Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 485 2001

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 485 2001

186
CANADIAN RAIL
ISSN 0008-4875
Postal Permit No. 40066621
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE ROYAL TRAIN OF 1901 …………………………………………………………………………………………………… .. FRED ANGUS ……………………………….. ..
TAKE THE 0 TRAIN ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. .
THE 2001 REMOTE RAIL ADVENTURE TOUR ………………………………………………………………………………. . FRED ANGUS ………………………………… .
THE NEW VIA TRAIN TO KITCHENER ………………………………………………………………………………………… . MARK PAUL ………………………………….. .
VIAS NEW LOCOMOTiVES ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. .
THE REBORN QUEBEC CENTRAL ………………………………………………………………………………………….. .
THE LAST TRIP OF THE WASCANA ………………………………………………………………
………………………… . DAVID MORRiS ……………………………… ..
EXPORAIL REPORT 7 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. . CHARLES DE JEAN …………………………. .
THE FIRST SUPERLINER1 IN 18291 ………………………………………………………………
……………………….. .. NEW YORK AMERiCAN …………………….. .
A CHRISTMAS STREET CAR STORy ………….••.••.•..•….••.••..••.••…••…••.•.•••.•……….
………………………………. SI. NICHOLAS 1895 ………………………… .
TOMORROW AND TOMORROW AND TOMORROW …………………………………………………………………………
. .
THE GREAT CANADIAN ACHIEVEMENTS MURAL AT AURORA ………………………………………………………….. .
THE BUSINESS CAR …………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
.. .
SANTA ON THE TRACKS …………………••••..•••………………………………
………………………………………………. MONTREAL DAILY STAR 1898 ……………. ..
187
196
198
202
203
204
206
207
210
212
214
215
218
219
FRONT COVER: The special train of the Remote Rail Adventure Tour, operated by the Pacific Coast chapter of the Railway and
Locomotive Historical Socie
ty, passes a grain elevator at Davidson Saskatchewan on April 22, 2001. These grain elevators are
rapidly disappearing. Photo by Fred Angus.
BELOW VIA RAIL has retired all of its LRC locomotives, the last run of which occurred on December 12, 2001. This photo was taken
on July
19 1986, when 6914 was hauling a special train commemorating the sesquicentennial of Canadian railways. Photos of
VIAs new locomotives are on page 203. Photo by Fred Angus
For your membership in the CRHA, which
includes a subscription to Canadian Rail,
write to:
CRHA, 120 Rue St-Pierre, St. Constant,
Que.
J5A 2G9
Membership Dues for 2001:
In Canada: $36.00 (including all taxes)
United States:
$31.00 in U.S. funds.
Other Countries:
$56.00 Canadian funds. Canadian Rail
is continually in need of news, stories
historical data, photos, maps and other material. Please
send all contributions to the editor: Fred
F. Angus, 3021
Trafalgar Avenue, Montreal, P.Q. H3Y 1 H3, e-mail
angus82@aei.ca . No payment can be made for
contributions, but the contributer will be given credit for
material submitted. Material
will be retumed to the contributer
if requested. Remember Knowledge is of little value unless
it is shared with others.
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR:
Douglas NW. Smith
ASSOCIATE EDITOR (Motive Power):
Hugues W. Bonin
LAYOUT: Fred F. Angus
PRINTING:
Procel Printing
DISTRIBUTION: Joncas
Postexperts
Inc.
The CRHA may be reached at its web site: www.exporail.org or by telephone at (450) 638-1522
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 187 CANADIAN RAIL -485
The Royal Train of 1901
by Fred Angus
This year marks the one hundredth anniversary of the most famous Royal train ever operated in Canada up to that date.
Even today, only the Royal train
of 1939 is more well known.
THE CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAYS ROYAL TRAIN.
The Royal Train, built in the Canadian Pacific
Railwa
ys own workshops, by Canadian brains and labor,
is a marvel of pelfect workmanship and refined taste. Its
equal the world has yet
to see.
This tribute appeared in Canadian newspapers in
September and October
1901, just 100 years ago, as the Duke
and Duchess
of Cornwall and York, later King George V and
Queen Mary, toured Canada.
In
1900 the Victorian era was drawing rapidly to a
close.
The nineteenth century was in its last year and the
queen, after whom the era was named, was also near the end
of her life, outliving the century by only three weeks. Despite
the war then raging in South Africa, the British Empire was
then at the peak
of its greatness, and it was arranged that
Prioce George, who held the two titles
of Duke of Cornwall
and Duke
of York, would, with his wife Mary, make a tour of
several countries of the Empire during 1901. George was the
grandson
of Queen Victoria, and in 1910 he would become
King
George V. Starting in March 1901, they would board
the
Royal yacht Ophir and would visit India, Australia
and New Zealand before arriving in Canada in September.
Then they would go
to South Africa, where the Boer War was
still being fought, and would then return to England.
While the plans for the tour were being finalized,
Queen Victoria died on January
22, 1901 and her son Edward,
Georges father, became King Edward VII. Thus George
became the next in line to the throne and would soon be
invested as Prince
of Wales. Despite this change in status, it
was decided to continue with plans for the Royal tour.
The Royal yacht entered Canadian waters on
September 14 1901, and the newspapers announced The
Ophir, bearing the Royal party, has reached the coast of
Canada. The Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York are
welcome to this Dominion.
By an unfortunate historical
coincidence, this was the very day of the death of U.S.
President McKinley who had been shot by an assassin at the
Worlds Fair in Buffalo eight days previously.
So it was that
the start
of the Royal tOllr of 1901 in Canada was relegated
to the back pages
of most of the papers.
The arrival of the Ophir at Quebec, and the official
start of the tour, was delayed by a dense fog in the SI.
Lawrence river which forced the Royal yacht to stop for
several hours. However at 9:30 on the morning of September
16 the Ophir came in sight of Quebec, and at 12:30 PM.
the Duke and Duchess steped ashore on Canadian soil. Amid
the celebration there was a note
of sadness. All vessels in
port, the Ophir included, fle the Stars and Stripes at
half
mast in mourning for the murdered president, and a planned
reception and
garden party were cancelled.
For the next five weeks the Royal party toured
Canada
from coast to coast, before sailing from Halifax to
Newfoundland (then a separate Dominion) on October 21.
After a visit to Britains oldest colony, they sailed for England
on October 25. The Royal tour of Canada of 1901 was over.
Although there would be other Royal tours
of Canada, most
notably those
of the Prince of Wales (Georges son) in 1919
and 1927, it would not be until 1939 that a tour as elaborate
as that
of 1901 would be held.
RAIL CANADIEN -485
Most of the long-distance travel in the tour was by
tra
in, and the Canadian Pacific Railway spared no effort to
make this train the best available anywhere. Detailed
descriptions, with
plans and illustrations, appeared in many
188 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
newspapers; the one that follows is from the Daily Sun, of
Saint John New Brunswick, on October 12 1901, five days
before the R
oyal train aITi ved at that city.
The C.P.R.s Royal Train
r
DAY This train consists of the day coach Cornwall
and the night coach York, each reserved for the use of
Their
Royal Highnesses; the compartment car Canada
and the sleeping car Australia for the members of their
suite;
the dining car Sandringham and the sleeping car
India for their attendants; the sleeping car South Africa
for the members of
the press and others invited to join
the Royal progress; and two cars for baggage and the
accommodation of railway train employees.
The train
is 730 feet in length and its weight is
595 tons. Locomotives, varying
in weight and power
according
to grades, will be used, and during the long
r
un of over 3000 miles from ocean to ocean about twenty
changes
of locomotives in all will be made.
The cars are
all vestibuled, communication being
had from
end to end of train. The exteriors are finished in
Mahogany. The entire train is lighted by electricity and
equipped with electric
bells, and there is telephone
connecti
on between all the cars.
The Cornwall
is the rearmost coach so that from
its observation platform an uninterupted view may
be
obtained through which the train will pass.
Immediately preceding the Cornwall
is the York
night coach, with bedchambers, bathrooms and
accommodations for Their Royal Highnesses and their
personal attendants.
The train was designed and constructed for the
purpose for
which it is to be used. Having in view the
long
run it is intended to make, the essentials for comfort
and safety have
been kept in mind in its construction,
and
it is believed the train represents all that is best in
Canadian railway equipment.
DESCRIPTION OF THE CORNWALL
The Cornwall is a day coach, 78 feet 6 1/2 inches
in length overall, with a width of 10 feet 3 3/8 inches, an
extreme height over rail of 14 feet, and a weight of over
59 tons.
It is divided into a reception room, boudoir, dining
room and kitchen etc.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001
The reception room, the largest room of the
suite, opens directly
on to the observation platform
at the rear of the train. The woodwork is of Circassian
walnut,
and is undecorated save for a few ornamental
mouldings. The entire upper part
of the room above
the cornice is finished in quiet antique gold. The
mouldings and ornaments are touched with gold and
blue. The decorations in the room are in the style of
Louis
Xv. The curtains are plain, of dark blue velvet,
draped simply back from the windows,
and the floors
are carpeted with a heavy Wilton of a quiet grey­
green tone. The furniture, consisting of a large sofa
and light roomy arm chairs and table and desk,
is
upholstered in blue velvet to match the draperies,
and a
specially designed piano of Canadian
manufacture is conspicuously placed in this room.
A short corridor, finished
in mahogany, leads
from the reception
to the dining room. Half way in
this corridor a door opens into the boudoir. This room
is finished in pearl grey enamel. The walls are divided
into panels framed with delicately modelled ornament
in the style of Louis Quinze, and filled with paintings,
soft yet r
ich in colour, after the manner of Watteau.
Ornamental frames
in the ceiling, filled with lattice
work, provide ventilation. These, as well as the
RECEPTION ROOM, DAY CAR CORNWALL, C.P.R. ROYAL TRAIN.
189 CANADIAN RAIL -485
THE DUCHESS OF CORNWALL AND YORKS BOUDOIR,
CAR CORNWALL, C.P.R. TRAIN.
ornament around the wall panels, are touched with
gold. The draperies are of light blue moire-silk. A
couple of small chairs, a divan, and a table finished
in gold, the latter carrying a reading light, complete
the furnishings of this room.
The woodwork
in the dining room is of African
Coromandel; the coves and ceiling being carried out
in a lighter tone. The ceiling is plain, save for the
gold frames of the
electric fixtures. Ornamental
cartouches in
bas-relief display at one end the
heraldic bearings of the King; at the
other the
combined coats-of-arms of the Duke and Duchess
of Cornwall
and York, while the arms of the Dominion
and
the private badge of the Duke face each other
on opposite sides of the room. The hangings are of
green velvet, the portieres and wall draperies being
decorated with painted and embroidered applique
in
tones of gold and green. The furniture matches the
other woodwork in the room and is upholstered in
velvet of a rich warm brown. A candelabrum-like
electric fixture supplies light for the dining-table, which
is capable of extension to seat eight persons.
A corridor, similar in finish
to the one already
mentioned, leads forward past the pantry, kitchen
and storerooms, towards the night car.
RAIL CANADIEN -485 190 IJOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
NIGHTeOACHYORK
DESCRIPTION OF THE YORK
THE DUCHESS OF CORNW,LL AND YORKS Ul!lJROOM, CAR VORH,
C.P.R. ROVAL fRA1N.
The York is the night coach, divided into sleeping
apartments, bathrooms etc.
Its length is 78 feet 2 inches,
and its
weight being about 57 1/4 tons, the other
dimensions being uniform with those of the Cornwall.
A corridor extends the entire length
of the car. The central
section of this car, between the trucks for a length of
about thirty feet, is occupied by the two principal
bedrooms, with the servants rooms adjoining them. The
bedrooms are finished
in pearl grey enamel and the walls
are panelled
in silk to match the draperies. One corner
of each room
is occupied by a wardrobe, another by a
convenient dressing-table with large mirrors. The
bedsteads are of brass finished in gold to match the
hardware. Besides the usual ceiling lights,
in these rooms
there is a special fixture over each dressing-table
designed to throw light upon the person sitting before it.
The wall panels, draperies and furniture coverings of the
Dukes bedroom are of red silk armure; in the Duchess
of light blue moire. The ornamental mouldings, ventilator
screens etc.,
are touch with colour, relieved in gold. The
furniture is of satinwood.
Next to each bedroom, and communicating
directly with it, is a commodious bathroom. These
bathrooms are
exactly alike. The walls are entirely
covered with tufted upholstery
in waterproof rubber cloth.
Next to the bathrooms, and communicating
therewith, are rooms for valet and maid.
The remainder of the car is occupied by two
staterooms finished in mahogany, a general toilet,
luggage room etc.
ROOM IN CO~IPARTMENT CAR CANADA,
C.P.R. ROVAL TRAIN, SHOW-
ING TELEPHONE.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 191 CANADIAN RAIL -485
SLEEPING eAR eANADA
DESCRIPTION OF THE CANADA
The third car from the rear of the train is the
Canada, a compartment car specially constructed for
the
accommodation of the suite of Their Royal
Highnesses. The interior
is finished in white mahogany
and upholstered in terra-cotta and olive green plush. The
Canada contains six separate staterooms which are
fitted with all conveniences;
in the centre of the car is a
commodious sitting or smoking
room with a large table,
lounge and luxurious easy chairs.
At one end of the car
is a bathroom with a full-sized bath, and at the other end
is a large lavatory, adjoining which is a shower bath. floor
is carpeted with green Brussels. It is well lighted,
having
ten large windows draped with green silk, and at
night twenty-eight electric lights, besides five double
Acme lights, are used. The mahogany tables, which
will
accommodate thirty people, are arranged on two sides
of
an aisle -tables for four persons on one side, tables
for two on the other. The chairs are upholstered in leather.
The bulkheads at each entrance
to the main room are
draped with heavy green silk.
In the annex leading to the pantry on the left and
the corridor
on the right stands a large mahogany side­
board, with silk coverings and fixtures of brass.
DINING eAR SANDRINGI1AM
DESCRIPTION OF THE SANDRINGHAM
The Sand ring ham is the dining car for the staff,
and consists of main dining saloon, pantry, kitchen, etc.
It is 77 feet 2 inches long, weighs 57 tons, and is of
uniform width with that of
the other cars. The dining room
is finished in red figured mahogany, with ceilings of
embossed Lincrusta Walton, old gold
in colour, and the The pantry
is spacious and is fitted up with tables,
counters etc
., covered with metal. In the kitchen are
standard ranges, etc.
THE OTHER CARS
The other cars which make up the train are of the
standard class which has been adopted by the Canadian
Pacific Railway Company.
RAIL CANADIEN -485 192 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
THE LOCOMOTIVES
Three styles of locomotives are used by the Royal train in crossing the continent.
214
The 10 wheeled passenger engine (4-6-0). The weight of engine and tender when loaded is 130 1/2 tons. The
diameter of the driving wheels is 5 feet 9 inches, the cylinders are 29 by 24 inches, the steam pressure is 200 Ibs. The
length
of engine and tender overall is 61 feet 1 1/2 inches.
777
The Consolidation Engine (2-8-0). This type of engine is used in the mountain districts of the C.P.R. The weight
of engine and tender when loaded ia 132 tons. The diameter of the driving wheels is 4 feet 9 inches. The high pressure
cylinder
is 22 inches in diameter and the low pressure cylinder is 35 inches in diameter. The stroke is 26 inches and the
steam pressure 200 Ibs. The length of engine and tender overall is 61 feet 5 1/8 inches.
)
The Prairie Flyer (4-4-2). This engine is used in the prairie country traversed by the C.p.A.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 193 CANADIAN RAIL -485
Three views of the Royal train of 1901. TOP: An artists conception of the train. MIDDLE: The train in the shadow of the
Rockies.
B07TOM: The Duke and Duchess on the pilot of locomotive 683 going through the mountains.
RAIL CANADIEN -485 194 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
OTTAWAS ELECTRIC CAR FORTHE 1901 ROYAL TOUR
ABOVE: The special car Duchess of Cornwall and York of the Ottawa Electric Railway with the East Block in the background.
OPPOSITE TOP:
At the gales of Rideau Hall, the residence of the Governor General, Lord Minto.
OPPOSITE BOTTOM: Turning
011 to Wellington Street. National Archives of Canada, photos C-26390, C-26393, C-26378.
Although not a part of the Royal train, the electric
parlour car of the Ottawa Electric Railway should nol be
forgotten. This magnificant car was built by the Ottawa
Car
Company especially for the Royal visit to the nations
capital. After visiting Quebec City and Montreal, the Royal
party travelled to
Ottawa on September 20 for a four-day
visit. During this time many activities and social events took
place. One
of these events, of interest to railway historians,
occurred on September 21 when the Duke conferred a
knighthood
on Thomas Shaughnessy, the president of the
CPR, giving him the title
of Sir Thomas.
Then on
September 23 occurred a visit to a lumber
camp and a ride down a timber slide, as the Dukes father had
done in 1860. Under a heading reading Ate Pork and Beans,
the newspapers reported the event, including the following:
At 12:30 their royal highi1esses, with the Goveri1or General
and Lady Minto, boarded a magnificent palace car specially
built by the Ottawa Electric Railway
Co. for this occasion.
The car
Vas standing at Rideau Hall gates and was in charge
of Supt. i.E. Hutchison. Another car conveyed the members
of the ducal staff The progress through the city was a
triumphal one, and as the Royal party passed along Sparks
street there was enthusiastic cheering.
During the entire visit many buildings in Ottawa were
illuminated by a great variety
of electric lights, arranged for
by Messrs. Ahearn and Soper. The spectacle was said to
compare favourably with the illuminations at the Pan
American Exposition then being held in Buffalo. However
there was one slip up which was more humorous than
otherwise. Among the structures illuminated was the new
Alexandra bridge, which was named for the
Dukes mother,
Queen Alexandra. The words ROYAL ALEXANDRA
BRIDGE, made up of light bulbs, were placed along the
side
of the bridge. On the night of September 23 something
went wrong with the lighting system and
half the lights went
out. As a result, for several hours the words ROYAL ALE
shone from the bridge, much to the disgusl of temperance
advocates! Since this happened only a few days after Carrie
Nation had been
in Ottawa, and had smashed up two saloons,
one wonders
if the saloon keepers had a bit of revenge.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 195 CANADIAN RAIL -485
RAIL CANADIEN -485 196 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
Take the 0 Train
The new O-Train rolled into
Ottawas transportation
history on
October
15,2001, signalling a new
era
of public transit in the growing
city.
Ottawa Mayor Bob
Chiarelli was joined by Michael
Hill, a
young train enthusiast and
many dignitaries to launch
Ottawas eight-kilometre O-Train
Light Rail Passenger service and
open the five
new stations during
a ceremony at Carleton Station, in
the
heart of Carleton University.
The eight kilometre pilot project
is the first single operator
passenger rail service in North
America.
Effective October 15, 2001
En vigueur Ie 15 octobre 2001
provincial governments recent
commitment to invest in municipal
transit
in the coming years, and the
move should better the quality of
life for residents, keeping our city
liva
ble. He is confident of the
success
of the pilot project and said
there is public pressure to quickly
expand the transportation system
to serve eastern and western
communities, including a link to
the airport.
I think youre going
to
see this line extended with
Schedules are subject to change
Les horaires peuvent etres modifies
The train left the Carleton
University station at an afternoon
ceremony filled wi th speeches
from municipal, provincial and
federal politicians who spoke
about the benefits of the light-rail
project. The platform at the
Carleton station overflowed with
people.
Hundreds came to check
out the sleek 48-metre-Iong train
and board it for the free ride along
its eight-kilometre north-south
route.
Two Bombardier Talent
trai ns broke through ceremonial
banners, bells clanging to the
sound of hundreds of spectators
blowing train whistles. I am very
proud to launch the new O-Train
service, said
Ottawa Mayor Bob
Chiarelli our population is
growing quickly and residents are
demanding access to excellent,
state-of-the art public transit,
added Chiarelli.
1
Bayview
Carling
Carleton
Greenboro
The mayor, a champion of the light-rail project,
praised everyone who made it a reality, calling it a train to
the future that should serve the future transportation needs
of a growing city.
Kanata Ward Councillor Alex Munter showed up at
the station holding a sign
that read: Next Stop Kanata.
This
is the face of smart growth, said Mayor Chiarelli
in his speech.
The excitement for this launch has been
builcting over the last two years to the point that demand is
now enormous to move as quickly as possible to east-west
light-rail. Mayor Chiarelli said he was pleased by the
additional trains in operation in less
than five years, said Mr. Chiarelli.
The money for an expansion will
come from other levels of
government, as well as from the city,
he added.
The new rail service runs on a
s
ingle track through five new
stations, with a passing track at
Carleton station. Service on tile
0-
Train will be free up to and
including January
j, 2002. I know
the
0-Train will be a huge hit with
the people of Ottawa, and I
encourage everyone to get on
board, said
Councillor Madeleine
Meilleur, Chair of the Citys
Transportation and Transit
Committee.
Capital Ward Councillor Clive
Doucet, also a big supporter of
light-rail, blamed the Ottawa
council of 1958 for shutting down
electric
street cars, which resu.lted
in a dependence on automobiles for
getting around. This day is the best
day
weve seen since street car
service ended because once we start
extending the system, it will be the
key to building communities that
are more sustainable, more safe and more environmentally
friendly, said Mr. Doucet. There will be other high days
Im sure, but never one as important as this one.
David Jeanes, a Nortel engineer and a light-ra
il expert
for the national lobby group Transport 2000, was also
enthusiastic the O-Train had finally anived in the city. This
is
an exciting opportunity to try rail again as part of Ottawas
trans
it system for the first time in 42 years and see why light­
rail
is so successful in many other cities, he said.
Customers can obtain 0-Train and bus service trip
planning assistance and schedule information by calling
(613) 741-4390 or by visiting www.octranspo.com.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001
i
1–Welllnglon
—–j}—Qucbnsway

~
g
___ 111-_–_ Cmling
Rideau Canal :::–:–;,-:j
C(Inal Rideau ::.:—::
Carleton
U Carle 1011 IJ.
Dow£; Lake
lac Dow
IJl
g
13
}–t=~–Sunnysidc
~) h·
-. –
~
Confederation
South Keys
Airport I Aeroport
Riviere Rideau River
101 )-t–t—Heron
r:::l–Johnslon
Leo Legellde ____________ 1
• O-Train and Stai!on / Slatton or O· Train
-0-Iransitw8) & StatIOn
~ Pad .. & Aida I Parc-o-8us
Time. pOln11 Posla daNon(o
197 CANADIAN RAIL -485
Some photos of the 0 Train taken by Fred Angus on November 2, 2001.
RAIL CANADIEN -485 198 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
The 2001 Remote Rail Adventure Tour
by Fred Angus
Train 693, wilh Ihe special coupled to the rem; at The Pas on the morning of April 16, 2001. All photos by Ihe author
From April 15 to 23,
200
J, the Pacific Coast Chapter
of the Railway and Locomotive
Historical Society operated their
third annual
Remote Canadian
Adventure tour. The evening of
the 14th the members of the
group, about
50 in all, arrived
at Winnipegs Fort Garry Hotel,
and the
following day, Easter
Sunday, were treated to a tour of
Winnipeg by double-decker
bus. Included in this tour was a
visit to the shops
of the Prairie
Dog Central where 1882
locomotive No. 3 was being
prepared for its operating
season.
The rear of the special at The Pas after the departure of train 693 for Churchill.
That evening, after a visil to the Winnipeg Railway
Museum, the group boarded a special train for the great tour.
This train consisted of locomotives 6304 and 6311, and
seven
stainless-steel cars. There were: A baggage car, a
manor sleeper used as a crew car, a diner, another manor
sleeper, two chateau sleepers (Chateau Dollard and
Chateau Marquette) and dome car Tweedsmuir Park. From
Winnipeg to The Pas the train was attached to the rear of VIA
train 693, the Hudson Bay, and at 8:45 P.M. it departed
Winnipeg exactly on time.
The following morning the combined train reached
the tracks
of the Hudson Bay Railway and soon arrived at
The Pas. There train 693 was uncoupled and proceeded north
to
Churchill. The special, however, had a different
destination. Heading up the Flin Flon Subdivision to Sherrit Junction, the train entered the Sherridon Sub and continued
north to Lynn Lake which it reached at 10:20
P.M. It then
turned on the wye and , at
II :30 the Lynn Lake mixed train,
which had been following the special all day, arrived.
Tuesday, April
17 the excursionists were up early and
at 9:00 A.M. departed heading south. Reaching Sherrit
Junction, the train returned to the Flin Flon Sub, turned on
the wye and backed towards Flin Flon. Reaching Channing,
at mile post 82, the train spent the night, five miles
ShOlt of
Flin Flon.
The following morning, April 18, it was announced
that permission had been secured
to back aU the way to Flin
Flon, and this was done, to the great pleasure
of the rare
mileage collectors. Interestingly, the train crossed the
Manitoba -Saskatchewan border four times in this short
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 199 CANADIAN RAIL -485
., ~ -. . ~.
Lynn Lake the morning of April 17. On the right is the mixed train ready to depart soon after the special.
distance. Then it was back to The Pas,
pas
sing the Lynn Lake mixed, with tluee
coaches, en route.
Then it was farewell
to the Hudson Bay Railway and back to
Canadian National. Passing through
Hudson Bay and Canora, the train turned
west on the
former Canadian Northern
main line. The line from Can ora to
Edmonton, 540 miles was built entirely
during the season
of 1905, breaking the
record
set by the CPR in crossing the
prairies in 1882.
The train travelled all
night, passing Lloydminster, on the
Saskatchewan -Alberta border, early in
the morning.
Then on to Edmonton by
10:45 A.M.
Thursday April 19 was a very
interesting day. Departing from
Edmonton heading west,
the train traversed the
Edson Sub to Bickerdike
and then turned south on
to the Foothills Sub.
These branch lines had
been built by the Grand
Trunk Pacific about 1912
to tap the coal deposits in
the a
rea. As the train
climbed higher and higher
the light drizzle turned
to
heavy wet snow as the
special rounded the
spectacular curves and
passed beautiful scenery.
After Parkhill Junction
A runpast just outside of FUn Flol1 011 April 18.
At Edmonton 011 April 19 just before departing westward.
RAIL CANADIEN -485 200 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
Climbing the Foothills Subdivision in a snowstorm on April 19.
A spectacular runpast north
of Calgary on April 20.
the train traversed parts of the line to Mountain Park as well
as that
to Foothills. Turning on the wye at Parkhill Junction
after darkness had falien,
the special returned to Bickerdike,
then east
on the main line to Edmonton, arriving there at
4:30 A.M.
On Friday, April 20,
it was south on the Cam rose and
T
hree Hills Subs. These comprise fonner Canadian Northern and Grand Trunk Pacific lines, as well as connections built
by CN
in more recent times. At 6:30 P.M., 3 1/2 hours earlier
than platmed, the train
alTived at CalgalYs Sarcee Yard where
busses took
the excursionists to the Palliser Hotel.
Saturday, April 21, the 75th birthday of Queen
Elizabeth II, was a day to explore Calgary. Highlight of the
visit was a tour
of the Royal Canadian Pacific train which
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 201 CANADIAN RAIL -485
The group posed at Sarcee Yard just before departing Calgary on April 21.
was being prepared for its summer tour season. This
magnificent train is
kept in a special train shed adjacent to
the PaIliser and operates on scenic trips during the
sUlTuner.
FoIlowing this tour it was back to Sarcee Yard and at 7:52
the train Left the Stampede City.
All
night the train traversed the Drumheller, Oyen
and Rosetown subs and in the morning of Sunday, April 22
arrived at Saskatoon station. Then fo.llowed a layover there
until
12: 15 P.M. when it was off to Regina via the Craik Sub.
This line had been built in 1889 as the
Qu Appelle, Long
Lake & Saskatchewan Railroad and Steamship Company, and had been operated
by the CPR untiL 1906 when it came
under Canadian Northern control. From Regina north east
it
was the Qu Appelle Sub to Birmingham Junction, just
outside of Melville, which was reached at 10:45 P.M. Here
train
No.1, the Canadian, passed en route to Vancouver.
The final leg of the trip was eastbound on the main
line to Winnipeg, arriving th
ere at 4:30 A.M. on Monday
April 23 after having covered about 3300 miles. The
excursionists then returned to their homes after an
unforgettable trip on some of Canadas more interesting
freight-only lines in the west.
Nearing Saskatoon 011 Sunday, April 22.
RAIL CANADIEN -485 202 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
The New VIA Train to Kitchener
by Mark Paul
On Monday, October 29, 2001 VIA Rail Canada
introduced its new service between Kitchener Ontario and
Toronto.
These two photos were taken that day, at
approximately 9:50 am. They show the first run
of new VIA
Train #84 operating from Kitchener to Toronto.
They were
taken at the Kitchener station.
Some notes about this train:
VIA #84 operates daily except Sunday from
Kitchener at 10:00 am. Its westward counterpart, #89, leaves
Toronto at 9:00
pm except Saturday as an extension of Ottawa
-Toronto #47.
Preceding the first run
was a celebration and press
conference in the Kitchener
station with federal transport
minister David Colenette.
Colenette also announced an
expenditure of $350,000 to
upgrade and expand the 19th
century Kitchener station.
Upon arrival at Toronto
Union Station at 11:40 am (at the
GO Transit platforms, rather than
the VIA platforms) minister
Colenette held another press
conference in the GO concourse
announcing a new joint ticket
issuing and sharing scheme
between VIA Rail and GO Transit
to 5
Toronto area stations:
Oshawa, Oakville, Aldershot,
Brampton and Georgetown.
Mayors from the municipalities where the new train
stops got on along the route at their respective stations.
In
the photos. the train is pulled ahead of its usual location in
Kitchener so the minister, politicians and VIA officials can
board the VIA I first class
car opposite the station waiting
room entrance.
The new train is the result of years of lobbying by
Transport 2000 and area mayors for additional
VIA service
to Kitchener. [t
is the first new train (with the exception of a
short lived
experiment with the Danish flexiliner) on this
route since the nation-wide cutbacks
in 1990. At that time 4
trains in each di rection
were reduced
to 2 in each
direction. one of the
remaining trains on the
route being the joint VIA

Amtrak International.
The train uses
tracks of the Goderich
and Exeter Railway
(former eN) between
Kitchener and George­
town and CN between
Georgetown and Toro­
nto. My understanding
is that starting the train
in
London. the logical
terminus, cannot be
done at this time because
of Goderich and Exeter
operations in Stratford at
the time the new train
would be operating.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 203
The first of Via Rails
new locomotives are
now in
service. The las I run of the
LRC locomotives was on
December 12, 2001.
These
photos were
taken at Drummondville,
Quebec all December 17.
Top and Centre:
Engille 905 Oil train 20
bound for Quebec City.
Bollom: Engine 904
on train
23 bound for
Montreal.
Photos by Fred Angus
VIAs New Locomotives
CANADIAN RAIL -485
RAIL CAIJADIEIl -485 204 NOVEIVIBRE-DECEIVIBRE 2001
The Reborn Quebec Central
On October 19 and 20, 2001 an excursion took place over the entire main line of the Quebec Central from Breakyville
to Sherbrooke. These photos were taken on that trip.
,
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 205 CANADIAN RAIL -485
RAIL CANADIEN -485 206 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
The Last Trip of the Wascana
by David Morris
On April 10, 2001 David Morris took these photos of VIA No. 14, the Ocean, eastbound at Amherst Nova Scotia. The
train was hauled by locomotives 6405 and
6455, and it consisted of cars 8619, 8119, 8134, 8130, 8136, 8503, WASCANA,
CHATEAU ROUVILLE, CHATEAU
DENONVILLE, CHATEAU LATOUR, CHATEAU VERCHERES, CHATEAU CLOSSE,
BURTON
MANOR, LAURENTIDE PARK. On reaching Halifax the train laid over until April 12, just two days later. It then
started back west, as No.
15, with exactly the same consist, and was derailed at Stewiacke N.S. because of a vandalized switch.
Dining car Wascana, seen at the left
in the middle photo just behind the Skyline dome car, was destroyed and several other
cars badly damaged. These historic photos
show the ill fated train only two days before the unfortunate incident.
..
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 207 CANADIAN RAIL -485
The Exporail Project
View looking south on December 3, 2001. On the left is the office / display building, the structural deck is the future coffee
shop, the great hall
is straight ahead. Photo by Peter Murphy
Project Report No.7-November, 2001
Charles De Jean Project Manager
Forty days to go until the construction Christmas
holidays begin and there is lots of work to accomplish to get
our new building enclosed and heated before winter
conditions set in.
The past five weeks on the construction site have
seen tremendous change. Due to serious difficulties with
our general contractor, he had
to be removed from the site.
Your association is now the general contractor (GC).
The
CRHA has put in a team of Maurice Fiset, Salvatore Tresente
and Annette Jenson, to be our General Contractor Team. They
will
contract with and coordinate all the work to be
accomplished on the site with the sub contractors.
We
have met with all the sub contractors and
concluded contracts with some. The steel contractor has
assembled all the steel structure with the exception
of the
marquise
and the arch at the main entrance to be installed by
late November. The roofing contractor has commenced work
on the main exhibit hall. Installation of the insulation and
the roofing began mid-November.
Rapport des travaux No.7 -Novembre, 2001
Charles De Jean Charge de Projet
A l approche du grand conge des Fetes, plusieurs
travaux restent
a faire pour fermer et preparer Ie nouveau
batiment pour Ihiver.
Lars des cinq dernieres semaines, de nombreux
changements ont ete apportes sur Ie chan tier. Mentionnons
tout dabord que, suite a de nombreux problemes avec
l entrepreneur general, celui-ci a ete remplace. L ACHF, avec
Iaide de messieurs Maurice Fiset, Salvatore Tresente et de
madame Annette Jenson, soccupe maintenant doctroyer
les contrats et de coordonner Ie travail des sous-contractants
engages.
Depuis
la rencontre dinformation avec tOllS les sous­
contractants,
Ie travail a repris et avance rapidement. Apres
la structure metallique
deja completee au moment decrire
ce texte, Iarche de Ientree principal et la marquise seront
termines dici la fin
du mois de novembre. Le contractant
pour
Ie toit est a I(l!uvre depllis peu et entreprendra Iisolation
du toit a la mi-novembre.
RAIL CANADIEN -485
The electrical, plumbing, siding and insulation
contractors should begin work later this month, bringing
more trades to work on the site.
Work by volunteers also continues. Gord Hill has
prepared a
representative portion of the ladder track from
the
MTC car barns at St. Henry including a diamond and
two switches that will form a crossover, part of the street and
interurban display on tracks A and B. Daniel Laurendeau
has continued negotiations with
Home Depot to acquire five
tractor trailer loads of cobblestones from St. Henry to be
integrated
into GOtds special work display. The Saturday
group has all but completed the movement of stored material
to make way for the new yard location in the rear of the new
display building. Volunteer
work continues on many other
fronts i.e. fund raising, exhibit design, restoration and project
coordination to name a few.
If you think you can help please
contact Kevin Robinson at 450-638-1522.
It is going to be a tough race to have the building
fully enclosed before the Christmas Vacation but with the
hard
work of the new GC group and continued volunteer
participation, I know we can do it!
Thanks for your continued support!
ABOVE: Charles de Jean, Project Manager and
Maurice Fiset, Contract Manager up on the roof
of the new Exporai/ great hall.
RIGHT Worker from Toiture Vieto laying our new
roof; the latest architectural products are being
used for the installation.
Both photos by Peter Murphy, December
3, 2001.
208 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
Les travaux relatifs it Ielectricite, la plomberie, les
panneaux exterieurs et I
isolation debuteront eux aussi it la
mi-novembre et augmenteront
Ie nombre de corps de metier
sur
Ie site.
Je men voudrais de ne pas souligner Ie travail de
deux de nos benevoles pour Iavancement du projet.
Mentionnons tout dabord, monsieur Gordon Hill. II est it
recomposer une importante portion du faisceau de triage
des hangars de la MTC a Saint-Henri, incluant un diamant et
deux aiguillages. Cette bretelle
pOLma etre vue sur les voies
A
et B dans la section « Tramway». Monsieur Daniel
Laurendeau lui apporte son aide en negociatiant avec la
compagnie Home Depot pour lachal des paves qui seronl
utilises pour completer Ie travail de Gordon. Lequipe du
Samedi. quant a elle, a presque termine Ie demenagement
ainsi que Ie rangement du materiel situe a Iarriere du
nouveau batiment principal. Cet espace deviendra la
nouvelle cour de triage. Enfin, nos volontaires sont
a Ireuvre
dans plusieurs autres dossiers tels, la levee de fonds,
Ie design
de la nouvelle exposition, Ia restauration, la coordination
des projets, pour nen nommer que quelqlles-llns. Si vous
souhaitez vous impliquer, nhesitez pas a contacter Kevin
Robinson au 450-638-1522. Votre aide nous est tres
preciellse.
Lecheancier pour fermer Ie nouveau batiment est
court, mais avec Iaide de notre nouvelle equipe et des
nombreux volontaires, nous y arriverons I
A suivre.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001
RIGHT: Digging to install services
(watet; sewet; gas, etc.), these run under
the
St. Pierre River and our tram line.
Photo by Peter Murphy, Dec.
3, 2001.
BELOW:
Two views of the construction
on December 5, 2001.
Photos by Fred Angus.
209 CANADIAN RAIL -485
RAIL CANADIEN -485 210 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
The First Superliner?

In 1829?
The modern double-decker passenger car came into
use in the second half of the twentieth century. Basically
there are two forms of this type of car, the double-deck
commuter equipment, found in a number of cities, and the
long-distance passeng
er cars such as Amtraks Superliners.
However the idea of a double-decker, double-truck
passenger car goes back a lot farther; a very great deal farther.
Back in 1827 a certain Mr. Richard Morgan, of Stockbridge
Massachusetts, invented and
patented a railway car that, in
its
general configuration, resembles lodays long-distance
passenger equipment. Two years later, the newspaper The
New-York American, in its issue of Friday, May 22 1829,
printed an article, with drawings, describing this car. The
article was copied from a Boston newspaper where it had
appeared on April
14 of that year. From the wording of the
article it appears that the c
ar was actually built and tested.
In
1829 there was no common carrier steam railway
operating anywhere in America. Even in England, the
Stockton & Darlington had been open for less than four
years, and the Rainhill Trials would not be held for another
five months.
Stephensons Rocket was under construction,
and the Liverpool
& Manchester would not be opened until
September
1830. In America, the Baltimore & Ohio was under c
onstruction, but the first steam line, the South Carolina
Railroad, would only begin operation in December 1830.
Canadas first common-carrier railway, the Champlain & St.
Lawrence, was not founded until 1832, and did not
commence service until 1836.
Yet in 1829 there was much interest, on both sides of
the ocean, in the new railway technology, and this explains
Mr. Morgans amazing design. Having no land vehicle on
which to base his design he copied many features of the
canal boats which were very numerous at the time.
He calls
it a land barge and refers to the operator as the Captain.
However he unwittingly anticipated some features that are
in use
170 years later; double trucks, passenger seating on
the upper deck with baggage undemeath, even a dome!
The
article dwells considerably
on the matter of friction, which
is,
of course, of prime consideration in railway operation,
even today. Whether the locomotive was coupled to the car
or was actually pal1 of it is not very clear; perhaps this was to
be the
first self-propelled passenger car.
The following article is exactly as printed in the New­
York American on May 22, 1829. Spelling, punctuation
and italics are as they were in the original article. The
diagrams are also exactly as they first appeared.
MORGANS NEWLY INVENTED RAILRO_+~D CARRIAGE.
[FROM A BOSTON PAPER]
We have the pleasure, herewith, of presenting our
patrons, and the public generally, with such
views of
Morgans new
Rail Road Carriage, as we hope will not
only fully illustrate and explain this improvement
in
travelling vehicles, but arouse the attention of those who
have given
the subject of internal improvements but little thought, and silence the opposition
of any who may have
been disposed
to look upon the contemplated Boston
and Hudson
Rail Road as a mere visionary scheme, or,
at best, a project to benefit a few interested towns. The
ingenious inventor
is a resident of Stockbridge, Berkshire
county, and has expended much labor and money to
bring this machine to its present state of perfection.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 211 CANADIAN RAIL -485
FLOOR PLAN OF llIORGANS RAILROAD (:l~RRIAGE.
Having obtained leave of the city authorities, he
constructed a temporary rail road in Faneuil Hall, on which
his application of friction wheels has been exhibited to
very fine advantage. A weight
of five pounds, suspended
over a pulley, moved the carriage with its load, the whole
weight being 2,850
Ibs. -and when upwards of twenty
persons,
in addition, were mounted on the carriage, the
whole was easily moved by a gentleman, standing
behind, with one foot. In the absence from town of Mr.
Morgan, the carriage at Faneuil Hall
is in charge of the
new Rail Road Association, whose committee would take
pleasure
in making those who have not yet seen it, better
acquainted with its principles, than they can be from
examining a drawing or written explanation.
The engraving above, exhibits what may
emphatically be termed a land barge; and to the traveller,
will furnish
an idea of all the convenience and comfort
which belong
to the best steamboats. It is constructed
with a cabin, births, &c. below; a
promenade deck,
awning, seats, &c. above. We might as well mention
here, perhaps, as
in another place, that the views are
from the graver of our ingenious Mr. Abel Bowen; who,
we think, deserves much credit for their tasteful
execution.
During the last six months the public have been
called upon
in various parts of the Union, to witness the
application of friction wheels to Railway Cars; and very
striking experiments have been exhibited. The principle
itself has been long known
in Mechanics, its value fully
appreciated, and found of essential benefit in the
construction of some particular machines.
It is, however,
the mode of applying it, unencumbered with practical
difficulties, to wheel carriages, which is new, and the
Railway presents the most rational considerations for
attempting its introduction, because
1:10Se circumstances
which precluded its successful adoption on common
Roads become entirely changed by the arrangement.
To understand, clearly, the nature of the improvement, a
distinct idea should
be first obtained, of the mechanical
advantage gained by providing iron tracks for the wheels.
Theoretically, a perfectly true and hard cylinder, rolling
on a perfectly hard plane, would have no resistance;
and though this impossible
in practice, the Railway
approaches so near
to it that in estimating the friction to
be overcome, the resistance at the axle of the Car is
alone considered. The same carriage, with its load, which requires 125 pounds to draw it
on a common Road,
being put
on a Railway, needs but 15 Ibs.; hence, it is
easy to perceive, that as,
in the first instance, 110 Ibs.
is employed to overcome the obstruction at the rim, it is
better to use all possible means of improving the surface
of the road, than to resort to complicated methods for
reducing the resistance which employs only 15 Ibs.
It
appears then, that on the Railway, the case is altered,
and
as nearly all the friction is found at the axle, every
simple method to reduce it at that point
is worthy of
attention. How far the inventors of the several cars,
which have come into notice, have succeeded in
accomplishing this object, so as to stand the test of
practice, will be determined by experience. The principle
of compound leverage can
be carried, without doubt, to
an extent almost incredible, in reducing the resistance
from attrition. Practical utility will alone he secured by
such arrangement as shall require little complication,
and
no increased liability to get out of order.
The loading of Morgans Carriage,
is supported
on a platform, suspended by iron rods from the upper
part of
four frames of cast iron, which enclose the
wheels. These frames are unconnected with each other,
and act independently, following their respective guides,
on any curve which the rail assumes. These guides are
substituted for the flanche, and by their placement, give
much greater security and less friction.
It is optional as
to the dimensions of each platform, as each system of
wheels can
be set at any distance required, or that the
railway will admit
of. The whole load being suspended
within one inch of the rails, combines,
in a remarkable
degree, commodiousness,
safety and strength. It has
been recenly suggested, that a degree of comfort,
in
accommodatiom for travellers, not heretofore anticipated,
may with ease be adopted.
The
diagram annexed, together with the view
above, will give an interesting idea of the method alluded
to, and of the facility afforded by the new car for effecting
this purpose.
A.A. -the Cabin.
B.B. -the Births.
C. -the Wheels.
D. -Captains Office.
E. -the Engine.
F. -the Ralls.
RAIL CANADIEN -485 212 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
A Christmas Street Car Story
This delightful Christmas story is condensed from one which appeared in St. Nicholas Magazine, a childrens monthly,
in
December 1895. This was at the time when street car companies were converting to electricity and getting rid of their old
horse cars.
The old cars found many uses, and it is quite likely that Santa Claus did get some for truly deserving recipients.
Perhaps he even hamesed his eight tiny reindeer to pull them! At this Christmas season your editor hopes you enjoy this little
story as much as he did on finding it in the yellowed pages
of an old magazine.
How a Street Car Came in a Stocking
David Douglas wanted to be a street car driver. This
did not interfere in the least with his ambition to be a plumber
with a bag
of tools, or a doctor with a pocket thermometer
and a stop-watch. David was almost seven years old. He had
been in love with the street car profession for at least a year;
and there was nothing he
couldnt tell you about the business
which can be told to an outsider
whose heart is not in it.
One morning, about three weeks before Christmas,
David was transfixed by hearing his father read the following
announcement:
CARS TO GIVE AWAY
An offer of the Street-Car Company.
General Manager Miller, of the Citizens Street Railroad
Company, said to-day that he had on hand thirty or
forty old box street-cars which he would like to give
away. The company has
no further use for the cars. Mr.
Miller suggests that the cars would make good play­
houses for children.
Oh, Papa!,
Davi-cl cried, let us get one of those cars!
whereupon his father made big eyes
of astonishment at David,
and pretended to be absolutely upset by the mere suggestion
of such an idea, and was in such a wild haste to get out of
reach of little boys who wanted to have full-grown real street
cars for their very own, that
David was unable to get in a
serious word before
he was gone.
Some hours later he spoke to his mother who quickly
replied
It would cost too much, dear. Why Mama, he
said, The paper said they would give them away. So they
will, but even a present is
sometimes expensive. Because a
street car
is so large and heavy, it would take strong horses,
and a great big truck, and ever so many men to move it, and
all that costs money – a great deal
of money. Besides those
cars have no wheels.
It would just be a helpless old car all
the rest
of its life. Very gently she convinced him that it was
out of the question.
One day, not long before Christmas, David had an
idea.
If Santa Claus could get anything he wants, he could
get a street carl
You see, if Santa Claus was giving street cars
away, there was nothing to pay for hauling. No need
of money
at all.
You just wrote the right kind of letter and Santa Claus
did the rest! That night he handed his mother this letter to
r
ead:
Dear Santa Claus: Wont you please bring me a street
CG/: Not a little one but a Real one. I am trying hard to be a
good
boy, and I want one very much.
David Douglas.
Why David, said his mother, I thought you had
given up the idea of having a street car. Yes, Mama, I had;
but you see this is different.
If Santa Claus brings it, it wont
cost us any money at all -not even a cent. You know
David, mother replied, If children ask for too much, Santa
Claus must disappoint them. Will you promise not to be
unhappy if it doesnt come after all? Oh, yes, he could
promise with a light heat1.
After that Davids hopes ran sometimes high,
sometimes low. In the latter state of mind he put the matter
before Santa Claus again and again with such entreaties and
promises as desperate longing suggested. Here are two of
the letters Santa Claus found in his little Dutch house:
Dear Santa Claus: You neednt bring me a bob-sled
if you will only give me a CG/: I can use my old sled till next
Christmas. David Douglas.
PS. I can do without the
Firemans Helmet.
Dear Santa Clau
s: Please do bring me a Street car. If
I had one I wouldnt need a hook and ladder wagon. I will
be very careful
of it. Even if it was a little broken in some
places
it would do. I could mend it. Ive got a hammer and
some nails. I pounded them out strate. I hope you will. Please
leave
it in our side yard. Good by. David Douglas.
Christmas morning David woke early and looked out
the window upon a smooth, shining surface
of snow. There
was no carl He began to make the best of it, and to wonder
what Santa Claus had left in his stocking. Later, when he
came downstairs, his father swung him up to kiss him good
morning and said Santa Claus slipped up on that car
business -must be he had no cars this year -but your stocking
looks pretty
lumpy and tight. So David was able to smile
quite cheerfully, and when he tried on a firemans helmet
and new skates, with a lot of lesser treasures scattered around,
Christmas
seemed pretty cheery.
Later they all went out for a sleigh ride and, as they
were returning they say a broad strong truck, two strong
gray horses looking at them, four or five men standing about
and,
of course youve guessed it, a street car lruge as life; a
beautiful yellow and white car with No. II in gold figures
on the side.
Then someone said Well, sir, how do you like
it? And he found a big white placard hanging from the
front brake lever saying For David Douglas from Santa
Claus.
Then David really came back to earth. He laughed
and kissed his mother and held his fathers hand in both his
own; he walked back and forth in the car, and took note
of
the familiar signs about no smoking and beware of
pickpockets, and to use none but Quigleys Baking Powder.
There was the cash-box and the brass slide for change in the
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001
front door. The brake worked and the bell-strap rang a real
bell
when his father held him up to reach it. Well it was
peliect -surpassing all dreams
of joy and Christmas. Indeed,
a bit
of Christmas cheer had fallen to those rough-coated
men who worked on Christmas day, for they were drinking
coffee and eating gingerbread, and had cigars to smoke. Even
the horses had each an apple to eat.
213 CANADIAN RAIL -485
There stood a street car -large as life.
Suddenly Davids mother said Where is the letter?
His father took the letter out
of his pocket, opened it Then
he began to read:
My Dear Douglas:
I
have taken the liberty of asking Santa Claus to
deliver one
of our old cars on your premises. I was going
rusty, but Santa Claus has waked
me up by showing me a
one-sided correspondence hes been having with a young
I1UU1 by the name of David. I suddenly realized what a world
of fUll there was in Christmas, if you only knew how to get
hold of it by the handle, as my grandfather used to say. I
hope you
and Mrs. Douglas will forgive me for getting my
pleasure first and asking permission aftelward. But when a
man takes a holiday I suppose he may be allowed
to take it
in his own way. So put this street car into Davids stocking!
A
nd I think this may not be a
bad occasion for saying Ive
never forgotten the time your
mother made Christmas
in my
heart when I was a poor
youngster with scarcely a
stocking
to hang. God bless
You
l
You have a fine boy.
Very truly yours,
John Miller.
P.S. That correspondence is
a confidential matter
between Santa Claus and
me. No questions answered
at this office. 1. M.
Well have to let that strap out a little, until you get a taller conductor! said his father.
David wondered why
his mother, who had been
reading the letter over his
fathers arm, turned suddenly,
while she was still smiling,
and cried on his fatherS
shoulder.
RAIL CANADIEN -485 214 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
Tomorrow and Tonlorrow and Tomorrow
(with apologies to Macbeth by William Shakespeare)
Once upon a time, when passenger trains went
to a lot more places than they do now, there
was a tri-weekly train to a town called Morrow. One day a would-be passenger went up to the
ticket window, and there ensued the following delightful conversation:
WOULD-BE
PASSENGER (WBP). I want
to buy a ticket to Morrow.
TICKET
AGENT (TA). Certainly, I can hold it till tomorrow. Where do you want to go?
WBP.
I just told you, I want to go to Morrow.
TA.
I know when you want to go, but where do you want to go?
WBP.
Ive told you twice already, r want to go to Morrow!
TA.
Yes,
I know that, but you still havent told me where.
WBP.
Look, there is a town down the line called Morrow. Thats where
I want to go.
TA.
Oh, now
I see, you want to go to Morrow.
WBP.
Thats what Ive been trying to tell you.
TA.
Well, when do you want
to go?
WBP.
r want to go today.
TA.
You
cant go toMorrow today, youll have to go to Morrow tomon·ow.
WBP.
But
I dont want to go to Morrow tomorrow, I want to go to Morrow today.
TA.
You cant, because theres no train
to Morrow until tomorrow.
WBP.
Is there any other way I can get to Morrow today?
TA. Lets look at the timetable. Yes, there is a train this afternoon that will take you to
Morrow Junction, but you will have
to wait there until the eastbound local comes, so you will not
get
to Morrow until very late tonight or early tomorrow.
WBP.
You mean that I still cant get to Morrow today?
TA.
Im afraid not, the first train to Morrow wont get there till tomorrow.
WBP.
Oh, never mind.
Ill take the bus!
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 215 CANADIAN RAIL -485
The Great Canadian Achievements Mural at Aurora
Latter Advertising, one of Ontarios leading marketing
and
advertising companies, unveiled its Great Canadian
Achievements wall mural at Aurora station. The huge ninety
foot
by thirty foot mural features over thirty great moments
in Canadian history. Aurora Mayor Tim Jones was among
the dignitaries on hand for the official ribbon cutting
ceremonies November 23, 2001. Inspired by the advent of
the new millennium, and from a great sense of pride for his
country, Brian Larter conceptualized the Great Canadian
Achievements mural as a way of paying tribute to our
heritage, accomplishments and history of innovation. The
mural involved the support of ten corporations, in a unique
community partnership with Larter and
the Town of Aurora.
Each business was invited to sponsor an achievement of
their choice and receive recognition on the wall mural in
return. The Canadian achievements selected were: the AVRO
Arrow, Armand Bombardier, Northern Dancer, Rick Hansen,
the
Group of Seven, Roberta Bondar and Marc Gameau,
Team Canada 72, the Canadarm, Marilyn Bell and Sir John
A. Macdonald. Each tribute is a Canadian hero who helped
s
hape our nation said Brian Larter, President of Larter
Advertising,
They excelled in their own accomplishments,
and inspired others
to rise to their best. The Great Canadian
Achievements mural is a lasting visual reminder
to all of us
that we can, and always will, accomplish our hopes and
dreams no matter what challenges may arise. The ceremony
included a dedication to former Aurora councillor Bob
Hartwell. My hope is that the Great Canadian
Achievements mural will help Canadians realize that we
live in one of the best countries in the world said Lalter.
Great Canadian Achievements Wall Mural
Major Tributes:
AVRO Arrow -Fi.rst plane to reach Mach 1.98 (1958)
Northern Dancer -First Canadian bred Kentucky Derby
winner (1964)
Armand Bombardier -inventor
of the snowmobile (1922)
Rick Hansen -travelled 40,000
km. by wheelchair on his
Man in Motion tour (1985-87)
The Group
of Seven -Canadas first distinctive art movement Roberta Bondar
& Marc Garneau -First Canadians in space
(1992
& 1984)
Team Canada
72 -First victory over Team Russia (1972)
The Canadarm -First robotic space tool (198 I)
Sir John
A. Macdonald -Canadas first Prime Minister (1867)
Marilyn Bell -First to swim across Lake Ontario (1954)
Additional Tributes:
Lorne Greene -First CBC announcer (1944)
Hudsons Bay Blanket -Canadas signature blanket
Group
of Soldiers -honouring our veterans
George Chuvalo -Canadian Heavyweight Boxing
Champion 21 years
The Rocky Mountains
Bi.lly Bishop -most decorated flying ace WW I
Senator James Gladstone -First aboriginal senator (1958)
Niagara Falls -one
of the seven wonders of the world
Canadian Pacific Railway -the Last Spike November 1885
The Klondike -the Gold Rush
Ernie Coombs -the popular Mr. Dressup
Banting and Best -discovered insulin. 1922
Dr. James Naismith -inventor of basketball
The Prairies
Alexander Graham Be
ll -inventor of the telephone
Donuts -highest consumption
per capita in the world
Foster Hewitt -voice
of hockey: first game 1923
Barbara Ann Scott -1948 Olympic gold medallist -skating
Bonhomme -representing worlds biggest winter carnival
in
Quebec
Lester B. Pearson -first Canadian Nobel Peace Prize winner
(1957)
Emily Stowe -fi.rst Canadian female doctor (1867)
Pierre Trudeau & The Queen -repatriating the constitution
(1982)
The Bluenose-our most celebrated ship
(~5
S~c:rtO
_
Lit

A.
.

___
_
§
! :

END
ELC-VA.TION—-
GRAND
TRUNK
RLY.
STATION
BUILDING

~:)
f) ~J
. ~~
,~
,
.:o-
i

~:-
.-:;

a
Uf?Of?a
—-
fRONT
ELLVATIOH
___
_
G
:.;
.,J
(;
:.
~
C:
>
i
.:;
I

G
r
~
.5,,
:
..

I
(:
,:p
,,
1-:——..
—–,~
i
..
,
.
~

..
, .-
()
-,.:;
-=J
·i
.,

;,
l.adlc,
:,:;.
W~i~i;~

.
-. ~:
F-.c.
ICOMT
Hou~E..
it
r~j

C
,

,,
:
..

–4-..:0
_..:o~
..
:.i.
… …
4:.
,_.,:;
,
~)
r, ,.
J
r.
.
I
001
l,~·:lj
II
~.:;~:
cc~
…..
~
A~1
-L
.
:l

~
,
~
.
.~:-

c~
I
!
iT1
I
–,,
:
,;
..
-.;}.
;,;}.~
~.:
.;
-~:.;
—.;,.
–):.;
.•
-.:.,-

-.:)..:).(
~:Q
x.:;.o;.a6.;
114

6
I
.j
~
0
;0
0
G
lJI
P1.AN
(; 🙂
_.
la:o·
~
,
I~C—–
~
PIal
form
JJ » r o » z » o m z .j:>. (Xl ()l I) (J) z o < m s: OJ ::II m
,
o m o m s: OJ JJ m I) o o
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 217 CANADIAN RAIL -485
Aurora
GO station
New life for an old lady
At age 92, Aurora railway station has a new lease on life. The grand old
lady on Wellington Street has been given a thorough rebuilding and has
been restored to its turn-of-the-century as-built appearance as it heads
for the turn of another century, still serving its community, now in the
role of a modern GO Transit commuter station.
Aurora has a significant place in
Canadian railway history. The first
locomotive-hauled train in Ontario
arrived there from Toronto on May 16,
1853.
Known
then as MacheUs Corners,
Aurora was
the temporary northern
terminus of the Ontario, Simcoe and
Huron Railroad.
That first trip took two hours and
cost the princely sum of $1. By
comparison, in 1992, the
GO Train
makes the same trip in 49 minutes at a
single-ride fare
of $4.50.
The
Grand Trunk Railway took over
in 1888 and in 1900 built a new Aurora
station.
Canadian National Railways
inherited the bankrupt Grand Trunk in
1923
and added a freight shed to the
buildingS south
end.
CN covered
the board and batten
exterior with insulbrick to cut
maintenance costs. As the railways
business declined, maintenance was
again reduced,
and ultimately CN had no
further use for the aging station.
By
this time, GO Transit was the
sole
user of the building, serving the
passengers on
its two weekday commuter
trains. And
the building was literally
falling down.
Official opening July 1, 1992
Because of the buildings historical
significance, GO decided to restore
it to
its 1900 appearance. The added freight
shed was demolished, but before any
restoration work could begin, the
building
had to be picked up and moved
aside because the original wooden posts
it had been built on had rotted.
Set down on a new concrete
foundation,
the old buildingS sags
virtually disappeared and the work crews
started on a restoration which included
the complete replacement of the tongue
and groove ceiling which had been
destroyed by
water leaks.
The exterior was stripped and the
board
and batten finish restored. Finally,
the original exterior colours of brick red,
green,
and yellow, verified through
careful scraping of many layers of paint,
were applied.
The result is a beautiful heritage
building which will efficiently serve the
travelling public for many years to come.
Tit .. H SIT
~
111.1·
1967· 1991
RAIL CANADIEN -485 218 NOVEMBRE-DECEMBRE 2001
The Business Car
ESQl1IMALT & NANAIMO TO SHUT DOWN
Rail America, owners of the Esquimalt & Nanaimo
Railway on Vancouver Island, have announced the shutdown
of operations on that line. Unless ongoing negotiations are
successful VIA
Rails train 198 and 199 between Victoria
and
Courtenay B.C. will make its last run on March ]0,
2002. If you have not yet ridden this scenic line better do it
soon.
MONTREALS WINDSOR TERMINAL TO CHANGE
NAME
The Montreal terminal of the Lakeshore commuter
train service is to change from Windsor to Lucien L Allier
on January
1, 2002. This name will agree with the adjacent
Metro station to which the
terminal is connected. Despite
some sensational press reports, it should be emphasized that
Windsor Station is
not being renamed and will stay as is,
albeit without tracks. The present passenger terminal is quite
remote from Windsor Station and has, unfortunately, been
virtually cut
off from it by a sports facility. Thus the name
change
is not a break with history.
IRVING TO SHIP VIA eN
The Irving companies of New Brunswick have
announced that henceforth they will ship their goods to
central Canada via
Moncton and the CN lines, rather than
over the Canadian American, the former CPR Short Line
across Maine. This leaves the future
of the latter line more in
doubt than it was, especially in the light
of the impending
sale
of the Bangor & Aroostook.
BYE, BYE, REDBIRD
New York City has been much in the news lately, so
this item, from the Daily News
of August 18,2001, will be of
interest, especially in view of the fact that many of the
replacement subway cars will be built
by Bombardier. It is,
of course, a takeoff on the song Bye Bye Blackbird.
Forget their four decades of dedicated,
uncomplaining service to the New York City subways. Forget
that they have been the reliable workhorses of the transit
system. They are old now. And
in this town, old is bad -unless
youre French wine or a landmarked building.
So the Redbird
subway cars are being phased out.
In a few years all 1300
will
be gone. Twenty already are. No one here can love or
understand them, so they packed
up all their cares and woe
and moved to Delaware. But alas, they will
no longer be trains. They will be reefs. Eventually, 400 Redbirds will be
sunk into the sea
to sleep with the fishes. Poor Redbirds.
Sent to a watery grave by a thankless MT
A. They deserved a
better fate. But
at least the fishes wont deface them with
graffiti. Or spit
on the floors. Or refuse to move to the middle
of the car. So make
up their seabed and turn off their lights.
Theyll arrive [this
is poetiC licence] late tonight. Redbirds,
bye bye.
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND HISTORY IN THIRD
PRINTING
The history of the Prince Edward Island Railway, by
Allan Graham, reviewed in the September-October 2000
Canadian Rail, is now in its third printing. It is still available
from Mr. Graham at the original price.
VIA STATIONS CLOSED
In the recent VIA timetable, trains no longer stop at
Prescott, Trenton Junction and Maxville, all
in Ontario. This
v iew
of Maxvi lie station was taken on October 27 2001, the
day before it closed.
ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO
This item, from the Saint John Daily Sun of October
12 1901, is
of considerable interest:
PAN AMERICAN EXCURSIONS ON CANADIAN PACIFIC
Arrangements have been made for a very low rate
to
the Pan American exhibition, in effect Tuesdays, Thursdays
and Saturdays, from the 15th
to the 26th of October, both
dates inclusive. One
can purchase tickets from St. John to
Buffalo and return for the remarkably low rate of $17.50.
Those who avail themselves
of this rate and travel by the
Canadian Pacific from
St. John will have only one night on
the road en route to Buffalo, with excellent trains. In addition
to the Sights at the great fair, and electrical wonders at Buffalo,
you must remember that Niagara Falls is only 20 miles away,
about 50 minutes ride
in the electric car. Anyone who has
thoroughly seen the falls and the many attractions
in its vicinity
will tell you that the opportunity
of seeing the falls alone is
worth the price of an excursion ticket.
We trust that many of our young maritime province
people will take advantage
of the above excursions, as the
educational wonders
of the trip are something that should
not be missed by anyone that
can afford the trip.
NOVEMBER-DECEMBER 2001 219 CANADIAN RAIL -485
Santa 011 the Tracks
..-
• +-
• +
. .—–
..-

+

..-
+

i ;
• i

I i
J ,:?~< rC t
• ••• -~~~:~:-•• –…. o •• _,.. f
I IMMENSE COLLECTION OF TOYS I
t AND XMAS PRESENTS! t
t VARIETY PRACTICALLY UNLIMITED 1 f
~ t • t • to ………… , .1 …………………………. ………………….. ,., ..
Continuing our annual series of old time Santa Claus cartoons with a railway theme, we see this advertisement for the John
Murphy departmen/ store on Montreals Sf. Ca/herine street. It is Chris/mas Eve 1898 and Santa is taking a shortcll/ in his
sleigh along the railway tracks. Naughty San/a;
he should not be using the tracks! If he looks over his shoulder he will see
engine
49 and i/s freigh/ train bearing down on him. San/a will get away with ii, but you may no/ if you try it. Have a safe and
happy Chris/mas, stay off the tracks (unless you are riding a /rain) and all the bes/ for 2002.
Source: Montreal Daily
S/ar; December 23, J 898.
BACK COVER: A three-car RDC frain, headed by 9105, runs /hrough /he main street of Wakefield Quebec 011 Oc/ober 5, 1969.
The special train was returning from a fall foliage excursion to Manawaki. Steam trains still run /0 Wakefield.
Ph% by Fred Angus
This issue of Canadian Rail delivered [0 prinler December 21, 200 I.

Demande en ligne