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Canadian Rail 444 1995

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Canadian Rail 444 1995

Canadian Rail
THE JOURNAL OF CANADAS RAILWAY HISTORY
No, 444
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
,

, ,
~I
I I
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J
PUBLISHED BI,MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
PUBLIE TOUS LES DEUX MOIS PAR LASSOCIATION CANADIENNE DHISTOIRE FERROVIAIRE
CANADIAN RAIL
ISSN 0001-4875
PUBLISHED BI-MONlHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION .
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE SECOND GENERATION DIESEL REPORT ………………………………………… .
AE
·VISITING ST.LUC yARD …………………………………………………………. ………. .
M
USEUM NOTES ……………………………………………………………………………………… .
THE MODEL
BUILDERS SECTION (MTC 1900·ClASS ONE-MAN CAR) …….. .
THE DEMISE O
FTHE .. ATLANTIC ………. __ .. __ ……………………………………………. .
WHEN
TRAINS FIRST CAME TO SAINT JOHN, 1857 AND 1889 ………………….. .
SO
ME POETRY TO PASS THE TIME (THE PASS PACiFiC .. ) ……………………… .
BOOK REVIEWS …………………………………………………………………………………….. .
CRHA
COMMUNiCATIONS ……………………………………………………………………….. .
THE BUSINESS CAR .
……………………………………………………………………………… .
FRONT COVER: In Bedlffl. ()/llllrif!. (III Marcil 24. /993. CP Rail/lain N(1. 904.
po ….. ered I)), SD40·2 No. 5691.lv/6JU Nu. 4..5 and unO/her IInidelltlfied A/CO, SlOps to
pick up uhoul ({ (/o:(n loads IIwl II erc delivered hy Ihe Ol/awn S\·ilcfrer ear/ier Ihat
morning.
PhoiO by Pierre OZQNik.
For your membership ;/l the CRHA, which
incl
udes a subscriplion to Canadian Rail.
write
10:
CRHA. 1 ZO RueSt·Pierre. 51. Constant. Que.
J5A 209
Membership Dues for t995:
In Canada:
$31 (including GST).
Outside Canada: $29.50 in U.S. funds.
Canadian Rail is continua
lly in need of news.
stories.
hiSlOrical data. photos. maps and
other material.
Please send all contributions
to the editor: Fred F. Angu
s, 3021 Trafalgar
Ave. Mo
ntreal. P.O. H3Y 1 H3. No payment
can be made for contributions. but the con­
tributer will be given credit tor material sub­
milled. Material will be returned to the con­
tributor if requested. Rem
er.1ber Knowl­
edge is of
tittle value unless it is shared with
ot
hers-.
As pM 01 its activities. the CRHA operates
the
Canadian Railway Museum at Oelson I
St. Constant, Que. which IS aboul 14 miles
(23 Km.) from downtown Montreal.
It is open
from late May
early October (daily u-.tit
Labour Day). Members. and their immediate
l
arrilie!>. are adml:ted free of charge.
THE
GOAL OF THE ASSOCIATION IS THE
C
OLLECTION, PRESERVATION AND DiS­
SEMINATION OF ITEMS RELATING TO
THE HISTORY OF CANADIAN RAILWAYS
Th~ CRHA hn a number 01 local divisions aero
1M counlry. Manv hold regula, Oiling. and l$SUe
wdUMll. FunM Inoml&llon mlv b. oblaln~
by w~tlng 10 III. OIYi~.
NEW BRUNSWICK OMSION
P.O. BoY I 162
SainlJoMN.B E2l~7
DIVISION Vl1£E..IONCT1ON 9EAUCe
397 BIIId. RoI-..
V~OJt OOS3JO
ST LAWRENCE Vl1£Y DfVISION
P.O. BoIC 22. Sr. …. 8
~P.O. H3e3J5
AlOEAU VAll ~Y OIVISION
P.O 110:<962
SrMh·, Fall. Orl. 1(7A ~
KINGSTON DIVISION
P.O. BoIC 1714
~Ion. Ont. K7L S~
TORONTO VORK DIVISION
P.O. eox SM!. T …….. W
T
10. Ore. M5W 1 P3
NIAGAfU. DIVISION
P.O Box 2031 I O,nltam Fo$I.:.I ClutkIt
St. CaIt1a CALGARY, SOUTH Wl:SfEAN ONISION
c 1!112 WM1tIIOU ~. AI:>erQI T2N 3M7
SEUORl< DIVISION
POIloJci561
-……… S.C VOE 2SO
CROWSNEST KETTlE VALLEY DIVISION
.PO.Bo:l.olOO
Cr;onbn;>ok. 8.C. VIC 41-$
NElSOH ELECTRIC TRAMWAY SOCIETY
IZlVlew su..
Nelson. B.C. VIL 2V8
PRINCE GEORGE NECtW<().fRA$EA DIVISION
PO.Bo2408
Pm» CMorgIo. 8 C V2N 2S6
PACIfIC COAST DlVISIC:lN
PO. eo. IOCII, SUlIk>n .,,­
V~.8C. V6C2f1
ESOUIMALT AND NANAIMO DIVISION
11# BanoI$I ROOICI
Viclo CRHA COLLECTION COMM…….. 3
REV.
BRYAN GIRLlNG……………. 10
JOHN GODFREy ………………….. .
CRHA ARCHiVES …………………… .
FRED F. ANGUS ..
…………………… .
CO
NTEMPORARY PAPERS ……. .
ANONYMOUS (C.1902) ……………. .
15
19
23
28
30
. .. _ .. _ .. __ ……. __ ………. ……………………. 31
EDITOR: Fmd F. Angus
36
38
CO·EDlTOR: Douglas N.W. Sm:t
ASSOCIATE EDITOR (Molive Fower):
tugues W. Bonin
DISTRIBUTION: Gerard Frecheue
LAYOUT: Fred.F. Angus
Printing· Procel Printing
DIRECTORS OF THE C.R.H.A.
P
RESIDENT: Walter J. BedbrOOk
VICE FRES.: Charles De Jean
VICE PRES.: David W. Johnson
TREASURER: Robert Carlson
SECRETARY: Bernard Manin
Frederick F. Angus
Alan C. Blackburn
Jam
es Bouchard
Gerard Frechette
Mervyn T. Green
J. Chrislop/ler Kyle
William Le Surf
ROOen V. V. Nicholls
Ernest Ottewell
Andrew W. Fanko
Douglas NW. Smith
William Thomson
A. Stephen Walbridge
Michael Westran
DIVISION LlASON REFRESENT ATIVES
WESTERN
D. Walter Edgar
4515 Dalhart Road N.W.
Caigal).
AS T3A 189
-Phone: (403)·286-2189
CENTRAL
Christopher Kyle
49 . 77 Wellesley SI. Easl
Toronto.ON M4Y tM7
Phone: (4t6)-962-1880
MARITIME
Richard E. Viberg
172 Main SI.
Hillsborough, N8 EOA 1 XO
Phone: 1506)-7:!4·3467
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995 3 CANADIAN RAIL -444
The Second Generation Diesel Report
By The C.R.H.A. Collection Committee
FORWARD
On October 30th, 1967, when the C.R.H.A Board of
Directors passed a resolution to create a committee, under the
chairmanship of Mr. Murray Dean, to prepare a master list of
Canadian-built diesel locomotives recommended for acquisition
by the C.R.H.A, little did they expect that the Association would
become a pioneer in the preservation
of diesel locomotives in
North America. Indeed, the C.R.H.A. and its members have, over
the years, carefully assembled one
of the finest collections in
North America.
As the year 2000
is fast approaching; railroad museums
across North America face mounting pressure
to preserve Second
Generation diesel locomotives. The first locomotives
of this
generation are close
to 30 years old and are rapidly nearing
retirement age.
Marked by an increasing amount
of technological innovations
in the field of locomotive building, this generation also saw the
emergence of the standardization phenomenon, thus reducing
the
number
of models acquired by Canadian railroad companies.
As past and present members
of this committee sought to
preserve steam locomotives, streetcars and first generation diesel
locomotives, the C.R.H.A. collection committee has once again
the
mandate to review and list the sienificant 2nd generation
diesels
that truly deserve to be preserved within the core of the
C.R.H.A.s collection.
INTRODUCTION
This committee was faced with the problem of selecting
the minimum number
of locomotives to represent adequately a
fleet
of approximately 2334.
As a general guideline the original policy from the first
diesel locomotive repOit was followed:
to select locomotives
either representative of Canadian railways or significant in the
development
of the diesel locomotive in Canada, or both.
Twenty three models were studied from two diesel
locomotives builders (GMD and MLW + Bombardier) and significant
locomotives were noted.
(General Electric locomotives were
excluded from this report, since all GE locomotives built for
Canadian Railroads were done in the United States, using a
mixture of predominantly American and Canadian parts;
therefore they do not qualify as Canadian locomotives.)
A separate section
of this report lists two models of diesel
locomotives
to be reviewed in a third generation diesel report.
A thank
you note is extended to all the Committee members
for contributing their time and effort
in making this report (Len
Thibeault, Chairman; Fred Angus, SecretaJY; Gerard Frechette,
Franc;ois Gaudette,
John GOdfrey, David Johnson, Peter Murphy,
Marie-Claude Reid, (C.R.M. DirectoL). This note is also extended
to the following individual for their assistance and input: Barry
Biglow, Charles Dejean, Ken Goslett and Stan Smaill.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
-Forward
-Introduction
-List
of diesel locomotives for the C.R.H.A. collection
(2nd generation)
-Locomotives
to be given serious consideration in a 3rd
generation diesel preservation list.
-Annex (A) 2nd and 3rd generation diesel locomotives
in
Canada -main production list.
2ND GENERATION DIESEL REPORT
by The C.R.H.A. Collection Committee
Report presented
to the C.R.H.A. Board of Directors August 29th
1994
LIST OF DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES FOR THE C.R.H.A.
COLLECTION (2nd Generation)
1-C-424:
In the early
sixties, U.S. locomotives builders began to
encourage railway companies into trading their first generation
diesel locomotives for newer ones. This was particularly attractive
for Amelican railways since most
of them had dieselized most of
their fleets in the late forties and early fifties, and quite a few
locomotives were due for replacement.
In Canada however, this was not the case. Both major
railways had acquired most
of thei.r locomotives in the late fifties,
and were therefore not ready
to redieselize on a massive scale.
Only two builders were left
in Canada at the time: GMD and
MLW-Worthington (MLW). Initially both railways made token
orders
to both builders: CN Rail: 2 GP35 and 2 C424; CP Rail:2
GP30 and 1 C424.
A year later,
as MLW was in good standing as a locomotive
builder, both railroads returned
to the market choosing the C424
on a 2
to 1 ratio over GMD products available at the time: CN Rail:
39 C424 vs
16 GP40; CP Rail: 50 C424 vs. 22 GP35.
Recommended: -1st Choice -CP Rail model, No. 4200
-2nd Choice
-CP Rail model, Any other
of same series (4200)
2-
MLW 6-Motors Units (M-636, M-630, C-630M):
Both major railJoads
had previously bought SD40s and
both, CP Rail
in particular, had been somewhat dissatisfied due to
various technical problems, such as: an excessive number of
turbocharger failures, a higher-than·expected number of traction
motor changeouts and a wheel slip system that wasnt up to
expectations.
RAIL CANADIEN -444 4 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
Travelling wesr at Bedell, Ontario on Saturday, March 13, 1993, an all-Alco lineup powers CP Rail train 903 between Montreal and Toronto.
The locomotives are:
MLW C424 Nos 4228 and 4222,followed by RS-18u No. 1824.
Photo by Pierre
OZOI·dk.
Following the demise of Alco in the United States, ML W
sought to improve products it was already selling with new
features such as: a
new high adhesion truck and a wheel-slip
system, to be
more competitive with GMD. Thus the Century or
CLine became the MLine, increasing the amount
of Canadian
content and technology
in each locomotive.
Whereas American railroads had tried SD45, SD45-2,
U33C and U36C, Canadian railroads completely avoided the
GMD models SD45 & SD45-2 and GE Locomotives were not sold
in Canada.
A total
of 204 C-Line/M-Line 6-motor units were built in
Canada for four railway companies between
1967 and 1976.
From the historical point
of view, this group of locomotives
represents close to 25 years
or mainline freight locomotive power
in eastern Canada. These locomotives also ushered the robot
control concept for
CP Rail, as used in coal unit trains through the
Canadian rockies.
Recommended: -1st Choice: -M-636
-2nd Choice: -M-630
-3rd Choice: -C-630M 3-SD40-2
The sales
of this second generation model were the largest
in Canada. After numerous mechanical failures inculTed by
MLine units following their acquisition, such as
an increased
number of lubricating oil changes, a defective wheel slip
system
and an unusually high amount of turbo charger failures,
both Canadian railroads started to give preferential treatment to
GMD after 1972. In fact, CP Rail adopted a
No New MLW Units
Policy and turned to GMD to standardize their mainline fleet with
the SD40-2, acquiring a total
of 515.
A total
of712 units were built by GMD of London, Ontario
between 1972 and 1989. From an historical point
of view, this unit
represents over 20 years of mainline freight diesel power anywhere
west
of Montreal and ·a successful approach to standardization
from the point
of view of CP Rail, being used in a wide range of
assignments.
Although the basic design
of this locomotive remains
American, the Canadian version
of this locomotive has had various
minor modifications made
to it, such as: location of the front
headlight on the short nose, classification lights on number
board, ditch lights, bell located between number boards, etc.;
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995 5 CANADIAN RAIL -444
CP Rail Traill85 at Wamoiuncliol1, Hufl, Que., westbound to Walkley Yard on March 6,1990. Motive power is C424 No. 4229 and SW 1200RS
No.
8139.
Photo by Pierre Ozorak.
making it different from American models. For this reason and
because
of the sheer number acquired by CP Rail, it has eall1ed the
right
to be preserved.
Recommended: -CP Rail model, 5565 to 6069 Series,
Except 5629 to 5658
which were built by EMD at La Grange,
Ill,
4-GP40-2(W)
While CP Rail opted for the SD40-2 as their all-purpose
locomotive, CN Rail bought a large number
of the four-axle model
known
as the GP40-2. One of the reasons for this was the large
number
of lines operated by CN that could not accommodate 6-
motor units at full line speed because
of Designated Unit speed
limits, thus requiring the high-horsepower that the GP40-2(W)
offered.
The Designated Unit speed limits had been introduced in
the late sixties following a number
of derailments caused by 6-axle
units
in tight curves.
This model also included a
Canadian Comfort Cab thaI
would change North American standard. This cab was developed
by CN Rail following numerous employee complaints concerning visibility, the crews general comfort (washroom location, general
alTangemenl
of cab, etc.), and crew protection in collisions, etc. II
was also adapted to Canadas climate, a fact not encountered in
most parts of the United States. This locomotive also marked the
introduction
of the Positive Traction Control (P,T.C.), a successful
wheel-slip system developed
by CN Rail.
This model became CNs versatile model, like the GP9 had
been
15 years before. A total of 279 units were buill, for two
companies (CN Rail and GO Transit), between 1973 and 1975.
From the historical point
of view, this locomotive is significant not
only for its technology and the number acquired, but also for the
role it played for CN Rail.
Recommended: -CN Rail, 9400 to 9668 Series
5-M-420(W)
This locomotive represents M.L.W.s efforts to create a
new line
of freight locomotives. At this point, MLW was anxious
to regain some
of the ground lost by its previous lines oflocomotives
and give GMD some competition. This unit incorporated a
redesigned caJbody, improved electrical systems and its own
version
of the comfort cab.
RAIL CANADIEN -444 6 JAIJVIER -FEVRIER 1995
CP Rail SD40-2 No. 5670, 011 lease to theDelawareandHudsoll, is seen in the D&H yard at Rouses PoilltN.Y. 011 December 10,1990. Coupled
to
5670 is a D&H Geep No. 7314.
Photo by Pierre Ozor6k.
This locomotive proved to be reliable, serving
in various
freight assignments, previously held by RS18s
in Eastem Canada,
one
of MLWs goals at the time of their introduction. MLW
managed
to sell five of these units to the Providence and Worcester,
a small railway company in the U.S., the only MLW diesel
locomotives ever sold new to an Amelican
raiIJ·oad.
From an historical point of view, this unit represents 20
years
of operation in Eastem Canada in various types of service for
CN Rail. It also shows a departure from traditional
Ako designs
in favour of a more Canadian appearance.
Recommended: -CN Rail model, 3560 to 3679 Series.
6-
LRC Locomotive (LRC-2 & LRC-3)
The development of this locomotive was the fruit of the
consortium
of Dofasco, MLW (later Bombardier), Alcan and CN
Rail. When VIA Rail took over passenger operations
in Canada in
1977, they were anxious to modernise their Corridor operations
(Windsor to Quebec City) and to this end acquired
31 of these
locomotives and 100 cars. The trains originally designed to operate at high speeds
(150 mph), featured tilting mechanisms, among other features.
The coaches were electrically heated and air-conditioned with
electricity provided
by the locomotive. Various design flaws
made these locomotives unreliable and about half
of them were
stored
in 1990 following VIA Rails budget cuts.
Because they were equipped with
traction motors that
were spring suspended on the axle and high speed dynamic
brakes, thus permitted to operate at speeds higher than 95 mph;
some were reactivated
to serve on the new high speed Metropolis
service between Montreal and Toronto.
Fwm an. historical point of view, this locomotive is very
significant for its Canadian technology, design and role for passenger
service.
It also represents the last locomotives ever built by
Bombardier, which
in 1976 took over the MLW plant and designs.
Recommended: -VIA Rail model, 6900 Series, especially
6930, the
last locomotive built by Bombardier.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
Algoma Central SD40-2 No. 186 and GP7 No. 167 are seen al
Hawk Junction, Ontario on August
29,1991. On an sdjacenl track
is ACR No. 102.
Photo
by Pierre Ozorak.
LOCOMOTIVES TO BE GIVEN SERIOUS CONSIDER A TION
IN A 3RD GENERATION DIESEL PRESERV ATION LIST.
1-SD60F
As the seventies gave way
to the eighties, Canadian
railroads became increasingly conscious about fuel efficiency.
The early eighties had been difficult for most railroads with the
recession hitting them hard. CN Rail especially was increasingly
interested in newer locomotives which would permit
it to increase
the amount
of tonnage per locomotive, as with models such as the
S050 and S060, without increasing the number of locomotives.
The introduction
of both of these models by CN Rail also
saw the introduction
of the Draper Taper. Developed by CN Rail,
it was first introduced on the HR616 and featured a full body
cowling to provide
an easier access for servicing, increased rear
visibility and desk top controls. The introduction
of the S060F
was also thejntroduction of computerized engine controls and the
710 engine.
The increasing success
of this model throughout the late
eighties and early nineties makes this model more interesting from
an historical point
of view than the HR616 and the S050F. The
success the
S060 is currently enjoying is making it one of the
symbols
of railway operations in the nineties.
Recommended: -CN Rail, 5504 & Onwards Series.
7 CANADIAN RAIL -444
2-F59PH
This model was first introduced in 1988 and was the fruit
of a joint effort by GO Transit and GMD. Its predecessor, the
F40PH, had been developed
in the mid-seventies for Amtrak to
replace its antiquated fleet
of post World War II cab units (FP7s,
E8s and E9s, among others).
One
of the F40PHs main features was a Head End Power
(H.E.P.) alternator that provided electricity to passenger cars, for
heating and air conditioning systems. This concept was introduced
on passenger cars to replace obsolete steam heating and axle­
driven electric generators systems which had become umeliable.
On the F40PH the electricity is furnished by a generator connected
to the main diesel engine, the same one that provides electricity for
the traction motors, resulting in the prime mover operating at a
constantly high RPM.
One
of the features of the F59PH was the use of a separate
generator for
HEP purposes, thereby greatly reducing engine
noises, air pollution and engine wear, factors
of growing concern
to commuter train operators.
It also had a 12 cylinder 710 engine
vs.
16 cylinder 645 engine, allowing the production of the same
horsepower (3000 hp) with a smaller engine, resulting
in a lower
consumption
of diesel fueJ. It also featured a comfort cab and desk
top controls.
From
an historical point of view, this locomotive is
significant for its Canadian technology
in the field of commuter
train service and represents a growing segment
of rai I way operations
in North America, partially due to growing environmental concerns.
Recommended: -GO Transit, 520 Series.
RAIL CANADIEN -444 8 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
ANNEX (A)
2ND AND 3RD GENERATION DIESEL LOCOMOTIVES IN CANADA
MAIN
PRODUCTION LIST
PLEASE NOTE: This Jist only accounts for Canadian Production for Canadian Railways
Railwav Company Series Number of Locomotives
*GMO Locomotives*
CP Rail 2
5000-5001
(Total
Number of Locomotives:2)
GP35
CN Rail
4000-4001
CP Rail
5002-5025
(Total
Number of Locomotives:26)
CN Rail
4002-4017
GO Transit
Last GO Numbers:500-507
(Total
Number of Locomotives:24)
CN Rail
5000-5240
CP Rail
5500-5564
Algoma Central
180-182
Q.N.S.
& L.
200-220
(Total
Number of Locomotives:330)
S040-2 (GMO Built Only)
CN Rail
5241-5263
CP Rail
5565-6069 series
CP Rail
9000-9024
2
24
16
8 (GP40TC version)
241
65
3
21
123
489 (Spartan Cab)
25 (Draper Taper) Algoma Central
183-l88
BC Rail
751-767
Ontario Northland
1730-1737
Q.N.S.
& L.
221-264
6
17
8
44
(Total Number of Locomotives:712)
CN Rail
9400-9668
GO Transit
Last
GO Numbers:700-710
(Total
Number of Locomotives:279)
VIA Rail
6400-6458
GO Transit
510-55
(Total
Number of Locomotives:6S)
~ (GMO Built Only)
CN Rail
5500-5559
CN Rail
5560-5610
CP Rail
3000-3020
CPRail
3021-3135
Algoma Central
200-205
DEVCO
216-228
Ontario Northland
1800-1809 268 (Wide Nose)
11 (Wide Nose)
59 (Dash 2 Model)
6
60 (Spartan Cab)
51 (Wide Nose)
21 (GP38AC)
115
6
13
10
(Total Number of Locomotives:2SS (GP3RAC incl. 276»
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
CN Rail
5400-5459
(Total Number of Locomotives:60)
CN Rail
9900-9903(Now 5500-5503)
CN Rail
5504-5563
(Total Number of Locomotives:64)
00 Transit
520-561
(Total Number of Locomotives:42)
Other GMD Locomotives:
-SD38-2 NAR( 401-404)
60
4 (Demonstrators)
60
42 (as
of Nov. 1993)
-MPISAC Ports Canada (8403-8406)
*MLW Locomotives*
(ML W Built Only-Canadian Railroads)
C-424
CN Rail 41
3200-3240
CP Rail 51
4200-4250
(Total Number of Locomotives:92)
C-630M
CN Rail
2000-2043 series
CP Rail
4500-4507
POE
701-704
(Total Number or Locomotives:S4)
42
8
4
M:Q!! (MLW Version-Post ALCO Years. ie:After 1968)
CP Rail
4508s
BC Rail
705-722
29
18 (Regular Version)
9 CANADIAN RAIL -444
BC Rail
723-730
(Total Number of Locomotives:SS)
CN Rail
2300-2339
CP Rail
4700-4743
Canier Railway
71-76
& 81-85
(Total Number of Locomotives:9S)
8 (Wide Cab)
40
44
11
M-420(W) (Canadian Production Only)
CN Rail
2500-2579
BC Rail
640-647
BC Rail
681-688
(Total Number of Locomotives:96)
Other ML W Locomotives:
M420TR RS (26 & 27)
*Bombardier Locomotives*
80
8
8 (B-Units)
LRC Locomotives (Canadian Production Only)
ViA Rail
6900-6920
ViA Rail
6921-6930
(Total Number of Locomotives:31)
CN Rail
2100-2119
(Total Number of Locomotives:2Q)
HR412(W)
Bombardier
7000
CN Rail
2580-2589 (Now 3580-3589)
(Total Number of Locomotives:ll)
21 (LRC-2)
10 (LRC-3)
20
1 (Test Bed)
10
(Grand Total Number of Locomotives: 2334)
RAIL CANADIEN -444 10 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
Re-visiting St. Luc Yard
By The Rev. Bryan Girling
The Rev. Bryan GirJing is a native of Lachute, Quebec and resides in Brantford, Ontario, where he is an Anglican Priest and rector
of St. James Church.
PHOTO CAPTIONS (all photos by the author)
Rs-3u No. 8450 sitting on the Hump. Augus
t, 1980.
As a teenager growing up in Lachute Quebec in the mid-
1970s, I was introduced to the railroad by my father. It was
something that
my father enjoyed greatly, especially since the CP
Express Office,
in which he worked most of his life,
was situated in the
CP station in Lachute.
In those days, he made an annual pilgrimage
with a fellow-railfan to SI. Luc Yard in Montreal.
One year I was asked to come along and that was the
start
of a hobby that Ive enjoyed for over fifteen
years. As 1 think back to those annual trip
s, which we
made from 1978 to 1984, we witnessed the ending
of
an era at St. Luc Yard. I want to recall its memory in
this article.
One of those annual visits began with a trip
from Lachute to Montreal West on VIA train No.
132, usually consisting
of one ROC (an era that has
ended). Upon alTivai at Montreal West, a bus trip
would bring us to the front gates
of SI. Luc Yard.
After the signing
of a liability release in the diesel
shop office the rest
of the day was spent exploring
this wonderful yard. the work at the hump was done
by those great little
1600 H.P. RS-3s built
in 1954. As far as I was
concerned they were in a class by themselves. There
was character
in these locomotives as they went
about their duties.
By the time [ was familiar with these work horses
and began photographing them, CPs original fleet
of
36 (8426 -8461) was down to 16 (8430, 8432, 8433,
8435, 8436, 8438, 8439, 8440, 8441, 8443, 8445,
8449,8450,8452,8456,8460). The others had either
been retired
or sold to various industrial operations.
As you can tell, the RS-3 was one
of my favourite
locomotives. I know that every time I visit the
Ontario Northland yard
in North Bay and see two of
their retired RS-3s (1306 and 1308) sitting on the
dead track I can easily imagine them working up a
storm on the front end
of a freight. The same thing
goes for the remaining Devco
RS-Is and any other
railroad or indusuial operation
in Canada or the
U.S.A. that still has active
RS-Is, 2s, or 3s.
Back at SI.
Luc Yard, it was easy to find the RS-3s.
Youd just watch for the plumes of black diesel exhaust and there
theyd be!! As I listened to them working up a storm at the hump
yards, theyd sound like a rod could come through the block at any
moment.
That sound gave them their character.
..~ …
What I enjoyed most about visiting St. Luc
Yard was going over to
the hump and watching the
activity there.
In the late 70s and early 80s, most of
RS-3u No. 8445 at the east end of St. Luc beginning to push a string of cars over the
hump. August, 1980.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
RIGHT: RS-3u No. 8435 on the dead track,
ca
nnihalizedfor parts. June, 1983.
RIGHT: RS-3uNo. 8440 on the Pull-down at
St. Luc, June, 1982.
11 CANADIAN RAIL -444
LEFT: Rs-3u No. 8438 facing the same fate as
8435. June, 1983.
RAIL CANADIEN -444
RIGHT: S-2 No 7087 sitting outside the
shops af Sf. Llic after working a PlIlI­
down
in May, 1981.
12
::,..
JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
LEFT: RS-3u Nos. 8450 and 8456 sifling on
the Hump in June, 1983.
LEFT:
GP9 No. 8696 working a Pull­
down in May, 1984.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
[t was truly amazing what a pair of RS-3s
could do. They seemed to effortless
ly push whole
trains over the hump a
nd down into the classification
yards.
It was always nice to see a pair of them either
sitting by themselves on top
of the hump (as if to
catch their breath) or taking a string
of vans (another
era gone) down into the caboose tracks.
In their twilight years, these RS-3s looked
their age. All
of the units listed above finished their
life in hump, pull down and transfer service. All
of
them, except for 8443, 8450 and 8452, were chop­
nosed on the short hoods giving them a unique look.
It was hard to tell whether these chopped-hoods had
ever been painted, because most
of them were fuJI of
rust, grease and dirt. The exteriors werent shown a
lot
of care.
13 CANADIAN RAIL -444
Gradually with each passing year, and each
annual trip to St. Luc, more and more
of the RS-3s
could be found, along with many S-2s and
RS-l0s,
on the dead tracks at SI. Luc.
The S-2s, another
MLW product, were 1000 H.P.locomotives that had
spent most
of their life in yard, transfer and classification
duties. Cannibalization became the order
of the day
GP9 No. 8686 working the same duties as 8696 (opposite, bottom), also in May,
1984.
as parts would be salvaged to keep the remaining units operational.
As more and more RS-3s met this unfortunate fate, and CP
began a program
of rebuilding theirGP7s and GP9s, a transformation
was beginning. GP9s that were awaiting entry into
CPs rebuilding program at Angus Shops (another era ended), could be seen
working in the pull-down and transfer services at St. Luc,
in place
of the Rs-3 and S-2 types. They never seemed to work on the same
hump duties, that was done by the newly rebuilt GP7us and GP9us.
GP7u Nos. 1509 and 1508 working the transfer 10 eN in June, 1983.
RAIL CANADIEN -444 14 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
GP9u Nos. 1548 and 1547 silling on the Hump in June, 1983.
The last of the RS-3s were retired in 1983
and the transformation was complete.
The GP9u
was on the scene and definitely here
to stay. For
someone like me, they seemed like an unlikely
replacement -no character, no plumes
of smoke,
just the familiar GM drone and whine.
The last time that I visited
SI. Luc was in
1988 prior
to my move to southwestern Ontario.
All the RS-3s were gone, even from the dead line.
Hump, pull-down and transfer duties were done
by a fleet
of five GP7us and eighteen GP9us that
were assigned
to St. Luc for maintenance purposes.
A trip to Sl. Luc today (January, 1994)
would reveal GP7u Nos. 1508,
1509,1683,1685,
1687; also GP9u Nos. 1547,1548, 1549, 1572,
1599
,1602,1604,1606,1607,1608,1612,1613,
1625,
1628,1630,1688,1689,1690 performing
the duties
of the once great RS-3. Somehow I
think that those who are new to the rail scene have
missed something special
in the chop-nosed RS-
3. It is truly the end
of an era for me.
I hope that the photos included with this
~.~ ..
…… ,
reflection bring back fond memories to those of us who remember
CPs fleet of RS-3s in SI. Luc Yard, and, to those who dont know
of them, a glimpse into the recent past.
GP9u No. 1608 working a Pull-down in May, 1987.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995 15 CANADIAN RAIL -444
Museum Notes
By John Godfrey
At the December 1994 meeting of the CRHA Collection
Committee, committee members came to the conclusion that
CRHA members and friends should be better informed about the
Associations most public project, the Canadian Railway Museum;
not
just in terms of what locomotives, [Taction equipment and
rolling stock are to be found on the premises, but also in terms
of
site activities, restoration projects, areas of responsibility (who
does what), recent donations, etc. Hence this column, which will
appear on a regular basis with a varying length. One thing that will
not appear
is an equipment roster. The Museum is in the process
of assembling a revised guide book which will include one.
However, brief histories and anecdotes about items and events
wiU
be printed from time to time in an effort to bring the CRM to life.
The map shown below, reprinted from the Museums timetable­
rule book, will help orient things.
o
U
E
PLAN DUMUSEE
MUSEUM PLAN
PORI[ DE L EST
EASTGA~
D£S 8OUl£W)(:
POR~ DE LQUEST
WESTGA~
partie
est / east section
A!iUfA
r~
.–~~~—-~~q~
partie ouest / west section
The Museum opened to the public on Sunday May I, 1994
this season. Return visitors this season noticed a number
of new
pieces and one new building on the property,
in addition to new
exhibits
in the Hays Building concerning railway travel literature
and one
in CP baggage car 3987 inside building 1 on model trains.
Streetcar service was provided as advertised mainly with MTC
1959, supplemented on occasion by
MTC golden chariot observation
number 3 (until an electrical problem sidelined
it on September
10). Passenger service did not start until June 24th owing
to a delay
in the restoration work on CN 15767, the principle accommodation
on the train. Once the equipment was available, the train ran as
scheduled until the last day
of the season. Locomotive John
Molson began
to show its age this year and only operated sporadically.
Major boiler work will be required before the engine returns to its
regular schedule next year.
The association was fortunate to acquire a
number
of new pieces over the course of the
year. FOlmer Via and CN 1153 Eureka, a 4
section – 8 roomette -4 double bedroom sleeper
arrived in May, as did
BC Rail M630 715.
Earlier
in the spring, CN baggage car 8075
arri ved on the property to serve as a lunch room
for the various groups that come to visit the
Museum, as did fOimer CN plow 55063.
December 20th saw the arrival of T&Ys CN
F7Au 9171 (Ex GTW F3A 9013), a 1948
graduate
of EMD and one of the few F3s
around.
The visual arts paid a visit to the CRM on
a
number of occasions this year. In June,
sequences for the TVA series
Le Sorcier
were
shot on the site. CP 2928,3618, 1554, CN
650002, and Barrington Station were the featured
performers. Behind the scenes, PofM 1002
made everything move. Sharp-eyed viewers
will notice that the train will stop at Moose
Factory. This station was built by the production
company along the Muse
ums Hays Sub.
Intended to be
of a temporary nature, it finally
met its fate during the month
of November. GT
713 put in a supematural perfOimance in scenes
shot for the YTV
series Are You Afraid of the
Dark? early
in October. December 19th
marked the
visit of Hollywood to the propelty.
Scenes for the Danielle Steel movie
No Greater
Love were shot in and around Barrington
Station with
GT 7 I 3, CP 1554, and CP Neville
in the background. Motive power was provided
by CN
30 (returned to service for the occasion)
and PofM 1002.
The TV movie is to appear on
NBC in the spring.
RAIL CANADIEN -444
GT 713, in fact, has
had quite an autumn.
Thanksgiving found the
locomotive at
CNs Tasch­
ereau Yard in suburban St.
Laurenl for a family day.
Then, no sooner was she
back
in the display building
when word came that CN
wanted to send her to
Richmond Quebec to help
mark the 100th anniversary
of that railroad towns
chamber of commerce
November 5 and 6.
Restoration
of one type
or another is a year round
proposition. At present, CGR
boxcar 551672 and CP reefer
284845 are undergoing
repairs to their wood sides
and roofs.
Roof work was
alsocompletedonCN 15767.
CN 15824s
roof will also
receive some attention and
16 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
have repairs to its pilol The model exhibit set up informer CPR baggage car 3987 during the summer of 1994.
completed. Throw-in regular
Canadian Railway Museum photo.
maintenance to the operating
pieces a
nd track work, and
one can see that theres lots to do. In fact, volunteers are always
welcome. Listed below are the names
of those responsible for the
various departments at the CRM. Anyone interested
in donating
time should contact them directly care
of the CRM at the CRHA s
SI. Constant, Qc address. Please note that not only rail enthusiasts
are welcome, but also anyone with a flare for carpentry, working
with metal, electricity, or diesel mechanics as well. Retired
railroad employees interested
in sharing their work experience
with Museum
visitors as docents are also welcome; it is easy for
someone
in their thillies to see the size of a CN Northern, but nOI
as easy to appreciate what it took to run or maintain one, for
example. Here are those contacts:
Restoration / Site Maintenance: Francois Gaudet
Mechan
ical/Electric: Barry Biglow
John Molson: Alan Blackburn
Engineering: Alain Bosse / Charlie
Dejean
Tramway Ops: Daniel Laurendeau
Train Ops:
Docents, etc. Roger Desautels / John Godfrey
Marie-Claude-Reid
The CRM would not be able to survive were it not for
the generousdonationsofa number
of individuals and compan.ies.
As is often the case with things
of a volunteer nature saying
thank you can take a while. So, to all those listed here,
THANK YOU!!!!
That about sums things up for now. Till next time

Anonymous donor VIA Eureka $23,000
Steam Decals $1800
Martin Gaudette
N.
B. Ballantyne
Odilon Perreault Miniature trains
FIackt, Piro & Woodfine Audit line
Stella-Jones 30 ties
CN North America CN55063
CN71641
Jean Lacroix
Moose FaetOly statioll during the filming of Le Sorcier.
Photo by John Godfrey.
$24,800
$100
$15
$200
$1,500
$1.239
$10,720
$15
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
Our member Roger Desautels during the filming
of Le Sorcier
Canadian Railway Museum photo.
17 CANADIAN RAIL -444
ABOVE: Model demonstralion in the restoration building. Summer 1994.
Canadian Railway Museum photo.
Former CN baggage car 8075 gelling cleaned
up.
Photo by John Godfrey.
RAIL CANADIEN -444 18 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
Cal 1959 in the restoration building at the Museum on December 17, 1993. Photo by John Godfrey.
Cal
1959 in service at the Canadian Railway Museum in the summer of 1994.
Canadian Railway Museum photo.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995 19 CANADIAN RAIL -444
Model Builders Section
With this issue we introduce what we hope will be a regular feature; photos and diagrams of a piece of railway equipment suitable
for model building.
The Association has a large collection of builders drawings and photographs. and it is planned to reproduce these as
part of this series.
To start, we have chosen a piece of equipment familiar to all visitors to the Canadian Railway Museum; the I 950-class one-man
lightweight street
car of the Montreal Tramways Company. The Museum has two of these well-known cars, Nos. 1953 and 1959. No. 1959
is used regularly in service at the Museum and carries thousands of passengers every year.
The I 950-class represents one
of the most modern developments of the lightweight street car in Canada. More than 250 cars of this
basic design ran
in Montreal, and almost identical cars were found in Regina, Calgary and other cities. The diagram on the next two pages
is the original builders drawing, dated January 17, 1928, for the fifteen cars, numbered 1950 to 1964, built for Montreal and delivered in
May, 1928. A builders photo is also provided, as are photos of the cars in service, a somewhat similar car built for Calgary, and, of course,
views
of No. 1959 at the Museum, still in use after almost 67 years .
• •• .~ ~ <) .... ,:
TOP: Mon/real Tramways car No. 1951 in May, 1928. Bottom: Calgary Municipal Railway car No. 84 in October, 1928. This car
is longer thall
No. 1951 (12 windows instead of 10), but is otherwise similar. Both photos, CRHA Archives, Call-Car Collection.
RAIL CANADIEN -444 20 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
K- E1IE:R6 ENCI
COMPl?f5SO~
–~~————–~————–~b~
CANADIAN CAR & FOUNDRY CO. DRAWING No. D-1008. JAI
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995 21 CANADIAN RAIL -444
DDDDCII
I 7//
,-c-K-C.-=-£.-N-r£-:e-s-,———–~+————-I/-76 —————i
PE ,0 RELAY VALVE:.
~-fr-1l
~—–tJ
E::e BODY R.47C S,
_4~/.?~b-~-~~————————–~—-~
B CJVE~ ANTI CLII1BE:e.
IUARY 17, 1928.
SASH SWINqS IN.
RAIL CANADIEN -444 22 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
TOP: The fronl veslibule of a /900-class car, showing the controls, raken al Ihe Can-Car faclory.
ABOVE: Two willler veils of cars 1956 and 1954 allhe comer of Cole des Neiges alld The Boulevard in 1950.
AlIlhree phOIOS, CRHA Archives, Binns Colleclion.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995 23 CANADIAN RAIL -444
The Demise of the Atlantic
By Fred F. Angus
Friday, December 16, 1994 was indeed a black
Friday for the city of Saint John New Brunswick. The
morning
of that day saw the arrival, and the departure, of
the last passenger train to serve the Loyalist City, so
ending an era which had begun on March 17, 1857, almost
138 years ago.
For at least twenty-five years the passenger service
over Canadian
Pacifics Short Line through Main had
been threatened with cancellation as ridership declined.
In the last years
of CP operation of the service the train,
then known
as Nos. 41 and 42, The Atlantic Limited,
usually consisted
offourcars hauled by a single locomotive.
Throughout the 1970s the service continued
in anticipation
of a new corporation taking over passenger service in
Canada much as Amtrak had done in the United States.
This finally happened
in 1979 when VIA Rail Canada
began running its trains
II and 12 between Montreal and
Halifax via Saint John. Overnight the train, now known
simply as the Atlantic, became a major train, consisting
of as many as sixteen cars hauled by two locomotives.
Alas, this did not last long.
The cuts to passenger service,
The easrbotlnd Atlanric ar Moncton on December 2,1994.
All photos by the author.
ordered by the Liberal government of the day, resulted in the
discontinuance
of the Atlantic on the night of November 15 -16,
1981.
Although the Atlantic was gone, Saint John still had
passenger service. Trains, consisting
of Budd Rail Diesel cars
(RDCs), provided service between Saint John and Halifax.
There
was an extra bonus. One train a day went beyond Saint John, to
Fredericton Junction and then to Fredericton. Thus passenger
service returned to the Fredericton Branch for the first time in
many years.
Then,
in 1985, with a new Conservative government in
Ottawa, it was announced that several of the trains cut in 1981
would be reinstated, including the Atlantic. Thus
it was, on a
rainy May I, 1985, after a hiatus
of 1293 days, the Atlantic once
more wended its way down through McAdam, around Harvey
Lake, through Fredericton Junction and on to the Loyalist City.
Pausing briefly, it followed the Kennebecasis valley on the former
Intercolonial line, now palt
of CN, reached Moncton, then on to
Halifax.
The Atlantic had returned and, surprisingly as it seemed,
the
Budd car service to Fredericton continued all through the
summer
of 1985 before being discontinued in September.
For the next four years all was well. Then rumours began
to spread of fw·ther, and greater, cuts to VIA in the months ahead.
It was strongly rumoured that the Atlantic would certainly be
one of the trains to get the axe in the latter part of 1989. In the
meantime, however, there was a celebration amid the uncertainty
as the Short Line reached its 100th anniversary of service in June
1989.
Steam locomotive 1201 and its train of historic cars travelled
all the way from Ottawa to Saint John to commemorate the
occasion. As the months went on
it became more and more certain
that the Atlantic would make its final run late
in 1989. Then, in
October, the announcement was made of the massive service
reductions (about 50%) which were to take place in VIA on
January 15, 1990. To nearly
everyones surprise, the Atlantic
was not going to be discontinued entirely, but, along with the
Ocean, would be reduced from daily to three days a week.
It
would leave from Montreal and Halifax on Monday, Thursday and
Saturday. At the same time its sister train, the Ocean, which
followed a longer route, would depart Sunday, Wednesday and
Friday. Thus between Montreal and Halifax there would be service
daily except Tuesday. This re-scheduling saved the Atlantic for
another
fi ve years.
Meanwhile, VIA had been rebuilding much
of its fleet of
Budd-built fOImer CP stainless-steel rolling stock to create what
are possibly the finest passenger cars in service
in North America.
While the initial effort in this upgrading was concentrated on the
western transcontinental service, the new equipment later was
used on the eastern runs
as well. Under the schedules then in effect
the service provided by the Atlantic and the
Ocean was
provided by three complete trainsets which were enough to operate
both trains. These were changed over to the rebuilt equipment one
at a time as the upgraded cars came out
of the shop. In addition, the
Chaleur, operating between Montreal and Gaspe, was also
equipped with the rebuilt cars.
In January J 993 the last of the old
trainsets was retired, and the transcontinental service, both east
and west, was entirely composed
of stainless steel equipment. At
this time VIA introduced the new Easterly class, making the
Atlantic and the Ocean among the finest passenger trains
in
North America.
RAIL CANADIEN -444
All aboard for St-Hyacinthe, Richmond, Sherbrooke, McAdam,
Fredericton Junction, Saint John, Moncton, Amherst, Truro,
Halifax. View taken at MOn/reals CentraL Station on December
I,
1994. Note Santa and his sleigh in the background.
In 1993 there was disturbing news. For some time Canadian
Pacific had been losing money on its Short Line through
Maine to
Saint John, and its operation as a separate unit called the Canadian
Atlantic Railway did not bring the hoped-for improvement. Eventually
CP applied for permission to abandon all their lines east
of
Sherbrooke and this permission was granted in August, 1993. At
first the abandonment date was set for one year after the decision,
but the federal government lat
er extended this to December 31,
1994. It was hoped that this would give CP time
to sell the line as
a going concern.
During this time morale among employees and users
of the
line
sank, and signs like
300 days to oblivion appeared in offices,
the
number being decreased as a sort of countdown. Rumours
abounded as
to which prospective buyers were serious and which
were not.
At one time it was thought that a deal might be made with
an operator who would take over the entire line, but this fell
through. It soon appeared that whoever took over the line did not
want to run passenger service so
it became obvious that the
Atlantic would make its final run before the end of 1994. Then
early
in October 1994 VIA announced that the Atlantic wouId be
discontinued in mid-December, with the final runs being those
which departed from Montreal a
nd Halifax respectively on Thursday,
December 15, 1994, arriving at their destinations on Friday,
24 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE: Some scenes at VIAs brand new
station at Saint John on the morning
of December 13,1994 as the
second
to last eastbound Atlantic stops. The station was in use
for only a lillie more than a year.
December 16. Coincidentally with this, the frequency of the
Ocean would be increased to six times a week, thus providing the
through
service formerly given by the Atlantic. Due to extra
costs it was decided not to run a train between Saint John and
Moncton for the benefit
of Saint John passengers travelling to and
from Halifax and Montreal. Instead a connecting bus was provided;
thus leaving Saint John without any passenger service. All this was
to come into effect more than two weeks before
the deadline for the
abandonment or sale
of the CP line! VIAs reasoning was that itdid
not want to interrupt the travel plans of travellers by discontinuing
the train
in the middle of the holiday season, but this writer does
not
see the logic of this reasoning; the true answer may be the
attitude
of The sooner were out of it the better.
The onJy bright spot in this sad story was that a deal was
made,
just in the nick of time, to sell the line as a going concern.
The arrangement made, as of December 15, is quite complex and
involves the Irving interests in
New Brunswick, as well as Iron
Roads Railroad,
of Washington D.C. which is also negotiating to
take over the Bangor a
nd Aroostook Railroad in Maine. The
following quotation from The 470, the monthly publication of
the 470 Railroad Club of Portland Maine, will explain the situation:
Irving will create its
own railroad in New Brunswick, the New
Brunswick Southern Railway Company, and operate from Saint
John to McAdam.
It invited lRR/BAR to operate the line, which
Irving
is purchasing from CP, from McAdam to Brownville
Junction.
lRR/BARs new subsidiary, the Canadian-American
Railroad, will become a tariff carrier from Saint John and will
interchange with Springfield Terminal Railroad [i.e. Guilford,
aka. Maine Central] at Mattawamkeag. T
his ended the discussion
between Irving and STR about
STR operating from Mattawamkeag
into Saint John. A corporate structure
is being set up for a railroad
to operate from Sherbrooke to McAdam, over the stretch from
Sherbrooke
to Brownville Junction which lRR/BAR would buy
from CP, as well as the line from Brownville Junction to McAdam
which Irving would own.
lRR and STR will be connecting carriers
offering service
to all shippers on N.B. Southern lines. The
Canadian-American Railroad, along with the Bangor & Aroostook
and the N.B. Southern will be a strong paltnership providing
seamless service to its customers. An interesting observation
is
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995 25 CANADIAN RAIL -444
RAIL CANADIEN -444
Arrivals and departures at Saint John, NB.
that the name New Brunswick Southern was used once before.
In 1901 a company
of that name was formed to take over the old
Shore Line Railway and it operated under that
name until it was
leased to CP in 1911. There is,
of course, no connection between
the old NBS and the present one.
26 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
The train crew, as well as some retired employees. on hand at Saint John
for the last run, the evening of December 15, 1994.
Meanwhile the
countdown to oblivion continued for the
Atlantic. Your editor made several trips on the train
in the last
two months, either to Saint John, Moncton,
or even all the way to
Halifax. This
is a personal as well as a railway enthusiasts interest,
for I have been riding this train, and its predecessors, since 1936
when
T made my first trip from Montreal to Saint John at the age
of six months. In those days there were two trains a day in each
direction; all were,
of course, steam hauled and consisted of
heavyweight steel cars. I was interviewed for an article which
appeared
in the Saint John Evening Times Globe newspaper. The
headline aptly put it Train buff returned home for a funeral. That
is exactly the way it felt.
Cameras and microphones record the scene as Elsie Wayne,formef Mayor of Saint
John,
is interviewed just before the departure of the last westbound Atlantic. Many people who were at Saint John station
on the evening
of December 15 agreed with
the general feeling
of this protesters sign.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
The night of December 15, the last westbound Atlantic
arrived at Saint John and was met by the expected reporters
and television
crews, as well as the passengers intending to
board. Also on hand for the sad occasion was Elsie Wayne,
long time Mayor
of Saint John, who had long fought for the
retention
of the train. Your editor was one of the boarding
passengers and travelled west on the last run. Along with a
few other interested persons, I was permitted to
go to the
meet between the westbound and eastbound
Atlantics
where a stop was required to interchange U.S. customs
officers.
The transfer from one train to the other took only a
few seconds, and then
it was east again aboard the last No. 12.
It being a clear night with an almost full moon, one could
plainly see the scenic features
of the line, especially the large
steel bridge at Ship Pond near Onawa, Maine.
Then on to
Signing in al Brownville Junction for the
lasl time. December
16, 1994. NOle the
Canadian Atlanlic Railway sign as well
as the CP beaver emblems.
Saint John where a few photos were taken,
but the reporters
of the night before were
absent. FinaUy the train departed for Moncton
and Halifax, so ending more than
105
years of service on the Sh011 Line, and
almost
138 years of passenger service in
Saint John. By coincidence, the time was
9:22 A.M .. precisely the same local time
as when the Last Spike on the CPR had
been driven at Craigellachie B.C. on
November 7, 1885.
27 CANADIAN RAIL -444
ABOVE: Conductor Guy N. Cleghorn makes
out his
forms aboard the last westbound
Atlantic, shollly after leaving Saint John.
level crossing accident and derailment at Causapscal on
the main line through Campbellton and
Mont Joli. As a
result, the
Ocean was rerouted on the former National
Transcontinental Railway through Edmundston. It was
almost a week before the train returned to its regular route.
There is
no need to make further comments on the
sad and unfortunate events
of December 15-16, 1994.
Anyone wanting more is referred to the article Requiem
for the Atlantic
which appeared in Canadian Rail No. 367,
August 1982, soon after the last discontinuance of the
trai.n. All comments and observations made in that article
are still valid today.
The train continued on to Halifax.
arriving there well after the last westbound
had reached Montreal. Thus the eastbound
was the
last Atlantic to operate. Following
a night in Halifax,
it was back to Montreal
on what was, in effect, the first Ocean to
replace the Atlantic. There was a sense
of irony in the event. Shortly before the
Atlantic was discontinued there was a
The last Atlantic about to depart from Saint John on the morning of December 16, 1994. The
CP beaver drum-sign, with dates
/889 -/994, was temporarily placed therefor the photo I
In a few moments the train will leave for: Sussex, Moncton, Sack ville, Amherst, Springhill
Junction. Truro, Halifax, – — -and oblivion.
RAIL CANADIEN -444 28 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
When Trains First Came to Saint John
1857 and1889
Havingjust witnessed the departure of the last passenger train to serve Saint John, it is fitting to go back and read about two significant
first runs
of trains in that city,
The first article, from the Morning News, describes the first actual operation
of a train out of Saint John. The date was March 17,
1857, and the distance was only three miles.
The first sod of the European and North American Railway had been turned, in a huge celebration,
in September, 1853. However lack
of money and other problems delayed construction for years. Following the opening of this first three
miles, construction was more rapid, and Moncton was reached
in 1860, just before the visit of the Prince of Wales to North Amelica.
The other article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on May 17,1889, a little more than two weeks before the official opening of the
CPR Short Line. It describes the lun of a special train, carrying CP officials, as they came to inspect the new line which completed CPs
system from sea to sea. It should be noted that the heading reads To Montreal In 16 Hours. VIAs new schedule, including the bus ride
to Moncton, takes about
17 1/2 hours. Such is progress in 105 years!
As usual, both articles are quoted verbatim, including punctuation and,
in the case of the 1889 article, the then-typical practice of
running the headings in with the text.
OPENING OF THE
NORTH AMERICAN
EUROPEAN
RAILWAY –
SAINT PATRICKS DAY, 1857.
AND
On the afternoon of Yesterday, Saint Patricks Day, the first steam
engine
on the European and North American Railway was put in
motion, and witnessed
by an assemblage of several thousand
persons,
of all ages and sexes. Precisely at 3 oclock, the train,
consisting
of engine and tender, one covered, and two open cars,
containing
in all probability about six hundred persons, left the
Station at the Westem side
of the Mill Pond, and proceeded up the
Marsh about 3 and a half miles, where the rails terminate,
accomplishing the distance
in about twelve minutes, The sides of
the road from the starting point to the Station house near the road
leading to the residence
of John McAvity, Esq., were studded with
spectators, who cheered the Train and its occupants with most
stentorian voices, After the train returned to the starting point, the
managers very politely allowed a second load
of live freight to get
on board, and the
joumey was repeated under the same favourable
circumstances.
The speed, and safety of the railroad appeared to
give satisfaction
to evelY one present; and we must say that the trial
trip was a great success.
It is no use in talking, but it is a pleasing sight to see the iron horse
making his appearance
in St. John, and coursing through the valley
after a twenty year Railway agitation, ending from year to year
in
disappointment and dismay. The Liberals are entitled to the credit
of having originated and started this Railway and the present
Government may take the credit
of having gone to work to callY
it out.
We shall not dispute with them any more upon these points,
but
we call upon the Government and Engineer, now that they have
got their hands in, to go
to work vigorously and complete the road
between St. John and Shediac with all despatcll consistent with a
prudent course; and the Morning News will not show any hostility
to their proceedings. Let all parties go to work together upon the Railroad since it is now a settled question, but at the same time
adhere to our political course with reference
to open questions.
Hurra for the Railroad!
From The Morning News. Saint John N.B., March
18, 1857.
TO MONTREAL IN 16 HOURS
WHAT THE SHORT LINE WILL DO FOR ST. JOHN
Manager Van Horne, of the c.P.R., Takes a Trip Over
the New Road to This City and Says It is the Finest
Yet Built by the Company –To be Opened June 2nd.
S h 0 r t I Y aft e r 5 0 c I 0 c k, yes t e r d y afternoon,
Mr. W, C. Van Horne, general manager,
of the C. P. R.,
arrived in t
his city by special train, having made a
FLYING TRIP OVER THE SHORT LINE
from Montreal.
The gentlemen who accompanied him were Messrs,
R.R Angus, a director of the road; T.A. McKinnon, general
superintendent
of the Ontario & Atlantic division of the C.P.R.;
kR.G, Heward, secretary to Mr. Van Horne; and Mr. F,W, Cram,
general manager
of the New Brunswick Railway, who met the
party on his own line and came to the city with them. Their stay,
however, was a
brief one, for they returned by special shortly after
8 oclock. Soon after their arrival the visitors look a short walk
around town, and returned
(0 the Royal Hotel where they had
supper. Several
of our business men, including the mayor, Aid,
TN. Robertson and Mr. W.H. Thorne, president of the board of
trade, availed themselves of the presence in the city of Mr. Van
Horne, for the purpose of getting some information as to what he
MIGHT REQUIRE THE CITY TO DO
to facilitate matters for the Short Line company, Mr. Van Horne
very cordially received the gentlemen, but he said he was unable,
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
as yet, to state what might be required. In
fact. he said, his trip was merely one to
ascertain how the work
of ballasting the
uncompleted portion of the line was
progressing and also to satisfy himself that
the arrangements would be all complete for
the opening and the running
of trains between
St. John and Montreal. He likewise said that
he would make another trip to St. John at an
early date, when he would be glad
to meet
representatives of the council, or others, who
would be most interested in the matter and
discuss the whole subject with them.
A representative
of The Telegraph was
accorded an interview with Mr. Van
Horne. Speaking
of the Short Line, he
said it was the finest piece
of road that has
yet been built by the company. On the
completed portion the train travelled as
fast as any train will be required to run
when the fast service is established.
The
LINE WILL BE OPEN FOR TRAFFIC
for passengers and freight, on June 2nd. A
passenger train will be despatched from
Montreal on tIle date mentioned, about 8:30
in the evening, which would be due to arrive
in St. John about 7 p.m. [sic. Should be I
p.m.jnext day, the journey occupyi.ng about
15 and a half or 16 hours. At Mattawamkeag,
connection wi
ll be had with a p0l1ion of the
road now jointly owned by the company. and
at Vanceboro with the New Brunswick
Railway, under whose management trains
will be run into St. John. The passenger cars
of the C.P.R. will lUn tluough to the destination,
the New Brunswick Railway furnishing the
locomotive power.
It is proposed that this
through train will then make close connex ion
with
theI.C.R. for Moncton and points farther
east. In the matter
of ticket agents, and other
business which are required
to be done by
employees, Mr. Van Horne said, the service
would bepeJfOlrued under the superintendence
ofthe New Brunswick Railway management.
MA YOR
THORNE
who was seen last evening, said that, in
company with Ald. Robertson, he called at
the
Royal Hotel at 6:30 oclock to see Mr.
29 CANADIAN RAIL -444
NEW CPH RRllGF OVt:-H ~t-VI= ~( .. FALlS, ST. JOHfo, NS
j
Bridge tid Falls. S1. John. N. B. (Tide runnIng down.>.
Two old postcards showing the bridges across the Reversing falls at Sailll John. The top one
was mailed
in 1927, but bears a photo taken about /92/,just after/he new railway bridge
was completed, but before the 1884 cantilever bridge was torn down.The train
is likely the
early-afternoon departure for Montreal. The lower card, mailed
in 1918, shows the old
railway bridge, with the new highway bridge (and a Til/sonburg street car)
in the
foreground. The message reads Saw
[his bridge /rom the train yesterday. Train passed over
[he bridge YOll see at other side of arch bridge. This is where the reversing falls are to be
seen.
St. John is as hilly as Sheffield, and nearly as smoky. Collection of Fred Angus.
Van Horne. Their
mission was to secur.e an appointment for thatgentleman to meet
with the
harbor committee. Mr. Van Home received the deLegation
very kindly, but said the time at his disposal this trip would not
pemlit
of his seeing the harbor committee. He, however, said he
would visit the city very shortly again, when he would be only too
happy to
meet the committee or any of the citys representatives
and talk
over matters with them. And, just to
show that history sometimes repeats itself, this
small item from the Railway and Shipping World which appeared
ill 1902. just about the time the New Brunswick Southern Railway
Co. was taking
over the old Shore Line Railway:
The Shore Line Railway, N.B., recently received four platform
cars from Rhodes, Curry
& Co., Amherst, N.S. They are lettered
N.B. Southem Ry
. which is expected to be the lines name in the
near future.
From the Daily Telegraph, Saint John N.B.,
May 17, 1889. Railway and Shipping World, April, 1902.
RAIL CANADIEN -444 30 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
Some Poetry to Pass the Time!
The following piece of deathless poetry (!) was copied from the Railway and Shipping Wojldfor April, 1902. The war referred to was the
South African,
or Boer, War which was fought from 1899 to 1902.
The CPR General Passenger Department has received the following acknowledgement
of an annual pass, which is worth reproducing.
The Pass Pacific
There are some who pass the bottle, there are some who pass away,
Or pass us by upon the street, or pass the time
of day.
And some may pass a wormy plague, or some digestive riot,
And some may pass a jack-pot, or an ace (upon the quiet).
There are those who, in their anger, make a quick pass at a foe.
Others pass examinations, sometimes when they do not know.
There are others who pass opinions in their self-conceit and pride;
There are those -both priest and Levite -that pass by the other side.
There are those who pass their rivals
in all struggles here below,
There
are others who pass people to the circus or the show.
But the boss
of all the passes is the one that passes me
From the shore
of old Atlantic plumb to the Pacific sea.
Storied passes have been fought for by the legions fierce
of old
And our boys are storming passes in the Aflic land
of gold.
And the passing war is bitter, may it gain that perfect peace
That which passes understanding, when earths bloody wars shall cease.
For I love not warlike clamour, though for some it hath a zest
And to me the pass Pacific far surpasses all the rest.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
TRAIN COUNTRY
AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF CN
By Donald Mackay and Lome Perry
Published by Douglas
& McIntyre
1615 Venables Street
Vanc
ouver, B.C.
V2L
2Hl
Price: $45.00
When Canadian National Railways was created aft
er World
War I, by putting together five financially troubled railways, it
became the largest railway
in the country, with thousands of miles
of lines as well as hotels, ships, telegraph and other services.
But with masses
of obsolete equipment and duplicate
facilities, it took the vision and will
of Sir Hemy Thornton to create
a system that would become a vital part
of Canadas history and a
central
element in the Canadian landscape.
Train Country captures the heyday
of CN through the
reminiscences
of the many people who actually worked for the
railway.
The 150 photos, drawn chiefly from CNs archives, show
the impressive locomotives and opulent dining cars. Here are the
local all-purpose freights serving long-abandoned branch lines,
the mysterious
silkers that rushed their vital cargo from the
Vancouver docks to the si
lk market in New York, the grain trains
at prairie elevators, and the exclusive Limiteds that linked major
cities before aircraft and automobiles took
over much of the
passenger business.
The epilogue looks at the role of the railway today and
speculates on
its future, and this chapter includes some fascinating
then-and-now photos
of railway scenes and operations.
Montreal
historian Donald MacKay is the author of nine
books, including
The Square Mile and The Peoples Railway.
He received the QSPELL Award in 1991 for his book Flight from
Famine:
The Coming of the Irish to Canada, and he has twice been
short-listed
for the Governor Generals Award. Born and raised in
Nova Scotia,
his grandfathers on both sides of the family and one
great-grandfather were railway men in that province.
Lome Perry retired from CN in 1992 after 40 years in
public relations. Over the years he had become acquainted with the
riches of CNs photo library and took on the photo research for this
book as a labour
of love.
JUST A FEW LINES
THE STORY OF CANADAS FIRST RAILWAY
THE CHAMPLAIN & ST. LAWRENCE RAIL ROAD
By Lionel F. Gillam
Published
by the Author
Rotherham, South Yorkshi.re
England
From the time of the Trout brothers, who published their
Railways
of Canada in 1871, until very recent years, it is evident
31 CANADIAN RAIL -444
JUST A FEW LINES
THE STORY OF CANADAS
JlH,ST RAILWAY
THE CHAMPLAIN & ST. LAWRENCE
RAILROAD
by
LIONEL j,. GILLAM
that as far as the story of the Champlain & SI. Lawrence Rail Road
is concerned, fact and fiction have been so inextricably interwoven
that
the task of unravelling this tangled skein has become a
daunting one. Magazine contributors, journalists, school textbook
compi.lers and even reputable historians have, all
in their time,
added their
own share to the confusion of half truths and myths that
envelop
Canadas first steam railway.
These words are the beginning
of the preface, by Mr.
Gillam,
of this most interesting account of the early days of
Canadas first railway. Drawing considerably upon previously­
published accounts, but relying also on recent research, Mr.
GiJlam has produced a
fascinating 144-page account of the life and
times
of this pioneer project, as well as much material on its
promoters. As he says all sources are suspect
in researching a
subject that goes back so far, and the fact that a source book was
published as far back as 18
71 does not necessarily make it more
accurate than one published in 1991. At this late date it is unlikely
that a true and complete story will ever be told, but Mr. Gillam has
taken a good step in that direction. As he says
I cannot lay claim
to have avoided all the pitfalls, but at least I can say that I have
trodden warily. It
is for others to reveal where, if anywhere, I have
stumbled.
Anyone wanting to know details about the first railway in
Canada should have this book.
RAIL CANADIEN -444
CANADIAN RAILWAY RECORDS
A GUIDE FOR GENEALOGISTS
By Althea Douglas, M.A., c.G.(C) and J. Douglas Creighton,
B.Sc.
Published by
The Ontario Genealogical Society
40 Orchard View Blvd.
Toronto, Ontario
M4R IB9
Price: $12.30 including all taxes and postage
This 64 page book
is a guide to Canadian railway records,
written for genealogists and family historians.
It is not written for
railway historians or enthusiasts. It is, basically, a list
of various
archival sources where infOlmation on former railroad employees
may be found, together with
some very useful hints and instructions
as to how
to consult and use these archives. As the authors say, they
can point you in the right direction, but
cannot do the research for
you.
Often knowing where and how to start a project
is half the
battle, and this book
is an excellent place to start. For anyone
wanting
to do any kind of genealogical research involving employees
of the railways, this book is required reading.
THEENGL~HBAYBRANCH
By David LI. Davies and Lome Nicklason
IIIE epIC. s
ENGLISII BAY
I
BRANCH I
I
i
Tlw Illt{nded Telminus of
i
tltI <:nnadinn Pacific Ituilway?
32 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
Published by The Pacific Coast Division of the CRHA
P.O. Box 1006, Station A
Vancouver, B.C.
V6C
2PI
Price not stated.
This 90-page book
is a second edition of the work originally
published in 1975 by the Pacific Coast Division
of the CRHA. It
tells the story
of the now-abandoned line which may not have been
a branch
at all, but rather CPs main line; the present line to its
downtown station being originally a branch. It is suggested that
this interesting idea was an attempt by
CP to outsmart land
speculators in the mid-1880s,
just before Vancouver became a
city.
Containing rare maps, photos, and many interesting facts,
this publication tells much about the history
of the western
terminus
of Canadas first transcontinental railway.
UNCOMMON CARRIER
By K.R. Cassells
Published by the New Zealand RaiJway and Locomotive Society
P.O. Box 5134
Wellington
New Zealand
Price: $49.95 (New Zealand dollars)
Of all the railways built in New Zealand, the Wellington
and Manawatu Railway, built between 1882 and 1886,
seems to
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
have captured the public imagination more than any other. This
208-page hardbound book, published
bytheRailway and Locomotive
Society
in New Zealand, with which the CRHA is affiliated,
certainly does the line justice. It is a first-class work
of the type that
all railway history books should be (but most are not).
It contains
more than 180 rare photographs and more than 60 maps and
diagrams, including scale drawings locomotives, rolling stock,
track plans, timetables; even the
companys monogram and stock
certificates! Anyone with any interest in overseas railways, and
even those who do not, should read this book. If you do not know
anything about New Zealand railways, you will when you have
finished reading
it.
CHRISTMAS STORIES FROM THE STREETCAR BARN
By Douglas Parker with illustrations by Sandra Tiano
Published
by Havelock House
5211 Lansdowne Drive
Edmonton, Alberta
T6H 4L2
Price: $10.95 postpaid
This
is a collection of Christmas stories, based on the
historic streetcars at Fort Edmonton Park
in Edmonton, Alberta.
Here
we read stories like The Streetcars Christmas Wish, A
Christmas Special, Santa Gets Snowbound, The Elfs Christmas
Present
and A Streetcar for Christmas. The stories were originally
written for the children and grandchildren
of the men and women
33 CANADIAN RAIL -444
who operate the streetcars at the historic park. For those who have
never visited Edmonton, the park contains historic buildings
situated on 1885 Street, 1905 Street and 1920 Street.
The latter two
streets have an operating streetcar line on which are run
some of
the historic cars in the collection.
Although,
of course, a work of fiction, this book should be
read by railway enthusiasts, because most of us are young at heat1,
especially on Christmas Eve. And who knows;
if Santa can come
in a sleigh hauled by reindeer, why not in a streetcar.
… ?
THE KINGSTON PORTSMOUTH & CATARAQUI
ELECTRIC RAIL WAY
By George Dillon & William Thomson
Published by
The Kingston Division of the CRHA
P.O. Box 1714
Kingston, Ontario
K7L 5V6
Price not stated.
KINGSTON PORTSMOUTH
&
CATARAQUI
ELECTRIC RAILWAY
GEORGE DILLON & WILLIAM 1JIOMSON
-..,~= …. , …. 3l~
… ~ .
Hic;tory of the Limestone Citys
StrectcQr System
One of the lesser-known of Canadas street railway systems
was the one that ran
in Kingston, Ontario; the Limestone City. The
Kingston Street Railway began operation, with horsecars, on
February 2, 1877, and was electrified
in 1893, the same year its
name was changed to the Kingston Portsmouth and Cataraqui
Street Railway. Then, in 1897,
it was renamed the Kingston
Portsmouth and Cataraqui Electric Railway, and ran until March,
1930 when, as a result
of a car bam fire, the system was abandoned,
and replaced
by a bus line.
RAIL CANADIEN -444
This 36-page book was inspired by the success of a special
issue
of the Kingston Divisions publication Kingston Rail,
produced
in 1993 on the 100th anniversary of the electrification of
the system. It contains 43 rare photos, a map, and a history of the
line
as well as descriptions of the routes and rolling stock.
THE MUSKEG LIMITED
THE FIRST 80 YEARS OF THE GREATER WINNIPEG
WATER DISTRICT RAILWAY
By Peter Lacey
Published by Anvil Crafts
Box 233, St. Vital Station
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R2M 4A5
Price not stated
This 96-page hardbound book
is the history of one of
Canadas more fascinating small railways. Owned by the City of
Winnipeg, the line, almost 100 miles long, was constructed in
conjunction with the new system of water supply then being built
by the city. Construction
of the railway was begun in 1914, and the
last spike was driven on December 10
of the same,),ear. Gnce the
line was completed it had a fairly uneventful existence; as the
author says
It would be fairly accurate to say that not much has
happened since 1921.
The railway is still in existence, with about
half its original track and some
of its original buildings unchanged,
servicing the aqueduct as
it has always done.
There is, however, a lot more
to the GWWD than just that
simple statement. The fact that, in this year
of 1995, it is still
34 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
serving as it was planned, is notable enough, but other things are
notable also. Its rolling stock, such as its famous 1928 Mack car,
was, and
in some cases still is, well known among rail enthusiasts.
The Muskeg Limited has 87 photos plus maps, diagrams
and track plans. Having read about the first 80 years
of the GWWD,
we wish it all the best for its next 80.
NORTHERN NEW ENGLAND COLOR GUIDE TO FREIGHT
AND PASSENGER EQUIPMENT
By David R. Sweetland with Stephen Horsley
Published by Morning Star Books Inc.
1
I Sussex Court
Edison, N.J.
08820
U.S.A.
Price: $48.50 postpaid (U.S. dollars)
This 128-page hardbound volume contains no less than
TWO HUNDRED AND SEVENTY EIGHT high quality photos,
all
in COLOUR, of freight, passenger and work cars on railways
in New England. Some of the photos date back to the early 1950s,
or even before, and show equipment that has long gone. In other
cases, cars that are still in existence are shown when new, with their
original paint schemes clear and bright. Railways covered are
Bangor & Aroostook, Boston & Maine, Maine Central (the latter
two in the pre-Guilford days), Canadian Pacific (lines both in
Vermont and Maine), Central Vermont and Rutland
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
There is a lot of interest to the Canadian enthusiast here.
Besides the obvious fact that many cars
of New England railways
were seen frequently
in Canada, there is much of Canadian origin,
especially on the CPR and CV.
For instance some of the CP
passenger cars seen at Brownville Junction Maine
in the 1950s
include 1908 wooden coach No. 1032, steel coach 1300 (used as
a back up
car for trains 41 and 42, the Atlantic Limited of famous
memory), 1896 wooden business
car23 (now undergoing restoration
at Smiths Falls) and 1870s business
car 37 (once owned by the
CRHA but later scrapped).
Model builders will,
in particular, find this book indispensable
if they are modelling New England equipment. However, it also
provides a look at how
our neighbouring railways looked in those
days, not so very long ago, before they were so seriously affected
by the inroads
of the automobile and truck.
THE SKYLINE LIMITED
THE KASLO AND SLOCAN RAIL WAY
By Robert D. Turner and David S. Wilkie
Published
by Sono Nis Press
1745 Blanshard Street
Victoria, B.C.
V8W 2J8
Price not stated.
The Skyline Limited presents the dramatic story of the
Kaslo & Siocan Railway -the
Great Northerns nalTOW gauge -in
the rugged Slocan Mountains of British Columbias West Kootenay
district. Here too is the story
of the beautiful stemwheelers that
connected the K&S with other Great Northern branch lines. This
is a fascinating account of railroading in the 1890s and early 1900s.
Backed by James
J. Hill, the Empire Builder of the Great
Northern Railway, the K&S was built to haul the silver-lead ore
of
the Silvery Slocan. The CPR also built branch lines into the
district and competition was fierce.
By 1910, after many slides and a devasting fire, the dreams
had been shattered and the K&S was in ruins. Soon after, it was
taken
over by its arch-rival the CPR, and rebuilt as an isolated
standard-gauge branch line that survived into the 1950s.
35 CANADIAN RAIL -444
Anyone who has read the previous works by Robert D.
Turner expects the highest standard, and The Skyline Limited
follows this tradition.
It is a masterpiece, containing 296 pages,
300 illustrations, including 12
in full colour, and 25 specially
prepared maps and plans.
It has equipment rosters, a fleet list,
bibliography and index.
CANADIAN RAIL PASSENGER YEARBOOK
1995 EDITION
By Douglas N.W. Smith
Published by Trackside Canada
P.O. Box 1369, Station B
Ottawa, Ontario
KIP 5R4
Price: $24.45 postpaid.
This
is the second in a series which began last year with the
1993 edition (No, there
is no 1994 due to the change of dating from
actual date
to expiry date). OUf hopes and expectations expressed
this year were fully realized
in this edition which follows in the
footsteps
of its illustrious predecessor. This year the number of
pages has been increased by 25%, making a total of 82 pages.
While there
is a decrease of one third (from 48 to 32) in the number
of colour illustrations, those that are present are of uniformly high
quality, and they are augmented by a great number
of historic
black-and-white photos, some
of them more than 100 years old.
A glance
of the table of contents shows that there is
something here for everyone who is interested in rail passenger
transport. Whether steam or diesel, heavyweight
or streamlined
even stations, street cars and interurbans, there
is something here.
As before, the first article
is the year (in this case 1993) in
review. This is followed by an account of the X-2000 in the
Dominion, after Wllich there
is the story of North Americas Most
Unique (we will pardon this contradiction in terminology)
Observation Cars, i.e. the Skyview cars which
CN acquired from
the Milwaukee Road. After this comes
The Stations and Passenger
Trains
of Hamilton which is 150 years of history of CN (and
predecessors) and TH&B
in the Steel City.
The next article is the feature of the book, Rebuilding the
Dream, a twenty-five page history of CPs Budd-built stainless
steel passenger fleet from the first inception
of the concept in the
early 1930s, through
CPs purchase of 173 stainless steel cars in
1953-54, to the rebuilding and upgrading of the cars by VIA in the
late 1980s and early
1990s. Street car enthusiasts will have a real
treat with the next item, a sixteen page history
of the street cars of
Kingston, Ontario from 1877 to 1930. There are 15 rare photos, a
map,
car roster and copious end notes for those of us who wish to
delve deeper into the subject.
The Heritage Gallery contains
four photos taken
in the 1950s and early 19605, and then follows
the history
of the sleeping car Clinton (and its two running mates
BarkerviUe and Pavilion) which started
as interurban sleepers
in the Midwest U.S., ran for years on the
PGE (now BC Rail), after
which
Clinton went to a U.S. museum but is now returning to
Canada. Finally, The Departing Image is a colour view
of CPR
D-lO No. 896 working on Ontarios Bruce Peninsula.
Once again, we look forward to the next book in this series.
RAIL CANADIEN -444 36 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
CRHA Communications
1995 CRHA CONFERENCE IN SMITHS FALLS
The Rideau Valley Division of the CRHA, and the Smiths
Falls Railway Museum Corp
., is pleased to host the 1995 CRHA
Conference
in Smiths Fails, Ontario from June 30 to July 2, 1995.
The Smiths Falls Railway Museum
is located in the fonner CNR
/ CNoR station on a five acre site featuring some
23 pieces of
rolling stock equipment, railway artifacts, archival materials and
library. The conference will feature special presentations, exhibits,
field trip, slide presentations, silent movies etc., as well as the
Associations Annual General Meeting.
Smiths Falls
is accessible by train, auto, bus or air. A block
of rooms has been reserved at the Colonel By, Best Western Motel
a few blocks from the railway muselUn. For reservations please
contact the Smiths Falls Railway Museum, P.O. Box 962,
90
William Street West, Smiths Falls, OntalioK7A SA5: Phone-I-
6l3-283-5696.
It is expected that reservations for the conference to be
$100, which is about $35 to $40 per day. Field trips will be extra
to the Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa, or train trip
from Hull to and from Wakefield, Que. The scheduled events
promise to be very interesting. All members of the Association are
urged to attend.
THE AUBREY MATTINGLY COLLECTION
The Smiths Falls Railway Museum has just acquired the
Aubrey Mattingly collection
of railway photographs. This collection
consists
of about 30 albums full of pictures of steam and diesel
locomotives, stations and long-abandoned local railways. As well
as the photographs, the collection includes all of the negatives.
Aubrey Mattingly was a great supporter
of the museum in its early
day
s. He spent a term as director in 1983. The collection was kindly
donated
by Aubreys son, Wayne Mattingly. Thank you for your
support, Wayne.
LINDSAY MODEL RAILWAY SHOW 1995
The Lindsay and District Model Engineers show will take
place on Saturday and Sunday, April 8th and 9th, 1995 at the
Victoria Park Armoury, 210 Kent Street West, Lindsay, Ontario.
Hours are from 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. on Saturday, and from
12:00 noon t04:30 P.
M. on Sunday. Admission: Adults $4, Seniors
$2, Students $2, Children $1. For more information please write
the society at box 452, Lindsay, Ontario K9V
4S5 or phone:
Wayne Lamb. 1-705-324-9865.
Eric Potter. 1-705-328-3749.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995
INFORMATION WANTED
Mr. Gustave R. Portelance, 1430 St. Marc, Apl. 1207,
Montreal P.Q. H3H 2G3
is looking for the date of the last operation
of the old New York Central passenger trains between Helena,
New York and Ottawa, Ontario.
It is thought that the last year of
operation was 1954, but the exact date is not known. Freight
service ended
in 1957, and the line was abandoned soon after. In
the minutes of the City Council of Ottawa in May, 1954 is the
statement that they had no objection to the abandonment
of
passenger service as long as the N. Y.c. continues to provide
emergency services during the winter months due to possible
impassable roads, similar
to the reduced services that they have
been carrying on since 1952.
Mr Portelance would also like to know if the NYC ever
operated a gas car (doodlebug) between Berwick and Finch. One
old resident
of the area said that they once did.
Any information, or timetables, relating to the latter days
of either of these services would be appreciated.
THE ROYAL TRAIN IN SAINT JOHN IN 1939
Mr.
R.D. Thomas of Saint John, N.B. sent this very
interesting photo (opposite page) which he took
at the time of the
visit
of Their Majesties King George VI and Queen Elizabeth (now
the Queen Mother) to Canada
in 1939. CNR 6028 with the Royal
train stands
near Union Station, while 6013 appears to the right of
the photo. Note the ancient open-platfOlm wooden cars, probably
in work service, in the background. He also sent us a photo
of the
CN station at Sussex N.B. which has also lost passenger service.
37 CANADIAN RAIL -444
MODEL ENGINEER MAGAZINES A V AILABLE
Fred F. Angus, 3021 Trafalgar Ave., Montreal P.Q. H3Y
1
H3 has a set of the British magazine Model Engineer from 1939
to 1992. They are complete from 1939 to the mid-1970s (including
the rare World War II issues), and almost complete from the mid-
1970s
to 1992, a total of almost 2000 magazines. They cover all
aspects
of model engineering, with a great deal of emphasis on
locomotives and railway equipment.
This
is a rare opportunity to acquire 54 years of the Model
Engineer. It
is preferable to sell them as a set rather than breaking
up the run.
If interested please contact contact IN WRITING
regarding possible purchase
of them.
CANADIAN RAIL MAGAZINES AVAILABLE
Large numbers of back issues of Canadian Rail are available
at the Canadian Railway Museum. A list, with prices,
is enclosed
with this issue.
SALEM AND HILLSBOROUGH FIRE
The Salem & Hillsborough is rebuilding after the disasterous
fire
of September 16, 1994. While donations and offers of help
have been coming in, they are still in need
of further assistance in
this difficult time.
If you wish to help this worthy cause please write to The
Salem & Hillsborough Railroad, P.O. Box 70, Hillsborough, New
Brunswick
EOA I XO. A tax receipt for donation will be issued upon
request.
RAIL CANADIEN -444 38 JANVIER -FEVRIER 1995
The Business Car
STEAM ENGINE STALLED
A plan to transport a vintage Alberta
steam locomotive for tourist duty
in Arizona
has run
out of steam. The Rocky Mountain Rail
Society had hoped to lease 50-year old
ex-CN
locomotive 6060 for up to four years to a U.S.
company for trips on the Grand Canyon Railroad
in Arizona.
But thousands of kilometres in
unexpected detours to
get the massive machine
to Arizona has broken the U.S.
firms budget,
said Rocky Mountains Don Totten on November
8. The lease would have funded the societys
purchase of rolling stock, train renovations and
educational initiatives.
The locomotive will
stay
in an Edmonton Museum.
Source:
The Calgary Sun, November 9, 1994.
RETURN TO CRAWFORD NOTCH
TheStateofNew Hampshire has awarded
the
Conway Scenic Railroad a five-year contract
to operate trains on the former Maine Central
Mountain Division through Crawford Notch.
Work on the line, which has been dormant for
more than a decade, wiU begin after the state
acquires it from Guilford. Conway Scenic hopes
to begin service to the historic Crawford Notch
depot by late 1995.
Source: Trains Magazine.
DURABLE BRIDGES IN WESTERN
CANADA ARE SA VING CN MONEY
CN North America has discovered that
its hundreds
of old railway bridges built in the
West early this century are tough enough to last
well into the
next century. Anticipating that the
bridges would have to be replaced or reinforced
to withstand heavier loads, CN ordered stress
tests and found that most
of the bridges will
endure more than a century.
Thats why we got into the testing
One of Canadas more interesting passenger trains is the weekly Niagara Rainbow
between New York
Gnd Toronto. At Niagara Falls, Ontario, the Amtrak train couples to
the VIA train alld they procede, back
to back, to Toronto. These photos, taken at Aldershot
all September 17, 1994, show the train coming (top) and going (bottom).
because then it becomes an economic question Both photos by Fred Angus.
if we have to spend an awful lot of money on
infrastructure said Robelt Sweeney, CN Assistant
Chief Engineer. We dont see the need to replace the vast majority
of these bridges, certainly not in the next 25 years.
Based on the positive results
of the recent bridge testing,
the caSh-strapped crown corporation estimates it will save
$110
million during the next 15 years, just for its main line between
Thunder Bay and Vancouver. The 312 steel bridges on that line
were built between 1908 and 1914, using rivets, whereas steel
structures built since 1960 are bolted and welded. CN and other railroads are increasing the weight and
frequency
of freight trains to improve efficiency. CN and CP Rail
are considering a new load limit
of 120.6 tonnes per car, compared
with 118 tonnes currently, and there is pressure to
go higher. The
heaviest western trains haul coal, sulphur, potash and grain.
Bridges in the
eastem network, a bit older, tend to bear lighter
loads.
The tests were conducted at the University of Alberta in
Edmonton, and Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.
Source:
The Montreal Gazette, January 13, 1995.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1995 39 CANADIAN RAIL -444
The Itcenr (/1II101l!{c.:mCII/ Ihm Wisconsin Cenlru/II(U compteted Ihe fI/rllllgllI1cn{s /£1 luke OIer IIII Algoma Ctnlfo( recalls our COItrage 0/
Ifl{lI /,, in I/;, j./I/!!W), /9()·; iuue of Canadian Rail. / this strikill!; photo we we see ACR passenser lrain No.2. hauled by GP 38-2 No.
:~f)5 at Hlal.I/, IiiI lIorth€, ICrnrifllfJ o/the fine, /III Augltsl 28. /99/. The If Marie Ihe /lext dtry. Sin(t Ihe plio/f) W(1.5 wken, Ihl old Nmj(lna/ Trall.lOmillOnlal ,~/(Ilion. U(,11 011 tltl riShl of the pl/oto,llOs been demolished.
Photo by Piare Ozorak.
NORFOLK SOUTHl-;RN STEAM PROGRAM CANCELLED
As mo~t members no doubt know already, the Norfolk
Southern announced, late in October, thaI it was c steam program. a
nd thai the trips 10 be run in December 19)4
would
be the laSL Thus 28 y~lrs of these famous nips, first by tli~
Southern lind laler by ils successor Nonolk Southern. have conI;;
10
an end, Perhaps the l(ceident affecting some of it~ reccntly­
,furbished pasM:Rger cars was a reason. oc perhaps the retirement
of
some of the uflici:lls th:u supported the trips also Imd an effecl.
but
the result is ~d news to railway enlhusia~IS. While Ihe
cllcursions did nOt
opemle inlO canada. some came very close, a.i
lIe~r the border C
arolina and Virginia. In fael. foc a time. a former CPR Royal
Hudson
W:IS used in Ihis excursion prognun.
Your editor had the privilege of riding 011 .~ome of these
trips, and Chasing othe~, In fact only last April I rode behind 1911
SOllthern locomotive 4501 from Kingsport Tennessee on a circle
l
our through Appalachia Virginia. and returning throogh the
na!llr,tltUllne
l. Previou$ly I have wilnesS((! 4-8-4 No. 611 slonning
the g
n.de of Saluda Mounl.ll.in jn North CarolimL. and watched it
nm11ing at high spo..Cd through Gaffney South carolina ncar midnight
on an
October night in 1992. One of the rnost impressive railway
sights I h
ave ever seen was thm nf Mallet No, 1218 hauling 25
pnss
enger ClIfl(. without assist~n(e. in the motlntain~ of Nonh
Carolina,
It is hoped th:lI we will have photos of some of the$C trips
in a later is
sue.
Wllile we arc all
saddened thatlhcsc steam trips have come
II) an eod. we arc thankful lhal lhe Southem and the Norfolk Southern s
a fLtto run special ste3m excursions for the very long
pe
riod of 28 years, Thanks to this we will be able to enjoy. in
memory clim
bing the mountains, crossing the fiallnnds and passing through
a gre
at vanelY of countryside,
AMTRAK CUTS COMING
On December 14, [994, Coincidentally the day before
VI
As Allanlic Iliade iLI lasl run, Amtrak announced thatlllore
thon 20% of its pa~sengcr service will be eliminated. The only one
affecting Canada dil.Ctly is the Montrealer, between Montreal
aLld Washington, which will be discontinUed on April I. However
discontinuancc~ throughout the system will include the CapitOl
servi
ce in California (not 10 bccnnfused wilh the Capitol Limited
in Ihe East). tIle Hiawatha service ~tween Chicago andM.jlwaukee.
the scJlice between Chic;tgo and Grand Rllpids. between SI. Loujs
;tnd Kansas City. between Binningllilm and Mobile, between
Delroit and Pontiac
(only rceemly introduced), between Detrojt
andT
okdo. also Philadelphitl -A t1aotic CilY and Boston -Springfield.
There will also be servicc reductions, starting Fcbruary I
TIteSC will include the Elllpire Builder, the Desert Wind and
the
Crescent, While i[ had been planned 10 reduce tnc fR of two of the New York -f10rida trains. the Silver Met,01 and
the Silver
StilJ, the latest JJlL10unecmcms say thaltM frequency
of these tmins will stay the same; however the third train. the

lalmcIlO wiU bediscominued. It is also reported that further cutS
wi
ll be rl1:lde later this year and in 1996.
BACK COVEl<: A CP Ruil fil;!igJrf /rO;II. wtSI/JfJ!III(/ltl HIIIOIl Min .... Brislol Que., liI.Hrs Ihe Car/nOlr UlliWrsil) mmpus III OI/(lolQ (Ill April
28, 1975, Tit! InulillS lo … oll/olfloe is RS-IS No. 8758. while RS·lO No 8560 i.f IrailiIlK. PII()/Q I,), Pierre O:QrnJ.:.

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