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Canadian Rail 478 2000

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Canadian Rail 478 2000

130
CANADIAN RAIL
ISSN 0008·4875
Postal Permit No. 1494279
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BYTHE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OFTHE 1950 RAILWAY STRIKE -INTRODUCTION ………………………. .
THE GREAT RAILWAY STRIKE OF 1950 ………………………………………………………………
………………… . LORNE PERRy ………………………….. . 131
132
136
148
152
153
156
158
159 SELECTION OF NEWS ITEMS FROM THE GREAT STRIKE OF 1950 ………………………………… . FRED ANGUS ……………………………. .
THE 75TH ANNIVERSARY OF 158208
RUN FROM MONTREAL TO VANCOUVER …………….. . F.E. COLLINSON ……………………….. .
CANADIAN RAILWAYS
INTHE GREAT STORM OF 1900 …………………………………………………. . FRED F. ANGUS ………………………… .
THE WINDSOR AND HANTSPORT RAILWAY, A FLYING ViSiT ………………………………………….
.. ROGER G. STEED …………………….. .
IN MEMORIAM, WALTER J. BEDBROOK ………………………………………………………………
………… . WILLIAM J. RADFORD ………………. .
EXPORAIL PROJECT UP AND RUNNING ………………………………………………………………
……….
..
BOOK REViEWS ………………………………………………………………
…………………………………………….. .
FRONT COVER: Former Canadian National Railways FA-1 diesel locomotive 9400 at the head of a special display train, exhibited by the CRHA at
the old Port
of Montreal on July 2, 2000. This engine was built in 1950, and placed in service in April of that yew: Thus it was one of CNR s newest
locomotives at the time
of the great strike of 1950. However most locomotives at that time were still steam. 9400 was retired in 1969, spent 17 years
on exhibition at the National Museum
of Science and Technology in Ottawa, and today is a prized exhibit at the Canadian Railway Museum.
Photo by FredAngus
BELOW-A montage
of afew of the many headlines which appeared in the newspapers in the days leading up 10 the 1950 railway strike. The one
relating
to the Korean War is included to show that these were very troubled times; it is shown exactly where it appeared, directly below the headline
abolll the strike. Note the effect
of inflation; the price of a newspaper had gone up to 5 centsfrom3 cents afew years earlier.
For your membership in the CRHA, which
includes a subscription
to Canadian Rail,
write
to:
CRHA, 120 Rue St-Pierre, SI. Constant,
Oue. J5A 2G9
Membership Dues
for 2000:
In Canada: $36.00 (including all taxes)
United States: $31.00
in U.S. funds.
Other Countries: $56.00 Canadian funds. Canadian Rail
is continually in need of news, sto­
ries historical data, photos, maps and other mate­
rial. Please send all contributions
to the editor: Fred
F. Angus, 3021 Trafalgar Ave. Montreal, PO. H3Y 1 H3.
No payment can be made for contributions, but the
contributer will
be given credit for material submit­
ted. Material will
be returned to the contributer if re­
quested. Remember Knowledge is of little value
unless
it is shared with others.
THE WEATHER k 4m *1 J
!:~r~~~h.1 I~t ~dtrt.l ~! tIt
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: Douglas
N.W. Smith
ASSOCIATE EDITOR (Motive Power):
Hugues
W. Bonin
LAYOUT: Fred F. Angus
PRINTING: Procel Printing
DISTRIBUTION: Joncas Postexperts
Inc.
FIRST ••
EDITION
ComplOLe~creondlllon.(>nIIIIO!
-:C
V
=OL:-.-=-LXXX=·=Il:-. No-.–cl.,-94c—–=–c——–·-~-IlIONTHEAL, SATURDAY. AUGUST 19, ·195_tJ ___ ·-_T-o_,,=o .. =o=\-·_===,,=M .• ~._~T.~7-.• _-D_.-~_T-._-_-_-_-_-~P_R~IC~~~F1~VE:..~CE~=N_T=S
Final Effort Starts To Avert Rail Stril{e
Allies Report Landing Behind Korea Reds
Parties Confer
With Mediator
Unions May Agree to Delay
If Progress Made in Talks
30-day Postponement Urged
If Dispute UnsettledAug.22
~-0 –• —
Railways Agree;!co~panies AdviselSpecific Scheme

S d ITram Passengers I 0 . db
mons tu y Tie.up Threatens S mltie y
Request I St. Laurent
Unions Spurn
I
ITOKEN STRIKES
iPLANNED IN U,S,
!
I
Truman Reluses to Seize Rail-
roads at tbe Present
~ .
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000 131 CANADIAN RAIL -478
The 50th Anniversary of the 1950 Railway Strike
I
0, .s. c I
CLOllOY, COOL
_l,M7tart)l1l •.
1ofU1 ….. ,/at. ••
~·;~.:l …. I!f … ~· ~ f,
…. ,. r.;, 1111. ,.It 11 H
1730• YEAR MONTREAL, 1 UESDA Y. AUGUST 22. 19S0 PRICE FIVE CENTS
Rail and Union Leaders Still Deadlocked
INTRODUCTION
In the history of Canadian railways there are dates that are recognized
as important mileposts
or turning points. One such historic date was just half
a
century ago, August 22. 1950, the day that almost the entire Canadian
railway system was shut down by a nationwide strike, the first in its history.
In 1950, Canada was more dependent on the railways than it is today.
Road and air systems were far less developed than they are now, and the Trans
Canada Highway was not completed for another 12 years. Far more passengers
and freight went by rail, and branch lines served many places that are now far
from any railhead. Even automobile traffic was partially dependent on
railways, for gasoline and other supplies were shipped by rail to many locations.

lFactions Remain at Odds
As Fateful Hour at Hand
T ieup to All ee/Nothing to Report,iN ation Prepares
E Ph
States St. Laurent 1 P . d 1
very ase Of Cabinet Talk! or erro 0
01 Living I Chaos
ABOVE: Nothing to report as the time ran
out in the early hours
of August 22, 1950. The
great railway strike
of 1950 was on!
The railway system in the mid-century year of 1950 was much larger, but less efficient, than it is today. Canadian
National had about 25,000 miles of track, while Canadian Pacific operated over more than 17,000. By far the greatest part of
Canadas trains were steam hauled, as diesels were just beginning to take over. In fact the last steam locomotives had been
delivered
to the CPR only a year and a half before. The entire system was very labour-intensive; the non-operating employees
(non-ops) alone numbered about 124,000, a number greater than the population
of many Canadian cities.
Less than two months before, on June 25, the Korean War had broken out, and there was a strong threat that the fighting
would spread and become another world war. Even as
it stood, Canadas involvement in Korea meant that increasing quantities
of personnel and supplies were being moved, largely by rail. Memories of the huge railway traffic handled in World War II, only
five years before, were very strong. Clearly a nationwide rail shutdown would be a major disaster, but that
is exactly what the
nation faced as the countdown began towards the deadline, and the soon-to-be-historic date
of August 22, 1950.
The threat of a strike had existed for some time, Since the end of World War II prices had risen dramatically but the wages
of railway workers had not kept pace. In 1948 there was a crisis, and strong threat of a strike, but on July 16 of that year the
federal government brokered an
agreement which brought temporary peace. By 1950, however, changing conditions brought
about another confrontation, and this time neither side showed any sign
of backing down. The basic demands of the unions
would not seem very extreme today.
The chief demand was for a reduction of the 48-hour week to 40 hours, with a raise of 7 to
10 cents an hour, which would result in no change in take-home pay. After much discussion the railways, represented by the
newly-elected president
of the CNR, Donald Gordon, made a counter offer. This was a choice of either a 48-hour week with an
8.5 cent an hour raise, or a 44-hour week with a
9.1 % raise. Both these offers would have meant little change in take-home pay.
In addition the railways recognized a moral obligation
to implement the 40-hour week at the appropriate time. This offer was
rejected by the unions
in a 95% to 5% vote, and on August 2 a strike date was set for the 22nd, less than three weeks ahead.
A negotiating team was established
to try to solve the impasse. Representing the railways were Donald Gordon (CNR
president) and W.A. Mather (CPR president). The unions were represented by Frank Hall (chairman of negotiating committee),
and A.R. Mosher (president
of the Canadian Congress of Labour). However, finding a solution proved well nigh impossible.
The situation in Canada was being closely watched south of the border where the threat of a nationwide railway strike
was also building. As the situation grew more and more ominous,
it appeared that, if a strike broke out, President Truman would
order the federal government
to take over the railways as had been done in World War I and the Civil War. Eventually this is what
happened and the U.S. strikes never took place. It was different in Canada where all attempts at compromise were fruitless, and
early
in the morning of August 22 most of Canadas trains came to a halt.
Your editor recalls those days well. First a family vacation
in New Brunswick was cut short so all could be home before
the strike began. Then there was the unforgettable sight, so well described by
Mr. Perry, of literally hundreds of steam locomotives
stored idle in
CNRs Turcot yard and, only a few hundred feet away, the silent rolling stock in CPRs Glen Yard, The extra
passenger traffic on Montreals street car system meant that older cars were used in all-day service, and the occasion also
meant
the transfer of the two articulated cars, 2500 and 2501, from the Wellington Street run to much busier St. Catherine Street.
To commemorate the 50th anniversary
of the great strike of 1950, we are pleased to present an article by Lome Perry,
including seven photos, vividly describing his experiences, as a railway enthusiast, during those eventful nine days. In
addition, articles, announcements and cartoons from newspapers, some saved by your editor at the time, are reprinted.
We hope
that reading these accounts, and looking
at the pictures, will bring to life again those memorable nine days in August 1950.
RAIL CANADIEN -478 132 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
The Great Railway Strike of 1950
by Lorne Perry
Countdown to shutdown -5507 sleered the second to last train through Sf. Lambert at 8:20 AM, August 22, 1950, already over
two hours beyond the strike deadline.
Some years stand out from all the others, especially
when
youre young. For me, 1950 was one of them. It was
just at the beginning of the dieselization process, so steam
locomotives were the pervasive railway
power source. My
town was St.Lambert, east of Victoria Bridge where the line
divided into three; straight on to St.Hyacinthe and Levis,
round the bend to the south towards Rouses Point, and north­
east along the shore of the St.Lawrence River to Sorel.
Trains were a big part
of my life. 1 studied railways,
photographed trains, drew locomotive diagrams, made up
clipping albums about railway media news, and closely
watched the CNR action around St.Lambert. That summer 1
took a temporary
job with CPR at their Place Viger freight
office
in east end Montreal.
So imagine the hole
in my life when the two major
railways were struck by their non-operating union
employees, 124,000 strong, for the first time in history. Their
objective was a five-day work week with an increase
in pay.
The railways said No. The August strike date came and
nobody backed down.
The railways ground to a halt.
I
well remember the empty feeling, the shocked
amazement, when the long-haul trains were cancelled if
they couldnt finish their run before the 6 AM, August 22
deadline, and when the last trains trickled in on the final
morning.
My record shows that tile second to last scheduled
train inbound to Montreal passed through St.Lambert at 8:20 AM; the local from Waterloo, and the last at 8:29, the Scotian,
number 59 from Halifax, locomotive 6166.
Suspended Animation
No more trains ran and 1 had no work; Place Viger
Freight Office shut and picketed. But 1 had film
in my camera
and set out to document evidences
of the gap in my routine.
The Montreal and Southern Counties Railway was an
electric interurban line, subsidiary to CNR and was closed
for the duration. The trolley cars were gathered on the last
day and packed into all available shop trackage at
St.Lambert. Silence. Pickets marched up and down across
t
he tracks at
the nearest road crossing, the only sign of life in
a usually busy scene.
The old reliable 20-minute service to
the heart of Montreal was suddenly unavailable. But
motorists rejoiced because the toll takers on the road lanes
of Victoria Bridge were strikers.
Turcot
Roundhouse, the 56-stall nerve center for steam
power
in Montreal was smokeless for the first time in living
memOly. All stalls were full, but that was more or less norma
l.
What was unusual was the long lines of locomotives parked
nose to tail on all the trackage in the vicinity of the
roundhouse. I counted 143, all dead. The corner of Decarie
and
Upper Lachine Road (as St.Jacques was known then)
provided an elevated vantage point to survey and
document
the scene.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000 133 CANADIAN RAIL -478
Turco/ Roundhouse on a rare smokeless day -Lines of locomotives can just be discerned beyond the roundhouse.
Locomotives
in waiting -A few of the 143 steam locomotives parked outdoors to the west of Turcot roundhouse. Day two of
the strike.
RAIL CANADIEN -478 134 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
The Sounds of Silence
There was no rumble from
Victoria Bridge, since IOO-car freight
trains were no longer storming its
grades.
The telegraph sounders at the
station were silent, and the order
boards were permanently at stop
position. The CTC signals were all
red, not a green
or yellow to be seen
anywhere. The old locomotive bell
on
the gatehouse at the Victoria
Avenue crossing stopped swinging,
and the gates stayed up (to the
delight of many!). Trains of the
Central Vermont and Rutland canied
on service in New England, their
unions being completely separate,
but their trains turned round just
south of the border. Shiny railheads
rusted over.
Missing Freight Cars -CPR Place Viger freight depot is completely cleared of freight
cars on the first morning
of the strike. A pair of pickets makes their point.
The Barn
is full to overflowing -Montreal and Southern Counties electric cars plug the yard tracks at St. Lambert; the car
barn at right
is full 10 the doors.
The newspapers were full of the story. Impact on
business. Disruption to travel plans. Intransigence of
management. Stubbornness of the workers, etc. The week
wore on and people adjusted, but commerce was grinding to
a halt. After seven days the government could stand it no
longer. They declared
an emergency and in two more days
passed legislation to force the men back
to work.
Three cheers! Being a railfan without trains was
turning out to be boring. Time on my hands and no trains to
wa
tch. A bad combination. Later on the Government
declared that Saturday morning office work would come to
an end at last.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000
Return to Life
On August 31, things got underway slowly. There
were positioning moves to put locomotives and trains
out at the end of the line; freight locos where the freight
was back-logged. By dawn commuter trains and
outbound locals were operating. Finally, the main lines
began
to hum. There was a tremendous volume of freight
waiting for attention; not only that which had been stuck
in
the yards for more than a week, but what had
accumulated at factories everywhere, and at yards on the
south side
of the border.
135 CANADIAN RAIL-A78
The largest locomotives available were dispatched
to Rouses Point from Montreal in order to help cl
ear the
US yard; plugged with freight cars that had been rolling
in all week from the American connecting roads, freight
embargoes notwithstanding. One such northbound
Picket fence -Looking from the other direction, employees picket
M
&SC head office, station and car barns.
A helping hand –
The strike just over, CNR yard switcher 8350
combines forces with Northern
6225 to lift 56 heavy loads the
last mile uphill through
St. Lambert to Southwark Yard.
locomoti ve coped with its long train of coal and banana
reefers over the flatland, but the S-curve ·on a grade
approaching the junction at St.Lambert proved more than it
could manage.
Great fountains
of smoke to the sky.
Impressive spinning
of driving wheels.
Much taking up
of slack and trying again.
To no avail.
Stall.
After awhile an eight-wheel switcher backed down
and coupled on. Now there was power to burn. The
syncopated rhythm of 6225 (4-8-4) working in tandem with
8350 (0-8-0) was a memorable performance
of stack music.
It shook the ground and rattled the windows
of nearby houses
(we lived
in one of them).
It was wonderfully reassuring to spend an evening at
the station again, watching the parade
of sleeping car trains
leave for Eastern and Southern points. The community
echoed to their whistle blasts, but nobody complained. All
was back to normal!
RAIL CANADIEN -478 136 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
News Items From the Great Strike
Compiled by Fred Angus
The railway strike of 1950 was one of the biggest news items of the year in Canada, second only to the Korean War.
During the nine days of the strike, and the time leading up to it, countless articles, announcements, editorials and cartoons
appeared in newspapers throughout Canada. Television was not yet on the scene (it would appear in 1952), but there was heavy
coverage on the radio and
in the newsreels.
Your editor has selected a few
of these items to give an idea of the coverage given to the various aspects of the strike.
They range from the grimly serious to the humourous. Overshadowing it all was the ominous news from Korea where the so
called police action
of June 25 threatened to go on indefinitely (it actually lasted three years) and perhaps turn into a world­
wide conflict.
For this reason we have included a few Korea headlines where they occurred beside the strike items.
IMPORTANT NOTICE IMPORTANT NOTICE
of
EXPRESS EMBARGO
E FFECTI·VE immediately; on account of
the possible work stoppage due to the cur­
rent labowr dispute, an emba.,., is ~ced on
all iprne~h, carload a~d less carload, of
liYestock, live poult~ and other perishabl~
goods; gold and silve.. bullion and currency
which
co_of. with reasoable .certainty
re.ch
its destination in C.nod. Of be tra … ··
ferred
to •. connecting United Statn carrier
by Mond.y noon, Augu, 21 unl…, …..
thorized
by • permit··o;er ·the sig … ture of
T, H. Martin, .Tr.ffic .nd Transportation, Mo .. t … al, Que.
Ott.~r shipments will be .c:cept~d only sb, ..
ject to delay
·perioc!,
August 17; 1950;
CANADIAN NATIONAL EXPRESS
Of.
EXPRESS EMBARGO
Effective immediately, on account of the
possible work stoppage ·du. to the current
labour dispute, an embargo is placed on all
carload ond Iell carload
shipments of live­
stock, live poultry
and other porishabl. goods,
gold and sliver bullion
and currency which
cannot with rlOsonabl. certainty reach its
destination
in Canada or be tronsf …. d to
a connecting United
Stat.s carrier by Monday
noan,
Aug~1t 21, uriless authorlnd by a plr­
mit 0 he signature of W. F. POLLEY,
Superintend.nt Transportation, Toronto.
.0tJ,,, ship~t .. wj!l.b. CI.,.u 6!rIy illtiJKt to
de/oy. ..
~ U, ltte,
CANADIAN PACIFIC EXPRESS
IMPORTANT NOTICE
OF
GENERAL FREIGHT EMBARGO
The Railway Anoc:iation of Canada Embarto No. 23
Eff •• ti .. 11.59 p.m. M011day AUtU8t 21.t
10 view DC pOll8lble work stopper due to labour dispute, embargo la placed
against the acceptance DC all carload and LCL rre1rht shipments not cov.
ered by RaUway AS8OClaUon oC Canada embargo n~mber 22 issued August
sixteenth, errecUve AugWlt Bevent.,nth from all connectlnr rail, water
and steamship lines tor
aU staUoM on or via the Canadian Padtlc Railway,
Canadian Na((onal Railways, Jines
In Canada. Toronto, HamUt.on and Buf·
falo Railway. Ontario Northland RaiJway, NapiervJUe Junetlon Railway
and Northern Alberta Railways; and against the seeeplanee oC all auch
shipments trom all
stalloos to all conal en … and deStinationa on or via
Canadian Pacific Railway, Canadian National Ral1ways, JInes
In Canada,
Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway, Ontario Northland RaUway,
NapiervllJe Junclion Railway and
Northern Alberta Railways. Exceptio,
When authorized by permit Issued
by the folio wine-For trafllc orlginal ..
ing on Canadian Pacific EMtern Reaion. D. A. Smith. Supt. Transportation,
Toronto; for Canadian
Pacinc Prairie and Pacillc Reelona. A. B. Burpee,
Supt. Transportation, Winnipeg; (or
traffic originating on ,Canadian
National Atlantic Region, E.
A. Robertson, General Supt. Tranaportation,
Moncton; for Canadian National C
entral RegIon. E. H. Locke, General
Supl. Transportation, Toronto; for Canadian National Wel5lern Region,
W. H. Horner, Supt. Car Service, WlDDlpeaj for Toronto, Hamilton and
Buffalo Railway,
J. R. Vanevery, Car Accountant, HamUlon; for Ontario
Northland Railway, R.
J. McMillin, Supt. Tra.naport.atlon, North Bay; for
NaplerviUe
Junction Railway, R. E. Kendrick. Vlce·Prealdent, Montreal;
for
Northern Alberta RaUways, J. M. Maearthur,· ·General Man8£er,
Edmonton.
THE RAILWAY ASSOCIATION Of CANADA
The Canadian National Rail­
ways announced that In the in­
terests of public safety and for
the protection of property it
would not permit trucks larger
than a small pick-up or light de­
livery size to use Its Victoria
Bridge over the St. Lawrence.
Boost in Bus Service
Planned if Rails Strike
Tolls are usually collected on
the bridge but since the toll­
keepers are on strike, vehicles
have been passing over without
charge and traffic has been un­
usually heavy.
Spokesmen for three Ganadian I facilities for space re.servation.
bU$ companies serving a large area Officials said emergency com­
of eastern Canada yestelday, an· I muter tickets will be sold only to
nounced plans for Increased ser-passengers surrendering the front
vice in the event of a railway cover of an expired commuter
strike. ticket book. The space reservation
The spokesmen, representing the system will be set up between
Provlnda! TlansPort Company, terminal points such as Montreal,
Colonial Coach Lines and Interna-Ottawa, Kingston, Toronto and
tiona! Coach Lines, said the com-Saint John, NB.
panies wiU institute shuttle service They said extra buses will be
through heavily-travelled areas, an rented from hus o(lerators serving
anti·ticket hoarding system and unaffected area~.
ABOVE AND OPPOSITE: In the days leading up to the strike, both the CNR and CPR placed embargos on express shipments,
as well as similar embargos on freight and passenger traffic. Mail transportation was cut back, and bus companies prepared
to cope with the extra rush. Airline travel was not of sufficient volume to make a big difference, but the airlines also increased
service.
International passenger trains, like the Delaware & Hudsons service to New York, often continued to run, but
terminated south
of the borde!:
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000
Mail Service Deadline Set
Curtailment of mail services
will begin today unless the rail
strike Is settled before 7 pm.
Arter 7 pm, no parcels, news­
papers and periodicals, and
plinted matter wlll be accepled
by the Post Office here for po
inls in British Columbia and Newfo
undland.
After 7 pm tomolIoW,. mail
for A I be r 1 a. Saskatchewan,
Manitona and Ihe Maritimes will
nOl be accepled.
The deadline for such mail for
points in Onlario and Quebec
i. 7
pm Sunday.
IMPORTANT
ANNOUNCEMENT
If threatened strike on Canadian Railways
is mad~ effective Tuesday Morning, August
22nd, Delaware and Hudson Railroad trains
between Montreal and New York will be af·
fected as autlined herein DURING THE DURA·
TION OF THE STRIKE.
Train 10, leaving Montreal 9: 15 p.m., Tuesday,
August 22nd, definitely cancelled.
Train 9, arriving Montreal 7 :30 a.m., Tuesday,
August 22nd, definitely cancelled.
Trains 7 and 8-night trains, also Trains 34
and 35 -day trains will operate South of
Rouses
Point, N.Y., only.
THE DELAWARE & HUDSON RAILROAD
192,000 IDLED
BY RAIL STRIKE
Enects 01 Tie-up Growing
Daily, Labor Minister Reports
Ottawa, Aug. 29. -(P; -The
crippling national rail strike. ~it­
ting severely at the Canadlar.
economy. has enforced idleness on
at least 192.000 workers, Labor
Minister Gregg estimated today.
His dEpartment, gatllering Na­
tional Employment Selvice reports. said
that one week after the 125,000
railway workers left their jobs as a
result of a rail-wage dispute with
management, the Effects of th9
strike had reached into almost
every segment of Canadian indu.s­
try.
Besides the 125,000 rail workers
made unemployed, there were an
additipnal 47.000 non-striking rail
employees out of work for the dura­
tion of the strike and anoH-er 20.-
000
in other industries, forced into
idleness because of a shortage ot
materials and lack of storage space
for finished goods.
137 CANADIAN RAIL -478
The lijt and swing bridges over the Lachine Canal in
Montreal were l
eji open for the duration of the strike.
Rail Tie-up
SetsRecord
First Coast·to-co8st
Walkout Records Show
OTTAWA, Aug. 25 -(C.P.) –
Canada never before has ~uffered
a complete s~oppage of coast-..t9·.
coast rail transport or anytbmg­
approaching it, so far as. Ule.
records kept in the Labor Depart.
ment show. . A
check of statistics ye~terd~Y­
showed 3. 190H strike of mt;chanical.
and car department workmen i~.
the Canadian Pacific Railway to
have cost the greatest aggregate
of man day~ of idlenes~440,OOO.·
That strike started Aug. 5 and
e-nded Oct. 12. A
strike in the Montreal and
Sarnia maer-me shops in 1905 i.asted
from May 8 to Dec. 31, but
fewer worker~ were involved and
the man day..; ~ost were 58,000. A C.P.R.
strike in 1910 of con ..
ductors and trainmen in Ontario
and Quebec <:ost 35,000 man days.
There have beE.n other smaller rail
work stoppages.
These strikes over tht-last 50
years caused some dislocation of,
train movements, but nothing to
compare, with the complete tie-up
in the currp.nt walkout.
RAIL CANADIEIJ -478 138 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
The Companies and Unions That Were On Strike
Canaaian Pacific Railway Com­
pany; Dominion Atlantic Railway
Company; Esquimalt and Nanaimo
Railway Company; Quebec Central
Railway Company; CanadianPaci­
fic Expres.o Company; Eastern
Abattoirs Limited, Montreal; New
Brunswick Cold Storage Company
Limited, Saint JohPl, N.B.; Cana­
dian National Rail ways; Canadian
National Railway Company; Mont­
real and Southern Counties Rail­
way Company; Niagara, St. Cath­
arines and Toronto Railway Com­
pany; Thousand Islands Railway
Company; Canadian National Tele­
graph Company; Canadian National
Steamship Company Limited; Cana­
dian National Transportation Lim-
ited, Port Arthur, Ont.: .
~orthern Alberta ,Railway Com­
pany; Montreal Stockyards Com­
pany; Toronto Terminals Railway
Company; the Public Market Limit­
ed, St. Boniface, Man.; Ontario
Northland Transportation Commis­
sion; the Toronto, Hamilton and
Buffalo Railway Company; the
Railway Association of Canada;
Vancouver Hotel Company, Limit ..
ed
A list of the companies (above) and unions (above right)
involved in the strike, as taken from Schedules
A and E
of the back-to-work legislation,
Commercial Telegraphers Union
of North America; Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen of
America In­
terna tional Brotherhood of Elec­trical Workers;
Canadian Brother­
hood of Rail way Employees and
Other Transport Workers; Brother­
hood of Exp:ess Employees; the
Order of RaIlroad Telegraphers; . Brotherhood of
Maintenance of Way Employees;
Brotherhood ot
Railway and Steamship Clerks
~reight Handlers, Express and Sta~
tlOn Employees; International Bro­
therhoOd of Blacksmiths, Drop For­
gers and Helpers; International As­sociation of Machinists;
United ~­
sociation of Journeymen and Ap­
prentices of the Plumbing and Pipe
Fitting Industry of the United
States and Canada;
Brotherhood of Railway Carmen
of America; International Brother­
hood of Boiler Makers, Iron Ship
Builders and Helpers of America; Sheet Metal
Workers Internation­
al Association; International Moul;
ders and Foundry Workers Union of North America;
International
Brotherhood of Firemen and Oil­ers,
Power Plant Employees, Roundhouse
and Railway Shop La­
borers; Hotel and Restaurant Em­
ployees and Bartenders Interna­
tional Union.
And Those That Were Not On Strike
Not all of Canadas railways were strikebound during the strike of 1950, Some lines, not represented by any of the
striking unions, kept going,
One of these was the New York Central line in south western Quebec which brought vitally-needed
food
to Beauharnois, from where it was trucked to MontreaL On August 25, the Montreal Herald ran a picture story on this line,
with the caption on the photo below at Valleyfield station being
Its not a mirage, One story told of an automobile driver near
Beauhamois who ignored the warning signs at a railway crossing because the trains are on strike, Seconds later his car was hit
by a train, for it was the NYC line which was not on strike The driver survived, but his car did not, and he learned a good lesson,
still applicable today,
to always stop, look and listen,
The photo below, and the four at the top
of the opposite page are all from the Herald article and, although somewhat
fuzzy, are included because
of their rarity and histOlical interest. It shows the so-called Banana Train run by the NYC to bring
food to Mon treal.
1950 was the last full
year in which engine
No. 1891 and other
steam locomotives
ran on this line, for
dieselization came in
1951.
Other lines not on
strike included the
Algoma Central, the
Pacific
Great Eastern
(which at that time
did not connect at
either end) and
smaller lines, three of
which are shown on
the
opposite page,
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000
No Strike on Worlds Smalkst Railway
The HUllISvllle &. l.~kc of Bays IJne, whi(h ODrr·
aIM 1) 2H nlll.~ or 45 aauae tro.ck In Ihe
Hunt.5ille dlelrlcl, 15 not on ~Irlke M Ihe four·
nUllI t.raln crew ;!.Iso act ~$ desNl.lrhers, (r(liM
hllnI11cr.c.. cl€. Ttl£ ,,,1111) . .;ometlme,a: uUed Ihe
Operating on Schedule
P(lrtllIl:C Line, holdr a Dominion ch8rttr lind I!
called I he ullalltl shortt-it 1116..\ complete rill!·
way til Ihe ,,orld. Jl hauh pas.sen.crcrs. frel.l:hlllnd
the (0),&1 mall.
_I r.
,.,,~ j~ Clilcra e till ScllirllI!r ion ch:Jrircn (,ew o
tl n,)~)..£Uf:cr .f( Iljm in!:. h.
139 CANADIAN RAIL -478
UNArrECTtD BY STRIKE. the Quebec Railwny Ughl and Power trains ron p~ncclulll
on. CO.nducl.or ]ohn Gariepy chats with rcgulnr pos~cngcr~ in Our-bee City before
Train No. 4S0 l~avcfi for points up to and including Sic. Anne de Beaupro.
ABOVE LEFT: THe little Huntsville and Lake of Bays, in
Ontario, kept going throughout the summer
of 1950 without
inciden:.
In later years, howevel; it was abandoned and
most of its equipment was shipped to St Thomas. Eventually,
though, the equipment was shipped back
10 Huntsville, the
line rebuilt (in a somewhat different/ocation), and it resumed
operation
in the SUlll1ner of 2000, so it is again possible 10
ride what used 10 be called The world~ smallest railway,
ABOVE RIGHT: The Quebec Railway Light & Power
interurban line was not involved in the strike. Had the strike
taken place little more than a year latei the QRL&P would
have been shut down,
for the CNR bought it in 1951.
LEFT:
Small lines in park,S, like this one in Vancouvers
Stanley park, were not,
of course, affected by the strike. In
fact a sign on the train boldly proclaims
NOT ON STRIKE.
RAIL CANADIEN -478 140 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
FOUNDED JUNE 3, 1778
MONTREAL, FRIDAY, AUGUST 25.
A CONTRAST IN CONCESSIONS
On several occasions since they gave the nod been a definite gain in the pay rates and working
to start the disastrous railway strike across this conditions of the railway workers.
country, top leaders of the unions involved have On the ··other hand, even .the moderate settle·
. . . ment proposed by the conciliation board IJIsjority
publicly referred to the concessions they offered reports last slring would have involved substantial
to bridge the gap of. disagreement and help avert add~tions to the rail,:,ays payroll costs, estimated
-the walkout. So far, however, no clear statement at $20.$25 millions for all employees. The revised
h of these concessions, and how far they receded entailed an extra cost of around $37 millions. The
10 the direction of compromise settlement from eleventh-hour compromise offer during the recent
the unions . previous insistence on their full mediation effort to avert the strike would have
original dewds.· involved an added burden on the railways which,
A
joint statement by Mr. Frank Hall and Mr. as nearly as can be calculated in the absence of
A. R. Mosher in behalf of the 17 unions referred official figures, would have been twice or two
to material concessions offered as a consider-and a half times as great as that of the August 10
·able contritlution toward settlement, but did not prop,osal.
•• y what concessions or, how Jllaterial they In short,. the very real concessions held out
were. In a progress report letter to all affiliated by the railways would have had a marked effect
locals,
the union heads told of making concessions on their costs and on the ability of revenues to
on path the amount of the pay increase sought keep abreast of those costs despite the freight
and the effective date of the proposed 40-hour rate increases of the past two years. Furthermore,
week. But again they gave no precise account of the railways took the responsibility of making
what these concessions amounted to. such offers despite the lack of any assurance that
The lack of amplifying detail supplied by the they would be able to offset the added costs from
union leaders as to
their offers is in contrasttu additional revenn-es: They acted rather with the
the full and specific outlines given by the rail-knowledge that any further rate boosts· Muld be –
-ways of the .concession offers they advanced
at gained only by dint of strenuous pleading before
.various stages of
the deadlocked negotiations. the Dominion Transport Board, and then only to
:
Starting with an offer of a four-hour reduction a limited extent after many months of argument
in the work week without loss of take-home pay, over sectional, politically inspired opposition.
after the conciliation proceedings last spring, .the _ For the railways, it is not just a simple matter
railways ended up, in the recent mediation pro-of raising their rates as they deem necessary to
ceedings, with a proposal for the 40-hour week offset added costs forced upon them. They must go
In
little over a year. In addition they were pre-before the Transport Board which, in the past
pared to give an immediate wage rate increase of few years, has taken 18 months or more to sanc­
four cents an
hour (more than half that sought tion rate increases to cover rises in costs dating
.by the unions) and provide fo; a pay bonus tied back to before the rate applications. They must
-to the cost-of-living index. battle against the claims for preferred rate treat-
The railways concessions were offered on four, ment from those representing regional and
tlilferent occasions, on
each of which their value special-class interests; and against the tendency
mounted; their last offer appeared to involve of the Transport Board to regard its function as
ultimate costs more than double those of the restriction of the railroads, rather than protection
previous one on
August lO. The unions offered no of the general public interest and the ability of
definite concessions at all until the intervention the railways to render efficient, self-supporting
of
the mediator, and have yet to give the public service. While they wait for board decisions, they
any idea of what those concessions were. must shoulder increased costs out of demonstrably
An important aspect of the unions reluctance insufficient revenues, which may not be made
-to bargain on any basis short of their original sufficient by the rate increases ultimately granted.
demands is that no matter what the unions In view of their special difficulties and the
()ffered to concede, they had nothing to lose. What-demands for service made upon them, the rail­
ever compromise settlement might have been ways would seem ·to have gone a long way and
feached, even
if. it was equivalent to only a half at definite risk to their financial position, in mak­
or a third of their first demands, would have I ing the concessions they have.
The Gazelles editorial on August
25 was rather pro-management in tone, but as time went on it was realized that the talks were
deadlocked, and neither side would yield.
It was then that the anger of the population became less directed to management and
labour; alld more aimed at the government, for not forcing an end to the strike.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000 141 CANADIAN RAIL -478
The Lighter Side of the Strike
AROUND OUR TOWN
Town Greets
Mercy
Train
Atikokan Rf~jdfnts
Back on .FuJI Diet
ATIKOKAN, Ont., Aug. 28~
CB.U.P.>-The 3,000 peorlE of this
northwest Ontario mining town,
faced \!ith virtual famine because
of the rail strike, tucked into man­
sized meals today for the first time
in nearly a week..
~ .mercy train, approved by the
slokmg rai Iway unions, hauled
119,000 pounds of food and supplies
into Atikokan from Port Arthur,
Ont., Saturday.
With no highways or regular air
service, the t.own depends on the
Canadian National Railways for all
Its supplIes. The rail 8trike. had
severed that supply line.
Appeals to the unions, thp rail­
ways and the Government. brought
the mercy train to the town just. as
rEsidents were dipping into the last
of t.heir food supplies.
Our food would have :Jp.rn ex­
hausted by Monday, but now well
he okay, said Town Clerk F. A. Cox yest
elday.
By Gordie Moore
As so often happens in serious
times, there were many displays of
lighter, and even humoLlous emotions
as Canadians tried to cope with the
strike. Of cOLlfse Montreals famous
cartoonist Gordie Moore drew one
of his
inimitatible cartoons on the subject; this
one concerned a suburban dweller who
suddenly became very popular because
he had a car.
There were also many strike jokes,
including this one with the atrocious
pun of mother vs. Mather (W.A.
Mather being the president of the CPR).
Another story that served to
lighten the glo
om concerned the special
train, operated by the strikers, which
brought much-needed supplies to an
isolated town.
Then
there was the play on words
as we learned that the town
of Tyup B.C.
was tied
up by the strike.
And so the strike went on, and
Canadians listened to news bulletins on
the radio, endured innumerable playings
of Goodnight Irene, the number one
song of .the time, played Canasta, and
hoped the strike would soon be over.
The strike has ha.d its hu­morous side too.
The la.test joke
current as a result of the
rail walk ou t goes like this:
First man: Did you hear
the latest on the strike ?
Second man: No.
First man: Donald Gordon is in hosiptal.
Second man: Whats
wrong?
First man: Hes got labor
pains. Going to be a Mather.
Railway Tieup .
Ties
Up Tyup,B.C.
TYUP, B.C., Aug. 26 -(B.U.P.)
-The nation-wide rail tieup
has. tied up Tyup, railway com­
mumty soutn of Duncan on Bri­
tish Columbias Vancouver Is­
land.
RAIL CANADIEN -478 142 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
The Public Begins to Denland a Settlement
By August 28 the strike had been on for six days and the realization of the seriousness of the situation was setting in. The
humourous comments and jokes were disappearing as hardship began to be felt. Almost 200,000 Canadians were out of work,
and supplies
of all kinds, especially food, were in short supply. As so often happens, profiteers were taking advantage of the
shortages to raise prices, and there was scarcely a person in Canada unaffected
by the strike. Stores started running advertisements
(see next page) urging an end to the strike.
Morgans department store (now the Bay) offered alternative delivery service, while
even
Burnetts, the dry cleaner ran a very strongly worded message, naming and picturing the chief negotiators.
It was obvious that the negotiations were hoplessly deadlocked, and the only hope was government intervention. Some
people thought that the government should invoke the War Measures Act, a law passed in 1914, at the start of World War I,
which gave the government sweeping powers in wartime. Since Canada was involved in the fighting in Korea (which by then
was no longer a police action but a full-fledged war),
it was felt that the use of the act was justified. However most felt that
special legislation dealing specifically with the strike was the way to go. Eventually this is the method the
government used,
and the War Measures Act was not invoked (it was invoked once, however, twenty years later, in the
October crisis of 1970).
TRUMAN MAY ·PROVIDE RAIL PATTERN
Conjecture is rife as to the steps which may after they are said to have promised a truce.
be taken by President Truman with regard to Quite naturally this aroused the presidential
. wrath and some observers see in it sufficieni
the threatened railway strik.e which will tie up provocation
and justification for the taking 01
:U.S. roads starting Monday failing preventive drastic action.
action. In view of
Canadas unprecedented posi-Legislation already is before Congress which
tion, with
not a wheel of a Canadian train turn-would provide for the setting up of government
ing and no clear idea as to what to do about it, fact-finding boards which would inquire into
the U.S. situation is attracting nearly as much future disputes and their recommendations would
attentioh in this country as it is across the line. be binding upon both labor and management.
While the guesswork as to what President Tru-At . present, as is the case in Canada, the
man will do covers a wide range, no one believes recommendations of boards of conciliation and
.
for a moment that he will permit for long-it at arbitration are not binding. Recalled is President
all-the shutting down of railway traffic. The Trumans impatience with railway strike threats
present critical state of the Korean campaign as to the welfare of the country. Particularly
well as of the international situation in general remembered is his move to draft striking rail
is
such as to make such a stoppage unthinkable. workers into the armed services when a strike
At no time in history has more depended upon loomed at the end of World War 11 .
.
the efficient operation of the United States trans· By the time the Canadian Parliament meets
portation system. on Tuesday to consider this countrys railway
The concensus of opinion is that Mr. Truman I dilemma it seems possible that action in Washing­
will
order the lines taken over for government I ton may have set a pattern. Whether or not such
operation, which
is what the unions hope he will pattern is followed here, it can hardly prove
do, were it not for the inexplicable factor of the lotherwise than helpful to Ottawa in arriving at
union leaders calling a strike less than an hour a decision.
ABOVE: A Gazette editorial speculates
that the solution being considered
by
President Truman to prevent rail
strikes in the United States, might also
be a solution
for Canada.
RIGHT: A cartoon in the Montreal
Standard urges common sense (Ind
government action
to end the strike and
get the trains moving again.
OPPOSITE: Advertisements by
Morgans and Burnells dealing with
the strike. They were the full height
of
the newspaper page, and showed the
concern of the stores in achieving a
settlement. Note that the Burnell ad
has a reference to Stalin who was
considered to be the villain
of the time
because
of the war in Korea.
Get It Moving
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000
EMERGENCY DELIVERY
during the railway strike
• As a service to our customers living in
the vicinity of the undernoted places, a
special free delivery
by motor truck
will be operated
on roads suitable for
delivery
•.
With each order please give fuO de­
livery information including name, ex­
act address and any further information .

All orders will be delivered as soon as
possible, but we cannot give exact dates
Th is service will be for the du ration of
the railway strike only.
Abbotsford Bedford·
Berthier
Bondville
Brome L..ke
Brownsbur,
Brrlonville
Carillon·
C,ville
Clareneeville
Contrecoeur
Cowanlvill,
Dalelville
buniny.
Dunham
East
Farnh.m
Emard
Far.ham
Fort Lewil
·
Folter
Franklin Cinter
FrOnti,r .
emby
Hivelock
Henryvili,
Herdm.n
Hill H,ad
Howick
H.unti~JJdon
Ibervlll. Joliette
Knowlton
L.c .
eh.mbau.1t
L..c Charleboil
L..c P.use
Lie St. Louil
Laehute
L..kefield
L.ke Louis.
.
L.nOl.ie
L..valtri L·
Epiph.ni.
-4arieville
Mueouehe
Maskinon,e
Miuilquoi laie
Notre-D.me d. I.
Merei
Ok.
Otmtlown
Pinehill
Pike River
P&inte
fortune
Port Lewn
Rawdon
Ri
,.ud
Rou,emont
St. AI,is
St •. Andr_t East
St. Anled
St. Augustin
Ste.
Barb.
St. Bthel,,,,y
I St. Brigid,
St. Celllire
St. Chrysostoml
St.
Cuthbert
St. Don.t
St. Emil.
St. E
prit
St. Hermit
St. ,acquel
,st. Johns
St. Joseph
de SOrl
$Ie. lulienne
St.
Lue
Ste. M.rtinl
St. Placide
Ste. Philomena
St.
RGch
Ste. Sc hol.ltlqul
St. Theodore
S.brlvois
Selbv L.k.
Sorel
Sweetsbur,
Var~net
Verch·~res
Waterloo
HENRY MORGAN ~ CO. LIMITED
You … sur. of .. Illy .t Mor,.
143 CANADIAN RAIL -478
THE RAIL STRIKE
IS GOING TO
BE SETTLED
WHY NOT STOP IT TODAY?
Sooner !:!. lot., • Httltment must b. Hc~td-th. urik. Just ront ,0 .-n.
(very day d.ay is disastrous -I,t, coli 0 ho.lt b.fore the di,put. tH …..
.. rioul proportions -be for •• Yery man, womon and child dart. to f •• , the pinch.
EVERY DAYS DELAY IS A BODY·BLOW TO CANADA – A DIUCT. iOOST
fOR STALIN.
IUlinltU I. falling off -shipm.nt. cant be mod. or .Ind -.hop •• d ,ttk
af. glutt.d with production -the wh •• ls or. Indlng to a halt.
Un.mploym.nt II mountin a. con.umption .telp and matarlal. for la&rfcan_
D not Qrriye.
D,f,nc, luHI,. al wo*. I, htllted on wanhip cDnsrrwtion. ,MII. 1fI~ .
fabrication. troopi cannot mo.,. to trolnillg c.ntfU.
This Isnt Just Another Strike
Its A National Calamity
AANK HAll
We Depend
On
These Men
To Settle
The Strike
W. A. MAnUI
Theil men. bet, .. n them, can decide the future Df this country. If th.y·
… nDt agr .. and the dtike goe. 0 I, might well ftlult in plullgl1l9 the whof. country into a
moj If they agree, Iven ;ith the Inte,nnon of rh. Gove,nm.nt, WI IOn
pick up where we I,ft Dff. .
AGREEMENT MUST BE REACHED
AGREEMENT
WILL BE REACHED
LET
IT BE REACHED TODAY
RAIL CANADIEN – 478 144 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
Ottawa Acts At Last
Faced with the breakdown of negotiations, as well as the demands of angry Canadians, the federal government, under the
leadership
of Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent, called Parliament into emergency session on August 28. Debate began on the
29th as
members of Parliament hurried back to Ottawa by various means (but not by train). The bill passed in the early evening
of August 30, and was given Royal Assent, so becoming law, at 9:56 P.M. that night. It called for a return to work within 48 hours,
an interim wage increase
of four cents an hour, appointment of an arbitrator if no solution reached in 15 days, and a government
guarantee that no employee would be discharged because
he had gone on strike. On the other side the unions were to withdraw
a
ll their strike orders. This would assure an end to the strike.
US Army Takes Over.
As Truman Seizes Rails
TRF. Hr.RALD. MONTR!:i.( … MONOAY, r(jOUST U. HO
Ottawa Parleys Collapse;
Railways,. Unions Now Say
Next Step Up to Commons
U.K. Troops Rushed to Front As Reds Launch Three Major Drives in Korea
AUGUST
itltt ~a~tttt.
MOIoTJI!:oU. ANO VIClhnl
!i~I. )o{o … Tu ….. .t. Tlta …. Frl. 8.1. CLOUDY, VERY COOL
~ ~ I ! S , l _ -,:CWPC …. lUIlC_
, , • , 11 II It
.. uLla ….. H.I.a.I,u.
11 II n 16 11 II I~
i~.::X? fe!I~;I~~:;~ H

to %1 tt u u tJ U

t1 tI U 10 JI

, 173 YEAR
,.

MONTREAL, WEDNESDA). AUGUST 3D, 1950 PRICE FIVE CIlNTS
STRIKE END ORDERED
Ottawa Bill to Halt Rail Tie-up;
To Name Arbiter If Talks Collapse
GOIN MY WAY?
A cartoon of a member of Parliament thumbing his way to
Ottawa to deal with the strike.
FREIGHT 4ND EXPRESS
EMBARGOES CANCELLED
PASSENGER AND TELEGRAPH
SERVICES RESUMED
The railway ~trike havinl: been settled.
all freighl an,) expreKS emhargor .• nre
lifted immediately,
PaSUUKer flnd tclcKrnph
servicos arc also resumed.
THE RAILWAY ASSOCIATION OF CANADA
CANADIAN NATIONAL EXPRESS. CANADIAN PACIFIC EXPRESS
The joint announcement stating that all embargoes are lifted
on freight, express, passenger and telegraph operations.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000 145 CANADIAN RAIL -478
The Trains Start Running Again
ORDER YCt1.JR STAR WA.NT ADS BY n:t.£EHONE _ LA. I1D
JIt_lvlnr houlS Igr Star Want Ad!: 8.30 R.m. 10 :i p.m. MOIld.at
~~~&.UI;nhoo~r~~)· ~:~~d~~o~,~n~r.da~f:.~gfllt~I%~r.I:~~ln·Ti.~~
orl&rn NotlOOi IIn~ l.tI~t and Fo!,) adYfrt1Hm~nl.l l.tCtple4 WlW
IO.l~ ~..[Q. for the oame day ISatLlfdaya t.~plN).
STAn TELEPHONES
CoDn~·/~I~~ept.. l~e.~t~f~~:tt{t
w.u.,. ADS LA. Uti, &1(1 LrU. 10 6 1= d.t.LI,
S.lurday. &.JO LIII. 10 11 Dna.
VOL. LXXXII, No. 204 MONTREAL, THURSDAY, AUGUST 31, 1950 PRICE f1YE CENTS
Hundreds Of Trains Start Rumbling Over Tarnished Rails
Equipment Operating
Within Two Hours
Public
Happy Its
All Over
e
H., CST LIKE OLD TIMES AC.uN
Commuier Train Whistles Call
Thousands Back to Stations
The end of the strike came quickly. Although the
government had ordered service to start within 48 hours, the
actual start was
much sooner than that. Within minutes of
the passage of the legislation, union leaders Frank Hall and
A.R.
Mosher made a radio broadcast urging their members
to go back to work. By the time steam could be raised in the
boilers,
most other workers were back, and by rush hour on
the morning of August 31 local trains were running, with
long distance trains
not far behind. The strike was over.
With his orders in his hand both management and labour
prepare
to get back 10 work. The words are from the popular
song Casey Jones. Montreal Daily
Star, August 31, 1950. Locomotive
2467 hauls fhe first CPR passenger train out of
Windsor slation after the strike. It was train 503, bound for
Otfmva, and it departed on schedule at 8: 15 A.M. on
Thursday, August 31, 1950.
Turcot roundhouse is
smoky again as the
locomotives prepare
to depart. August 31,
1950. Contrast this
photo with the one on
page 133.
Bridge Toll
Takers
Busy
MOTORISTS who switched
their allegiance from the
Jacques Cartier bridge to t.he toil-free
Victoria span during the
strIke, found early this morning
that the free rkles were over.
Fare collectors were back at
the old stands at midnight and
were helped in stopping cars by
C.N.R. and ProvincIal police. At 7:30 a.m.,
there was a line­
up niore than a mile long, of
motorists who figured they might
get one more ride on the house.
Inspector Orner Langlois was
first to get a Montreal and
Sou.thern Cotintie.!J CAr rolling
agam. At 10:30 oclock last night
shortly after the back-to-work
order, he took a car out to Mont­
real South to check the ralls.
RAIL CANADIEN -478 146 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
Conditions Get Back to Normal
Once the strike was over, things got back to normal very quickly, and within a very short time it was an item for the
history books, something to reminisce about in the years ahead. Although there were other railway strikes in the future,
including a general rail strike in 1966, and innumerable postal shutdowns, there was never again a strike which affected so many
Canadians
so seriously. We sincerely hope this is a record that will always stand.
We feel
that the best way to end this coverage of the great strike of 1950 is to reprint this delightful article which
appeared in the Montreal Daily Star the day the strike ended, and which described so well how Canadians returned happily to
their trains.
There is even another groaner of a pun -at the very end I
THE WHISTLE WEVE BEEN WAITING FOR
This cartooll, in the Montreal Gazette, of August 30, 1950, summed up the public feeling at the time.
Canadas railway strike moved back into history
today.
Life sprang anew into hundreds of silent locomotives
today, the
creak of freights and passenger trains rumbling
over tarnished rails could be heard again around major rail
terminals, and the travelling public which suffered the most
during the nine-day strike breathed a sigh of relief. Less
than
two hours after the two union leaders, Frank H. Hall,
chairman of the negotiation committee of the IS International
Railway Brotherhoods, and A.R. Mosher, president of the
Canadian Congress of Labour, and representing two unions,
Brotherhood of Railway Employees and Brotherhood of
Express Employees, made their appeal to workers to get back
on the
job, ,freight and rail terminals, like cities awakening
in the morning, suddenly sprang into life.
By dawn smoke was curling skyward from the two
great railway marshalling yards at Cote St Luc and Turcot;
the blast of steam and diesel whistles as trains sped over the
rails broke the early morning silence, and signal lights
along
the crossings blinked out their warnings to motorists that
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000
Canadas ribbons of steel were back in use. Inside and outside
the big Turcot roundhouse, which can hold 56 locomotives,
men
in greasy overalls hurried about. Some had been at work
all night, while others arrived to relieve them. One
by one
the engines left the roundhouse. As they passed the office,
the engineer
got aboard and took over. Soon they would be
heading towards points north, south, east and west.
The romance and thrill
of railroading also came again
to
the Lakeshore today! Thousands of citizens who
contemplated another day of hitch-hiking and makeshift
transportation to work in the city heard the chuff-chuff of
commuter train locomotives with profound delight early this
morning.
The smiling citizens stuffed down a hasty breakfast
and streamed towards the nearest railway station. Many were
there ahead
of them, lining the platforms where they were
wont
to regale neighbours and friends with news of the day,
or brag about the size
of prize vegetables and flowers.
Man, what a pleasure
to get back to our comfortable
seats, have a smoke and read our newspapers again, one
of
the more voluble commuters commented. It will be just
like old times again, we will be able to resume our bull
session on politics and the good and bad of municipal
administrations, another stated.
Train crews were not oblivious to commuters
sensations on seeing trains again. Locomotive engineers,
mindful of the fact that people did not have to take
precautions at level crossings during the last few days, came
in with slow approaches and whistles blowing. It was almost
like a triumphal procession,
or public celebration.
Some citizens took up familiar stands on platforms
where they had awaited trains for nearly half a century and
greeted each old pal with the comment Well, theyre running
again.
Local stationmasters handled a rush of business this
morning, also a great number
of queries. What are we going
to do with our old tickets which still have many unexpired
rides? was the most frequent question. The answer was ready.
The unexpired tickets, as of the date of the onset of the
strike, will be acceptable to conductors for an additional
nine days, or fraction thereof according to how many days
they had
to run, the rail officials informed commuters. There
was no talk
of increase in fares. Tickets were sold at the
familiar
rates, which
to Valois, a central part on the Lakeshore,
was $5.10 for 50 rides, the rides to be used up
in 30 days.
Housewives, tired
of staying at home, are planning
shopping trips
to the city again -an urgent necessity in view
of the approach of school days and the rush to get Johnny
and Mary ready for classes.
Commuters, like strikebound Montrealers, will swell
the rush
of week-end traffic because many of them postponed
their holidays or simply stayed home. They want to take
advantage of the last summer holiday to get away and see
things.
Even the wise-crackers had a field day. It soots us,
they said
of locomotives coming down the line.
Montreal Daily Star, August 31, 1950.
147 CANADIAN RAIL -478
~.
Locomotive Trucks
Made
in Canada
by
CANADIAN CAR &
FOUNDRY
Company Limited
This ad appeared in Canadian Transportation in
September 1950, a few days after the end
of the strike. CNR
9400 still exists at the Canadian Railway Museum, an
important relic of the great transition begun by the railways
half a century ago.
Epilogue
The great strike of 1950 did mark a dividing line
between Canadian railroading of the first half of the
twentieth century and that of the second half. Within little
more than a year the
40 hour work week for the non-ops was
in effect, and changes came also to the running trades (who,
we
must remember, were not on strike in 1950). On the
technical side the dieselization program, already well under
way, continued as steam slowly disappeared. Just ten years
after the 1950 strike, both the
CNR and CPR held ceremonies
marking complete dieselization, and the end
of steam (except
for special excursions). Since then, most of the first
generation diesels have been retired, and railways use
technology undreamed of in 1950.
The Korean War, so much in the news
in 1950, dragged
on for three
more years, until an armistice was signed on
July 27, 1953. There has still not been a peace treaty, although
recently efforts have been made
to bring peace at last.
In
1,981 , Canada issued a postage stamp to honour
A.R. Mosher, one of the two union negotiators of 1950.
Neither-Donald Gordon or W.A. Mather have ever had their
picture on a stamp, nor
is it likely that they ever will.
RAIL CANADIEN -478 148 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
The 75th Anniversary of 15820s Run to Vancouver
Seventy-five years ago, November 1 to 4, 1925, occurred a memorable event in the history of Canadian railroading,
when Canadian National Railways diesel-electric car 15820 made a run from Montreal to Vancouver in a total elapsed time
of
72 hours, and an actual running time of 67 hours 7 minutes.
Car 15820 was brand new,
just out of the shop, and was assigned to go into service in western Canada. CNR officials
decided to have a test run from
Montreal to Vancouver, to see just how well the new diesel technology would perform in
sustained long-distance running. After some discussion and planning, a scheduled time
of 72 hours was determined. This was
very much faster than the fastest transcontinental passenger train
of the time, and is, in fact, faster than the present-day VIA train.
At 2:30 P.M. Eastern
Standard Time on November I, 1925 the 15820 departed from Montreals Bonaventure station.
The rLln encountered numerous troubles, such as hitting a cow at Alexandria Ontario and a track speeder at Dalehurst Alberta, as
well as problems with the brake gear. Despi te being 3 hours and
15 minutes late at Wainwright Alberta, all the lost time was made
up and the 15820 pulled into Vancouver at II :28 A.M. Pacific Standard Time on
November 4, just 71 hours and 58 minutes after
leaving Montreal, and two minutes ahead
of schedule. An interesting feature of the cars trip is that while it left Montreal 16
hours
15 minutes behind the Continental Limited (No.1) which left there on October 31 at 10: 15 PM., it arrived at Vancouver
20 hours ahead
of it.
The test run shocked railway officials throughout North America, demonstrated the practicability
of diesel power, and set
the stage for the huge conversion
program which would completely replace the steam locomotive 35 years later.
On this 75th anniversary,
we are privileged to reprint an official log of this historic trip. The document, from the CNR
holdings in the National Archives of Canada, was prepared by Mr. F.E. Collinson, a mechanical engineer who rode the entire trip
of the 15820 from Montreal to Vancouver.
Car 15819, similar to 15820. Canadian Railway (lnd Marine World, Novembel; 1925.
Mr. A.H. Eager: Winnipeg, Ma
n. November 9, 1925.
Diesel Electric
Car #15820.
On arrival at Montreal on
Monday 26th October, it
was found that car # 15820 was
just out of the shops, and had
not been run.
Trial trips were made between Point SI. Charles and
St. Hyacinthe on October 27th, 28th and 29th, to tune up the
engine and electrical equipment.
It was found that the car would not develop the speed
expected, making only about 52 miles per hour on falling
grades and 45 miles per hour on the level.
The car was equipped for the road on Friday 30th,
berths being made by removing seat backs and placing
wooden frames and mattresses over sets of three seats,
refrigerator in the passenger end and a lunch counter, wash
table and water tanks
in the baggage compartment.
Three 85-gallon oil drums were also loaded in the
baggage room and engine spares and equipment were also
put on, so that the car was carrying the full load with which
it was to make the run to Vancouver.
At the same time, Mr. Schrantz made a change to the
resistan
ce for the shunts of the motors in order to obtain a
higher
car speed to enable it to make the schedule which
had been laid down; four out of the twelve coils of each
resistance being jumped.
On Saturday, October 31 st, a test trip was made at the
full loa
d, Mr. Smart accompanying the car, and 50 MPH was
made on the level and 60 MPH on down grade, so it was
decided that the alteration that had been made was sufficient
to allow the
car to undertake the trip to Vancouver.
On Sunday, November I st, the final preparations were
made, brakes adjusted, supplies taken, and the car moved to
Bonaventure station at noon.
The arrangements for movement to Vancouver had
been made by Mr. Crombie, and a 72-hour schedule drawn
up, which aJlowed
for five minute stops at all divisional
points.
Fuel oil had been arranged for at Winnipeg and
Kamloops Jet. But no extra time was considered necessary
at these points, as a fuel oil pump had been
installed on the
car and arrangements made to load oil
in drums and pump it
into the
engine tank whilst the car was running.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000 149 CANADIAN RAIL -478
6··6–_1——–£0:/07.:…. ————
IJd ______ -+ ____ IJr —-….;
Floor Plan, 60 rt. Oil EI.etrie Car,
Floor plan of car 15820 as buill, and when it made its historic run. Canadian Railway and Marine World, Novembel; 1925.
The start was made on time from Bonaventure and
the car arrived on time at Vancouver, the running time, speeds
and
detentions being as shown on the attached sheet, the
total distance
of 2917.5 miles being run at an average speed
of 43.47 MPH.
The causes for delays on the road, other than the
necessary time for changing pilots and conductors and
examining a car, were as follows:-
POLYCARPE: 7 min. Changing atomizer in
#2 cylinder.
ALEXANDRIA:
13 min. Struck a cow and broke train and
signal lines. Signal lines cut out and train line plugged with
a
wooden plug.
NAK1NA: 11 min. Changing atomizer on
#4 cylinder and
replacing brake gear release springs.
WINN1PEG: 30 min. Oil and supplies loaded in
13 min.
Balance
of time taken in applying new brake shoes,
LESTOCK: 5 min. Orders in connection with stop at
Touchwood.
TOUCHWOOD: 60 min. Held up behind a wreck, freight car
across both main and side tracks.
BIGGAR: 42 min. The car had pulled heavily all the way
from Touchwood. There was a strong head wind but this
failed to account altogether for the slow running.
The stop
was made
to adjust the oil regulator of the engine and inspect
motors and generator. After this was done and a fresh start
made, no very noticeable improvement was found.
CAVELL: 6 min. Stop made
to examine the trucks, when it
was found that the adjustor
of the right front brake lever had
stuck, allowing the shoe
to trail on the wheel. This was freed
and a temporary support put in.
TAKO: 5 min. The car still did not run as freely as it should
and was further examined, and the trailing shoes of the
leading truck were found to be holding too close to the
wheels. An arrangement
of bell cord was put on to hold the
shoes clear.
STONY PLAINS: 2 min. Stop to send a message to the Chief
Dispatcher for permission to make up time.
LEAMAN: 4 min. Stop to fix the smoke pipe from the heater
as the temperature was falling and there was not sufficient
draft
to keep the heating system working and prevent freezing
the rear end. DALEHURST: 5 min. Struck a speeder,
no damage to 15820.
BRULE: 5 min.
Orders received to run 10 min. ahead of
previous run late order.
AVOLA: 4 min. Order board at danger, in error.
NEW WESTMINSTER: 3 min. Diamond semaphore at
danger.
As
will be noted from the running record, the
maximum time late between Montreal and Winnipeg was 31
minutes at Ottawa, and this was made up to Winnipeg, which
was reached on time.
At Wainwright, the
car was three hours and 15 minutes
behind schedule, but all the lost time was regained before
reaching Vancouver.
The maximum speed for a subdivision was made on
the Viking Subdivision, where an average
of 50.3 MPH was
maintained and a maximum speed
of 62 MPH was made for
five miles.
The following officials accompanied the car over
portions of the trip, in addition to Mr. Crombie, who made
the run from Montreal
to KamJoops Jet., and Mr. Boyd, Road
Foreman
of Engines, who made the entire trip, Montreal to
Vancouver.
MONTREAL
TO WINNIPEG:
Mr. G.E. Smart,
Chief of Car Equipment.
Mr.
A. Coleman, Unit Car Supervisor.
Mr. E. Philmore, Asst. Electrical Engineer.
REDDITT
TO WINN1PEG:
Mr. N.B. Walton, General Superintendent,
Manitoba Dist.
WINNIPEG TO KAMLOOPS JCT.:
Mr. Blackslock, Asst. Chief Engineer.
BIGGAR
TO WAINWRIGHT:
Mr. B.T. Chappell, General Superintendent,
Saskatchewan Dist.
KAMLOOPS JCT. TO VANCOUVER:
Mr. C.J. Quantic, Supt. M.P. & Car Equipt.,
Vancouver B.C.
Mr.
McDowell, representative of the Publicity
Department also accompanied the car from Montreal to
Vancouver.
RAIL CANADIEN -478
One oj the adventures oj the trip was when 15820 hit an
errant track speeder at Dalehur
st, Alberta at 9:45 PM. on
November
3, 1925. Evidently the crew oj the speeder had
not expected the car /0 make up so much time. They jumped
and were unhurt, although the speeder was demolished.
There was no damage
to 15820, and it was only delayed
Jive minutes. The artist
s conception oj the event is in error,
in that it shows it deep in mountainous territory.
From
Self Propelled Cars oj the CNR.
The operating crew for the car consisted of Mr.
Schrantz, Electrical supervisor, Mr. Snitch, Diesel Engine
Supervisor, Mr. Sylvester and myself.
Six hour shifts were taken, two men on duty per shift,
and a change shift
of three hours was worked each afternoon.
Mr.
Boyd acted as relief operator on the Western
Region, after having some very long shifts of duty on the
Central Region.
As shown under
the causes for delays, the brake gear
was the
chief reason for detentions and lost time. With the
exception of changing two atomizers, no trouble was
experienced with the engine, which worked well throughout,
but did noticeably better on nights than on days.
As
regards electrical equipment, nothing gave any
trouble during the trip, but after leaving Biggar it was
necessary to increase the exciter voltage and decrease the
booster resistance in order to give the car the necessary
additional speed to make up the time lost.
The fuel oil consumption was 604 gallons, and ten
gallons
of lubricating oil were used.
The figures for consumption and horse-power are
shown below:-
150 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
Total elapsed time .of trip:
Total running time:
Total
engine time:
Fuel oil:
Lubricating oil:
Average volts, main generator:
Average volts, exciter
generator
71 hrs.58 min.
67
IlJ·s.07 min.
70 h
Is. 30 min.
604 gallons.
10 gallons.
700.
67
Average amperes, main generator: 148.
Average amps., exciter generator: 39.
Kilowatts, main generator: 103.6.
Kilowatts,
exciter generator: 2.6.
Engine horse power:
160
Horse power hours: 11,280.
(89% efficiency, main generator)
(85% efficiency,
exciter generator)
Consumption of fuel oil: 4.83 miles per gallon.
256 ton miles per gallon.
(0.535 gallons per horse power hour)
Costs (at
11 cents· per gallon for fuel oil and 90 cents per
gallon
for lubricating oil):
Per horse power hour:
Per kilowatt hour:
Per
car mile:
Per 1000 ton miles: 0.5885 cents for fuel oil.
0.1276 cents for lub. OiL
0.7161
cents total.
0
.887 cents for fuel oiL
0.192 cents for lub. Oil.
1.079 cents totaL
2.277 cents for fuel oiL
0.493 cents for lub. OiL
2.
770 cents total.
52.2 cents for fuel oil.
9.3 cents for tub. Oil.
61.5 cents totaL
Cost
of the trip from Montreal to Vancouver:
Fuel oil:
Lub. Oil:
Total:
$66.44
$14.40
$80.84
NOTE: Lubricating oil costs cover depreciation of
the original 40 gallons of oil in addition to costs of 10 gallons
of fresh oil added during the trip.
(signed) F.E. Collinson
M
echanical Engineer.
What Happened to 15820?
After its memorable trip, car 15820 returned to Edmonton, with some of the officials riding as far as Kamloops Junction.
It
was then assigned to the passenger trains 77 and 78 between Edmonton and Vermilion, Alberta, on the Vegreville and
Edmonton Terminals subdivisions, 129.8 miles, daily except Sunday. For many years it operated on various branch lines, and
in 1943 it was rebuilt, at which time its original Beardmore engine was replaced by a Cummins Diesel. It continued in service
until the late 1950s, and was finally written of, and presumably scrapped, at the end
of 1959.
While it
is unfortunate:· that this historic car was not preserved, a very similar car is still operable. Car 15824 went into
service
in February 1926, only three months after 15820, was also rebuilt in 1943, and after being retired from work service in
1964, came to the Canadian Railway Museum where it is preserved, an important relic of the early diesel era.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000 151 CANADIAN RAIL -478
THE LOG OF C.N.R. DIESEL-ELECTRIC CAR 15820
MONTREAL TO VANCOUVER, NOVEl,tfBER 1 TO 4,1925
STOPS MILES
Montreal 0.0
Polycarpe
Alexandria
Ottawa 116.2
Brent 165.3
Capreol 144.8
Foly
et 148.3
Hornepayne 147.8
Nakina 13l.6
Armstrong 112.2
S.
Lookout 139.1
Redditt 123.2
Winnipeg 129.3
Rivers 143.1
Melville 137.1
Lestock
·
··Touchwood
Watrous. 129.0
Biggar 118.4
Cavell
Tako
Wainwright 140.1
Edmonton 126.8
Stony Plains
Leaman
Edson 129.5
Dalehurst
Brule
Jasper 106.4
Blue River 132.5
Avola
Kaml ps Jet. 139.4
Boston Bar 125.6
Port Mann 114.9
N. Wminster
Vancouver 16.9
TOTAL 2917.5
TIMES
ARR. DEP.
14:30
15:35 15:42
16:06 16:19
17:33 l7:36
21:10 21:15
24:
24 24:30
03:54 04:02
07:25 07:34
10:40 10:
51
13:15 12:21*
15:33 15:38
18:25 18:30
21:25 21:55
01:10 01:16
04:10 04:14
05:38 05:43
_05:53 06:53
08:23 07:27*
10:38
11 :20
12:08 12:14
12:43 12:48
14:40 14:45
l7.16 17.22
17:53 17:55
19:39 19:43
20:45 20:47
21:45
21:50
22:20 22:26
23:16 22:19*
01:27 01:30
02:07 02:11
04:41 04:45
07:52 07:54
10:50 10:52
11:00 11:03
11:28 DET-RUN
SPEED
ENT TIME
MIN
LATE
7
13
3
5
6
8
9
1 1
6
5
5
30
6
4
5
60
4
42
6
5
5
6
2
4
2
5
6
3
3
4
4
2
2
3
291
163
214
189
204
203
186
144
192
167
175
195
174
184
191
189
151
197
138
188
187
188
175
33
4027 42.7
46.3
45.9
43.5
43.6
42.4
46.7
43.5
44.2
44.3
44.0
47.2
42.0
37.2
44.5
50.3
39.4
46.2
42.3
Time
31
15
Time
2
4
11
1
3
Time
Time in
25 out
36
29
73
180
195
182
152
139
90
44.7
50
40.1 5
39.4 4
30.7 plus 2
43.47
TOTAL HOURS 4 hr. 51m. 67 hr. 07m.
TOTAL ELAPSED TIME 71hr. 58m.
* Denotes time
zone change. OPERATOR
Boyd
Boyd
Boyd
Boyd
Boyd
Collinson
Collinson
Boyd
Boyd
Sylvester
Coleman
Sylvester
Collinson
Collinson
Sylvester
Sylvester
Sylvester
Collinson
ColJinson
Boyd
Boyd
Sylvester
Collinson
Collinson
Boyd
Boyd
Boyd
Sylvester
Sylvester
Sylvester
Collinson
Collinson
Collinson
Sylvester
Boyd
Boyd PILOT
Barden
Barden
Barden
Mason
Thomas
Murray
Morrison
McCarthy
Lister
Kendal
Campbell
Miller
Warner
Hill
Cardwell
Cardwell
Cardwell
Robinson
Reynolds
Reynolds
Reynolds
Ayre
Ca
meron
Cameron
Harrison
Harrison
Harrison
Coulsam
Coulsam
Graham
Jack
Jack
Jack
Gallagher
Gallagher
Gallagher
CONDUC­
TOR
Carpenter
Carpenter
Carpenter
Cook
Perrie
Shannon
Law
Downard
Smith
Nixon
Nixon
Cameron
Tofting
Marberry
Soba
Soba
Soba
Munechell
McKay
McKay
McKay
Mckee
Emerson
Emerson
Flaherty
Flaherty
Flaherty
Mainprize
Mainprize
Field
Field
Field
Field
Nolan
Nolan
Nolan
RAIL CANADIEN -478 152 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
Canadian Railways in the Great Storm of 1900
by Fred Angus
This September marks the 100th
anniversary of the most disastrous
hurricane, in terms of loss of life, ever to
hit North
America. The Great Storm of
1900 swept out of the Gulf of Mexico
and came ashore on the coast of Texas
on September 8, 1900,
just 100 years ago.
By far the most damage, and loss
of life,
occurred
in the city of Galveston which
came close to being wiped off the map,
and in which about nooo people were
killed. The entire island on which
Galveston is situated, was covered by
water, and
almost every structure along
the gulf coast was destroyed. Those
buildings that survived were protected
by the wall of debris pushed inland from
the area in which the destruction was
complete.
This storm is usually known as
the great Galveston storm
of 1900 (this
was
long before hurricanes were named),
but the extent
of this storm extended far
beyond Texas, and far beyond the United
States. The effects
of the 1900 storm were
plainly felt in Canada, and the
disruptions to all means of transportation,
including railways, was considerable.
l)
The storm reached hurricane force in the
gulf during the days immediately before
From gulf to gulf. A map of the.path of the 1900 storm from the Gulf of Mexico to
the
Gulf of St. Lawrence, from Saturday, September 8 to Wednesday, September 12.
Note that more than 40% of the storm track is in Can~lda.
La Presse, Montreal, Ie 14 Septembre, 1900, page 1
September 8, and was observed by ships at sea. However
there was not an efficient means of communication, so many
people were caught unawares when it struck the land,
just to
the sou thwes t of Gal ves ton that Saturday eveni ng,
September 8. After devastating the Texas coast it turned
north, where it gradually weakened passing over land
through Oklahoma and Kansas during Sunday the 9th and
early Monday the 10th. By Monday evening it was over
Wisconsin, traveling east again, and, as it passed over the
Great Lakes, it picked up more water and increased in
intensity once again. After passing
over Michigan Tuesday
night, it crossed part of Lake Huron and swept through
Ontario on Wednesday September 12. It then continued on
east, passing just south of Montreal later that same day,
reaching Gaspe by that night. After deluging northern New
Brunswick and Prince Edward Island, the 1900 storm crossed
Newfoundland, then over the Atlantic Ocean to northern
Europe, and is supposed to have died out somewhere in
Siberia more than two weeks after devastating Galveston.
During its passage
over Canada, the storm caused a
great deal
of damage. Although no longer of hurricane force,
the winds, and the rainfall, were heavy. Much
of the damage
was caused to shipping, but on land trees and telegraph wires
were down, tracks were blocked and trains were running
hours late, or were cancelled altogether. Fortunately there
were
few lives lost in Canada, but material damage was
substantial. The worst damage occurred at Paris, Ontario,
where a fire was started, perhaps by lightning, and was fanned
by the high wind. Unfortunately the rain had let up, so was
not much
help in extinguishing the flames, so a large part of
the town was in ruins by Thursday morning.
After the storm had passed it was several days before
trains got back to their regular schedules, and lines of
communication were restored. Shipping took longer to
restore as some vessels had been sunk
in the storm. In many
cases it was days before full reports were received
of storm
damage in outlying areas. However things did get restored,
and the damage caused
in Capada was overshadowed by the
horrible news bulletins from Galveston describing the effects
of the same storm in Texas.
This year the city of Galveston is commemorating
the centennial of the great storm of 1900 and, among other
things,
is affixing a special bronze plaque to each building,
still standing, that withstood the storm a century ago.
At this
time it
is fitting to observe that Canada, and its railways,
also suffered during that tragic time, and
we hope that never
again will a storm cause as much damage to the North
American continent as the Great Storm of 1900.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000 153 CANADIAN RAIL -478
The Windsor and Hantsport Railway, A Flying Visit
by Roger G. Steed
RS-23 No. 8046, lying adjacent to the Windsor shops. She is the only locomotive completely repainted from the original CP rail
red, and lettered with The Windsor & Hantsport Railway Company Limited.
Hugues Bonin very kindly suggested that I might
like to report on the state of some of the short lines in Eastern
Canada, and so while on holiday at our cottage near
Lunenburg my wife and I drove across to Windsor on
Tuesday, July
II to see what we could see in
just one afternoon. We didnt do too badly!
Without any map
of Windsor, our car
unerringly found its way to the Windsor
station, which is also the Railways head
office. Whats more, Jim Taylor, the general
manager, was
in and was able to spare a few
minutes to answer a few questions. Jim had
been with CP Rail for many years before CP
Rail left the Maritimes. Jim Taylor told me that the railways main line runs
from
Windsor Junction to New Minas, a distance of 54.8
miles.
He went on to tell me that the railway has nine
operating RS-23s, and runs 4 to 5 trains a day for a total of
An eastbound train of some 22 empty
hopper cars with three MLW RS-23s, Nos.
8036, 8042, and 8037, at its head was waiting
beside the station, and a few minutes later
two more RS-23s appeared. 8038 and 8019.
This train would shortly leave for the gypsum
mines only 2 and 4 miles up the Truro spur.
Several,
if not all, of these RS-23 locomotives
had operated with CP Rail out of Saint John
until
1994.
RS-23 s Nos. 8037, 8042, and 8036, viewed from behind, idle at the head of
a train of empty gypsum cars, waiting beside the (he Windsor station before
pulling out to the gypsum mines on the Truro
spur.
RAIL CANADIEN -478 154 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
RS-23 S Nos. 8037, 8042, and 8036, viewed from ahead, idle at the head of a train of
empty gypsum cars, waiting beside the the Windsor station before pulling out to the
gypsum mines on the Truro
SpUl:
no one ab,out from whom to ask
permis.sionto enter the property, we
thought better of trespassing, and
contented ourselves going down onto
a neighbouring dock from where we
had a marvellous view of the Avon
River at low tide. The range of tide here
is at least 50
to 60 feet, and a modern
tugboat was secured alongside the
dock we were on, completely out of
the water. We could easily see the Kort
nozzle under its stern. Jim Taylor had
told me that the Fundy
Gypsum ships
only have some three hours around
high water in which to be loaded with
typically
24,000 tons of gypsum, and
so must be very conscious
of the state
of the tide to avoid grounding. A lovely
little municipal park
just west of the
Fundy Gypsum dock gave
us another
excellent view of the Avon River.
about 20 trains per week. It carries
gypsum from the nearby mines to
Hantsport where it is loaded onto Fundy
Gypsums
ships for the Eastern Seaboard
of the United States, and also carries feed
grains to the Annapolis Valley, as well
as logs and mixed freight.
The railway
also operates a passenger excursion trip
during the summer to Grand Pre and back
from,
Windsor on Sundays for $18.50
for adults. Too bad we
werent there on
the right day!
After taking a few photos we
drove westwards a very few miles to
Hantsport to see what we could see
there. We quickly found Fundy
Gypsums dock, and another RS-23,
8041, was backing a full gypsum train
through the unloading house.
Finding
RS-23s Nos. 8038 and 8019, just arriving in Windsor at the end of the working
day.
Empty gypsum hopper cars roll past the allthor at
WindsOl; on their way
to a gypsum mille on the Truro
SpIll:
After a quick stop beside the Hantsport station,
which was still in use, we drove back
to Windsor
for a snack at a strategically situated Tim Hortons.
I was very curious to see what was beyond the road
bridge
just beyond the Windsor station, so we drove
up to Fort Edward park, from the top
of which we
could look over the railway shops and wye.
There
were some passenger excursion cars down there as
well as several more RS-23s which needed a closer
look. Just about then the gypsum train
wed seen
earlier was passing the shops, now westbound.
So a
brisk five minute walk along one
of the parks paths,
followed by a short scramble through some
undergrowth got me up onto a leg of the wye, from
where it was
just a short stroll to the shop tracks.
Some seven RS-23s were present, 8046 in new
brown W &HR livery, 8021, 8023, 8026, 8034, and
8045 lying in various conditions, and 8040 j
acked
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000
up on top of freight car trucks in a very
unhappy state.
There wasnt a soul about,
and so after taking a few photos I retraced
my steps to rejoin my wife in the
parks
parki ng
lot jus t as the flag was bei ng
hauled
down beside the blockhouse.
This certainly hadnt been an
exhaustive, in-depth survey of the
railway, but it sure demonstrated that this
ex-CP Rail shortline was very much alive
and well.
RIGHT: Low tide al Han.tsport, on the
south side of the Avon River, showing
Fundy Gypsums storage shed and
loading pier Ocean-going ships will not
be able to approach the
pier to load until
3 hours before high tide.
RIGHT: Anothel; more coLoU/ful
view
of Fundy Gypsums Hanlsport
piel; this one from the west at the
foot of a loveLy municipaL park.
155 CANADIAN RAIL -478
LEFT: RS-23 No. 8041
smokes up as she starts 10
push a string of full gypsum
cars through the unloading
sh
ed at Fundy Gypsums
Hantsport facililY.
RAIL CANADIEN – 478 156 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
In Memoriam, Walter J. Bedbrook
April 2, 1919 -August 31,2000
by William J. Radford
On Thursday, August
31, 2000 a longtime friend,
member and director of our
Canadian Railroad Historical
Association, Walter John
Beclbrook died at the Prince
Edward Memorial Hospital in
Picton, Ontario. His Wife of
53 years, Rita Rachel (nee
Goodwill) was at his side.
Walter Bedbrook was
born in Montreal West, Quebec
on April 2, 1919. He was
one
of three sons of Inez Hazel (ne
Watson) and Edward Arthur
Bedbrook. Bedbrook Ave. in
Montreal West is named for his
family.
Walters two brothers
are Perry and Robert Bob
Bedbrook. Bob was an
employee of Canadian
National Railways. At the age
of 7, Walter, along with his
parents and brothers moved to
the Beaurepaire area of
Jacques-Cartier Parish, now
Beaconsfield, in 1926.
At the young age
of 4, Walters interest in trains and
railways began. In 1925, he got a Lionel train set.
Throughout the years, Walters interest in railways increased
to a point where he joined the CRHA years later.
Wal ter
served in the Canadian A rmy between 1941
and 1946 and was stationed in York, England dUling World
War
II where he met Rita Goodwill and they were married in
1947. Walter and Rita moved to Beaurepaire a
nd built their
first home located at 84 Woodland Ave., and lived there
until 1970 when his company, Bell Canada, transferred him
to
Toronto, Ontario. During that era, Walter and Rita had
four children, Ross, Gary, Victoria and Glenn.
On November
15, 1960 Walter Joined the CRHA and was assigned
membership number 256.
At the
CRHA, Walter was much involved with various
projects including the establishment of the Canadian
Railway Museum. The museum, located in Delson -St.
Constant, Quebec was built between 1962 and 1965 when it
opened. Walter was a director
of the association for many
years and at times was charged with more than one
responsibility.
While in Toronto between 1970 and 1982, Walter
was one of fifteen founding members of the Toronto & York
Division on March 23, 1972 and was its first Division
President in which position he
served into 1981. Walter also
helped to form the Windsor­
Essex Division in 1976.
Unfortunately it folded in
1991 due to executive and
financial difficulties. He also
helped to form the Niagara
Division in 1979 which still is
in place in St. Catharines,
Ontario.
Association News was
formed
in 1971, and it became
CRHA Communications in
1974. It was h
eadquartered in
various locations and had
several editors. This bulletin
was to inform members
of news
and events within the
association. Walter served
three terms as its editor
including one while President
of the Toronto & York
Division.
In 1982, Walter was
posted in Saudi Arabia where
he came up with a short term
newsletter entitled The Sandpaper which featured some
of his railway reports up to when he retired from Bell Canada
in 1984 and returned
back home to Canada. Both Walter
and
Rita purchased property in the North Port area of
Sophiasburgh Township, Ontario located in the northeast
corner of Prince Edward County which, along with eight
other municipalities in that county, merged to form the new
Municip
ality of Prince Edward County on January I, 1998.
They built a new house and carport garage there for which
their mailing address
Compartment 132, RR2; Picton ON;
KOK 2TO became familiar to CRHA con-espondents in the
last
15 years. This address also served as a headquarters for
the
CRHA Annual Awards nominations as Walter was
responsible for these between 1985 and 1995.
While living
in North Port, 15 miles north of the then
Town of Picton, Walter also became involved with the
formation of the Kingston Division. The division was
founded on March 31, 1986 from the Ki ngston Railfan
Society that Hugues Bonin had formed in 1984 along with
some ten members. Walter was a director and in 1990 became
the third editor of Kingston Rail, succeeding Sparky
Sparks. Hugues was the first editor. While editor, Walter
also served his
second and third terms as editor of CRHA
Communications between 1994-1995 and 1997-1999. Also,
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000
Walter served as the Associations.
president between 1992 and 1996,
succeeding David
W. Johnson who
served since 1982.
Walter was very much
involved in the association along
with its
entities for much of the
second half of the 20th Century
and had devoted much of his time
and energy, and contributed so
much to the association. For
Walters role, he earned and was
awarded the associations Lifetime
Achi
evement Award in 1994. He
was special and always had a
personal touch
for other people in
general and was highly public
relations minded, was well liked
and admired by many people.
Besides Walters admir­
ations for railways, he was a
builder, educator. agronomist,
musician and a stone mason.
Walter was also an automobile and
airplene enthusiast.
Before joining Bell
Canada, Walter was a contractor
157 CANADIAN RAIL -478
which involved working with the
Montreal based architectural firm
Ross &
McDonald with the west
One of Walters many activities in the CRHA was serving as President. This picture shows
him (standing at left) at Delson at the ceremony when the CNR commuter equipment was
presented by CN to the CRHA
in 1995.
side extension of Canadian
Pacifies Royal York hotel in
Toronto. This was the firm which
designed the hotel along with four other
Toronto landmarks, Toronto Terminals
Railways Union Station, Postal Station
A which is now the Dominion
Government Building; the, Eatons
building which is now College Park; and
Maple Leaf Gardens where the NHL
Toronto
Maple Leafs played between
1931 and 1999.
My personal views of Walter are
the
same as everyone elses; that he was
an exceptional person with a unique
personally, always open to members of
the association as well as others. He was
well liked, respected and a special person
to
our association for almost forty years.
He volunteered to do things he did not
have to do, and was highly committed
to
almost everything.
With Walters passing, another
link with the
old days of the CRHA is
gone. Our condolences to his wife Rita,
four children, twelve grandchildren, and
his
two brothers. Walter has done the
CRHA proud, he will be dearly missed,
but will never be forgotten.
___ -. .:-=.=-:-._.–T—–
… -.–.
.~ -=—..
—-.-
-~
-==::-:–:::::::=–: .. -;6
.!.~.-:
The preservation of Barrington station was one of Walter s first major projects
in the CRHA. It is safe to say that this structure never would have been preserved
without Walters expertise
and determination to see the project through to
completion. The two-day job, during January
J 965, to move the station 35
miles was
filled with many problems, and few CRHA members, then or now,
would have been able
to accomplish it.
RAIL CANADIEN -478 158 SEPTEMBRE-OCTOBRE 2000
Exporail Project Up and Running
I
I_I ~
m ~
. 1I
EXPORAll
An artists conception of what the Canadian Railway Museum will look like if the present plans come to fruition. The drawings
of the new structures are superimposed on an aerial photograph of the present museum site.
The realization of the long-held dream of the CRHA
has come a giant step closer with the announcement that the
both the Federal and Provincial govelllments would greatly
increase their
support of the Canadian Railway Museum at
Delson / St. Constant enabling it
to move ahead after many
years
of planning. The good news was communicated to the
CRHA directors late in July, and it was officially announced
to the members, and the world at large,
at a special press
conference held
at the Museum on October 6, 2000.
As most members know, efforts for the expansion of
the Museum go back to the late 1960s, not long after it fiIst
opened.
Over the years land has been acquired and various
plans drawn up. At one time relocation
of the Museum was
considered, and after this was rejected
an ambitious plan for
the present site was drawn up. This was called Exporail,
the name
having been suggested by our member Howard
Shepherd, now of South Carolina. Lack of funding has held
back the project until now, but the support
of two levels of
govemment, together with very necessary contributions from
industry and individuals, including members, mean that work
can begin, for the contracts must be let and the work must be
well in hand by March 31, 200
I.
The following is taken from the official press release
given out on October
6:
A major investment of $10.4 million was officially
announced on October
6, 2000 at a special news conference
and reception at the Canadian Railway Museum. Present
at the ceremony were the Honourable Martin Cauchon,
Minister of National Revenue and authority responsible
for Canada Economic Development, and the MNA for
LaPrairie, MI: Serge Geoffrion, representing Ms. Agnes
Maitais, Minister of Ministere de la Culture et des
Communications du Quebec.
After many years of efforts -including eight years
most recently spent on raising awareness among
policymakers -the Exporail project will enable the Museum
to
enter a new stage of development. The creation of a
major museum complex dedicated to railway transportation
will ensure the preservation of a fabulous collection,
internationally known and recognised as being
of national
interest. The collection will be
housed in an environment
that
fully complies with museum standards and pr9vides
enhanced ways of viewing exhibits.
Opening in May 2002, Exporails new pavilion and
attractions will provide the Canadian Railway Museum
of
Delson / St. Constant with the opportunity to become a major
tourist attraction focusing on railway history and
technology. Visitors -whether adults or children -will first
visit the main pavilion, whose
main gallery will house the
permanent exhibition. The twelve
new tracks laid in this
building, which will be equipped with a mezzanine,
will be
used
to display close to fifty railway vehicles. The pavilion
will also include an observation pit enabling visitors
to see
the
underside of a locomotive, a number of exhibition
galleries (inc/uding one dedicated to model trains), an
archival centre, and a specialised library open
to the public.
The
Museums outdoor site, which recreates a
switching yard, will be enlivened by demonstrations of
significant pieces of railway equipment and the turntable.
The Museums
many dedicated volunteers, and its
regional
and municipal partners, have played, and are
playing, a key part
in making Expondl possible. The project,
which was given priority during the strategic planning
of
development projects for the area, will undoubtedly satisfy
visitors expectations as
it offers new ways of thinking about
the evolution
of railways and their effect on society.
SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER 2000 159 CANADIAN RAIL -478
Book Reviews
CANADIAN RAIL PASSENGER REVIEW, NUMBER 3
Edited by Douglas N.W. Smith
Published by: Trackside Canada
P.O. Box 1369, Station B
Ottawa, Ontario KIP 5R4
Once again we are pleased to receive what
is becoming
an annual treat, the
Canadian Rail Passenger Review. This
year there are I I
major articles, and some smaller features.
The publication starts with a brief account of the
epoch-making run of CNR diesel-electric car 15820 from
Montreal to Vancouver
75 years ago. Then comes a lengthy
account
of CPRs forgotten Limited, the Imperial Limited,
which went into service in 1899, and whose direct
descendent is still running (to find out what it is you will
have to read the book).
There follows a ride on the parlour observation car of
the Dominion Atlantic, then comes the story of CNRs famous
5700-class Hudson locomotives. After this is the annual
review of passenger train developments in Canada in 1999.
An account of an interurban car that returned to
Canada for preservation, the story of the CNRs dome cars
and the
CPRs Mount cars, and .the stations and railways
of Brantford make very interesting reading.
Finally an account about the Toronto subway, a
wartime trip on the Dominion in 1943, and the Departing
Image conclude the volume.
Both covers have illustrations in full colour
(including a night photo of the Imperial Limited about 1907),
and there are several colour
pages inside. In all there are 100
pages (including covers) of 8 112 by 11 inch size. Those
who like Canadian passenger trains, as well as the history of
Canadian railways, should have this book.
Reviewed by Fred Angus.
A PHOTO HISTORY OF THE PRINCE EDWARD
ISLAND RAILWAY
By Allan Graham
ISB N 0-9687204-0-4
Printed by William & Crue (1982) Ltd.
This book focuses on the railway lines that existed in
the Province of Prince Edward Island. It was written by Allan
Graham of Alberton P.E.1. who is the foremost authority on
the
subject of the railways, station buildings and railway
llistory of that province. The book was written after some
thirty years of collection and research by Mr. Graham.
The author maintains that the book is not a definitive
history, rather an introduction to P.E.I. railways that operated
from their beginning in 1875 to their
closing in 1989. For
railway historians, there is an excellent Table of Contents
enlisting sub-titles. Abollt 1/3 of the book is written text of
how the railway lines were surveyed and developed and
their reasons. This includes many quotes from local
newspaper articles. They include the awarded contractors
who built the railway lines along with station buildings and
other
important railway facilities. In the years following the
opening
of the main line, additional branch lines were built,
along with
new station buildings; these are also covered.
There is much coverage of the stations. There are
reports of the Terminal, Way or Crossing, Flag and

Keeper station buildings. A number of the stations were
renewed, re-Iocated and in some cases sold or demolished.
A few stations were also modified, with additions to the
original portion of the building. There is also a list of some
stations that were renamed.
The book also focuses on train operations. Some
snow and special trains are mentioned. Some passenger
timetables are printed along with advertising. The first steam
locomotives were built in England and the vast majority of
the early cars were built at the shops in Charlottetown.
The railway lines and train equipment was originally
narrow gauge of 42 inches. At the time of World War I,
standard
gauge of 56.5 inches was introduced to P.E.I., and
the
main line trackage between Charlottetown -Emerald
Jet. -Borden and Summerside had dual gauge trackage until
all Jines
were converted to standard gauge within the next
twenty years. Some photographs have interesting views of
such dual trackage.
The remaining 2/3 of the book is mainly interesting
photographs of station buildings, other structures and train
operations, the latter mostly during the CNR era. During
this era, many photos are divided into decades from the 1940s
to the 1980s.
The 1950s include many photos of CNR trains
hauled by the GE 70-Ton locomotives that were built in
1950.
The last three of these eighteen locomotives were
retired in 1983 at the age of 33. There are also other diesel
locomotives featured in the photos along with the last
passenger train operations as ·w,~ll as the last train operation
in the province on
Decembel~ 28; 1989.
For anyone who is interested in the history and
photographs of the railway lines in the Province of Prince
Edward Island A Photo History of the Prince Edward Island
Railway is recommended.
It is a 260 page soft cover book
with glossy paper pages which includes black and white
photos. The book measures 280 mm. by 215 mm. (II X
8.5) and is available in good book stores
or direct from the
author.
If YOll choose to buy from the author, Allan Graham,
please call him at (902) 853-3211 to order a copy. Mr.
Grahams mailing address is: P.O. Box 335; Alberton, PE,
COB IBO.
Reviewed by William
J. (Willie) Radford
BA CK COVER: The newly-revived Quebec Central Railway is the subject of this photo, taken at Vallee Jonction on July 2,
2000. Locomotive JMG-J, naned J.M. Giguere for the owner of the company, hauls a train of ex-Long Island R.R. commuter cars
in excursion service to Tring Jct., ten miles away. Photo by Fred Angus
This issue of Canadian Rail delivered 10 pril1ler OClober 26, 2000.

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