontario on January
29, 1994.
The Sudbury-White River Budd car is
still running.
Photo by Chris Martin, collection
of
Don McQueen
NOVEMBER -DECEMBER 2002
Although greatly threatened, the VIA
service
on the Esquimalt & Nanaimo on
Vancouver Island is still running as of
December 2002.
TOP:
Two views of the train, consisting of
cars 6133 and 6135, at Victoria on March
10,
2002. At that time, notice of dis­
continuence i
i two weeks had been given,
so the
train was sold out as passenge rs
availed themselves of one last ride.
However the train was reprieved and it
is
hoped that it may continue.
ABOVE: The train at its northern terminus
of Courtenay on the same
day.
Three photos by Fred Angus.
RIGHT VIAs other Budd car service is the
Sudbury -White River
run. Here we see VIA
6215 and 6250 (a rare RDC-4) at Sudbury
on
September 25, 2001.
Photo by Don Mc
Queen
249 CANADIAN RAIL -491
A contract signed at the end of April [2001] has confirmed
the refurbishment of VIAs six Rail Diesel Cars (RDCs)
servicing the Victoria-Courteney and Sudbury-White
River lines. The self-propelled cars, maintained locally
by third party contractors, have not been overhauled
in
over a decade, resulting in high maintenance costs and
tenuous reliability. Mechanically, there will be no
modernization per se but all systems will
be overhauled;
explains Capital Program and Business Development
project manager Alan MacKenzie.
In addition, car
interiors, such as carpets, upholstery, and seats, will be
completely refurbished with the HEP1 colour scheme.
Work
is scheduled to begin by mid-June, allowing two
RDCs to be refurbished by the end of 2001 and the
balance completed in 2002. There will be no disruption
in service, as only one ROC will be overhauled at a time.
From Vialogue, May 2001
RAIL CANADIEN -491 250 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2002
LEFT: Train-Touristiques
St Franr;oiss
ex-QNSL
6121 and 6125 (ex-VIA
same numbers) meet QCR
JMG-1 on a High Iron
Travel rare-mileage four
of the QCR system at Easf
Angus on August 10th,
2002. The smartly painted
RDCs are headed for
Disreali, Que. on the first
of two runs on this su.nny
summer Saturday.
Photo by John Godfrey
LEFT: The other operational RDC on the Train­
Touristiques St Franr;oiss line is 6121. This photo shows
it on a shakedown
frip for the news media on May 19,
2002.
BELOW 6121 at the beautifully-restored station at East
Angus on May
19, 2002. The station is now a museum of
the Pulp and Paper industry.
Both
phOfOS by Fred Angus
LEFT: During OC/ober the conventional tourist train
out of Vallee Jonction and the Budd cars out of Easf
Angus ran special Fall Foliage excursions. This photo
was taken on October 13, 2002, during one of these
trips. Having passed each other af Disraeli, the RDCs
then followed the conventional train to the nearby picnic
area where passengers on both trips enjoyed lunch.
Photo by Fred Angus
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER2002
RIGHT AND BELOW Thirteen
of VIAs RDCs were sold to
Dallas (Texas) Area Rapid
Transit in 1993, rebuilt in
Montreal and are now
in service
on the Trinity Railway Express
between Dallas and Fort
Worth.
These photos were taken at Fort
Worth on August 15, 2002.
Both photos by Fred Angus
251 CANADIAN RAIL-491
BELOW A number of VIA Budd cars
are still
in storage at Moncton, N.B.
Some of these are shown here,
looking
rather forlorn. The winter
scene was taken on February 17,
2001, while the other two were on
May
8, 2001.
Photos by David Morris
BA CK CO VER TOP: Canadian National car D-204, an RDC-2 photographed at Richmond, Quebec on October 13, 1962. Built
in 1957, this car was originally Grand Trunk Western D-204, later became CNR 6204 and still later VIA 6204.
BACK COVER BOTTOM CPR Dayliner 9102 stops at Nanaimo, B.C., en route
to Victoria on May 5, 1967. This car was built
in 1955 and was rebuilt to an RDC-5 and renumbered 9300 in 1974. In 1979 it was renumbered 92, and finally became VIA
6146. It was wrecked at Carstairs, Alberta on March 23, 1983.
Both photos by Fred Angus
This issue of Canadian Rail was reprinted in September, 2003.

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