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Canadian Rail 450 1996

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Canadian Rail 450 1996

NO … -4S0
. <-JANOARY~.FEBRUARY 1996.-_:·
, ~ •• 00 ••• :. -~ _ -•• -.
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
PUBLIE TOUS LES DEUX MOIS PAR LASSOCIATION CANADIENNE DHISTOIRE FERROVIAIRE
CANADIAN RAIL
ISSN 0008-4875
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHL Y BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
TABLE OF CONTENTS
WANDERING CANADIANS ……………………………………………………………. PIERRE OZORAK……………….. 3
THE GREAT SOUTH CAROLINA M.U. CAR MOVE …………………………… FRED ANGUS ……………………..
18
THE END OF P.C.C. STREET CAR SERVICE IN TORONTO ……………………………………………………………. 22
MUSEUM NOTES ………………………………………………………………
…………. JOHN GODFREy………………… 25
THE BUSINESS CAR……………………………………………………………
………. ………………………………………….. 26
FRONT COVER: As part of its annual railfan weekend, Steamtown operated a double­
header excursion between Scranton,
Pa. and Binghamton, N.Y., powered by ex CPR 4-6-2
2317 and ex CNR
2-8-2 3254. The excursion train is seen travelling westward through the
Delaware and Hudson Railroads Conklin Yard in Binghamton, September 20,1992.
Photo by Jean Louis Ozorak.
For your membership
in the CRHA, which
includes a subscription to Canadian Rail,
write to:
CRHA, 120
Rue St-Pierre, St. Constant, Que.
J5A 2G9
Membership Dues for 1996:
In Canada: $35.00 (including GST).
United States: $30.
00 in U.S. funds.
Other Countries: $35.00
in U.S_ funds.
Canadian Rail
is continually in need of news,
stories, historical data, photos, maps and
other material. Please send all contributions
to the editor: Fred F. Angus, 3021 Trafalgar
Ave. Montreal, P.Q. H3Y 1 H3. No payment
can be made for contributions, but the con­
tributer will
be given credit for material sub­
mitted. Material will
be returned to the con­
tributor
if requested. Remember Knowl­
edge is of little
value unless it is shared with
others.
As part of its activities, the CRHA operates
the Canadian Railway Museum
at Delson I
St. Constant, Que. which is about 14 miles
(23
Km.) from downtown Montreal. It is open
from late May to early October (daily until
Labour Day). Members, and their immediate
families, are admitted free of charge.
THE GOAL OFTHE ASSOCIATION IS THE
COLLECTION, PRESERVATION AND DIS­
SEMINATION OF ITEMS RElATING TO
THE HISTORY OF CANADIAN RAILWAYS
The CRHA has a number 01 local divisions across
the country. Many hold regular meetings and Issue
newsletters.
Further Information may be obtained
by writing to Ihe division.
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O. Box 1162
Saint John N.B. E2L
4G7
DIVISION VALLEE-JONCTION BEAUCE
397 Blvd. Rousseau
Vallee-Jonclion Qua
GOS 3JO
ST LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 22, Stalion
B
Monlreal P .Q. H3B 3J5
RIDEAU VALLEY DIVISION
P.
O. Box 962
Smiths Falls, Ont. K7A 5A5
KINGSTON DIVISION
P.O. Box 1714
Kingslon
,Ont. K7L 5V6
TORONTO
& YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal
A
Toronto,Ont. M5W 1 P3
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.O. Box
20311 Granlham Postal Outlet
SI. Catharines, Onl. L2M 7W7
CALGARY
& SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
c/o Rick Connery, Secrelary
95 Bennen Crescent N.w.
Calgary, Alberta T2L 1
R2
SELKIRK DIVISION
P.O. Box
2561
Revelstoke, B.C. VOE 2S0
CROWSNEST
& KETILE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 400
Cranbrook,
B.C. VIC 4H9
NELSON ELECTRIC TRAMWAY SOCIETY
123 View Street
Nelson, B.C.
V1 L 2V8
PRINCE GEORGE-NECHAKO-FRASER DIVISION
P.O. Box 2408
Prince George, B.
C. V2N 2S6
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006, Sialion A
Vancouver, B.C. V6C
2Pl
ESQUIMAL T AND NANAIMO DIVISION
1148 Balmoral Road
Victoria, B.C. V8T 1 B 1
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: Douglas
N.w. Smith
ASSOCIATE EDITOR (Motive Power):
Hugues
W. Bonin
DISTRIBUTION: Gerard Frechette
LAYOUT: Fred
F. Angus
Printing: Procel Printing
DIRECTORS
OF THE C.R.H.A.
PRESIDENT: Walter J. 8edbrook
VICE PRES
.: David W. Johnson
TREASURER: Robert Carlson
SECRETARY: Bernard Martin
Frederick
F. Angus
Doug Battrum
Alan
C. Blackburn
James Bouchard
Gerard Frechette
Franc;ois Gaudette
Dean Handley
J. Christopher Kyle
Robert V.V. Nicholls
Andrew
W. Panko
M. Robertson
Len Thibeault
William Thomson
A. Stephen Walbridge
Michael Westren
L1ASON REPRESENTATIVES
WESTERN
D. Walter Edgar
4515 Dalhart Road N.W.
Calgary, AB T3A 1
B9
Phone: (403) 286-2189
CENTRAL
Christopher Kyle
49 -77 Wellesley
SI. East
Toronto,
ON M4Y 1H7
Phone: (416) 962-1880
MARITIME
Richard
E. Viberg
172 Main SI.
Hillsborough, NB
EOA 1 XO
Phone: 506 734-3467
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996 3 CANADIAN RAIL -450
Wandering Canadians
By Pierre Ozorak
Western Maryland Scenic Railroad FPA4 number 305, seen here in Ridgeley, West Virginia on May 1, 1992, was originally built as Canadian
National number
6771. The unit last operated on V1A Rail in Canada before it left for the United States. Number 305 operated passenger
exceusions between Cumberland,
Mwyland and Frostburg for a couple oj years before it moved to the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad
in Peninsula, Ohio and was renumbered
15. All photos by the author unless otherwise indicated.
INTRODUCTION
It is remarkable how many pieces of Canadian railway
equipment have left the country for the United States as well as
other countries. Canadian locomotives and rolling stock have
found
homes in railway museums, as well as short line operations.
This equipment has become
whatl referto as Wandering Canadians
which, as the name implies, relates to railway equipment which
was either built
in Canada, or has at one time or another operated
on a Canadian railway. This article will teli about
some of them.
There are very many others, but there is not room to describe them
all. My earliest recollections
of Canadian railway equipment
having left Canada was
of the Grove series sleepers of the
Canadian Pacific Railway sold to Mexico.
The sleepers were
subsequently foliowed by some
of the Canadian Pacific 2100
series coaches. Since then,
many more pieces of Canadian railway
rolling stock have left the country.
For the last seven years,
I have travelled in search of
Wandering Canadians, which has resulted in the writing of this
article. By reading this text,
I hope the reader will think, a little at
least,
of this railway equipment which fOIms part of our history.
Where else could you get such a fine lesson
in geography as with
WANDERING CANADIANS
MAP SHOWING MOST CANADIAN RAILWAY EQUIPMENT
PRESERVED
IN
RAILWAY MUSEUMS THE UNITED STATES TODAY*
,
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:
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7,-
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:L
STATES WITH CANADIAN RAILWAY EQUIPMENT
BASED ON THE 1995 CANADIAN
lRACKSIDE
GUIDE
20 OR MORE PIECES 10
TO
19
PIECES
6T09
PIECES
2TO
5 PIECES
1 PIECE
i
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,-
,J
,-
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:JJ » r 0 » z » 0 m z .j:o>. (J1 0 L » z < m :JJ Tl m < :JJ m :JJ to to 0)
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996 5 CANADIAN RAIL -450
SUMMARY OF
PRESERVED CANADIAN RAILWAY EQUIPMENT
BY STATES*
ALASKA 8 MARYLAND 3 OKLAHOMA 1
ARIZONA 1 MICHIGAN 9 OREGON 6
CALIFORNIA
18 MINNESOTA 9 PENNSYLVANIA 20
COLORADO 1 MISSISSIPPI 1 SOUTH CAROLINA 3
CONNECTICUT 20 NEBRASKA 6 TENNESSEE 4
DELAWARE 1 NEW HAMPSHIRE 1 VERMONT 1
ILLINOIS 20 NEW JERSEY 2 VIRGINIA 2
INDIANA 2 NEW YORK 5 WASHINGTON 6
IOWA 4 NORTH CAROLINA 2 WEST VIRGINIA 2
MAINE 14 OHIO 17 WISCONSIN 1
·source: 8ytown Railway Society, Canadian Trackside Guide 1995
Note: This list excludes most Canadian passenger cars which have gone stateside.
Canadian locomotives operating
in U.S. mainline, short line and industrial service are
omitted as well.
passenger cars carrying such names as St. Hyacinthe, Riviere
Cloche and Glace Bay. Some individuals might even claim that
some
Wandering Canadians were like personal friends. In some
ways, this article
is like a visit to see these old friends.
A WHIRLWIND TOUR OF PENNSYLVANIA
The original idea for this article came following a whirlwind
weekend spent
in Pennsylvania in search of operating fOlmer
Canadian steam engines. This trip was organized by my brother,
Etienne,
who is also a resident of Pennsylvania (technically
speaking, this also makes him a wandering Canadian). Through
his
careful planning, it was possible for us to visit over half a dozen
railway museums with form
er Canadian steam locomotives, several
of which were still operating.
Our first stop was at Steamtown National Historic Site in
Scranton. Besides owning close to a dozen pieces
of Canadian
origin, Steamtown also operates a couple
of Canadian steam engine
s. Since Steamtown has become a National Historic Site, the
locomotives are considered artifacts; accordingly they have been
restored to their original appearance
in accordance with the
governing
bodys policy. This is why ex-CPR 4-6-2 No. 2317, built
by the Montreal Locomotive Works
in June 1923, has since been
restored to its Canadian Pacific appearance. Interestingly, the line
on which Steam town operates out
of Scranton was trackage owned
by the Delaware & Hudson Railway. As the D&H
has been
purchased by
CP Rail System, it was possible to see a Canadian
Pacific steam engine operating on CP trackage
in the United
States.
Besides the 2317, Steam town also operates 2-8-2 No. 3254
which
is a former Canadian National locomotive built in 1917 by
the Canadian LocomotiveCompany in Kingston, Ontario. Steamtown
owns much
more Canadian equipment, and for a complete listing
I reconunend looking
in section 3 of the Canadian Trackside
Guide, published by the By town Railway Society in Ottawa.
RAIL CANADIEN -450
6 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1996
Shortline operator, Lackawanna Valley Railroad, located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, purchased second hand power from Montreal
Locomotive Sales. This photo shows number
22, an RS18 still wearing its Canadian National diagonal stripe paint scheme. The unit was
photographed
in Scranton on October 14, 1991.
As part of their operating fleet, the Cuyhoga Valley Scenic Railroad purchased Lubrizon number 20. This unit was originally built by MLW
as Canadian National number
8485. The unit was then sold to the Bangor and Aroostook, and numbered 20, before being sold to Lubrizol.
The Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad bought the unit
afew years before the FPA4s arrived on the scene.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996 7 CANADIAN RAIL -450
On September 20,1992, Steamtown operated a double-header excursion to Binghamton, N.Y., using former Canadian Pacific 4-6-2 number
2317 and former Canadian National 2-8-2 number 3254. This photo of the double-header was taken at Binghamton
After our tour of Steamtown, our search for Canadian
steam took us to Jim Thorpe, where two former Canadian Pacific
4-6-0010 class locomotives are operated by Rail Tours Inc. At the
time of
our visit, 1098 was being repaired in Jim Thorpe, while 972
had been sent down to the Strasburg Railroad for a complete
overhaul.
It was inevitable that our next
stop should be at Strasburg
as they are the owners
of two active former Canadian National
locomotives. One
of these is No. 31, an 0-6-0 originally built in
July, 1908 for the Grand Trunk Railway as their number 118.
The
Strasburgs other Canadian steam engine is 89, a 2-6-0, originally
built for the Grand Trunk
in February 1919 as number 1009. The
Strasburg Railroad is well worth the visit and it is not surprising
that
it is one of the most popular railway museums in the United
States.
Our tour of Pennsylvania also included a visit to the
Middletown and Hwnmelstown Rail.road
to see former Canadian
National Railways 2-6-0 number
91. This locomotive was built by the Canadian Locomotive Company in February 1910 as Grand
Trunk Railway
number 1013. Unfortunately, it was not operating
at the time
of our visit.
A quick visit to the Blue Mountain and Reading revealed
that former Canadian Pacific 4-6-4 Royal Hudson 2839 was on the
premises in Temple, although it had not seen active service for a
few years.
Another stop took us to south-central Pennsylvania, where
Canadian Locomotive Company built ex-Canadian Pacific 4-6-2
No. 1278 was being steamed up for another day of operation on the
Gettysburg Railroad. Finally, a small detour just south
of Pennsylvania
permitted us to
see two more fOlmer Canadian Pacific locomotives,
1238 and 1286, operating on
the Allegheny Central out of Cumberland,
Maryland.
Although we only trave
lled for three days, I was amazed
at how much active Canadian steam was still concentrated in such
a small area. What seemed most surprising was how many pieces
of Canadian railway equipment still enjoyed active service!
RAIL CANADIEN -450
8 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1996

.. :. I ~
l – .
Although lellered Atlantic Central, Royal Hudson number 2839s former Canadian Pacific heritage is still quite obvious. The 2839 was
photographed lying dormant on the Blue Mountain and Reading Railroad at Temple, Pennsylvania on May
4, 1992.
A SELECTION OF OTHER FORMER CANADIAN STEAM
ENGINES IN THE UNITED STATES
Canadian railway equipment can be seen in American
railway museums throughout the country, although there
is a
marked concentration in the north-east region. Active Canadian
steam can be seen in several other locations besides Pennsylvania.
North Conway in New Hampshire has a fine example
of a fonner
Canadian National 0-6-0 steam engine. Operating as number 7470,
this locomotive was built by the Grand Trunk Railway in April
of
1921. The entire Conway Scenic Railroad operation is well worth
the visit. Cass Scenic Railroad in West Virginia also operates a
Canadian steam engine. Their Shay locomotive number 2, built by
Lima in July 1928, was purchased new by the Mayo Lumber
Company located in Paldi, British Columbia.
TRACTION AND ELECTRICS
Traction fans should take note that several street cars and
interurban cars have been preserved
in American railway museums;
many
of these cars are still in operating condition. One of the finest
examples
of an electric railway museum in America is the Seashore
TroUey Museum
in Kennebunkport, Maine. Besides being a great
traction attraction, Seashore owns over a dozen pieces
of Canadian
electric railway equipment, several
of which are stiU in service. The Shore Line Trolley Museum
in EastHaven, and the Connecticut
Trolley Museum, both located
in Connecticut, also have a substantial
collection
of Canadian electric railway equipment.
CANADIA N PASSENGER CARS IN THE UNITED STATES
A large number of passenger cars have gone stateside. It is
harder to keep track of them as these cars often adopt a new identity
and will sometimes undergo major conversions so they become
almost unrecognizable as
to what their origin was. Perhaps one of
the best known Canadian passenger cars in the U.S. is the beautifully
restored St. Hyacinthe at the California State Railroad
Museum
in Sacramento. This car was built by Canadian Car and Foundry in
1929 as Canadian National Railways
12-1 sleeper carrying its
present name.
Several small tourist operations also purchased
passenger
cars over the years. Among them is the Cape Cod Railroad which
uses several former Canadian Flyer coaches originally built by
Canadian Car and Foundry for the Canadian National Railways.
The Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad also operates four former
Canadian National Canadian Flyer coaches.
In recent years, as Canadian National disposed
of their
remaining passenger car fleet assigned to their Montreal to Deux
Montagnes
commuter service, once again several cars ended up
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996 9 CANADIAN RAIL -450
A considerable number of Canadian street cars have found their way sOllth of the border. Some Toronto PCCs went to San Francisco for
further use, but many other types of cars from Montreal, Toronto and Ottawa went to museums. A fine example is Montreal double-ender
2001, built by Canadian Car
& Foundry in 1929, which was used on such MontreallOutes as Remembrance and Lachine Extension.
It
is seen here on May 6,1995 in service at the Shore Line Trolley Museum at East Haven Connecticut, where it is painted in the authentic
Montreal paint scheme. Photo by Mark Gustafson.
Former Canadian Pacific Railway
D4 number 453, bu.ilt in 1912, is owned by O. Winston Link. The locomotive, ill the process of being
restored at the time, was photographed
ill Rome, New York 011 August 5,1991.
RAIL CANADIEIJ -450 10
JANVIER -FEVRIER 1996
In Cumberland, Maryland, on the Western Maryland Scenic Railway on September 4,1993, power is provided by twoformer VIA Rail FPA4s.
Sporting a classic paint scheme
of Baltimore & Ohio blue and grey, numher 800 once carried VIA number 6780. Behind 800 is another FPA4,
number 306, in the Western Maryland
fireball paint scheme. This unit began Life as Canadian National 6793 before being sold to VIA.
south of the border. New York State has become the home for many
of the cars which can be seen in excursion service on the new
Adirondack Railway, out
of Thendara, and also the LowviUe and
Beaver Creek Railroad. Tioga Central also operates many former
Canadian Nationalcars, including several Canadian Flyer coaches,
a diner, a solarium car and a business car. Recently eight
of
Canadian Nationals multiple-unit commuter cars have gone to the
U.S., four to North Conway, New Hampshire and four to South
Carolina. [For
an account of those that went to South Carolina, see
the article on page l8
of this issue.]
FOLLOWING THE JANUARY 15 1990 CUTBACKS
In 1990, VIA Rail was forced to cut back the number of
trains it operated due to the federal governments decision to
reduce its operating budget. As a consequence, VIA Rail had a
surplus
of equipment. This included MLW and GMD A and B
cab units as well as dozens of passenger cars known as the blue
and yellow fleet. These cars were for the most pmt
of Canadian
National Railways origin, having been built by Canadian Car and
Foundry, although some
of the cars were sleeping cars purchased
second hand from American railways by Canadian National
in the mid 1960s. Among the American cars were former New York
Central and Milwaukee Road cars.
The equipment was put up for sale through Canac, a
subsidiary company
of Canadian National, which disposes of
surplus Canadian National and VIA equipment. Although many
blue and yellow cars were purchased by Canadian railway
operators, including B.C. Rail and Algoma Central, many
of the
cars made their way stateside. Among them, the W
estern Maryland
Scenic Railroad picked up three coaches, numbers 4886, 4887 and
4888. These cars were built
by Pullman Standard for the Canadian
Nationals subsidiary, Grand Trunk Western, in 1953.
As the equipment was being put up for sale, it was clearly
obvious by the prices set by Canac, that no Canadian rail enthusiast
groups could afford
to purchase from Canac. In the last few years,
the difference between the U.S. and Canadian money exchange has
only encouraged the sale
of railway equipment south of the border.
Few
of the former VIA Rail cab units were sold to
Canadian outfits. La Societe des Chemins de Fer du Quebec
acquired two GMD
A units, numbered 6305 and 6306, and began
a passenger tourist operation out
of Quebec City in June of this
year.
The Windsor and HantsportRailway, in Nova Scotia, acquired
JANUARY ~ F.EBRUARY 1996 11 CANADIAN RAIL -450
The Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad in Peninsula, Ohio use former VIA Rail FPA4 units. This photo shows number 15,formerly VIA 6771,
on the poinr of a northbound excursion train in May, 1993. MLW-built FPA4s are distinguishedjromthe American version by the addition
of the extra grillwork located near the rear of the unit. Before becoming CVSR number 15, this unil operated on the Weslern Mmyland Scenic
Railroad out
of Cumberland, Md. AI thaI time, il was numbered 305.
a total of eight cab units from Canac, including five MLW A
units (ex-VIA
6761,6763,6765,6783,6786) and tluee ML W B
units (ex-VIA 6861,6862,6867). The Wisconsin Central/Algoma
Central picked up several GMD A and B units which they plan
to use for their passenger service. However the remaining surviving
cab units have all found homes south
of the border.
For a few years, two former VIA Rail FPA4s operated on
the Western Maryland Scenic Rail.road (formerly the Allegheny
Central Railroad)
in Cumberland, Maryland. One of these units
has since moved to the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad in
Peninsula, Ohio, bringing their total
to two former VIA Rail
FPA4s (ex-VIA 6771 and 6777). Short line operator Nebkota
Railroad, located in Gordon, Nebraska, acquired three fOimer VIA
Rail GMD
F units. Two A units were renumbered 54 and 55
by simply dropping the first and last number used by VIA (6541
and 6550). Another short line operator, the Ohio Central, also
acquired 7 former VIA Rail GMD cab units (6501, 6507, 6512,
6513.6518,6519,6530) which complements their Canadian f1eel.
This fleet includes ex-Canadian National Railways 2-6-0 No. 96
and 4-6-0 No. 1551.
Perhaps the most famous group
of former VIA Rail cab
units are the four MLW built FPA4s, numbered 70 to 73 (ex 6760,
6775. 6787, 6790) operated by the Napa Valley Wine Train
in
Napa, California. These units have been painted in an attractive
paint scheme complete with red and white number boards.
Also
in California, the Feather River Rail.road Society in
Portola has acquired two fonner VIA Rail MLW built units
numbered 6776 and 6860. This outfit had previously acquired
former Canadian National F7Bu No. 9190 through Century
Locomotive Parts
in Lachine. Que. It has since been repainted in
Western Pacific colours and renumbered 925C.
The Dallas Area Regional Transit in Texas also acquired
several
fOllTIer VIA Rail RDCs in order to start up their commuter
operation. These cars are 6100, 6104, 6106, 6112, 6123. 6126,
6127,6129,6131.6139,6141,6142.6145.
RAIL CANADIEN – 450 12 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1996
TOP: Lackawanna Valley RS18 number 1801 was busy working the Delaware and Hudson yard in Taylor, Pa., across the river from
Scranton,
on October 14,1991.1801 was originally built by MLW for Canadian. National. In this photo it still sports a Roberval & Saguenay
paint scheme as a result
of a short stint it had done on that railway.
BOTTOM: Although letleredfor the Mohawk, Adirondack
and Northern, these ALCO C424s betray their former BC Rail heritage. They
were photographed switching cars in Newton Falls, New
York. The MA&N acquired about half a dozen C425s from BC Rail.
OPPOSITE:
On. May 3,1992, Cass Scenic Railroad Shay number 2 was photographed under steam en route to Bald Knob, West Virginia.
Origina
lly built in July, 1928, this 90-ton three-truck Shay spent most of its working life on Canadas west coast.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996 13 CANADIAN RAIL -450
RAIL CANADIEN -450
14 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1996
In the late 1960s the Montreal Locomotive Works built dozens of big ALCOsfor the various railways of Mexico. When the Mexican railways
were nationalized, most units were relettered Ferrocarilies Nationales de Mexico. One
of these is number 8611, seen here in Oriental, Mexico
on February
26, 1992. During a visit to that country in 1992, several similar units were seen still operating ..
OTHER CANADIAN LOCOMOTIVES OPERATING
OUTSIDE CANADA
VIA Rail was not the only Canadian source of second hand
railway motive power. As Canadian railways upgraded to second
and third generation diesels, their older locomotives often emigrated
south.
The Lackawanna Valley Railroad, located
in Scranton,
Pennsylvania, acquired two former Canadian National RS18s
through Century Locomotive Parts. When I visited their company,
their locomotive
22 still wore its Canadian National diagonal
stripe paint scheme. A second unit, numbered 1802, sported a
Roberval and Saguenay paint scheme which it acquired due to a
short stint on that railway. Both locomotives were acquired by the
Lackawanna Valley Railroad through Century Locomotive parts,
a locomotive dealer in Lachine, Que.
The Mohawk, Adirondack and Northern, a short line
located in Carthage, New York, operates several ALCO C425s
which they acquired from BC Rail. As part of their purchase
of new
Dash 8 locomotives, several BC Rail M630 and M636 locomotives
were traded in to General Electric. Most
of the BC Rail behemoths
were subsequently sold
to the Ferrocariles Nationales de Mexico.
Their heritage remains quite obvious, as the FNM simply replaced
the
BC Rail logo with their own and never bothered repainting the
units. According
to some local sources, it seems the Mexicans are
quite fond of the BC Rail two tone green paint scheme, as they even
painted a few
of their own locomotives in a similar fashion.
Other locomotives could be considered Wandering
Canadians. These include the Montreal built M420s which were
purchased new by the Providence and Worcester Railroad. These
units were recently sold
to the Iowa Central Railroad. Mexico also
purchased a number
of Canadian built locomotives such as the
M420s and M420TRs from Montreal Locomotive Works. The
BC
Rail M630s and M636s probably felt quite at home in Mexico as
about two dozen similar locomotives were purchased new from
MLW about 1970. At the time
of my visit to Mexico in 1992,
several
of the original ALCOs were still in active service.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996 15 CANADIAN RAIL -450
Steamtown has close to a dozen pieces offormer Canadian railway equipment. Among others is number 47, aformer Canadian National
engine which origillally operated commuter trains all the Lakeshore lille out
of MOlltreal. This photo was taken all September 20, 1992.
Former VIA Rail combine number
7189 was all the property of the Morristown and Erie Railroad on April 18, 1992, when this photo was
takell. The car was purchased exclusively for its trucks which were to be installed on allother car. Today,
it is quite likely, unfortunately,
that the rest
of the car has been scrapped.
RAIL CANADIEN -450 16 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1996
Two former Milwaukee Road skyview cars form part of this restaurant on the former railroad car feny Lansdowne in this view taken at
Detroit. Michigan on August 12, 1990.
In Ihe background is the skyline of Windsor, Ontario. The Skyview cars spent several years operating
on Canadian National Railways, particularly
on Ihe Ocean and Scolian between Halifax and Montreal. In this service they were named
Malpeque
and Trinity. The Lansdowne was buill in 1886 and was named after Lord Lansdowne, the Govelllor General of Canada
between
1883 and 1888. This vessel served on the Great Lakes between Canada and the United States for 84 years until 1970. During Ihe
summer of 1995. Ihe Lansdowne and the two cars were moved 10 Cleveland, Ohio.
Several other diesel units have left Canada for more exotic
lands. These include two former Napierville Junction RS3s which
have found a home in Cuba. Following the shutdown
of the
Newfoundland railway system, several
of their narrow gauge
diesels were sold to Chile and Nigeria. Costa Rica also purchased
some 80-ton General Electric locomotives from Canadian National
during the 1960s.
CONCLUSION
Many pieces of railway equipment which formed part of
our railway heritage still exist, although they no longer call Canada
their home. The number of pieces which can be seen in active
service
is considerable, particularly in railway museums and on
short line operations
in the United States. Although some may
think
it sad that so much Canadian railway equipment has left the
country, it
is a relief to know that many are being cared for in
museums. It is certain that
most of them would not now exist if they
had not found homes outside
of Canada. As it is they will, no doubt,
be around for many years to come, for future generations
to enjoy.
The author wishes to thank Douglas N.W. Smith for kindly
reviewing the text.
OPPOSITE, TOP. Awaiting its delivery to the newly formed short line, Owego and Hartford, GP7 number 151 wails patiently in the yard
of the Montreal Locomotive Sales.jormerly Century Locomotive Parts, in Lachine. Que. on June 29, 1993. Number 151 was formerly a
Quebec.
Nonh Shore and Labrador unit which carried the same number.
OPPOSITE, BOTTOM: The Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad operate their passenger excursion train using former Canadian National
Canadian Flyer cars. This photo was taken on May 18. 1991.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996 17 CAIlADIAII RAIL -450
RAIL CANADIEN -450 18 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1996
The Great South Carolina M.U. Car Move
By Fred Angus, with data from Ed Wilko men
Occasionally it is nice to diverge a bit from the usual accounts of historical and contemporary events to tell a story which is a bit
more light hearted, and yet still pertains to the subject
of railway history. Having just read about Wandering Canadians, here is an account
of four more pieces of equipment, well known on the Montreal scene, that went south. It is easy enough to summarize the following story
in a few words Four of the old CN electric cars were sold to South Carolina and moved there in October. However as your editor was
involved in the story, and as there was a ce(cain amount
of adventure and humour in it, we are presenting this account, a bit tongue in cheek,
as a New
Years offering. All facts, however, are as they actually happened. Hope you enjoy it.
When the CN electric line, running between Montreal and
Deux Montagnes, was shut down for rebuilding, the old motive
power and rolling stock was retired from service. As has previously
been reported in Canadian Rail, the last day
of operation for these
venerable
machines was Friday, June 21995. Someoftheequipment,
including the five pieces going to the Canadian Railway Museum,
had already been slated for preservation, the remainder were
offered for sale. Among these were the multiple unit cars which
had seen 43 years
of service. Four MU cars went to Alberta, foW
more to North Conway and another four to South Carolina. This
story concerns dle latter four. In the summer of 1995 multiple unit
cars
6/30 (ex M-l), 6733 (ex M-4), 6746 (ex T-7) were purchased
by the South
Carolina Railroad Museum (SCRM). Subsequently
6735 (ex M-6) was purchased by a member
of SCRM, and it was
arranged that the four cars would be shipped together during the
month
of October, destined for the sunny south.
The South Carolina Railroad Museum is located near
Winn
sboro S.C., about thirty miles north of the state capital of
Columbia. It owns 11 miles of the former Rockton & Rion
Railway, now known as the Rockton Rion & Western Rail Road,
originally a 12 1/2 mile line extending west
from Rockton, on the
NOIfolk Southern
just south of Winnsboro. Construction of the line
was begun on April
I, 1883, and it was built to serve the granite
quanies which produced the famous Winnsboro blue granite, used
in
the construction of many famous buildings. The town of Rion
was named for James Henry Rion who was the original
promoter
of the railroad. An interesting fact is that Mr. Rion was born in
Montreal
in 1826, and was the son of one of the numerous persons
who claimed to be the missing Dauphin
of France, considered by
the royalists to have been Louis XVII.
The Rockton & Rion was
originally built to the Southern gauge
of 5 feet, but about 1887 it
was converted to standard. The R & R served thc qualTies for
almost
90 years, and in later times was well known among rail
enthusiasts as being one
of the last short lines in the east to use
steam locomotives in regular service. Eventually, however, the
line was shut down, but never formally abandoned, and the tracks
soon became derelict and overgrow
n. In fact a large factory was
built on a portion
of the line, creating a gap of about a mile.
On November 19,
1983 the South Carolina Railroad Museum
acquired
the old Rockton & Rion and since then has done a great
deal
of work to rehabilitate and rebuild it. A new track has been
built around the factory, so closing the gap, countless ties have
been replaced, and paved-over road crossings are being reopened.
At present train operation covers about two miles
of track, but eventually it is hoped to use
the entire 11 miles. This passenger
operation required good cars, and
after much discussion the CN
multiple unit cars were purchased. It should be noted that fully
half
of all the motorized passenger cars from the CN electric line are
now in South Carolina!
The route to be followed was somewhat circuitous, heading
west
to Toronto and Windsor, then to Detroit and Cincinnati,
where they would be handed over to
CSX. Then east again through
Kentucky and south
on the former Clinchfield to Spartanburg S.c.,
and further south on CSX lines to Columbia. In all cases they were
to be placed immediate
ly behind the locomotives. At Columbia
they were to be handed over
to Norfolk Southern for the short 30
mile trip nor
th to Rockton. However The best laid schemes 0
mice an men gang aft agley and the move had some aspects of
adventure. Your editor has been a member of SCRM for some
years, and has often visited South Carolina and ridden on the track
of the museum. Thus it was that I had the privilege of joining some
other members and taking part in the southern portion
of the big
move.
After suitable preparations (including chaining down the
pantographs) at
Montreals Taschereau Yard, the four cars were
scheduled to leave
on Monday, October 16. However 6730,6733
and 6746 actually moved to Toronto on train 367, two days early.
6735 missed this move as
it had a broken air hose, but it finally
departed on train 369 on October 17, and was reunited with the
other three which had been held in Toronto. At Toronto, CN
decided that the generators under the
motor cars were too low to
clear the Windsor-Detroit tunnel, so they were rerouted to Sarnia
and through the new St. Clair tunnel to Port Huron Michiga
n. Since
the cars were historical items destined for exhibit at a non-profit
museum, they were admitted to the United States duty free and,
once on U.S. tracks, were handed
over to CNs subsidiary the
Grand Trunk Western. CN train 385 continued on through
Mount
Clemens, Detroit and on to the big yard at Flat Rock, Mich. The
GTW has taken over the Detroit Toledo & Ironton RR, so this line
was used south
to Springfield, Ohio, and by trackage rights on
Conrail to Cincinnati. But things went bad on this line.
Southbound freight
472 got as far as Lima, Ohio where it
spent a lot
of time switching the Ford Motor plant. Then it passed
a recent derailment
of a Schnabel car, also bound for South
Carolina, carrying a very large pressure vessel for a power plant.
This car and its load had rolled
over on its side and extraordinary
measures were being taken to salvage it. By this time the crew had
died on the job since 12 hours of operating time had elapsed.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996
The next day, train 472 from Flat Rock
picked up all the cars from the previous day and the
combined train headed south out
of Lima. The crew
on this train
died at Maitland, Ohio. Before
Maitland the crew had
set out a locomotive at
Johnson City for northbound train 471. A new crew
was waiting at Maitland, and after a two hour delay
train 472 entered Conrail trackage. This train was
later delayed one and a
half hours at St. Bernard
because a freight in front had pulled apart right in
town. Finally, just before midnight on October
21
(the 77th anniversary of the opening of the Mount
Royal tunnel) the train pulled
in to CSX s Queensgate
yard
in Cincinnati.
19 CANADIAN RAIL -450
Meanwhile your editor had made
arrangements to meet other SCRM members who
were hoping to meet the cars somewhere en route.
Members Howard Shepherd and Ed Wilkomen
were on a cruise on the river steamer
Delta Queen
which was scheduled to tie up at Nashville Tenn. on
the morning
of October 21. That is a long way from
Montreal, but it was possible to make it
in time,
albeit by bus, and after 1400 miles and 30 hours
of
Greyhound, it was a relief to arrive in Nashville on
the evening
of October 20. We all met as planned
Switching wood chip and pulpwood cars into a siding for a mill 011 the Columbia
Newberry and Laurens
in South Carolina, the passenger cars got a little exira
mileage, as well as some surprised looks from the employees
of the mill.
All photos by Fred Angus.
on October 21, and having established that the cars had not yet
reached Cincinnati, it was decided to try
to intercept them there.
As it happened, a couple from Cleveland who had been on the
cruise were driving back home, and they gave us a ljft
to Cincinnati,
which we reached that afternoon. Having found that the cars would
arrive at Queensgate yard that night, we proceeded there and,
shOitly before midnight, they arrived and were officially turned
over
to CSX. Special permission had been secured for the three of
us to ride the cars, while they were on CSX trackage, in addition to the officially designated rider who was to accompany them from
Montreal
to Columbia. CSX officials said that the cars would
remain in Cincinnati until train 691 (a fast freight running between
Detroit and Waycross Ga.) was made up; they would then depart
late on October 22
or early October 23.
Saturday night we all stayed at a motel, and on Sunday
purchased supplies required for camping on the cars as they headed
south. Several times during the day we checked with
CSX who said
that the departure
of train 691 was delayed due to a sholtage of
power, and the cars were still in the yard. This
continued until Monday afternoon,
October 23
when
CSXs automated car tracing service revealed
the surprising fact that our cars were at Erwin
Tennessee, and had left on the previous days train
691 early in the morning
of October 22, having
spent only a few hours in Cincinnati!
A brief lunch stop along the Columbia Newberry and Laurens, now part of CSX,
allowed a chance to photograph 6730,
6733, 6735 and 6746 in the freight train
travelling through South Carolina on October
25,1995. By coincidence, the next day
the new equipment went into service on the Montreal commuter line.
Great! Here we were a day and a half, and
hundreds
of miles, behind our cars which were
rolling
south without even the official rider on
board.
There seemed little chance of catching them,
but
we could give it a try. It was decided not to have
the cars held at Erwin since this would mean that
they would have
to wait for the next 691 and might
suffer vandalism while standing there. The plan
was to rent a car and try to catch them at Spartanburg.
All would have gone well, except that the CSX van
which was to take us to pick up the
car at Cincinnati
airport (actually
in Kentucky) got a flat tire on the
expressway and we sat there by the median for
more than an hour while traffic rushed by at 70
miles
an hour only two feet away -not a pleasant
experience. Finally another van rescued us, we got
the rented car, and departed at 5:
17 P.M.
RAIL CANADIEN -450
The less said about the drive south
the better. Suffice it to say that in six and a
half hours
of driving time, plus half an hour
in food and rest stops, we covered more than
450 miles on the interstates, over mountain
ranges and valleys
of the Appalachians, through
Kentucky, Tennessee and North Carolina. It
would have been a very scenic trip if
it had
been daylight and if we had had time to enjoy
it. Coming down the escarpment near the
famous Saluda grade we soon passed a sign
reading
Welcome to South Carolina. This
was welcome indeed, and
we pulled into
Spartanburg at 12:17 A.M., exactly seven
hours after leaving Cincinnati airport.
20 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1996
We soon got to a phone and called
Spartanburg yard where we got the welcome
news that 691 is
in the yard and your cars are
on
it -they will be leaving about 1:30 A.M..
We had made it in time! Going straight to the
yard,
we found the cars, little the worse for
wear after their unattended trip down the
Clinchfield. They were to continue on 691
to
Safe in CSXs Cayce yard at Columbia, the cars arrived on train 788 at 3:00 P.M. on
October 25.
Greenwood S.C. where they would be left until another freight
would take them to Columbia. One
of us drove the rented car to
Greenwood while the other three boarded car 6735 and prepared to
bunk down. First order
of business was to get out the bottle of Mr.
Clean and clean the seats, then rearrange the cushions to form a
bed, spread the recently acquired blankets and prepare to settle
down after a long eventful day. It was not exactly Pullman service,
but then one does not often have the opportunity to ride a
CN
electric car by night through the South Carolina countryside. We
departed Spartanburg soon after 2:00 A.M. and soon passed
through the famous turmel under the Norfolk Southern main line.
lt seemed scarcely believable that, only five months before, these
same cars had been running regularly through the
Mount Royal tunnel. One thing we noticed was that, without electric power
being used, the familiar whine
of the traction motors was absent.
Even though we were riding on a motor unit with the traction
motors turning, there was no noticable sound above that
of a
regular coach.
So we continued on through the night, down the
fOlmer Charleston & Western Carolina R.R.
to Greenwood by 6:00
A.M. where
we saw the four cars switched off 691 and into
Maxwell yard. One amusing incident occurred at this time. We had
told the train crews that the cars were destined for a museum, and
to be careful with them. We were surprised when one said
I
thought they were going for scrap. It seems he thought the initials
SCRM on the car sides stood for scrap metal!
Earl y on the morning
of Wednesday , October
25, the four cars were coupled to train 788, again
right behind the locomotives. We departed at
8: 15
A.M. and backtracked up the old C&WC nonstop
to Laurens. Then on to the former Columbia
Newberry & Laurens which has now been upgraded
by CSX into a high speed main line with 132 lb.
welded rail.
In the yard at the South Carolina Railroad Museum, all four cars finally arrived on
Friday, November 10. 6730 and 6746 would soon be in service again.
We proceeded at about 40 miles per hour
and stopped
at two saw mills en route where we
picked up a total
of 14 wood chip cars. We also set
out a tank car and box cars at other industries.
Since our cars were right behind the locomotives,
they also went into the sidings on all these switching
moves -an interesting sight, and the envy
of South
Carolina raiJians, many
of whom have never had
the chance
to ride the CN&L. We also met two
northbound trains, and had a brief lunch stop. but
otherwise moved right along. During this time we
were hard at work cleaning the seats, sweeping
out the cars and making them look presentable for
their arrival at Columbia. It was strange to find
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996
old copies of the Montreal Gazette, plus old transfers
and timetables, stuck behind and under the seats.
Soon we were
passing through the outskirts of
Columbia, then went right by the Amtrak station, and
at exactly 3:00 P.M. we reached CSXs Cayce yard.
Eleven days after the
move began the cars were in
Columbia. The next day those of us who had come
from far away returned home.
21 CANADIAN RAIL -450
The cars were now less than thirty miles
from their destination, but the story was not yet over.
Thanks
to the great generosity of CN and CSX, the
move over their lines had been made free
of charge
as a gesture of support for the South Carolina Railroad
Museum. This covered the entire distance from
Montreal
to Columbia, well over a thousand miles.
It was hoped that NOIfolk Southern would extend the
same generosity for the short move to Rockton, but
it was not to be. Pending negotiations for a free
move, NS would not accept the cars,
so CSX placed
them on an industrial siding in Columbia where they
sat for fifteen days cooling their wheels. While it
might have been possible eventually to have them
moved free,
it was clear that this would take some
time, and the cars were needed soon. So it was
A test run was made on Friday, November 24, the day before the first Santa Claus trips
Here
we see 6730 and 82 (bearing a styalized map of South Carolina on its side)
stopped to pick up the flagging crew after the crossing
of highway 321. Flagging the
train across
is standard procedure when the Museums trains cross this busy road.
EPILOGUE
decided to pay for the move, and on Thursday, November 9, CSX
delivered them to Andrews yard
of Norfolk Southern. Friday
morning two cars were tumed
as requested and all four were put
on the local freight on the
R line (the former Charlotte Columbia
& Augusta RR) heading north. At 3:30 P.M. they arrived at
Rockton and were set
off on the Rockton house track. SCRM
members had been alerted that the train was on the way, so were
there with two locomotives and immediately hauled all four cars
into the
museums yard. Now the big move was really over. Late
in November your editor was again in South Carolina
(travelling
by Amtrak this time) visiting friends in Winnsboro.
This was less than a mile from the old track
of the Rockton & Rion,
so naturally a visit
to the SCRM was in order. As it happened, the
weekend
of November 2S -26 saw the museum running a Santa
Claus train, and during those two days many runs were made
carrying a total
of almost 2000 passengers. The train consisted of
its a long way from the Mount Royal tunnel to Fairfield County, South
Carolina, but these Wandering Canadians are in service again, on a railway
originally promoted by James Henry Rion, who was born in Montreal 170
years ago
l
6746 and 6730 are seen in push-pull operation on the South
Carolina Railroad Museums Santa Claus train on Sunday, November 26,
1995. The ride
is about two miles each way, but this will be extended in the
future, and eventually may run the entire eleven miles.
6730 and 6746 powered by locomotives 33 (ex Pennsylvania
RailJOad 9339) and 82 (an industrial switcher formerly
used
by the U.S. Navy at its base in Charleston) running in
push-pull fashion. Although all cars are,
of course, being
used as regular coaches the
pantographs and traction
motors are still
in place although they will never be used.
Before the Santa Claus runs there was some last
minute cleaning
as well as decorating with appropriate
Cluistmas trimmings. The interior lights were found to be
functional, and the air operated bells soon were ringing
their old familiar sound. Then we all enjoyed several rides
on the train
as well as a bit of motorcading. Getting aboard
6730 and 6746 with the crowds
of happy people was a very
nostalgic experience for one who had often ridden them in
Montreal.
It was almost like rush hour at Val Royal!
It
is good to know that these cars have found a good
home, and we sincerely hope that they will be exhibits at
the South Carolina Railroad Museum for many years to
come.
In June, 1996 the convention
of the National Railway
Historical Society will include a visit to the SCRM, and we
can be sure the M.U. cars will
playa big part in the
activities. Montrealers driving down to Florida can easily
take a small detour and visit the SCRM where they can see,
and perhaps even ride, the old MUs which were a part
of the
Montreal scene for so many years.
RAIL CANADIEN -450 22 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1996
The End of PCC Street Car Service in Toronto
-~-.–.-
~–::e
….. ,. T
One ojTorontosjirst pcc cars, number 4034, photographed new at the Canadian Car and Foundry plant near Montreal in November, 1938.
CRHA Archives, CanCar collection, photo No. 5914.
During November, 1995. official word was received that
confirmed rumours which had been around for some time. The
Toronto Transit Commission was going to retire from service all
its remaining
PCC street cars, and the last run would take place on
Friday. December 8, 1995.
In recent years, decreases in ridership and reduced service
on
TTC street car lines had rendered a number of cars surplus and
made it easily possible to maintain service with the fleet
of new
cars (CLRVs and ALRVs) presently on hand.
In the 1980s there
was a project to rebuild some PCCs and,
in effect, make them like
new cars, and 23 cars were scheduled to be so rebuilt. These cars,
after rebuilding. were to be renumbered in the
4600 series.
However the project was cancelled on August 12, 1991, after
19 of
the 23 had been rebuilt, or were in the process of being rebuilt.
Finally, at a meeting on November
28, 1995, the TTC
decided to retire the PCCs from regular service and dispose of 17
of the rebuilt cars, and the four remaining unrebuilt ones. Two cars,
4500 and 4549, will be kept for special tours and charters. Thus the
PCC will not yet disappear entirely from Toronto.
For the last week
of PCC operation it had been arranged
that PCCs would be used
in regular aU-day selvice on most of the major lines. That gave Torontonians a chance to ride the old cars
for the last time over a large part
of the system.
On the last day. December 8, there was a special run
between Russell and Roncesvalles car barns for the news media
and other invited guests, using cars 4600 and 4601.
In the afternoon
there was a special excursion for enthusiasts that used 4600, and
which covered several lines during a period
of about four hours.
Finally, the last run was made, with car
4qll, on route 506 on
Carleton.
At about 9:30 P.M. 4611 arrived at Roncesvalles and
ended 57 years
of PCC service in Toronto.
With the PCCs retired, there are now 248 street cars
in
service in Toronto. These are made up of 196 standard cars
(CLRVs) and 52 articulated cars (ALRVs).
If we add the two PCCs
which will be retained, the total will be an even 250 cars.
The PCC car design, as continually updated, ran in Toronto
in regular service for 57 years (1938 to 1995). However the
longest-lived order
of cars, class A-8, rebuilt as class A-15, had a
life only slightly longer than the two
fanner TTC standard
designs -and this with the aid
of two structural rebuilds -with all
three types averaging the same 25,000 (plus or minus) miles
annually over their lives.
YEARS OF SERVICE OF STANDARD TYPE CARS IN TORONTO
TYPE LAST CAR IN SERVICE OUT (excl charters) REBUILDS YEARS
TRC 1326 Dec II 1910 Mar 30 1951 1 (partial) 40.25
WITT 2766 Jan 30 1923 Apr
241963 1 (partial) 40.25
PCC
4611 Mar
121951 Dec 8 1995 2 (complete) 44.75
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996 23 CANADIAN RAIL -450
TORONTO PCC CAR HISTOR Y, REBUILD DATA AND MILEAGE
NUMBER DELIVERED REBUILD MILEAGE
A-IS
4600
4601
4602
4603
4500*
4549*
4606
4607
4608
4609
4610
4611
4612
4613
4614
4615
4616
4617
4618 A-8 OUTSHOP TO RBLD AFTER RBLD TOT AL FOR LIFE
4505 Feb 15 1951 Sep 11 1986 1,070,716 116,574 1,187,290
4512 Feb
191951 Dec 41986 1,089,196 105,994 1,195,190
4537 Mar 7
1951 Apr 261989 1,1 16,421 74,489 1,190,910
4548
Apr 10
1951 Jul 28 1989 929,567 78,677 1,008,244
4500
Jan311951 Jul 14 1989 1,116,068 18,004 1,134,072
4549
Mar261951 Dec61989 1,106,094 17,659 1,123,753
4528
Mar 5
1951 Dec 291989 1,139,978 67,066 1,207,044
4536 Mar 7
1951 Feb 14 1990 1,087,799 63,773 1,151,572
4544
Mar
13 1951 Apr 20 1990 1,140,776 64,967 1,205,743
4526
Feb 27
1951 Aug 7 1990 1,123,211 90,332 1,213,543
4541
Mar 12
1951 Nov 6 1990 1,143,900 79,595 1,223,495
4540
Mar 12 1951 Dec
31 1990 1,109,743 65,152 1,174,895
4543
Mar 14
1951 Dec 13 1990 1,118,867 69,400 1,188,267
4503 Feb 12
1951 Apr181991 1,162,649 53,750 1,216,399
4509
Feb 20
1951 Aug 271991 1,111,389 60,628 1,172,017
4518
Feb
221951 Oct 29 1991 1,145,178 58,369 1,203,547
4515
Feb
221951 Dec 13 1991 1,134,577 53,825 1,188,402
4539
Mar 14 1951 Jan 29 1992 1,142,597 40,208 1,182,805
4501
Jan
31 1951 Mar 31 1992 1,176,288 40,607 1,216,895
* Class A-15H (historically restored) cars 4604 and 4605 carry their original class A-8 numbers 4500 and 4549.
Cars 4524, 4529, 4530, 4546 were
to have been rebuilt and renumbered 4619, 4620, 4621, 4622 but the program was
cancelled in 1991. lnfonnation
couI1esy of R.F. Corley.
Goodbye to the Original Red Rocket. So said a large sign carried on a PCC car during the special
run on the morning
of December 8, 1995 -the last day.
Photo by Fred Angus.
RAIL CANADIEN -450 24 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1996
At the busy Church Street crossing, 4600 about to pass 4602 on the last day, December 8. The photo was
taken from the rear
of car 4601.
Photo by Fred Angus.
The last run
of a Toronto PCC in regular service. 4611 at the eastern end of its run the
evening
of December 8 1995, just before returning to Roncesvalles barn and retirement
Photo by Fred Angus.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996· 25 CAIJADIAIJ RAIL -450
Museum Notes
January 8, 1996
By John Godfrey
Winters here. Those of you who live in the
Montreal area know that we have already received
more snow than all
of last winter. Kinda makes one
appreciate the new shop building
all the more.
Since the last column, the Association has
acquired a number
of new pieces in the collection.
Just after the close
of the operating season (which saw
24,382 people go through the gate),
CN transferred
three pieces, formerly on its Museum
Train from
1953 to 1967,
to Delson from the National Museum
of Science and Technology in Ottawa. Arriving on
our CP connection on November2nd, after
an overnight
move from the national capital, were: CN 2541 (ex
COR
1531, nee ICR 5331), a sleeper built in 1910 by
the Siliker Car Co. in Halifax; CN 7108 (ex COR
2039, COR 98, NTR
14, nee ICR 495), a combination
passenger -baggage car built as a coach by Crossen
of Cobourg Ontario in 1890; CN 8400 (nee GTR 766).
a baggage car built in 1912
by the GTR i tsel f.
The Jolly Ole Elf himself left something at
the Museum a few days before Christmas when the
CP Delson roads witcher delivered former CP M-630
CP Rail 4563 soon after its arrival at the Museum in December, 1995.
Photo by John Godfrey.
No. 4563. A replacement for the former BC Rail M-630 No. 715.
which the CRHA reluctantly gave up title to earlier in the year, the
locomotive has been thoroughly mechanically reconditioned by
CP Rail in the St. Luc roundhouse
in Montreal and repainted in the
circa
1971 action red scheme. A little work on the alternator and,
come next
SLUnmer, a 251 prime mover may echo off the nearby
rooftop
s. A huge thank you to the boys (and girls) at CP who were
obviously much more nice than naughty, and made the CRM the
benefactor
of their good behaviour.
In the recent past, year-end switching has been somewhat
reduced due to more pieces being acquired and being put under
cover than
in preceding years, when marathon sessions were
known to have been held to get as much under cover as possible.
Such was not the case this year. A good portion
of one day was
spent getting CN 2541 inside building one shOltly after its arrival
on
the property, hauling in the equipment stored at the Des
Bouleaux end
of the site over the summer, and lastly CP 4563 was
hauled into the Upper Yard on December 23rd. However, it was the
activity on December 16th that had everybody talking.
Under
at times dangerous conditions, former London &
Port Stanley flanger
FA-l was moved from its location at the east
end of the Wabash track to a location
just behind the shop. This was
done over the course
of twelve hours by more than a dozen
volunteers. sometimes waist deep in snow. Why? An agreement
was struck with the city
of St. Constant to restore the piece and
place it on highway 132 for use as a tourist office.
It will take up
space in the shop to be vacated by the CP reefer in March, and is
expected to be out on the highway sometime
in April. Happily for all concerned, the volunteers and the flanger made it to the shop
safe and sound at the end
of the day.
Speaking
of the shop, this winters residents include the
aforementioned
CP reefer, which is seeing the end of a very
extended stay. All its roof and s
ides were completely rebuilt and,
once restoration work
is completed, it will be rolled out and its
place taken by the L&PS flanger. Courtalds
No.7 also made its
way from the Wabash track to the shop in October, though by a
much shorter route via the street car loop. It too is expected to be
there for a while,
as it is receiving a full cosmetic restoration to its
former appearance. CN 30
is spending the winter indoors undergoing
a minor tune-up and, 1astly, MTC 1959 is to undergo continuing
cosmetic and routine mechanical work. CN 15824 is yet to make
it into the bu.ilding for its work.
The Museum opens for
business on May 5th with a new
exhibit in the Hays Building, illustrating the life
of the railway
worker. Nine (to date) scheduled special event days include a
diesel weekend on July 6th and 7th, the 160th anniversary
of
Canadian railways on July 21st, a model train show on August.l0th
and
11 th, and a vintage automobile exhibition on September 7th
and 8th. Details about these and other events at the Museum can
be had at the Musemns number (514) 632-2410.
Between now and then, theres always lots
to do. Work
sessions are held every Saturday at
the Museum, and new volunteers
are always welcome. Hope
to see you out there if you are in the
Montreal area.
Til1 next time, happy shovelling!!
RAIL CAIJADIEN -450 26 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1996
The Business Car
TRAM GARNERS HISTORICAL A WARD
The City of Nelson, B.C. has once again been recognized
on the international stage for its rich heritage setting and restoration
of its past.
The Nelson Electric Tramway Society has been awarded a
Certificate
of Commendation from the American Association for
State and Local History (AASLH) for its restoration
of streetcar
23. Everybody is really pleased, we understand this to be a very
prestigious award said society president David Lloyd.
I think the
citizens
of Nelson should be proud of what we have here. Lloyd
and the society were made aware
of the award in March when a
member
of a heritage society in Victoria visited the area last
summer and encouraged them to enter. He said that the streetcar
was not only beautifully restored, but had an interesting history.
The life
of car 23 dates back to 1906 when it was originally
built for the City
of Cleveland. It came to Nelson in 1923 to
compliment a fleet which had been on the rails since
1899. After
50 years
of service the tramway system, which ran on five miles
of track, shut down in 1949. After retirement, the car was used for
a number
of purposes, including a dog kennel, for a period of time.
In 1981 it was moved to Selkirk College for a student restoration
project. With growing interest in the project, the society was
formed in 1988 with the goal
of getting car 23 back on the tracks.
With government funding from GO BC and donated materials,
equipment, tools and expertise, that goal was reached in 1992.
Despite the jubilation
of the recognition, the award comes
at a time when the society
is struggling financially. Since the
streetcar
began its triumphant return to the rails
of the Queen City,
it has had a difficult time paying for itself.
Were not too well off
financially, we need all the help we can get from the residents,
businesses and tourists said Lloyd. The 50 society members are
volunteers, however costs like the $7500 annual insurance, power
and maintenance add
up over the season. You have to take a lot
of two dollar passengers to payoff all of the costs involved said
Lloyd.
Despite the debt to the city and the banks, the society
forges on enthusiastically. So far the passenger totals are up over
last year, and restoration of a second car is in the works. The
society was presented with
the AASLH award on September 7, in
Saratoga Spri.ngs, New York.
Nelson, B.C., August I, 1995.
RAILWAY ENGINE BUILDING RUNS OUT OF STEAM
No locomotives will be built in Britain for home main line
use next year [1996] for the first time since the Stephensons
Rocket ran in 1829, a development alanning readers.
Britains largest manufacturer, ABB, has announced that
without
an order by next month it will have to close its plants in
York and Derby, which accounts for more than half the national
capacity. The only one on the books for next year for home u
se is
a steam locomotive, paid for by public subscription. By contrast,
in the four decades to 1990, British works turned out hundreds of
locomotives a year, up to three a day for the home market.
The Engineering Employers Federation has said that the
country which invented the steam engine
is about to be reduced to
no more than a component supplier. The industry blames rail
privatisation. The power to order locomotives
is vested in three
leasing companies set up by the government. Locomotives would
be hired to the
25 passenger operating. companies, and this revenue
used to buy new rolling stock. However, they have no customers
because none
of the envisioned 25 private train companies is yet
operating. Even when they are, industry analysts wonder what
incentive there will be for the 25 to enter into contracts
to hire new
trains when their operating leases are for seven years, against the
40 year life
of a train. This would leave the leaSing firm with no
guarantee that after the first passenger franchise ran out subsequent
holders would want
to pick up the costs of new trains when there
were plenty
of old ones about.
The Governmentcutnearly all contracts for new locomotives
and carriages in January 1993, when proposals for privatisation
were announced. Before then,
BR had a steady reinvestment
programme which kept the supply industry stable. There are no
orders on our books and no signs
of orders said Mr. John Malam,
chief executive
of the Engineering Employers Federation in the
North-West. Less
was being spent on improving the railway
system per head
of population than in any other country in the
European Union, he said. The railway supply industry, including
producers
of track, signalling and communications, made 20
percent
of the workforce redundant last year, he added. We shall
at best be relegated
to supplying components. The investment in
British railway rolling stock is pitiful compared to Germany,
where orders have recently been placed for 420 locomotives worth
3 billion pounds. Mr. Roger Harrison, ABB marketing director for
rail vehicles, said: This may be the end
of the show.
The Daily Telegraph, London.
A
RAIL WAY ADVENTURE TO THE PACIFIC
Next April 15 to April 28, Elderhostel Canada will be
conducting a special two-week program
of particular interest to
people fascinated
by the history, culture and impact of railways in
Canada. Called Canadas Insane Dream -a Railway Adventure to
the Pacific, it will feature a series
of lectures by Dr. Kenneth
Mackenzie, recently-retired chief archivist
of Canadian National
Railways, as well
as a trip across Canada on VIAs western
transcontinental train. The title originates from the description
used
in Parliament in the 1870s describing the idea of building a
railway across Canada as an act
of insane recklessness.
Since space
is limited, anyone interested in participating
should contact
Elderhostel Canada, care
of W.A. Rathbun,
20 Guildwood Parkway, Suite 408,
Scarborough, Ontario
MIE 5B6 as soon as possible.
The telephone number is (416) 261-8919.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1996 27 CANADIAN RAIL -450
HELP NEEDED TO PRESERVE CPR 374
The 374 Station Society is seeking to raise $250,000 to
build a glass pavilion to house former CPR 374 next to the old
foundhouse
in Vancouver. As most members know, 374 hauled the
first regular train into Vancouver when the main line was extended
to that city in 1887. Remember those gloriolls days of Expo 86?
Old 374 was one
of the stars of the show, as it was displayed in the
rowldhollse. Now it will be a star again, in the new glass enclosure,
together with the personalized bricks which commemorate the
donors
to the project in 1986. Supporting this project wilJ ensure
the preservation
of this pficeless 110 year old relic.
To help with the project, please contact:
The 374 Station Society
Suite 530 -355 Burrard Street
Vancouver B.C. V6C
2G8
LINDSAY MODEL RAILWAY SHOW
The Lindsay and District Model Engineers Show will be
held on April 13th and 14th 1996 at the Victoria Park Armoury, 210
Kent Street West, Lindsay, Ontario. On Saturday the show will
be
open from 11 :00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M., while on Sunday the hours will
be 12:00 noon
to 4:30 P.M. Admission is $4 for adults, $2 for
seniors and students, and
$1 fOf children.
For more information, write to Lindsay and District Model
Engineers, Box 452, Lindsay, Ontario K9V
4S5, or phone:
Wayne Lamb (705) 324-9865 or Eric Potter (705) 328-3749.
VIA
TRAINS REROUTED
Early in October 1995, scheduled work on Victoria Bridge
at Montreal resulted
in those VIA trains that normally cross this
bridge being rerouted. Trains to and from Quebec City operated
from St. Lambert, with bus connections between St. Lambert and
Montreals Central station. Howevef the longer distance trains the
Chaleur for Gaspe, and the Ocean for Halifax were rerouted
via Cannon Junction and Del son
to the CP line and over the CP
bridge at LaSalle Que., near Montreal. The photo below shows the
westbound Ocean crossing the CP bridge
in the morning of
October 9, 1995. Notice the ex tra cars being deadheaded to
Montreal. Photo by Fred Angus.
BACK COVER: Originally built/or the Canadian Northern Railway in 1912, Ohio Central 4-6-0 number 1551 still sees active service during
the summers, between Sugar Creek and Dresden, Ohio. The locomotive was photographed
in Sugar Creek on May 17,1991.
Photo by Pierre Ozorak.
Canadian Rail
120, rue St-Pierre, St. Constant, Quebec
Canada J5A 2G9
Postmaster: if undelivered within
10 days return to sender, postage guaranteed.

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