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Canadian Rail 451 1996

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Canadian Rail 451 1996

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I
1
No. 451
Canadian Rail
THE MAGAZINE OF CANADAS RAILWAY HISTORY
MARCH -APRIL 1996
1909 -Montreal and Southern Counties Railway -1956
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
PUBLIE TOUS LES DEUX MOIS PAR LASSOCIATION CANADIENNE DHISTOIRE FERROVIAIRE
CANADIAN RAIL
ISSN 0008-4875
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE MONTREAL AND SOUTHERN COUNTIES RAILWAY (1937) ……… T.C.H. SMITH ……………………… 31
LOCOMOTIVES OF THE GRAND TRUNK 100 YEARS AGO ……………… AMERICAN ENGINEER, 1896. 47
THE RESTORATION
OF TSR 24/ CNR 15702 …………………………………. D. SCAFE & T. KERNAHAN …. 54
THE CHURCH THAT BEGAN
IN A BOX CAR……………………………………………………………
…………………. 58
THE BUSINESS
CAR ………………………………………………………………
………………………………………………….. 59
FRONT COVER: Leaving Montreals McGill Street terminal, a convoy of five, all different,
M
&SC cars heads for the South Shore on Sunday, February 15, 1948. Visible here arei 04, a
320-class car, an i1-class car,
621 and frailer 220. When they reach St. Lambert they will each
headfor their respective destinations. Car 104, the first in the procession is now preserved
at the Canadian Railway Museum, while
621 is at the Seashore Trolley Museum in Maine.
CRHA Archives, Toohey Collectioll, photo No.
48-4i.
For your membership in the CRHA, which
includes a subscription
to Canadian Rail,
write to:
CRHA, 120 Rue St-Pierre,
St. Constant, Que.
J5A 2G9
Membership Dues for 1996:
In Canada: $35.00 (including GST).
United States: $30.00
in U.S. funds.
Other Countries: $35.00
in U.S. funds.
Canadian Rail
is continually in need of news,
stories, historical data, photos, maps and
other material. Please send all contributions
to the editor: Fred F. Angus, 3021 Trafalgar
Ave. Montreal, P.Q. H3Y 1 H3. No payment
can be made for contributions, but the con­
tributer will
be given credit for material sub­
mitted. Material will
be returned to the con­
tributor if requested. Remember Knowl­
edge
is of little value unless it is shared with
others .
As part of its
activities, the CRHA operates
the Canadian Railway Museum at Delson /
St. Constant, Que. which is about 14 miles
(23 Km.) from downtown Montreal.
It is open
from late May
to early October (daily until
Labour Day). Members,
and their immediate
families, are admitted free of charge.
THE
GOALOFTHEASSOCIATION ISTHE
COLLECTION, PRESERVATION
AND DIS­
SEMINATION OF ITEMS RELATING TO
THE HISTORY OF CANADIAN RAILWAYS
The CRHA has a number of local divisions across
the country. Many hold regular meetings and issue
newsletters. Further information may be obtained
by writing to the division.
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O. Box t 162
Saint John N.B. E2L 4G7
DIVISION VALLEE·JONCTION BEAUCE
397 Blvd. Rousseau
Vallee-Jonetion Que
GOS 3JO
ST LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box
22. Sialion B
Monlreal P.O. H3B 3J5
RIDEAU VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 962
Smilhs Falls. Onl. K7A 5A5
KINGSTON DIVISION
P.O. Box 1714
Kingslon, Onl. K7L 5V6
TORONTO
& YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, TerminalA
Toronto,Onl. M5W
lP3
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.
O. Box 20311 Granlham PostalOuliel
St. Calharines, Onl.
L2M 7W7
CALGARY
& SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
c/o Rick Connery, Secrelary
95 Bennett Crescenl
NW.
Calgary, Alberta T2L 1 R2
SELKIRK DIVISION
P.O. Box
2561
Revelsloke, B.C. VOE 2S0
CROWSNEST
& KETTLE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 400
Cranbrook, B.
C. VI C 4H9
NELSON ELECTRIC TRAMWAY SOCIETY
123 View Sireel
Nelson, B.C.
VI L 2V8
PRINCE GEORGE-NECHAKO-FRASER DIVISION
P.O. Box 2408
Prince George, B.C. V2N 2S6
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Sialion
A
Vancouver, B.
C. V6C 2P 1
ESQUIMAL T AND NANAIMO DIVISION
1148 Balmoral Road
Victoria, B.C. V8T 1 B 1
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: Douglas
NW. Smith
ASSOCIATE EDITOR (Motive Power):
Hugues
W. Bonin
DISTRIBUTION: Gerard Frechette
LAYOUT: Fred
F. Angus
Printing: Procel Printing
DIRECTORS OF THE C.R.H.A.
PRESIDENT: Walter J. Bedbrook
VICE PRES.: David
W. Johnson
TREASURER:
A. Stephen Walbridge
SECRETARY: Bernard Martin
Frederick
F. Angus
Doug Battrum
Barry Biglow
James Bouchard
Gerard Frechette
Frangois Gaudette
Dean Handley
J. Christopher Kyle
Robert V.V. Nicholls
Andrew
W. Panko
M. Robertson
Len Thibeault
William Thomson
Michael Westren
LlASON REPRESENTATIVES
WESTERN
D. Walter Edgar
4515 Dalhart Road
NW.
Calgary, AB T3A 1 B9
Phone: (403) 286-2189
CENTRAL
Christopher Kyle
49 -77 Wellesley St. East
Toronto, ON M4Y 1
H7
Phone: (416) 962-1880
MARITIME
Richard E. Viberg
172 Main St.
Hillsborough, NB
EOA 1XO
Phone. (506) 734 3467
MARCH -APRIL 1996 31 CANADIAN RAIL -451
The Montreal and Southern Counties Railway
By T.e.H. Smith
Editors note: Recently there has been much interest in the conversion of Montreals electric commuter line from the old 3000 volt
D.C. equipment to the new 25,000 A.C. cars. This
is a fitting time to remember that Montreal once had another electric commuter line. This
was,
as any traction enthusiast knows, the Montreal and Southern Counties Railway; a true interurban railway that also operated extensive
suburban commuter service. Its been gone for almost forty years now, but will always be fondly remembered
by those who had the privilege
of seeing and riding on these distinctive green cars.
It
is still possible to ride a regular passenger train over a small part of the M&SC. Amtraks Adirondack, running between Montreal
and Washington, D.C., runs over part
of the M&SC from near Cannon Junction (named for the M&SCs last manager) to Castle Gardens.
The following article by T.C.H. Smith
is a reprint of a lecture presented at a meeting of the CRHA at the Chateau de Ramezay in
Montreal on October 13, 1937, only five years after the year in which the Association was founded.
It was first published in the Bulletin
of the CRHA, issue No.9, in May 1939. It should be noted that some of the comments, especially those at the beginning of the first paragraph,
do not hold true todayl
Electric railways have not the same popular appeal
as
steam railways. They lack the glamour of the steam locomotive.
Small boys do not gaze with awe as the electric car hums past; nor
do grown men run about with cameras
to get a shot at the
interurban as it quietly comes to a stop at the telwinal station.
However, electric railways have done as much for the development
and progress
of the territory, through which they pass, as have the
steam railroads.
The Canadian Railroad Historical Association is
a society interested in railroad history, so some patt of am interest
should be given to the study and recording the development
of
electric railways.
Electric railways are especially suited for fast and frequent
service. They can be operated economically
by small trains of one
or two cars, and so have a great advantage in this respect over steam
trains. Single cars can be run at frequent intervals, instead
of trains
of several cars pulled by a steam locomotive, and manned by a
crew
of five or more, running several hours apart.
An electric railway was first operated
in Canada in 1885
[the date
is now known to be 1884. Ed.], when this novelty was
shown at the Toronto Exhibition grounds. This was only
of an
experimental nature and operated for only two weeks
in the year.
In 1886 the City
of Windsor had an electric street railway one and
a quarter miles long.
The City of SI. Catharines, this past September
[1937] celebrated the 50th anniversary
of what they claim to be the
first thoroughly practical electrified all-year transportation system
in Canada. This commemorated the replacing of horse cars on the
railway between St. Catharines and Thorold by electrically powered
cars. This was on the Niagara, St. Catharines and Toronto Railway,
now a part
of the Canadian National Electric Railways.
The Oua
wa Electric dates from 1891, and in 1892 the street
railways
of Montreal and Toronto were electrified. There was a
great boom
of electric railway building in southwestern Ontario
from this time up to about 1914. Lines were built connecting the
various towns and cities, but many
of these are now abandoned, as
the automobile has encroached on their field
of service. The
Province
of Quebec has only a small number of electric railways
in its territory, none
of which has been abandoned. The largest of
these I am to speak about to-night is the Montreal and Southern
Counties Railway. This electric road
is closely related to the steam
railroads,
as it belongs to the Canadian National and operates in
part over right-of-way that was once steam railroad.
The Montreal and Southern Counties Railway Company
was chartered on June 29, 1897 under chapter 56
of the statutes of
Canada, amended in 1892, 1902, 1905 and 1910. However,
nothing was done with this charter for some time after it was first
granted.
In March, 1904 the first transportation system
to the South
Shore opposite the Island
of Montreal, apart from the steam trains
and boats, was inaugurated by the Montreal and South Shore Auto
Car Co. This was the first [motor] bus line
in Canada, and was
started when the automobile was in its infancy [by the end
of 1904
there had been a total
of only 48 automobiles registered in
Montreal; provincial registration began only
in 1906 with 167
cars]. The company operated three open and two closed buses.
They were made in Harvey, Illinois and were 25 h.p.
The bus route started at the west side
of Victoria Square,
ran along SI. James St., down Inspector, across Chaboillez Square,
along Notre Dame, down Murray, across the Wellington St.
bridge, and out
SI. Etienne St., now Bridge St., to the Victoria
Bridge. The line terminated at Aberdeen Ave., St. Lambert.
The
purpose was to give a passenger service between St. Lambert and
Montreal, but the company was financed mostly
by Montreal
citizens. The bus line did not last long as the streets
in Montreal and
St. Lambert were
in such poor condition that operation became
impractical.
RAIL CANADIEN -451
32 MARS-AVRIL 1996
AUTOCARS WILL JOIN MONTREAL TO THE SOUTHERN SHORE OF THE RIVER
The Distance Has Never Been Great But to Solve the Difficulty of Crossing is What the New Company Has Set Itself to Do.
The vital question of where shall we live?
is one to
which Montrealers are no more strangers than the dwellers
in
other great and growing cities, and many a place is
mentioned
in the family circle as being so nice and healthy for
Jimmie or Maudie, only to be abandoned in deference to
Daddys unanswerable question How on earth am I to get
backward and forward?
The South Shore of the
St. Lawrence offers a
numberof charming and ideaf spots for residences, and rents
are comparatively low, but the difficulty of how to get there
has for years stood in the way of the suburbanite. But SI.
Lambert, Montreal South, Longueuil and the rest of the south
shore villages and towns have a new era in store for them

The wizard who is going to work these changes in the near
future
is the Montreal and South Shore Auto Car Company
which has for its object the opening up, by means of a regular
frequent and convenient service of motor busses, the towns
and villages lying on the opposite side of the river

The intention of the company is to inaugurate, within
a very few weeks, a regular service of commodious motor
vehicles which will leave Victoria Square
en route for the
South Shore and travel by way of the Victoria Jubilee Bridge,
the passage over which has been granted them by the terms
of a special agreement made with the Grand Trunk Railway A PUBLIC AUTOCAR TO CARRY TWENTY PEOPLE
System

The construction of the cars has been carefully thought out with every
regard forthe conditions under which they will have to operate; they are of 20 horse
power each, with seating accommodation for 22 passengers; access will be
obtained by steps, entrance and vestibule on the right front of the vehicle; the main
frame of the car is of white ash, the outside finish of poplar and the inside finish of
cherry wood. The interior presents a handsome and luxurious appearance, being
upholstered in leather and decorated with bevelled plate glass mirrors, and drop
windows, roll curtains and electric push call-bells will all combine towards the
comfort and convenience of the passengers. Nor has the exterior appearance
been overlooked. The body of the car is black, with brewster green panels; the
running gear is dark red; the whole tastefully lined in gold and on the panels the full
name
of the company in gold lettering. Acetylene head lamps will answer the
double purpose of giving notice of approach and lighting the road for the motorman.
The first shipment of cars
is expected to arrive on the 20th March, soon
after which date the service will be inaugurated. The first batch are being built in the
States, on the lines of cars already doing similar work, but future orders for cars will
be placed with Canadian firms. The Terminal buildings and waiting rooms will be
situated at SI. Lambert.
Thats alright, we can hearthe cynical reader say, but your servicewont
be any use in the winter. That, however, will be a bad mistake on the part of the
cynical one. The service will run all the year round alike, and even a winter like the
past one -beg pardon, the present, ever-present, one -will offer no terrors to the
pioneers of the South Shore service. Experiments with a similar type of car have
been made
in places which are happy enough to enjoy all the blessings of our
glorious winter, and no depth of snow, or degree of frost, or any Craig Street
conditions interferes with the progress
olthe car. Forwinter use, a tyre of a modified
pattern will be used, as the car
is fitted with a hot-water circulating system, comfort
for winter travellers
is assured; the heating system, moreover, will not be of the
heatless variety to be met with
in the cars of, well, never mind what company. THE INTERIOR OF A
PUBLICAUTOCARWHICH WILL
CARRY TWENTY PEOPLE
This is the first attempt of its kind in the country, and should success crown the efforts of the company, and there seems little doubt
that it will, the new method of transportation will be exploited on a large scale throughout the Dominion, as the companys charter empowers
them to carry on their business in any part of the Dominion. It is quite probable that the towns on the South Shore will, ere a few years are past,
become conceited over the fact that they were the first towns to be served by a system having its ramifications throughout Canada.
Montreal Herald. March 12, 1904.
MARCH -APRIL 1996 33 CANADIAN RAIL -451
What replaced the bus! One of the first cars of the Montreal and Southern Counties, number 8 was built by Ottawa Car Co. in 1909, the
year the line opened. This car had a very long life on the M&SC. serving for 46 years,
until/he end of service over Victoria Bridge in 1955.
In that year the busses took over again. This photo was taken at SI Lambert on May 3, 1948.
Photo by R.F. Corley.
When application was made to the aldermen of St. Annes
ward
to improve St. Etienne St., the enthusiastic reply they gave
was By 1—-well put a new skin on it. This new skin, however.
consisted of a layer of old macadam which tore the
bus tires to
pieces. Another incident, which will appear strange in this age of
the motor car,
is complaint from the City Engineer that the oil and
gasoline dripping from the buses on Victoria Square was ruining
the asphalt.
By 1905 the bus company was in serious trouble, and in
that year, by an amendment to their charter, the M&SC Ry. Co. was
empowered
to take it over and replace it by an electJic railway.
Here
is an instance where a bus line succumbed to the railway. We
shall not likely live
to see this occur again.
In order to build a railway between Montreal and the South
Shore
it was necessalY to cross the river by a bridge, so application
was made
to the Grand Trunk Railway for a right-of-way on the
down-stream side of the Victoria Bridge.
At that time vehicular
traffic used both sides of the bridge, the double train tracks being
in the centre. There was only one approach to the bridge at the east
end so
it was necessary for vehicles to cross the railway tracks at
both ends of the structure. Today this has been entirely eliminated. After considerable negotiation with the GTR authorities,
and with a personal inspection of the situation by Sir Alfred
Smithers, Chairman of the Board, permission was granted
to the
M&SC
to build a track on the down-stream side of the bridge. The
up-stream side was
to be used for vehicles moving in both
directions
as it is today [1937], The GTR took a controlling interest
of the stock, and undertook
to finance the construction of the
railroad.
The M&SC next secured rights over government property
by lease. along Riverside, Mill St. and Blacks Bridge to Common
St. Application was made
to the City of Montreal to operate over
the city streets along Youville, Grey Nun and Common Streets.
The tracks of the Montreal Street Railway were
to be used on
McGill St.
The granting of the lease and franchise was strongly
opposed
by the Montreal Street Railway and others. It was
necessary for the representatives of the M&SC
to attend 145
regular and special meetings of the City Council before this right
was granted. The balance of the trackage through
the South Shore
towns
is on CNR property or largely by perpetual rights from the
original owners.
I
RAIL CANADIEN -451
Construction was started on
the line early in 1909 and was completed
between Montreal and St. Lambert
City Hall
by November, 1909. Service
was started on Friday, November 1,
1909 with two passenger cars. This
number was later increased to eight
cars which were numbered consec­
utively from
I to 8. The terminal at
Montreal on the present site, foot
of
McGi II Street, consisted of a
combination baggage-passenger car
as a station.
34 MARS -AVRIL 1996
The line was extended to
Montreal South and Longueuil on
May 28,1910. The tracks in Longueuil
ran along
SI. Laurent SI. down to SI.
Charles on Montarville, at which point
a spur was built a short time later
down
to the wharf. The main line
continued along St. Charles St., the
main street
of Longueuil, to Chambly
Road, up Chambly Road to the station
at the corner
of Chambly Road and St.
As the M&SC was extended, more cars were needed. Double-end molal car 105 (above) and trailer
201 (below) were built
in 1912 and 1911 respectively. Both cars remained in use until the end of
service in 1956. These photos were taken by Ray Corley at St. Lambert on May 3, 1948.
.-
Laurent, then returning along St. Laurent to Montreal South, so
forming a loop.
On September 2, 1911 an extension was completed from
St. Lambert
to the RaneJagh Country Club to accommodate
golfers.
On November
1, 1912, the line was completed from
Ranelagh, where the
GTR St. Johns line is crossed, through
Greenfield Park and Mackayville to the junction with the GTR line
to SI. Hyacinthe. At this point, the line which was formerly the
Montreal and Province Line Railway
is met. It might be interesting
to give a brief review
of this line. Chartered in
1871 as the Montreal
Chambly and Sorel, the line was opened
on September25, 1873 from Longueuil
to Chambly under the name of the
Montreal Portland and Boston. The
line was continued on through
Marieville, St. Angele and Farnham
to Freleigsburg in 1877. It was operated
untiIJuly
1. 1891 by the Southeastern,
and then by the Central Vermont. On
March 2, 1896, the
company was
foreclosed and the name changed to
Montreal and Province Line Railway,
the Central Vermont obtaining control
of all the stock. The Central Vermont
operated trains over this line from
Sheldon
VI. to Montreal. The part
from Longueuil
to the junction with
the GTR had been abandoned some
year previous, and the GTR tracks
used from the junction to Montreal.
The Montreal and Southern Counties obtained the rights to
electrify this line
ofthe Central Vermont and to operate their trains
over it as far
as Richelieu, service starting on June 28, 1913. The
work was completed to Marieville on September 28, 1913, and to
SI. Cesaire on May 3, 1914. The M&SC built tracks from
SI.
Cesaire to Granby, commencing service to that place on April 30,
1916.
The Central Vermont received $1500 a year for the privilege
of allowing electric power poles on their right of way, and
$22,027.45 a year for joint use
of their tracks as an electric railway.
From 1913 until 1925 there was joint operation
of electric
and steam trains over portions
of the M&SC route. Due to this it
was necessary that the M&SC be operated by standard rules
in use
MARCH -APRIL 1996 35
TOP: 104 at SI. Lambert, on the main line, in August, 1943.
BOTTOM: 102 and 202 standing near the car barn at
St. Lambert on June 9, 1949.
Both photos from CRHA Archives, Bailey Collection.
CANADIAN RAIL -451
RAIL CANADIEN -451 36 MARS -AVRIL 1996
MONTREAL AND SOUTHERN COUNTIES RAILWAY
CAR EQUIPMENT
APRIL, 1911
CLASS
Electric Motor, Passenger Cars
Elecrtic Motor, Pass. and Baggage Cars
Trailer
Cars
Electric Motor, Flat Car
Electric Sweeper
Snow Plow SERIAL NUMBERS
Ito 8
9 and
10
200 and 201
500
XI
XII
The above list of M &SC equipment is from a small book entitled Grand Trunk Railway System,
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, Montreal and Southern Counties Railway, List
of Car Equipment.
It is shown as having been Re-issued April, 1911, and is presumably updated
to that month.
on steam roads, and this system is still the practice. On August 31,
1925 the operation
of the steam trains of the Central Vermont from
Farnham, through St. Angele and Marieville to Montreal was
abandoned,
the trains being routed via St. Johns. The line between
Marieville and St. Angele was electrified and M&SC service
began on January
6, 1926.
Service
on certain portions of the M&SC tracks has been
discontinued. The spur down
to the wharf at Longueuil was
abandoned about 1915, but the tracks are still there and in good
condition. A car used to run from the station
to the wharf
connecting with a ferry
to Montreal. Considerable freight was
handled over this line from boats, being delivered
by the M&SC
to Longueuil and St. Lambert. The line in Longueuil running along
St. Charles St. was abandoned about 1926. And when the Harbour
Commission bridge was built, all service
to Longueuil was abandoned,
a loop being built at St. Helene St. in Montreal South, where the
cars now tum about. The tracks are still in place through the streets
of Longueuil. The spur into the Golf Club has also been abandoned.
The source
of power for this railway, at the start, was
obtained from the Grand Trunk Point St. Charles shops, generated
by steam, from 1909
to 1913. From that date to the present time
power
is purchased from Montreal Light, Heat & Power Co. Direct
current
is used, and there are substations at St. Lambert, East
Greenfield, Chambly, Marieville, Rougemont,
D Arcy~s Comers
and Granby. Multiple control
is in use on the trains. By this device
two or more motor cars may be coupled together and a motorman
on the front car controls the operation
of the motors on the
individual cars. Trailers without motors are also in use.
The trains are operated
by standard rules, with the dispatching
office at St. Lambert. The selector system
of telephones connects
the dispatcher with various stations along the lines. There are ten
telegraph stations with operators
in charge, which may be used in
case
of failure of the telephone system. All first class trains are run
on timetable schedule and additional service is given
by the use of
one or more sections of the scheduled train. The dispatching office
is at the main office building at St. Lambert. The dispatcher used
to be located in the tower at East End Junction, Victoria Bridge. An excellent suburban passenger service
is given, with
cars running between Montreal South and Montreal every twenty
minutes, and a service from Mackayville, through Greenfield
Park, connecting with Montreal every forty minutes. The interurban
service affords three trains each way between Montreal and
Granby. A way freight operates each way daily giving freight
service between Granby and Montreal, including St. Angele.
Owing
to the sharp curves through the subway beneath the CNR
tracks at East End Junction, electric locomotives or freight cars
cannot pass through. Freight cars from Montreal are taken by CNR
to M&SC Junction, at the east end_ of the CNR Southwark yard, and
are there transferred
to the electric line for Granby and intervening
points. Freight cars for St. Lambert are transferred from the CNR
at the cross over track
j~st east of Victoria Bridge.
An express service runs three times each way, daily,
between Granby and Montreal. A mail service is carried twice
daily from Montreal to Granby and intervening points, with letter
boxes on the cars.
The weight
of rail was originally 60 lbs. This was increased
to 80 Ibs. and replacements are being made at SI. Lambert at the
present time with 100 lb. rail. The equipment at present consists of:
Passenger
cars 35, Baggage and express 8, Locomotives 3, Work
and miscellaneous cars 10. In 1936 the number
of passengers
carried was: Suburban 1,772,451: Interurban
331 ,202. Total2,1 03,653.
The-suburban fare to Montreal is tbreetickets
for25 cents.
There
is also a weekly pass sold for $1.00 which entitles the holder
to ride as often during that week as he wishes. This is extensively
used
by the daily commuters. In 1909, when the line started, the
fare was ] 5 cents single, 25 cents return, and a lO-ride strip
of
tickets for 75 cents. Mr. W.B. Powell is in possession of the first
ticket
of each series issued on November I, 1909.
We wish to acknowledge the kind assistance given by
Mr.
W.B. Powell, former General Manager, and Mr. A. Carbee,
Assistant Superintendent
of the Montreal and Southern Counties
Railway. Most
of the information contained in this paper was
given
by these men.
MARCH -APRIL 1996 37 CANADIAN RAIL -451
MONTREAL AND SOUTHERN COUNTIES PASSENGER TRAIN CARS IN SERVICE IN 1937
CAR TYPE BUILDER DATE OTHER PARTICULARS
2 S.E. Suburban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1909 Retired in 1939.
3
S.E. Suburban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1909 Retired
in 1939.
4 S.E. Suburban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1909 Retired
in 1939,
5 S.E. Suburban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1909 Retired in 1955.
6
S.E. Suburban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1909 Retired in 1955.
8 S.
E. Suburban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1909 Retired in 1955.
9
D.E. Suburban motor Grand Trunk 1910 Retired in 1956. Now at Branford.
100 D.E. Suburban motor Grand Trunk 1911 Retired in 1956.
101 D.E. Suburban motor Grand Trunk 1911 Retired
in 1956. Last car to run on M&SC.
102 D.E. Suburban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1912 Retired
in 1956.
103
D.
E. Suburban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1912 Retired in 1956.
104 D.E. Suburban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1912 Retired
in 1956. Now at Delson.
105 D.
E. Suburban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1912 Retired in 1956.
106 D.E. Combine motor Ottawa Car Co. 1912 Rebuilt to express trailer 506 in 1940. Retired 1955.
107 D.
E. Combine motor Ottawa Car Co. 1912 Reti.red in 1956. Now at Rockwood.
200 D.E. Suburban trailer Ottawa Car Co. 1911 Had been rebuilt in 1924. Retired
in 1955.
201
D.E. Suburban trailer Ottawa Car Co.
191 J Retired in 1956.
202 D.
E. Suburban trailer Ottawa Car Co. 1912 Retired in 1956.
204 D.E. Interurban trailer National Steel Car 1913 Retired
in 1956.
205 D.E. Interurban trailer Ottawa Car Co. 1917 Retired in 1956.
206 D.E. Interurban trailer Ottawa Car Co. 1917 Retired
in 1956.
207 D.E. Interurban trailer Ottawa
Car Co. 1917 Retired in 1956.
208
D.E. Interurban trailer Ottawa Car Co. 1923 Retired in 1956.
209 D.
E. Interurban trailer Ottawa Car Co. 1923 Retired in 1956.
501
S.E. Express motor National Steel Car 1913 Retired in 1956.
502 S.E. Express motor National Steel Car 1913 Retired in 1956.
503 D.E. Express trailer Grand Trunk 1916 Retired in 1955.
504
S.E. Express motor Ottawa Car Co. 1924 Retired in 1956. Now at Seashore.
512
D.
E. Milk trailer Grand Trunk 1915 Retired in 1951.
513 D.E. Milk trailer Grand Trunk 1915 Retired
in 1951.
514 D.E. Milk trailer Grand Trunk 1915 Retired
in 1951.
SIS D.E. Milk trailer Grand Trunk 1915 Retired in 1951.
600 S.E. Interurban motor National Steel Car 1913 Retired in 1956.
601
S.
E. Interurban motor National Steel Car 1913 Retired in 1956.
602
S.
E. Interurban motor National Steel Car 1913 Rebuilt in 1928 from trailer 203. Retired in 1956.
603
S.E. Interurb
an motor National Steel Car 1913 Burned in December 1951.
604 S.E. Interurban motor National Steel Car 1913 Retired
in 1956.
60S
S.
E. Interurban motor National Steel Car 1913 Retired in 1956.
607 S.E. Interurban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1917 Wrecked in 1956.
608
S.E. 1l1terurban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1922 Retired
in 1956.
609 S.E. Interurban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1922 Retired
in 1956.
610
S.E. Interurban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1922 Retired in
J 956. Now at Seashore.
611
S.E. Interurban motor Ottawa Car Co. 1917 Originally 606. Retired
in 1956. Now at Delson.
Note: This
roster includes only cars which were operated in passenger trains. The M&SC also had numerous work cars, locomotives
and special service cars which are not listed here.
Sixteen second hand passenger cars (11, 12,
13, 14, 15,220,320,321,322,323, 324, 326, 620, 621, 622, 623), as well as some work
equipment, came to the M&SC between 1939 and 1947, but they were not on the M&SC
in 1937 so are not included in this list.
RAIL CANADIEN -451
RIGHT: Line car 305, built in
1924, had originally been on the
Toronto Suburban Railway. After
the
M &SC closed it went to Quebec
for fUr/her service on the QRL&P.
1t is seen here at St. Lamber, on
May
3,1948.
Photo by R.F. Corley.
38 MARS -AVRIL 1996
LEFT: Sweeper 302, seen here at
St. Lambert on
lanumy 15. 1949,
was built by Ottawa Car Co. in
1911, and survived until the end of
service in 1956.
Photo by R.F. Corley.
LEFT: Snow plow
307 had come
from the CNR
in 1940. Built by
Russell in
1917, it did not have
any electric equipment. This photo
was taken at Granby in
lanumy,
1951.
CRHA Archives,
Toohey Coll­
ection, photo No. 51-60.
MARCH -APRIL 1996
RIGHT: Car 12 was photographed
at St. Lambert
in 1949. It was one
offive cars acquired by the M&SC
from the Oshawa Railway in 1940.
These cars had been built by Osgood
Bradley in
1926 for a line in New
Jerse
y.
CRHA Archives, TooheyCol/ection,
phOlO No. 49-751.
RIGHT: The de-luxe 620-class steel
motor cars, with trailer 220, arrived
at
the M&SC in 1939. They had
been bui
lt by Oltawa Car Co. in
1930
for the Willdsor Essex & Lake
Shore which closed soon after. They
were then stored until they came to
Montreal. After the M&SC closed,
623 went to Seashore Trolley
Museum, while the others went to
the Niagara St. Catharilles & Toronto
where the motor units served until
1959. This view
of620 and 220 was
taken at Montreal about 1949.
CRHA Archive
s, Toohey Collection.
39 CANADIAN RAIL -451
LEFT: Car 322 was another one
that came to the M &SC second hand.
Built by Brill in 1917
for a line in
Virginia, it went to the Niagara St.
Catharines and Toronto in 1929,
and then to Montreal in 1947. It had
been there
for only two years when
this photo was taken on June 9,
1949.
Photo by R.F. Corley.
RAIL CANADIEN -451 40 MARS -AVRIL 1996
Its What Y ou Cannot See That
In Car Construction Counts
. ..-:…..-.
View of Sl>perstructure Framing of High Speed Interurban Passenger Cars built for Montreal and
Southern Counties Railway.
WITHOUT MOTORS WITH MOTORS
Views of High Speed Trucks Used on Interurban Passenger Cars built for Montreal and Southern
Counties RailWay.
Arter the s·heathing, the paint and varnish is pu·t on a car, the only way to find oUl whether that car is buill
right is to opelate it. Wear and tear in opera·tion over the modern high speed inlerur·ban road will soou show
whether the framing is of lhe· propel kind, and whrlher the lrucks are designed right.
OUR REPUTATION IS BEHIND OUR METHOD OF INTERURBAN CAR CONSTRUCTION, AND THE
TRUCKS WE BUILD WILL WITHSTAND THE HARDEST KIND OF SERVICE.
National
Mont .. eal Office
Shaughnessy Building
AN INQUIRY WILL BRING ALL THE PROOFS TO YOU.
Steel Car Company,
ADDRESS INQUIRIES TO HAMILTON
Western Union Code
Canadian Railway and Marine World. July, 1914.
Limited
Work. and Operatiag Offices
Hamilton, Ontario
MARCH -APRIL 1996 41 CANADIAN RAIL -451
AN INTERURBAN CAR OF
DEPENDABLE CONSTRUCTION
IS WHAT YOU WANT ON YOUR ROAD
Side and EndView of High Speed Interurban CaTS built for the Montreal and Southern Counties Railway Company.
WE BUILD THEM
There are features in the construction of these cars which
will commend themselves to your operating executives.
We have solved the problem of
Maximum Strength with Minimum Weight
Just give us an idea that you would like to be shown. Our
experts will be pleased to prove our contentions to your
satisfaction.
The Summer rush of traffic will soon be here.
Deliveries can be made attractive
NOW.
National Steel Car Company, Limited
ADDRESS INQUIRIES TO HAMILTON
Montreal Office We.lern UnioD Code
Worka and OperatiDW Office.
Shaughnessy Building Hamilton,
Ontario
Canadian Railway and Marine World. June, 1914.
RAIL CANADIEN -451
~————–~~/O
42 MARS -AVRIL 1996
[!]DO[
DDDE
—————-~———————————————-z
ELEYATlOtf
jz/iod Guards (Jyer W;dows
:O——–7!-8 ———+-
7!-7 ———0-… 1—~.—–b~(J .. – –
—–+8-,1–
—-
—————————–49~4·——–
PLAIY
A 1916 drawing of an il1lerurban baggage motor of the M&SC.
This drawing
is reproduced to a scale of a quarter inch to thefoot,
for the benefit
of modellers in 0 gauge.
The photo to the left was taken by
RF Corley at Granby West on
June
/2, 1949.
MARCH -APRIL 1996 43 CANADIAN RAIL -451
I
~
1
]
.–.–Ir-
~ ~
/;
~%
/

]
Orop
t
r-.j
5C151t

—-
>
c:=J
-=:..
~
, J
fJ
…..
1111 II
rw
~
~
= ~,
~-
~
1~—N·
V

-t)
~
r-Tom
-~ )
–<}, I- t<)
IJ
I
sO/( Cuullll
~o ————————~——————
I l!..o/ 0- ————I
———————————-1
A
/

AI1/i-Climb Buller
alrd Shock A bstlrber
-1——–7-7 ——__+_~ -tJ–1——–7-8 ——-101–
49!…-8 ———————
INTERURBAN
MOTOR BAGGAGE CAR
————
_._—————–1
MONTREAL & SOUTHERN COUNTIES RY. CO.
MONTREAL,QUEBEC, CANADA
DATE:
Oct20-1916
SCALE: 1/4 = l
RAIL CANADIEN -451 44 MARS -AVRIL 1996
r 1 1 ~ I I J r 1 1 ~ 1 I] r 1 1 ~ I I J r 1 1 ~ I I J
m
.
-~
……
IZ~8————–~—————————————-
~———————————————————————————S6~
fj. :
t-J -n /
—–
II
,
t
_ ..
II
_11 r—–
~

-A
~
/

=
–…
,
z:
.!–…e.!z·–…….-!Ip·
5
-.—–..•.. -_.-_.-… _-.
ELEVATl
I r t
I ~
f -,
. ~-~
——–

~
~fi.
Mt7jlf CIlIff/lt7/fll1flff
. _–.. . —-, .. _–_. .. -. ——–
-~r
r—
.
r-F—r—r—r—,—-
~
~
I
2.
i
1
;.-
Z~t —1
I
;
4J.!-4-
– –.J3-tr
. ——-
.. ,. . .. ,-… -.. _—_ ..•.. –.. __ .
·–5S:
This drawing was also made in 1916 and shows one of the 600-class
il1lerurbans built in 1913. The drawing has been reproduced here to a
scale
of one-quarter of an inch to one foot, corresponding 10 0 gauge.
Note the dat
e, October 14 1916, which is exactly forty years to the day
before the M&SC
made itsfinal run! The car shown in the drawing would
be around for the end.
The photo to the left was taken at Marieville in June
1955 by Fred Angus.
MARCH -APRIL 1996
45 CANADIAN RAIL -451
1—-+—-1 TomlilfSPtr COllpler
):..!] —————–i———-Iz!.e· –.—–1
————————————–J
5m~kl.,,! CMfltrrlmflft
_____ ~~~zu
———
AnN-Climb Buller
lPTti Shpc/r Ap~PI-h/
;~:-.. ~~S–:::I–:-;~-:8::;~-=–=–=–=-~-=–=–=–=–=–=–=–=-~-=–=–=–=—=–=–=–=–=–=–=–=–=—_-_ ___=_-_ ___=_-_-_-_-_-_-_ ___=_-_~ _-_-_-_-_-_-_ ___=_-_-_-_-_-_-=-6..li~
INTERURBAN
MOTOR PASSENGER
CAR
MONTREAL & SOUTHERN COUNTIES RY. CO.
MONTREAL,QUEBEC, CANADA
DATE: Oct.
14 -1916
SCALE: 1/4 = l
RAIL CANADIEN -451 46
TOP. Clumping across Blacks Bridge, a three car M&SC train is inbound to Montreal about 1949.
CRHA Archives, Toohey Collection.
MARS -AVRIL 1996
BOTTOM: A scene which endured unchanged for many years, this view could have been taken at any time between about 1935 and 1955.
M &SC car
9 is coming off the Victoria Bridge at West End, en route to Montreals McGill Street station. This car, M &SCs first double-ender,
was built by the Grand Trunk
RailwayJor the M&SC, in 1910 and was originally a combine car. Rebuilt as a regular passenger car about
1934, it remained in service until 1955 and is now at the Shoreline Trolley Museum (Branford) in Connecticut.
CRHA Archives, source unknown.

I
MARCH -APRIL 1996 47 CANADIAN RAIL -451
Locomotives of the Grand Trunk 100 Years Ago
The year 1896 was an important year of great change for
Canada and for the Grand
Trunk Railway. That was the year that
Canadians elected a new government, that
of Wilfrid Laurier
(1841-1919),
who was to become Sir Wilfrid the following year,
ousting the previous government which had had no less than five
leaders (and hence five Prime Ministers) in the previous five years.
So began the longest unbroken term of service by any Canadian
Prime Minister;
15 years, during which Canada did enjoy prosperous
times. Changes were in store, and the promised pro
sperity was
aided by a general improvement in economic conditions
in North
America after many years
of stagnation. Within a few years Sir
Wilfrid would predict that the new twentieth century would
belong to Canada.
That these hopes were not realized could not
be foretold
in 1896, and it did seem that a great era was ahead. In
fact the optimism was so great that the Laurier government would
authorize two new transcontinental railways, in addition
to the
already existing CPR, a decision that would have far reaching
adverse effects in later years.
Coincidently, 1896 also saw the arrival at the Grand Trunk,
from the United States,
of a new General Manager, Charles
Melville Hays (1856-1912). Under the Hays administration, the
GTR was greatly reorganized, made more efficient, and many of
the old procedures were discarded. The main line between Montreal
and Toronto was double-tracked, the Victoria Bridge was rebuilt,
old equipment was retired and new locomotives and cars built.
After these changes the railway, for a time, actually showed a
profit. In 1900 Hays left the Grand Trunk
to become President of
the Southern Pacific, but in 1901 he returned to the GTR and later
became its President.
It was in the prosperous first decade of the
new century that the Grand
Trunk Pacific detennined to reach the
Pacific coast, and to establish the new port
of Prince Rupert.
Soon after 1910, the prosperity
of the Grand Trunk began
to fade again. The Laurier government was defeated in 1911, and
Charles M. Hays died in the sinking
of the Titanic in 1912. Then,
in 1914, came the worst disaster
of all, the outbreak of the First
World Wa
r. The prosperous years were over and the Grand Trunk
plunged into such heavy debt that its shares were declared valueless
when it was taken over by tbe government in 1923 and became part
of Canadian National Railways. It is only within the last few
months that the old
GTR lines have been returned to private
ownership with the sale
of CN shares to the public.
In February 1896, exactly 100 years ago and
just before the
great changes in the GTR, the
Magazine American Engineer
published an article on the standard locomotives
of the Grand
Trunk, This article took the form
of tables of very detailed
specifications
of six selected types of locomotives, all of which
were illustrated, along with a photograph
of a standard GTR
tender. The six locomotives chosen were numbers 39, 82,93, 196,
326,572, which had been built between 1881 and 1895 in the GTR
shops. Amazingly all six, after numerous renumberings and
modifications, survived to be taken over by the
CNR in 1923.
Under
CN ownership they became numbers 42, 286,313, 126,642,
615 respectively. Three were scrapped in 1925, two more in 1928,
and the last was cut up in 1931.
The tables and photographs are reproduced in their entirety,
as well as additional
historical information on dates of building,
retirement and renumbering
of these locomotives. The photos
themselves are fairly early examples
of photo engraving, but are
surprisingly good and show considerable detail.
They give an
excellent idea of the motive power used on the Grand Trunk
exactly a century ago.
DEC. 20, 1888.
The cover of a Grand Trunk timetable of /888, before the
railways image and operation was changed beginning
in
1896. Soon the Victorian/ook shown here disappeared as
the GTR faced the twentieth
ce11/U/y.
RAIL CANADIEN -451 48 MARS -AVRIL 1996
G. T. R. TEN D E R
STANDARD TYPE OF TENDER USED ON THE GRAND TRUNK RAILWAY
HISTORICAL DATA ON THE SIX GRAND TRUNK LOCOMOTIVES IN THIS ARTICLE
LOCOMOTIVE 39 82 93 196 326 572
Wheel arrangement 4-4-2T 4-4-0 4-4-0 4-4-0* 2-6-0 2-6-0
Class (starting
1904) K 1 H5 H L E3 E3
Type of service Suburban Express Express Lt. Psgr. Freight ** Freight
Builder
G.T.
R. G.T.R. G.T.R. G.T.R. G.T.R. G.T.R.
Construction
number 1249 1274 1066 1 1 26 1254 1223
Date built Feb. 1892 Jun. 1893 Nov. 1881 Jul. 1883 Feb. 1895 Mar. 1891
Re.numbered 1898 271 553 576*** 264 700 724
Renumbered 1904 206 424 462 1 99 522 546
Renumbered 1910 1 5 3 1 2214 2333 1996 2508 2481
Renumbered 1923 42 286 3 I 3 126 642 6 1 5
Date scrapped
Mar. 1925 Dec. 1925 Ju!. 1928 Aug. 1925 Nov. 1931 Sep. 1928
Note * 196 was built as a 4-4-2T in July 1883, and was converted to a 4-4-0 in 1888.
Note
** 326 was an experimental Rhode Island compound locomotive. It was converted to a simple in February 1905.
Note ***
93 was renumbered in 1899 from 576 to 595.
MARCH -APRIL 1996 49 CANADIAN RAIL -451
G. T. R. 39
DOUBLE ENDED SUBURBAN PASSENGER LOCOMOTNE WITH 17-INCH BY 22-INCH CYLINDERS
G. T. R. 82
EXPRESS PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVE WITH I8-INCH BY 24-INCH CYLINDERS
RAIL CANADIEN -451 50 MARS -AVRIL 1996
G. T. R. 93
EXPRESS PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVE WITH 18-INCH BY 26-INCH CYLINDERS
G. T. R. 196
LIGHT PASSENGER LOCOMOTNE FOR LOCAL SERVICE WITH 17-INCH BY 22-INCH CYLINDERS
MARCH -APRIL 1996 51 CANADIAN RAIL -451
G. T. R. 326
EXPERIMENTAL COMPOUND LOCOMOTIVE OF THE RHODE ISLAND SYSTEM
(Note that it is painted a light colour, probably the primer,for better visibility in the photo)
G. T. R. 572
MOGUL FREIGHT LOCOMOTNE WITH i8-INCH BY 26-INCH CYLINDERS
GENERAL
DIMENSIONS
OF
THE
VARIOUS
CLASSES
OF
LOCOMOTIVES
ON
THE
GRAND
TRUNK
RAILWAY.
..

..
-_.–.-_
..
_
….
_
.
..
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..

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.
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.
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tront
tr~?k,
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wor~!n~
or~er.,
..
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..
..

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.
……

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back


……
.
…..
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….
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l.~
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……..
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toCl~~~:;~8rtront.truck
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ss
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..
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whf:ele….
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mam

..
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..
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..
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…. . ..

..
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..
.
.. ..
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wbeel
base.
..
.
..
….
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..

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….
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……….

..
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w~~el
b~.:,e~!
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length
Of
engine
and
tend
er
over
aiL
.
……………..

..
..
….•
….
..
..
.
..

..
..
..

J…
·e
ngtb
of
main
connecting
rod
.
center
to
center
.
…..
.
..
.
..
.
..

……
.

,
….
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…… .
No.
39
double
eDd~r
with
side
and
back
tanks
17
in
. X
Z2
in.
X
Stt.2in.
~
ft.
SI1t
in.
Bituminous.
35,112Ibs. 19,712
..
1~
:
~
::
No
1-ender.
10
fL.
8
in.
10
..
~
6 6
No
.
82
express,
18
In.
X
24
in
.
X
6
ft.
1~
in.
.•
ft.
S~
in.
Bituminous.
38.528lbs.
···
i;7:.24IbS:
·
105.952 190.S1S

It
fL.
2
in.
12
..
2 ..
6 6
!
o.
93
express,
IS
in
. x 26
In.
X
6
tt.
Sin.
• fL.
S~
in.
Bituminous.
33
.
908lbs.
· …
52,3
60
)
be:

SO
,
268
..
160.868

12
ft.
2
in.
12

2
6 6
…. ·s·ii … ·
·····
..
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….
rii.:/iii;:·r
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.
6In.
7 ..
in.
S
29
3
No
tender.
39
ft,7~
in
.•
n.
only
6
ft.
10
in.
81
;
:6
i;;:
23
..
II

17
If>
57

11~

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.
..
6
in
.
~3

11
i6

II
;7

1I~

.7
10
CYI
.
INDER
••
VALVES
.
ETC.
Transverse
rlistaDce
from
center
to
center
ot
cylinders
..

.•
……
..
…..
.
..•
.
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Dia~t:ter
~f
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pre~,sure
CYIi
.~der
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thickn
ess
or
H.
P. piston
beaet
in
tbe
center
..
..
…..
..
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.
..
..
.

..
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ft.
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17
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. 6
ft.
4
in.
18
lD.
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.
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In. IS
in.
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.···
r
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No.
326
compound
No
.
196
Ihtht
pas.
mOlZul
(It.
I.

(
NO.
57~
8imlllemo
senger,
17
In. X
2t
system).
19
in
.
and
~ulIS
in.
X
W
in.
x
in.
X
5
ft.
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:IJ » r o » z » o m z .j:>.. 01 01 IJ s: » :IJ (j) » < :IJ r <.0 <.0 Ol
BOILER.
—————————————-,—Description
of
boiler
….
…..
…….
.
…..
,.
……
.
………..
..
……
…….
.
…………….
….
Straigbt
back.
~traight
back.
Straigbt
back
.
Inside
diameter
of
smallestring
of
boiler

:….
..

…………….
.

::..


.
……

1 ft.
O~
in.
I ft.
2~
In. 1
:t
.
2~
in.
Materialor
barrel
of
boiler
……….
::
..•…………………….

…..
:..

Steel.
Sttel.
Bowling
iron.
LeDgtb
of
b&rrel rro.m
back
01
fro~t
tube·pla!e
to
froDt of
Ihroat…..
.
..
….
……..
..

….
10
ft
..
fin.
11
ft.
.10~
in.
11
ft.
!~
in.
Thickness
of
plates
In
barrel
of
bOIler..

..
…………..
. ..
……….
..


..
….
.
……
. {
Butt:t~~de
and
Sutt.
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nd
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~iicie
and
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ot
borizoDte.l
seams.
.
……

..
..
…..
….
..
…….
…..
..
….
.
……..
….
….
.
…..
.

.
outsiqe
welts.
outside
well
s,
outside
welts.
douGle
riveted.
double
rive-ted.
double
riveted
.
Straight
back
.
f
ft.
OJ
In.
BOwling
iron
.
10
ft:
4
in
.
18
ID.
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.
double
riveted.
..
circumferential
seams
………………
.
{
Lap.
double
Lap.
double
Butt
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wld
tb
dwelt
Lap
.
double
.
……

…….
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n
veted
outal
~
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nveted
. .
single
riveted.
.
Slraight
back.
Straight
bllck.
1r..2~in.
,tt
2~ID
.
Sleel.
Sleel.
l!
tt.
2<1
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l!
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2~
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inside
llnd
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inside
and
outside
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doubJe
rivetf:d.
double
riveted.
Lap.
doubie
Lap.
double
rlvetea
.
nvet.ed.
Material
of
tubes
………
..
……….
~..
….
..

……..
.
..
…………..
…..
……
Cbarcoal
iron.
Cbarcoal
tron.
Chdorcoal
tron.
Cbarcoal
iron.
Cbarcoal
iron
.
Cbarcoal
iron.
~::~~~~r::
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51t.
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……
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……..
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3
it.
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fL.
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from
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….
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. . . . .
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of
o~~~e
~beJ1
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firebox

…………
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:
..
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:::
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Bowl~n~
..
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iron.
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ot
plates
ot
outside
sbell
ot
firebox-throat.
tace,
sides.
saddle…
..
.
..
……..
..
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J1
.in ..
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Mt.terlalof
lDslde
of
firebox…
..
………
.
………..
………………
……………………..
Steel.
Steel.
::-tp.el.
:::steel.
Steel.
SLeel
Thickness
of
eidb
sheets
ot
firebox……
…….
……….
…..
……..
…..
..
….
..
…………..
~
in.
~
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FEBRUARY,
1896
s::: » :lJ o :r;: » -U 😀 r U1 c,.) () » z » o 5> z 😀 » r .j:>. (JJ
RAIL CANADIEN -451 54 MARS -AVRIL 1996
Toronto Suburban Railway 24
Canadian
National 15702
By Don Scafe and Tony Kernahan
Edmonton Radial Railway Society
Edmonton Radial Railway Society members Ogilvie Thomson, Doug Parker and Barry Big/ow push ex-CNR 15702 into the car barn to start
restoration, October I,
1988. High Iron Photos 356-92-36.
A unique piece of Canadian urban transportation history
lives on at the street
car line of the Edmonton Radial Railway
Society
in the form of restored Toronto Suburban Railway car 24.
This car may have the most varied and interesting
history of any
Canadian street car.
The earliest years
of the car are somewhat uncertain. It
appears that it could have been built by the Toronto Railway
Company before the turn
of the century I the TRC began to build
flat sided tongue-and-groove sheathed cars
in 1894], and was
acquired
by the Toronto Suburban Railway in 1913, after the car
body had been rebuilt by the Preston Car and Coach Company. It
operated
as a double-ended car in the Weston area of Toronto on
the TSRs city line franchise. When the
TSR became part of the CNR in 1924, the city
franchise was turned over to the
TIC, with the suburban service to
Guelph being operated by CN. Thus. the city cars were no longer
required by CN. Fortunately the
company had plans to use No. 24
at their new Neebing rider-hump yard at Fort William. Car 24 was
modified for selvice to take yard crews to and from yard offices at
the new facility. Becoming CN 15702, it was fitted with footboards
along each side for easy transportation
of the workers. Later, for
added comfort in winter, a stove was installed. After some
40 years
of selvice at Neebing, CN J 5702 was retired and donated to the
CRHA, coming to the Canadian Railway Museum at Delson
in
1964. Unfortunately, the cai had to be stored outdoors and it
deteriorated.
It could have been easily and quietly forgotten, in
which case our story would be at an end. But read on
l
MARCH -APRIL 1996 55 CANADIAN RAIL -451
The Edmonton Radial Railway Societys plans for
an extension outside Fort Edmonton Park identified the
need for a double-ended car. When Malcolm Whittall
visited the CRHA museum in the early 1980s he realized
that 15702 could (potentially) meet the Socie
tys needs.
It was a double-ended four wheel streetcar with handbrakes,
and virtually a twin
to Edmonton Radial Railway No.7,
the only single-truck car ever
to operate in Edmonton!
Initial discussions were he
ld with the CRHA concerning
the possibility
of a long term lease. By November 1986
the
CRHA had agreed to the cars transfer to the ERRS
and its restoration and operation by the Society as
Toronto Suburban Railway 24 for a period
of twelve
years. As the most recent owners
of the car, Canadian
National very kindly donated the transportation
of the
car from Delson to Edmonton. It finally anived at the
ERRS
car barn on November 14, 1987.
Edmonton Radial Railway Society members Lany Roche and Bill
Belts dismantle side supports
of 15702 in the car barn on October
With its prolonged outside storage, the car was in much
poorer condition than anticipated. In contemplating total restoration,
the Society was faced with a formidable task.
Some preliminary
tidying up and removal
of loose parts was performed soon after
arrival
in Edmonton. However, it was not until after the end of the
1988 operating season that the
car was moved inside the barn for
the rebuilding to begin in earnest. The plan
of attack for its
restoration was to be as follows:
22, 1988. High Iron Photos 356-93-46.
Dismantling
of the rear vestibule was complete
by December 10, 1988, when this photo was
taken, and a new sub floor was under construction.
High Iron photos 356-95-5e.
i). Strip the car to its frame to detelmine what wood needed
to be replaced. It was clear from the condition
of the car when it
arrived that a virtually new car body would have to rise phoenix­
like from the frame.
ii). Inspect the condition
of the truck and motors and
undeltake whatever mechanical and electrical rehabilitation was
necessary.
The bottom side beams consist of a metal plate bolted between wooden
stringers on either side. About one half
of the inner wooden stringers had
rotted away on one side
of the car, and good wood ended at this mortise and
tenon joint
to a cross beam. July 29,1989.
High Iron Photos 356-104-7c.
RAIL CANADIEN -451
ERRS members Harvey Seagrave and Bill MacLean fit vestibule
roof struts to 15702, on March 3,1990.
High Iron Photos 356-114-7c.
56 MARS -AVRIL 1996
ABOVE: The truck of 15702 / 24 is almost completely dismantled
in this view
at the car bam on May 18,1991. One side frame is to
he replaced by a new one constructed in the shops.
High Iron Photos 356-13J-6b.
iii). Design and install a complete hand braking system.
iv). Install hardware -two controllers and breakerswitches
-and completely re-wire the car.
v). Reunite the reconstructed car body with its overhauled
truck, and pelform rigorous tests
to ensure that the car would
pelform satisfactorily
in service.
By the end
of 1988 the sides had been completely stripped
-in many cases a not too hefty push was sufficient to remove a
rotted pillar –
as well as the flooring and vestibules. After the
construction
of a new sub-flooring and side pillars, the roof was the
next phase tackled, and
by the spring of 1991 it was replaced
completely with new wood and canvas.
While the carpentry was
in progress, the Taylor truck
was totally disassembled and one complete
side frame was replaced
by a new one fabricated
in the shop. As well, the two electric
traction motors
(GE 1000 type) were thoroughly overhauled,
although they were found to be
in remarkably good condition. It is
interesting to note that the plate on the motors indicates a patent
date
of 1896, exactly 100 years ago, so it is Likely that these are now
the oldest street car motors in working order
in Canada. [The GE
1000 was introduced about 1892 and was one of the first fully
enclosed traction motor made.
It took its name from the fact that,
with suitable gearing and 33 inch wheels, it would provide a
tractive effort
of 1000 pounds. There was also a smaller version
called the GE
800.1 With the truck and motors as good as new,
the restored car body was reunited with its truck
on August 24,
1991.
MARCH -APRIL 1996
The remaining work was by
no means trivial. The hand braking
system had to be designed and
constructed in situ and the complete
electrical system installed. As a double­
end car, two General Electric KlO
controJlers were required, and the
lighting circuits and breakers were
installed. The car was fitted out with
two longitudinal wooden benches that
ran the length
of the car, four new
doors and two cow catchers. Then.
after the whole car had been painted,
it was ready for its final testing prior
to re-commissioning.
On May 9,
1992, restored
Toronto Suburban Railway
car 24
moved under its own power as it was
driven gingerly out of the car barn
(albeit with an incomplete braking
system!), to emerge into the sunlight
for the first time since the Fall
of
1988. Complete testing and shakedown
took place over the next few months,
and the car was able to assist Edmonton
cars 1 and 42 in passenger service at
the annual Harvest Fair held in early
September at Fort Edmonton Park.
The Societys thirty or so qualified
motormen all take special training
and refresher sessions on car 24 before
the start
of each operating season
because
of its hand braking system.
Now the car
is used regularly insummer
service (normally weekday mornings)
along with the two restored Edmonton
cars on the Societys 2 kilometre street
car line. It is proving to be a unique
attraction for Park visitors.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS AND
REFERENCES
CanadianRailNo. 223, Summer 1970.
C.
Hatcher and T. Schwarzkopf
Edmonton Electric Transit (Railfare
Enterprises Ltd. 1983)
D. Parker, The Trip Sheet (Newsletter
of the ERRS), June 1992
C. Hatcher, private communication
1995
D. Scafe (High Iron Photos)
57 CANADIAN RAIL -451
The rebuilt truck of ex-CNR 15702, (ex-Toronto Suburban Railway 24) ready to be run under the
body
on August 24,1991. Note the GE 1000 traction motors, almost 100 years old and still fully
functional. High 1ron Photos 356-/35-3a.
NOTE: For a view
of24 / 15702 as it appears completely restored please see the back cover.
RAIL CANADIEN -451 58 MARS -AVRIL 1996
The Church That Began In A Box Car
The recent news that the former CNR Point SI. Charles shops (now AMF) in Montreal may close makes one recall the great railway
heritage
of The Point dating back to the early days of the Grand Trunk, and especially the construction of Victoria Bridge. The present
shops trace their ancestry to those built by the Grand Trunk in the 1850s, and the site has been used for railway purposes
ever since.
Another story about the area, less known among railway historians, concerns Grace Anglican Church which was founded in Point
St Charles in 1871, 125 years ago this year, and which has always been a railwaymans church. In fact the first church building was a Grand
Trunk box car!
The following account is based on newspaper 31ticles that appeared in 1971, on the churchs 100th anniversary.
Point SI. Charles, which has been so long identified with
the
life
of railways and railwaymen, is located on the old Bourgeois
Seigneury, and prior to that the Robert Seigneury.
The site of the
present Grace Church, at Wellington and Fortune Streets, is a
portion
of the old Bourgeois Seigneury. It was bought from the
Sisters
of the Congregation of Notre Dame who had been given the
property by a daughter
of the Seigneur Bourgeois, a member of the
religious order.
Anglican church services for those
of that faith living in
the area
of Goose Village, Griffintown and the eastern end of Point
SI. Charles were first held in 1871 in a brick-coloured Grand Trunk
box car. It
is recalled that the services were conducted on a packing
box used
as an altar, and the box car was heated in winter by a pot­
bellied stove, consuming large amounts
of wood.
The Grand Trunk authorities were, from the first, interested
in seeing that their workers settling in Point SI. Charles had places
of worship within a suitable distance of their homes, but until 1871
there was
no nearby church at which Anglicans could worship.
Hence the GTR supplied the box car, and very soon provided a
piece
of land at the corner of Wellington and Centre Streets where
the first mission building was constructed.
Within a few years the congregation had grown so much
that the building became far too small. In fact, because
of the
limited seating available, many people were turned away Sunday
after Sunday. Because
of this, and the fact that much concern was
brought about because
of children living in the western part of the
Point having to cross the tracks, it was decided to erect a new larger
building
in a more convenient location.
Rev. Canon
S. Belcher, the first rector, approached the
Grand Trunk management suggesting that the company buy the
land on which the church was then built so that the congregation
would be able to buy another property.
The pastor rightly foresaw
that
in the future the majority of his parishioners would reside on
the westem side
of the tracks. A suitable deal was concluded and
the congregation acquired the land at the corner
of Wellington and
Fortune Streets.
The new church building was
of gothic design, and is a
very fine piece
of Montreal church architecture. It was erected in
accordance with the plans of John James Brown, a widely known
architect around the turn
of the century. The foundation stone was
laid on September 12, 1891, and it opened for its first service just
over a year later, on September 18, 1892. The seating capacity was
800, a far cry from the old box car
of 1871, and the interior decor,
with visible wooden framework,
is beautiful because of its distinctive
lall
d ~~ CRAND TPO .,.,._
a;; 4880 ….
,~~/o1 . n
-(, :.~
neat and quiet lines. It still stands, minus the tower, today, In this
day
of high prices and inflation, it is hard to realize that the total
cost
of the church was about $45,000, For many years there were
some 800 children enroled in the churchs sunday school, and the
strength
of the parish lay in the congregations ability to teach so
many, and also provide competent teachers for all those children.
From 1907 until the early 1920s the rector was Rev, (later
Canon)
J, Ellis Ireland, who was a very capable organizer, deeply
loved by his parishioners, During this time the church enjoyed its
maximum membership, with more than 700 families belonging,
This period also included the years
of the First World War during
which, for the first time
in Canadian history, railways, and the
mechanical skill
of railwaymen, were used in fighting a war
overseas, Many of these Canadian Railway Troops were members
of Grace Church, During World War II, the pastor was granted a
leave
of absence to serve as Chaplain to the Canadian armed
forces, which
he did until the end of the war.
In more recent times, the decline
of the English speaking
Anglican population
of Point SI. Charles has meant that the church
has more
of an at-large membership, and many of its members
come from surrounding parts of the city, However its distinguished
histOIY has continued, and it must be recalled that it all began with
a few devoted people holding divine service
in a Grand Trunk box
car a century and a quarter ago,
MARCH -APRIL 1996 59 CANADIAN RAIL -451
The Business Car
CRHA CONVENTION AND ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
Members are reminded that the annual convention of the
CRHA will be held at Prince George, B.C. from Friday, June 28 to
Monday, July 1,1996.
During the convention, the Annual General Meeting of the
Association will be held on
Saturday, June 29,1996. Please note
that the date
of June 30, previously announced, is incorrect. At this
meeting, four directors will be elected. Any
member wishing to
submit nominations for candidates for these pOSItIons should
submit them to the Secretmy, Mr.
Bemard Martin, no later than the
end
of May 31, 1996. To be valid, nominations must be made and
seconded, in writing,
by two members, and must also bear the
indication, in writing, that the candidate will serve
if elected.
A full program
of events is planned for the convention, and
more information will be given
as it is available.
HELP WANTED
Gloria J. Hersak, 4 Fairway Place, Winnipeg, Manitoba,
R3R 2P3 writes:
My family has been involved with the railway, first the
Grand Trunk and then the CNR, since they arrived in Canada from
the Manchester area
of England circa 1903. My great-grandfather,
William Henry Smith, was employed at the Point St. Charles shops
in Montreal until his death at age 60 on 2 April 1916. His son and
my grandfather, Robert Henry Smith, was also employed there as
a machinist until 1914
/15 when he moved to Transcona, Mal1ltoba
to work in the shops
of what became the CNR. Two further
generations
of the Smith family have also been employed there. I
am currently engaged
in family histOlY research and need lI1formatlon
concerning the background
of William Henry Smith. From what
his eldest grandson remembers
of life in Point St. Charles, W.H.
Smith worked in an area
of the shops with large stationary engines.
I gather that
there was a great deal of pride involved on the part of
my great-grandfather and his family concerl1lng the partIcular
position he occupied. Directories
of the day, and hIS death / bunal
records list his occupation as engineer. From what I
can tell, hIS
places of residence in Point St. Charles were as follows:
905-07 12 Knox Street, 1907-09 175 Island Street,
1909-10 445 Wellington Stree
t, 1910-12 110 Knox Street,
1914 12A Ryde Street, 1916 608 Mullins Street. .
Understandably, a Smith from England
of about 60 years old IS
almost impossible to trace back to England. Of course, what I
really need are personnel records which might allow me to search
into his background, date
of arrival in Canada, parents names,
place
of birth, place of previous employment in England, etc. 1
understand, however, that such records are hard
to come by. Please
inform
me as to the availability of the information which I require
and the cost to provide the same.
If any of our members could provide any information, Mrs.
Hersak would greatly appreciate if they could write directly to her.
NEWFOUNDLAND VIDEO AVAILABLE AGAIN
Back, by popular demand! In August 1988, shortly before
the Newfoundland Railway was abandoned, some members
of the
CRHA made a trip
to Newfoundland and rode the mixed train
between Bishops Falls and Corner Brook. Peter Murphy made an excelJent 90-minute video, called
The Gaffer, about this trip,
and other railway scenes at St. Johns. This video was offered
to
the members for $27.00, and a considerable number were sold,
before the production
of the tape ceased. Now, by popular demand,
The Gaffer is once again available, and at the same price, $27.00,
including postage.
To purchase this video, please write to Fred
Angus, 3021
Trafalgar Ave., Montreal P.Q .• H3Y 1H3, and
enclose cheque for $27.00 made payable to the CRHA.
TWO NEW BOOKS ON CANADIAN RAILWAY STATIONS
Directory of Railway Stations of Ontario,
and Directory
of Railway Stations of Ontario, Volume II.
Published by: Canadian Station News
P.
O. Box 171, Cobourg, Ontario, K9A 4K5
The price
of volume I is $23.95, while that of volume II is $24.95.
Both prices include all taxes and shipping charges.
These two volumes list more than 550 stations (300 in
volume I and
250 in volume Il), including active, relocated, and
recently demolished structures. There are more than 170 photographs,
and each listing gives a brief outline
of the station structure, year
built and points
of interest. Each listing provides where possib.le
the exact address
of the station and easy access roads lead1l1g to It.
For stations in rural areas, an approximate driving time is given.
The listing includes stations of: VIA Rail, CN, CP, Algoma
Central, Ontario Northland, Port Stanley Terminal Railway and
the Goderich & Exeter Railway, These books make the location
of
stations, in cities, towns, or the country, easy.
A
HEAVY CABOOSE
Caboose No. 27 had to have a new set of springs put under
it on account of being loaded too heavy with links, pins, etc. There
were taken out
of this caboose 2,020 pounds of unnecessary
materia
l. Conductors will only allow such material in their cabooses
as may be actually necessary, and not load the boxes down for the
purpose
of making the springs ride easier; and it is unnecessary to
haul a ton
of this material around month after month.
Locomotive Engineering, JanualY, 1896.
WET TRAINMEN
Trainmen will please discontinue throwing water at each
other on the road.
The party receiving the water is liable to slip or
fall and injure themselves [sic], perhaps very seriously. The
stormy weather will afford the brakemen all the outside application
of water that is necessary.
Locomotive Engineering, JanuaIY, 1896.
THE BIRTH OF OUR NUMBER S?
The Pittsburgh Locomotive Works are now quite busy
building new engines and on repair work. The shops have an order
from the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie for ten lO-wheel freight engines
with 18-inch by
24-inch cylinders, which will be larger than any
now used by that company.
American Engineer, February, 1896.
Editors note: One
of these engines may well be our Maritime
Railway
No.5, which was one of ten locomotives (Nos. 81 to 90)
built
by Pittsburgh in 1896 for the P&LE.
BACK COVER: Toronto Suburban Railway 24, ex Canadian National Railways 15702, leaving Melon Farm curve at Fort Edmonton Park
on August 8,
1992. This car has been completely restored to its pristine appearance by the members of the Edmonton Rachal Ratlway SOCIety.
High iron Photos 356-148-5d.

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