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Canadian Rail 442 1994

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Canadian Rail 442 1994

CANADIAN RAIL
.,.


….. ….
,
PUBLISHED el-MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
TAStE OF CONTEIITS
THE CANADIAN NORTH EASTERN RAILWAy ……… ………………………………. . MERVYN T. (MIKE) GREEN …… .. 167
172
16
16.
191
192
19
196
199
202
THE TOP FIFTY RAIL SPOTS IN PACIFIC CANADA ……………………….. …… . MERVYN T. (MIKE) GREEN …….. .
THE FIRE AT THE SALEM AND HILLSBOROUGH RAILWAY .•…….. __ .. __ •.•…..•…
CPR
29 AT HILLSBOROUGH …………………………………………………………………….. . RICHARD VIBERG .. , ………….. …. .
lWO eN COACHES IN NORTH CAROLINA …………………….. ………………………. . JACKSON McQUiGG ………………. .
DUNROBIMS TRIP TO AAllFAIR AT SACRAMENTO ………………………………… . ERNIE OTTEWELL. …………………. .
MORE MUSIC AND TRAINS ……………………………………………………………………… ..
RAIL CANADA DECiSiONS ……………………………………………….. ., …………………… . DOUGLAS N. W. SMITH ………….. .
CRHA COMMUNiCATIONS …………………….. , ………….. …………… , ………….. ……. ..
THE BUSINESS CAR ………………………………………………………………………………… .
FRONT COVER: On Slmoo),. N~ilfJer6. 1960. lilt eRJ11t. OpU(1I(i/ an eXCllrsion 10 commemoralt (onr
day I.ariy) Ihl. 751h annj,~~Sl1ry of Ihe dn;ng of Ihl. IU5I spike 011 Iht CPR ,if! /it. This sptciallroin
OfJtOIM I~om MMilo SI. VII ond (turn. (lnd CQlUillM of 44.() Sleum I(KY}nwti,~ 19 (originolly built
in
1887) af!d thru Iodem conmuUefC(lrs of/he SOQ-str;ts. Thj~ ,it!< shows IJ~ /min heading SQUlh Mar
the trIlI if the /rip. Sudl), Ihis hiSlIJrir !ocomQ/iIC was /x1(J/y (bUl1WI irrrpairably)damagt.d if! a Iragicfirl.
at Ihl. Sa/I.m &: HiIIlhQrO{gh Railroad i1l N.· … Brunswick U1r/y in Ihe morning of StpUml,.,r /6, 1994.
Plwloby F,edAn.tUS.
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RECTORS OF THE C,R.H.A.
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VICE PRES.: Charles De Jean
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TREASURER: Rober1 Carlson
SECRETARY: Bernard Mar1Jn
Frederick F. Angus
Alan C. Blackburn
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mes Bouchard
Gerard Frechene
MelVYn T. Green
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Wmiam Le Surf
RobM V. V. Nicholls
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Douglas N.W. Smith
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4
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, .
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994 167 CANADIAN RAIL -442
The Canadian North Eastern Railway
(Originally The Portland Canal Short Line Railway)
By Mervyn T. Green
With additional material provided by Douglas N.W. Smith
The Canadian North Eastern Railway was a short line
which carried one
of the most misleading names of any line ever
chartered in Canada. Its original title, the Portland Canal Short
Line Railway was very accurate, for it started at the head of
Portland Canal in Stewart, British Columbia and went for a short
distance inland up the Bear Valley. Stewart,
which is about 560
km. northwest of Vancouver as the crow flies, is practically the
BC-Alaska border.
The subsequent renaming of the line as the
CNER reflected the grandiose ambitions which fired Canadian
railway builders and politicians prior to World
War 1. Although
undertaken by Canadians (but originally chartered by Americans),
the company succeeded in covering only
21 km. in its course to the
northeast. Today, little remains to remind us
of its existence, apart
from a line
of muddy wooden pilings ill Stewart Bay, two houses
in Stewart on/or near Railway Avenue, and pictures, newspaper
reports and maps in Stewart Museum.
The years at the tum of the last. century were often times
of frantic interest in the areas we now know as the State of Alaska,
Yukon Territory and northwestern British Columbia: minerals,
especially gold, were the major cause. The Klondike strikes and
the attempts to survey and build lines which could penetrate easily
inland to the Yukon by using the long and narrow fjords along the
B.C.
coast focussed interest upon a number of potential rail routes
from such points as Lynn Canal, Taku Inlet, Portland Canal,
Observatory Inlet, Bute Inlet and others. The White Pass and
Yukon Railway chose to build from Skagway at the head
of the
Lynn Canal, but there was competition from a planned
all­
Canadian route to the Yukon from Glenora at the Stikine River
mouth, then north via Teslin Lake.! This was one
of a number of
routes surveyed for Donald Mann and William Mackenzie, who
were interested at that time in linking up their railways in central
Canada with a route to the west coast.
The opening of the WP& YR
over the White Pass in February 1899 and completion
of the whole
line to Whitehorse in June 1900 diverted the interest
of Mackenzie
and Mann to other areas, for a while.
2
One of the earl iest to survey in detail the Portland Canal
area was D.J. Rainey, who established a camp at the mouth
of the
Bear River and pre-empted as much
of the tidal flats at the head of
the Canal as he could in 1900. His first successful lode mining
operation was named the Grizzly Mine, and he operated several
subsequent
mines] In 1902, J.W. Stewart arrived in camp and
proceeded to stake all the remaining tidal flats, then he formed a
real estate company and staked a townsite named for himself.
The following year a second, larger boom occurred, when
the Portland Canal and Mining Company was formed. Its predecessor
company, the Portland Canal Short Line Railway Company had been formed by two Seattle mining investors, Timothy Hopkins
and Martin Stewart, in
1902: Developments were hindered as the
location
of the British Columbia-Alaska boundary was not settled
until 1906. After the settlement
of the border dispute, Hopkins and
Stewart obtained a Canadian railway charter in 1909
5.
One of the
new additions
to the companys board of directors was Donald
Mann, who foresaw major developments in northern British
Columbia.
We have unfinished business all the way to Alaska
he once said.
6
Late in 1907, reports of strikes of rich deposits of placer
gold along several creeks draining into Portland Canal led to the
construction
of an overhead tramway from the TunnelS Mine to
a concentrator in Stewart, where
some 1500 tons of Portland Canal
ore were treated between 1908 and 1910.
7
Stewart also serviced
the mines in the Salmon River area, which were (and are) reached
by road through Hyder, Alaska.
The gold strikes soon petered out,
but Mann and Mackenzie owned property further north. Early in
1910 they decided to buy up the PCSLR charter, for it included the
right
to build a standard gauge railway line inland from Stewart
northerly along the Bear River Valley to the mining camp at the
junction
of Bear River and American Creek. This mine site was
believed to be rich
in silver, copper, zinc and lead. The PCSLR
appeared
to be heading toward a wonderful future.
After the purchase, Donald
Mann became President of the
company
and things began to happen quickly.
On April 12, 1910,
W. H. Grant, a senior engineer with the firm Mackenzie, Mann &
Company was dispatched from the
companys head office in
Toronto to Stewart to act the superintendent
of construction for the
new line.
The contractors plant, camp supplies and first group of
100 constluction workers followed leaving Victoria for Stewart on
June 30, 1910
8.
To mark the beginning of construction, the citizens of
Stewart held a public dinner on July 25,1910 with Donald Mann
as its honoured guest. At that banquet, Mann referred to his long
connection with the westward course
of the railway from the late
1870s.
He said, During the time I have been a pioneer in nearly
every sense
of the word. When I reached Winnipeg at Christmas
in 1879, it was in advance
of railway construction. With my own
hands I prepared the railway ties which carried the first locomotive
over the Canadian Pacific Railway into that city. Now I have
come
to the Pacific Coast to help you pioneers push back the fringe of
civilization eastwards, and I assure you that we hope to it,9
Work had begun in earlier that month. The survey for the
line showed a relatively easy route. Gradients were gentle, for the
line followed the river upstream, climbing all the while to a height
of about 510 feet (155 meters) above sea level. The maximum
RAIL CANADIEN -442 168 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
InApril1911 ,CanadianRailway and Marine
World reported that their remained 1.75 miles
of
grading, 450 lineal feet of pile driving, 10.25 miles
of tracklaying to be done before the line reached
Red Cliff, its original destination
some 13.5 miles
from Stewart.
The track reached Glacier Creek
(Mileage 5.7) on
June 1st. A spur, 1,500 feet long
was built
to the Portland Canal ore concentrator
during the month
of June. The line reached Red
Cliff in August and a spur to the Red Cliff mine was
completed
in early October 191112.
By the time the line was completed, it had
been renamed the Canadian Northeastern Railway.1 )
However, none
of the locomotives nor rolling
stock appear to
have been repainted for CNER At
a 1911 banquet tendered to Mann by the grateful
city fathers
of Stewart, Mann proclaimed that he
was building the line
because there was a port at
one end
of it and Eldorado at the other. He owned
several silver/lead/zinc/copper properties along Bear
River, and talked
of freight possibilities to and
Stewart Bay, looking east from the Stewart -Hyder Road. The pilings that remain of
the PCSLR trestle curve across this scene from the right toward the main land in the
centr
e. June 1990. (M.T. Green)
from the agricultural Nass Valley and the Groundhog
Mountain coal deposits,
both not far to the east, through Bear River
Pass.
14 The coal deposits were estimated to contain as much as 900
million tons. curvature was 10 degrees.
The maximum gradient of 1.4 per cent
for three-quarters of a mile going north with no adverse grade for
loaded ore trains travelling south.
There was a 1.5 miles of heavy
rock work.
Due to the extensive tidal flats at Stewart, the company
had to build a large wharf to reach deep water. This massive pile
trestle would be
5,960 feet long, rise four feet above the high tide
level, and
give ships a 22 foot deep berth. Pile driving began in
early July and was completed in September
of 1910
10
.
During the course of the summer, rail and rolling stock
aITived by barge from Vancouver.
The deliveries included two
second-hand 2-6-0 type steam locomotives.
They had been built
by the Pittsburgh Works in 1891 and were
to be the only
steam locomotives
ever used on the line (see roster at end
of article). Initially they powered the construction trains
and were subsequently used during regular operations
from 1911 to 1915. Construction proceeded steadily, with
few major structures required, apart from the railway
wharf in Stewart Bay and the two crossings of the Bear
River, although several short trestles were needed to
bridge the creeks flowing in from the east. During 1911, the
company completed a preliminary
survey for a line through Bear
River Pass to Meziadin Lake. It
included a fOITnidable 2,008 foot long tunnel anhe pass and along
the northeast shore
of the lake
l5
• From there, the new Hne might
swing south, to connect with the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railway west
of Hazelton. However, it was not to be, for a decision not to build
into the Groundhog area was
made in the late summer of 1912 as
the coal field was not only isolated but also badly folded and
faulted.16
:,-. … ~
By the end of 1910, the construction company had
laid the first four miles
of track from the harbour. Early in
1911, the Premier
of British Columbia stated that Mackenzie,
Mann
& Company had big plans for this line which called
for the ultimate conversion
of this line into a fourth
transcontinental system for Canada. In February, the
B.C. legislature was asked
to rename the PCSL to the
Canadian North Eastern Railway and to authorize
it to
extend its line along the Bear River easterly to the eastern
boundary of the province
at the Bear River on Pine River
Pass and from
Stewart Lake to soutJlerly to a junction with
the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. II Many expected that
this line would cross the northern regions
of the prairies to
a junction with the Hudson Bay Railway being built from
The Pas, Manitoba to Hudson Bay.
PCSLR 2.6.0 steam locomotive #1 standing alone by the Stewart freight house
(on the left). On the right is the large combination depot. Loco #2 is
approaching from the direction of Red Cliff. Circa 1912. (Big CountlY
Printers: Authors Collection)
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
Red Cliff was to
remain the railhead as the
mother lode was never found
and mining in the area wenl
into decl ine. Mackenzie and
Manns dream to include the
line as
partofCanadas fOUith
transcontinental rail line
faded with the onslaught
of
the financial panic which
swept the European money
markets in 1913.
They had
to rein in their schemes and
harbour their resources
just
to complete the Canadian
Northerns Montreal-Van­
couver line in 1915.
The PCSLR started
169 CANADIAN RAIL -442
….
at a wharf and roundhouse
built on pilings above the
tidal flats
of Stewart Bay.
The railway wharf and a
Government Wharf were
served by vessels of both the
Grand Trunk Pacific
Steamship Company and the
Union
Steamship Comp-
PCSLR 2.6.0 steam locomotive #2 about to leave the whOlf and cross the wooden trestle over the shallow Bay
to the main land ill Stewart. Circa 1912. (Big Country Printers: Authors Collection)
any.17 The track then ran in a right-hand curve (again on a wooden
trestle supported on pilings) for
twe km·to solid land at I stStreet,
where it swung north through the town. About 800 acres of land,
part tidal, was owned by the railway and its associates.
ls
About one
km. from the end
of the wharf, at 10th Street, a large combination
passenger depot and
operators house was built, the centre portion
covered by an extensive mansard roof.
The depot-house measured
140 m. x 55 m., with bay windows both front and rear, set within
a large wooden platform, measuring about 485 m. x 95 m. Nearby,
on the opposite (west) side
of the track, was a separate freight
station (170 m. x 50 m.) with a
nanow platform and a peaked
roof.
19
The line progressed for another two km., then swung east
over the
Bear River on a flat deck blidge to hug the eastern side of
the Bear Valley for about 15 km. on a north-northeasterly course.
On the way, it serviced several mines, at Glacier Creek, Dunwell,
TunnelS and Bitter Creek. It then crossed the Bear River again on
a short bridge, to head north along the west side
of American
Creek, until
it reached the Red Cliff Mine, on Lydden Creek and
21 km. from the wharf.2°
A mixed train operated one daily round-trip between
Stewart and Red Cliff. Composed
of wooden boxcars and flatcars,
passengers were accommodated
in a single coach-baggage-caboose
(comboose) car.
The flat cars and the single cornboose were built
by the Canadian
Car and Foundry Company2l. One of the two
steam locomotives hauled the train, while the other switched the
wharf, hauled work trains, or was undergoing maintenance.
The failure to uncover large, easily accessible mineral
deposits lead to the decision to end regular operations. By April,
1915, all the locomotives and rolling stock had been placed aboard barges and towed to Port Mann on
the Fraser River, where they
were absorbed into Canadian Northern Railway stock.
22
The
CNER had run its last train. The CNER backers invested $75,000
in the pier, roundhouse, station and trackage.
23
The railway charter lay idle until 1919, when it was bought
by the Honourable H.H. Stevens.
He changed its name to the
Canadian North-Eastern Railway and its route was to reach to the
Finlay River only. However, nothing more was built and the
charter was sold to the Consolidated Mining
& Smelting Company
of Trail B.C. in 1924.24 Cominco already had a few holdings
nearby, but it may have been prompted to purchase in order to keep
out the Granby Consolidated Mining Smelting & Power Company.
Granby Consolidated had large holdings in northwest B.C., including
the Anyox Copper Mine and smelter located on Observatory Inlet
which was only some 65 km. due south
of Stewart. These operated
from 1913 to 1935.
When queried about the purchase in the 1950s,
a
company spokesmen said Cominco had purchased CNER for
reasons not apparenl in our files.25
A serious washout of the bridge crossing over the Bear
River at Stewart in 1924 was repaired. However, by this time, the
only rail traffic consisted
of a few shipments of ore carried by one
or two 4-wheel gasoline-engine track patrolmans speeders26 A
similar washout of the bridge over the wide mouth of Bitter Creek
was not repaired, however. During the years
of the Great Depression
of the 1930s, the track was left to deteriorate: the rails were tom
up in 1940/41, when they became steel salvage for the requirements
of World War II.27 The track bed through the town of Stewart was
later covered with blacktop and named
Railway Avenue. Some
time after World War II the combination depot was removed and
divided into three parts, two
of which still survive. The larger one
contains the original mansard
roof covered in corrugated steel; the
RAIL CANADIEN -442
PCSLR combinedfreight and passenger train leaving Stewart for
Red Cliff. Circa 1913. (J.w. Stewart)
smaller one has a peaked roof. During renovations to the latter
house in the mid-1980s, removal
of an interior wall exposed the
original depot ticket wicket and counter.
28
While he had decided to end regular train operations over
the CNER, Donald Mann continued to envisage it as part
of a new
northern transcontinental line. In a letter written sometime after
1915, he said,
The Yellow head line to Vancouver had hardly been
completed when I discovered that a railway run due east from
Portland Canal [at Stewart] through the Peace River
to the
Saskatchewan valley would far excel the Canadian Northern
Railway for grade and curvature and in actual costs
of transportation.
Crossing
by this route is by a pass 1,000 feet lower even than [thel
Yellow head. There are no deep rock canyons
to be negotiated
between the Pacific Coast and the Saskatchewan [near the present
day community
of Lynn Lake1.
He continued, This line, on a wide swinging curve, would
tap a bigger and better agricultural country, more coal, metal and
waterpower resources than all the Maritimes put together with
New England and New York thrown
in. There are
170 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
when going inland and tender-first when operating seaward. There
appear
to have been no wye tracks for reversing locomotive
direction at Red Cliff, nor at any point between Stewart and Red
Cliff.
Footnotes
1. Roy Minter, THE WHITE PASS: GATEWAY TO THE
KLONDIKE,
p. 100
2. ibid, p. 347
3. Guy Lawrence,
THE PORTLAND CANAL, p. 59
4. GeorgeStevens,CANADlANNATIONALRAILWA YS, Volume
2, p. 100
5. CANADIAN RAILWAY ANDMARINEWORLD,June 1910
6. George Stevens, op cit, p. 99
7. Guy Lawrence, op cit, p. 59
8. CR&WM, May and August 1910
9. CR&MW, September 1910
10. ibid
11. CR&MW, February and March 1911
12. CR&MW, April, July and November 1911
13. George Stevens, op cit, p. 100
14. STEWART TIMES, 1911 issues
15. CR&MW, November 1911
16. Bruce Ramsey, P.G.E. -RAILWAY TO THE NORTH, p. 198
17. Wardlaw Stewart, THE PORTLAND CANAL DISTRICT, p.
23
18. ibid, p. 22
~~n~:~~v:~~:Si;:e~fo;~a~~:~e:~r~~~!, … ~!~,liOnS of f:J.o:~ …;_~-~~~<_
Today, the Canadian North Eastern Railway
is but a memory in a smalJ town that has had a
continuing series
of ups and downs in its economic
life, mostly related to the vagaries
of the mining
industry. Today Westmin Resources operates an
open pit gold/silver mine in the nearby Salmon
Valley.3D There is little else here now in Stewart: a
small fishing fleet, a couple of hotels catering to
tourists who drive in over Highway 37 A while en
route
to Cassiar and to the Alaska Highway, an
airstrip, schools and a few stores and banks. But 80
years ago, Stewart dreamed
of becoming a major
Canadian port, exporting mineral ores all over the
world, thanks
to Donald Mann and the brand-new
CNER.
Although early maps show a turntable and roundhouse
at the Stewart Bay Wharf, all photographs seen
show both locomotives operating chimney-first
Private house on the east side of Railway Avenue in Stewart. Note the mansard roof
covered
in corrugated steel sections. June 1990. (M.T. Green)
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
19. InSUlance Plan, Stewart BC
20. Stewart Museum, map displays
21. CR&MW, June 1910,
p. 473
22. STEWART TIMES, 1915 issues
24. Guy Lawrence, op cit,
p. 60
24. Bruce Ramsey, op cit, p. 198
25. George Stevens, op cit,
p. 100
26. STEW ART TIMES, 1924 issues
27. Guy Lawrence, op cit,
p. 60
28. Kathleen Bogas, Personal Interview (in Stewart), June
3,1990
29. DAILY REPORTER, Canadian National Railways, February
3,1954
30. Alf Randall, Personal Interview and Westmin Mine Tour, June
2, 1990
Reference Sources
ABC Researchers: Norris Adams of Vancouver BC, Kathleen
Bogas
of Kamloops BC, Raymond Corley of Scarborough ON,
1990-91
B.e. Insurance Writers Association, INSURANCE PLAN OF
STEW ART
Be. Vancouver BC, Surveyed July 1922, Reprinted
August 1938, Population 250
171 CANADIAN RAIL -442
Big Country Printers, Quesnel, BC: Photographs of PCSLR
Locomotives
#1 and #2, circa 1912
CANADIAN RAIL WAY AND MARINE WORLD, Acton Burrows,
Toronto, Various issues
Lawrence Guy:
THE PORTLAND CANAL -B.e. s NORTHERN
MIN1NG REGION,
in B.e. Teachers Magazine, Vancouver BC,
Nov. 1949
Macdonald,IA.NATIONAL TOPOGRAPHICSERIES,CANADA,
I :50,000. Ottawa ON: Surveys and Mapping Branch, Department
of Mines and Technical Surveys, 1925. Sheet 103P/13 , Stewart
Sheet (Westell1 half), Map 193A. Sheet 104 A/4 (Westell1 Half),
Bear River Sheet Map. 217A.
Minter, Roy: THE WHITE PASS: GATEWAY
TO THE
KLONDIKE. Toronto ON: McClelland & Stewart, 1987
Ramsey,Bruce:
P.G.E.-RAILWAYTOTHENORTH. Vancouver
BC, Mitchell Press, 1962
Stevens, George Roy: CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS,
Vol.
2: TOWARDS THE INEVITABLE, 1896-1922. Toronto
ON, Clarke Irwin, 1962
Stewart,
J. Wardlaw: THE PORTLAND CANAL DISTRICT, in
British Columbia Magazine, Vancouver BC, Jan.-June 1913
StewartMuseum, Columbia Street, Stewart BC: maps & photographic
displays, 1990
STEW ART TIMES weekly newspaper, Stewart BC: various
issues
in 1911, 1915 and 1924
COMPLETE ROSTER OF THE LOCOMOTIVES OF THE PORTLAND CANAL SHORT LINE RAILWA Y 1910-1915
Running numbers
Built
by
Date completed
Construction numbers
Wheel arrangement
Cylinders (diameter and stroke)
Driving wheel diameter
Boiler pressure (Ibs. per sq. in.)
Tractive effort
Weight on drivers
Built originally for
Sold
to Canadian Northell1
Received
by CNor.
Sent to subsidiary PCLSR
Renumbered
in January 1912
CNo / CNR Number (from 1916)
CNR Class
Disposition (Roster data courtesy
of Raymond Corley)
PCSLR
No.1
Pittsburgh Works (Ako)
February, 1891
1223
2-6-0
19 X 24
53
150 lbs.
20,800Ibs.
116,000 lbs.
CMNO & TPR (No. 600)
February, 1910
April, 1910
July, 1910
105
474
C4a, later D2a
Scrapped
by CNR in May, 1923 PCSLR
No.2
Pittsburgh Works (Ako)
February, 1891
1226
2-6-0
19 X 24
53
1501bs.
20,800Ibs.
116,000 lbs.
CMNO & TPR (No. 597)
February, 1910
April, 1910
July, 1910
106
475
C4a, later D2a
Sold
by CNR in September, 1923 to
Huff Gravel Co., Edmonton Alberta.
RAIL CANADIEN -442 172 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
Tile Top Fifty Rail Spots In Pacific Canada
Railway-Associated Operations on the Pacific Coast
And in The Interior
of British Columbia
By Mervyn T. Mike Green
President, Pacific Coast Division of CRHA
INTRODUCTION
No -this is not a listing of the main railway sound records
played on your local radio station.
However it is an attempt to
familiarise readers with the operations associated with the standard
and narrow gauge railways
of the Pacific Coast of Canada and
Alaska and the interior
of British Columbia.
A visitor to an unfamiliar
town often finds it difficult to
discover the location
of construction plants, workshops and other
buildings
of railway-associated operations. To assist in this, we
offer this compilation
of sites, which should be of value to a visitor
tothe West Coast, whether travelling there by rail, road, ai.r line or
cruise ·ship.
Thelist below surrimarizes the fifty main railway-associated
operations (both private businesses and the railway-owned workshops)
that carry out
most of the building, repairing, upgrading and
scrapping operations
of railway equipment and vehicles in B.C.
and Southwestern Alaska today. It thus includes both the main
sites
of rail activity and of rail historical value.
It includes detailed notes on the rail and street access
routes to each operation listed. With the aid
of a good local map,
this should assist
in finding the location of each site and in
telephoning for opening times
(of museums and tours). However,
note that most industrial sites do not welcome visitors without
prior
pellTllssion, while the major rail yards all have police offices
near their entrances (where visitors should report before entering
the property). All sites are standard-gauge operations, except
where noted otherwise.
CATEGORY OF OPERATION ANDTYPE OF EQUIPMENT
C = Construction & Supply of new vehicles
f
= Freight ca.rs
M = Major Maintenances & Repairs
I
= Locomotives
R
= Rebuilding, Repainting & Upgrading
m
= Maintenance of Way equipment
S
= Scrappingcutting-Up (&Smelting Down)
p
= Passenger ca.rs
1990-94 = known dates of operation Track components
1. ABBOTSFORD· PNR RAIL CONTRACTORS
a) Rail access -None (CPR Mission Subdivision, mile 6.7 is about
3 km. east).
b) Street address -2595 Deacon Street (off South Fraser Highway),
Abbotsford V2S-5W6 (530-5131 or 850-9166).
c) Category &
Type -Cot; M-t, Sot.
d) Operating -1990-94.
e) Description –
The building & maintenance of rail trackbeds,
rails, switches & other components.
2. BRITANNIA BEACH -BRITISH COLUMBIA MINING
MUSEUM
a. Rail access -None. (located adjacent to & east ofBCR Squamish
Subdivision, mile 31.0)
b. Street address -Sea to Sky Highway (#99), P.O. Box 188,
Britannia Beach
VON lJO (896-2233 in BB & 688-8735 in Van.).
c. Category & Type -M-f,I,p, R-f,I,p.
d. Operating -1975-94.
e) Description –
The summer operation (May 15-0ct.14) of a 24
gauge passenger train (composed
of a Mancha Little Trammer 4-
wheel battery-electric loco hauling two locally-built
4-wheel cars)
into
the ex-Anaconda Copper Mine, as
part of the mine tour. Also
the maintenance
of9 other compressed air front-end loadermuckers
and diesel locos, (plus 23 ore and flat ca.rs) which are on public
display along Industrial Road, or nearby. The mine is a National
Historic Site. Nea.rby
is moored the ex-CNR coastal steamer
Prince
George, awaiting a buyer.
3. BURNABY -BRITISH COLUMBIA TRANSIT SKYTRAIN
OPERATIONS
CENTRE & WORK SHOPS
11. Rail aCcess -Bcr SkyTrain mainline, km. 16.
b. Street access -6800 14th. Avenue, Burnaby V3N
4S7 (520-
3641)
c. Category & Type -M-m,p
d. Operating -1984-94.
e. Description –
The sole depot for the maintenance of all SkyTrain
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
The B.C. Museum of Mining at Britannia Beach
vehicles, including 130 passenger vehicles operating in pairs (built
by UTDC in 1984-8591) and 6 mow vehicles (including 2 Highrail
grinders, built
by BCT in 1986.
173 CANADIAN RAIL -442
A 4-car SkyTrain set superimposed on the B.C. Place Stadium,
buill in 1983.
4. BURNABY -HERITAGE VILLAGE
a. Rail access -None.
b. Street address-6501 Deer Lake Avenue,Burnaby V5G 3T6 293-
6501
c. Category & Type -M-f,L,p.
d.
Operating -1975-94.
e. Description -A collection
of heritage houses, stores and
churches staffed by volunteers
in period costumes. Included are
one steam
OAAT (Curly, built by Marschutz & Cantrell in 1879),
one interw-ban car (ex.-BCER #1223, built
by St. Louis in 1912)
several logging flat cars and the ex-BCER Vorce tram station.
S. CLOVERDALE· CLOVERDALE RAILWAY MUSEUM
a. Rail access -SRY Fraser Valley Subdivision, mile 13.5.
b. Street address-I7790 #10 HighwaY,Cloverdale V3S IC7(576-
2750)
c. Category
& Type -R-p.
d. Operating -from June 1994 on.
e. Description -The refurbishing of passenger stock, including
NRHS vehicles stored at Braid Street, New Westminster (item
#17, below). The first completed cars comprise a five-car passenger
set
of ex-CPR baggage and passenger stock, painted in CPR
maroon colours. This was the site
of the defunct BC Transportation
Museum (1975-88).
6. COQUITLAM . CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
MAYFAIR TERMINAL INTERMODAL YARD
a. Rail access -CPR Westminster Subdivision, mile 2.5.
b. Street address -II Burbidge Street,Coquitlam V3K-5Z2 944-
5800
c. Category & Type -M-f.
d. Operating -1992-94.
e. Description -The west coast terminal for all CP Rail Systems
TOFC & COFC trains in the 400-499 series, which are generally
hauled by 3 or 4 SD40-2
& SD40-2F units.
RAIL CANADIEN -442
7.CRANBROOK-CANADIANMUSEUMOFRAIL TRAVEL
a. Rail access -CPR Cranbrook Subdivision, mile l07.5.
b. Street address -Box 400,
I Van Home Street N, Cranbrook,
VIC-4H9 (489-3918). Located just east of CPR Depot.
c. Category & Type -M-I,p, R-I,p.
d. Operating -1985-94.
e. Description – A collection
of five ex-CPR passenger train
fOlmations (reflecting travel styles
over the last 100 years). The
1886 Pacific Express, the 1907 Soo-Spokane Train
De Luxe,
the 1929 Trans-Canada Limited, the lightweight 1936 Chinook
and the 1955
The Canadian are aU on public display, together
with 5 other passenger and 2 freight cars. Recent site expansion
has seen the Cranbrook Water
Tower relocated and preserved to tie
together the new and old sites.
8. DUNCAN -BRITISH COLUMBIA FORESTRY MUSEUM
PARK
a. Rail access -None. (Located near to & west of the CPRE&N
Victoria Subdivision mile 40.0, on Vancouver Island).
b. Street address -2892 Drinkwater Road, R.R. #4, Duncan V9L-
3W8 (746-1251).
c. Category & Type -M-f,J,p; R-f,J,p.
d. Operating -1965-94.
e. Description – A large collection and public display of 16
restored steam and diesel locos, 23 freight cars and 4 coaches
mostly used
in narrow-gauge & standard gauge operations by the
forest industry (mainly on Vancouver Island), including Shay and
Climax locos. There
is also summertime public passenger operation
on 36 gauge track.
9. FORT STEELE -PROVINCIAL PARK & HERITAGE
TOWN
a. Rail access -None. (Approx 2 km. east of CPR Cranbrook
Division, mile 95.6).
b. Street access -Highway 9395, Fort Steele VOB-INO(489-
3351).
c. Category & Type -M-f,I,p, R-f,I,p.
d. Operating -1967-94.
e. Description – A collection
of locos (3 steam, one diesel and one
compressed air), 32 freight cars and 4 passenger cars, plus a
summer public passenger service using steam locos and one or two
passenger cars on the East Kootenay Railway.
10. GOLDEN -CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY CAR
REPAIR FACILITY
a. Rail access -CPR Windermere Subdivision, mile 143.0, close
to
KC Junction (Kootenay Central Ry. line to south -part of coal
train route).
b. Street address -CP Golden Yard, Golden VOA-l HO (344-3723).
174 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
FAMilY .. FUN!
Ride the Steam Train
BRITISH COLuMBIA
..Iaat
–lIIaum
·PIII
Located on
. .. . th_e-l,iland
-_~:-H!,ghway, 60 kIn
, riorth -of Victoria in
:; . ~, -c –0 {ti1.c,~ n, ILC. ~ , E
njoy one hundred
–acr-es ofhistory-and . .
nature dedicated. to .

Man For~s{s ..
The B.C. Forest Museum at Duncan.
c. Category & Type -M:f, R-f.
d. Operating -1992-94.
e. Description -Regular work is undertaken on bathtub coal
hopper cars used
in captive unit train coal service between
Sparwood coal mines and Roberts Bank export point on the
Gulf
of Georgia, which are hauled by 4-5 unit sets of SD40-2 and SD40-
2F units.
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
A uthentic mining railway
operating at
the
HAPPY HANS CAMPGROUND
Gerry Sorensen Way
Kimberley, B.C.
Bavarian City Mining Railway in Kimberley B.C.
11. KAMLOOPS -GREAT CANADIAN RAIL TOUR CO.
LTD. STORAGE
a. Rail access -CNR Okanagan Subdivision, mile 3.0.
b. Street access -Station Street, CNR Heritage Depot, Kamloops
(984-3315).
c. Category & Type -M-p.
d. Operating -J 989-94.
e. Description -The winter storage site of Rocky Mountain
Railtours passenger equipment (22 cars)
in winter, neaf to the ex­
CNR Kamloops Depot, another National Historic Site. They are
kept in Vancouvers VIA Pacific Central Station in summer, when
they are hauled
by two leased GE 836-7 units, #7488/98 (built in
1980).
175 CANADIAN RAIL -442
12. KEREMEOS -TED MONCK TRACK SPEEDER
COLLECTION
a. Rail access -None. (All vehicles are moved by road vehicle).
b. Street address -1100 2nd Stfeet, Kefemeos VOX-INO (499-
5441)
c. Category & Type -R-m.
d. Operating -1990-94.
e. Description – A collection of around 20 ex-CPR & ex-CNR 4-
wheel Fairmont gas-engined passenger track cafS, including one
rare ex-CNR 4-wheel 8eavercar.
13. KIMBERLEY -BAVARIAN CITY MINING RAIL WAY
a. Rail Access -None. (Approx. 5 km. north of CPR Kimberley
Subdivision, mile 16.3).
b. Stfeet addfess -Happy Hans Campground, 80x 465, Gerry
SOfenson Way, Kimbefley
VIA-389 (427-2929).
c. Category & Type -M-I,p, R-I,p.
d. Opefating -1984-94.
e. Descfiption – A summer public passenger service using two
Swedish-built 4-wheel diesel locos hauling 2
Of 3 4-wheellocally­
built passenger cars around the campsite, on 36 gauge track.
Along the eastern edge are displays
of 6 mining locos & 14 wagons
of the Kimberley District Histofical Society. The mine may close
in
199.6.
14. KIMBERLEY -COMINCO (TECK)S SULLIVAN MINE
RAILWAY
a. Rail access -CPR Kimberley Subdivision, mile 16.3.
b. Street address -Mill Road, Kimberley VIA-2Y3 (427-8226)
c. Category & Type -M-f,I,m.
d. Operating -1895-96.
e. Description -The extraction of lead, silver and ZillC ores, using
36 gauge and 18 gauge trains
of 4-wheel ore cars. These are
hauled
by 4-wheel overhead electric-powered mine mules (built
by GE in 1948 & Jefferys in 1948-62), which operate on several
different mine levels.
15. LADYSMITH RAIL WAY MUSEUM
a. Rail access -CPR/E&N Victoria Subdivision, mile 58.4.
b. Street address -Ladysmith Waterfront Site, on Vancouver
Island, P.O. Box 777, c/o Radio Shack, 514 1st. Avenue, Ladysmith
VOR-2EO (245-2341).
c. CategOlY & Type -M-f,I,m,p, R-f,I,m,p.
d. Operating -1985-91.
e. Description -A collection
of one steam and one diesel loco and
13 rail vehicles, including some used in the logging industry. For
eventual public display, but now they afe stored in the MacBlo
Timberland site, north
of the city. Future prospects are poor.
RAIL CANADIEN -442
The Ladysmith Railway Historical
Society (LRHS) was
formed to preserve
the
golden age of railroading for the
benefit
of young and old. residents and
tourists alike.
The #11 Baldwin 2-8-2.
built In 1923.
The Ladysmith Railway Historical Society.
16. NELSON -ELECTRIC TRAMWAY SOCIETY
a. Rail access -None. (A loop of track approx. 100m. north of CPR
Nelson Subdivision, mile
137.0).
b. Street address -Lakeside Park, off 2nd. Street at foot ofKokanee
Street, Nelson V IL-3N6 (352-3433).
c. Category & Type -M-p, R-p.
d. Operating -1991-94.
176 SEPTENIBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
For further information contact the Nelson
and District Chamber of Commerce,
phone: 352-3433
We are a non-profit society dedicated to the
restoration and operation of Streetcar 23 -a
valuable herit
age asset to the city of Nelson.
The Nelson Electric Tramway Society, including street car 23.
e. Description – A summer public operation for passengers of
Nelson Electric Tramway 2-truck car #23 ex-Nelson Street Ry.,
nee Cleveland OH (built by Stephenson
in 1906). There are also
3 other trams and a caboose on display. The CPR depot nearby
is
another National Historic Site.
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
17. NEW WESTMINSTER -BURLINGTON NORTHERN
RAILROAD DEPOT & YARD
a. Rail access -BNR New Westminster Subdivision, mile 144.8.
b. SUeet address -400 Brunette Avenue, New Westminster V3L-
3E8 (520-5218).
c. Category & Type -M-f,I.
d. Operating -1971-94.
e. Description -located between Westminster Junction (BNR,
CNR, CPR
& VIA Trains) and Fraser River Swing Bridge (BNR,
CNR, CPR
& SRY trains), there is joint use of the immediate tracks
by BNR
& CNR trains, including all CNR traffic to North
Vancouver. Just east
of CPR New Westminster Subdivision from
Poco
to New Westminster & South Vancouver (Marpole, etc.).
18.
NEW WESTMINSTER -NATIONAL RAILWAY
HISTORICAL SOCIETY, B.C. CHAPTER
a. Rail access -BNR Cascade Division, New Westminster
Subdivision, mile 155.7.
b. Street address -Woodwards Distribution Warehouse, 109
Braid Street, New Westminster V3L-5H4 (520-5811).
c. Category & Type -M-p, R-p.
d. Operating -1980-94.
e. Description – A fleet
of ex-CNR, CPR, NAR, SPR and VIA
heavyweight baggage-mail, cafe-parlour, coach, combine, dining,
and obselvation passenger cars
is available for lease in both
Canada
& USA. All are painted dark green with yellow trim.
19.
NEW WESTMINSTER -SOUTHERN RAILWAY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA LTD.
a. Rail access -SRY Vancouver Subdivision, mile 14.32.
b. Street address -6300 Trapp Road, Burnaby V3N-2V4 (526-
2421).
c. Category & Type -M-f,I,p; R-f,I,p; S-f,I,p.
d. Operating -1961-94.
e. Description -The main workshops of SRBC (ex-BC Hydro &
power Authority Ry., nee BCER) just west of its largest
switching yard at 21st. Street, New Westminster. It maintains all
of SRYS 19 diesel-electric units (painted red, white & blue) and
the blue
The BCE Route boxcars, with reporting marks WCTR.
It contains a Hagenscheidt wheel-turning lathe, often also used for
repair
of CNR units Port Mann Yard.
20.
NIMPKISH -CANADIAN FOREST PRODUCTS
WORKSHOPS
a. Rail access -AtNimpkish, off 122km. Canfor-owned Englewood
Railway main line from Vernon Reload
to Beaver Cove, on
Vancouver Island.
b. Road access -Canfor, Englewood Road, off Highway #19,
VON-3PO (281-3338).
177 CANADIAN RAIL -442
Steam Locomotives
of the
Nimpkish Valley
(1917 -1990)
The Grey Ghost passenger car pulled by the (1l3) locomotive.
t:CAIF Canadian Forest Products Ltd.
Englewood Logging Division
The Nimpkish Valley logging railway.
c. Category
& Type -M-f,I,m, R-f,I,m.
d. Operating -1990-94.
e. Description -This works maintains all the vehicles of the last
logging railroad in B.C., including 4 SW1200 Diesel units (built
by EMD & GMD in 1954/6/9, one steam loco (2.8.2 #113,
Schenectady-built 61859,
of August 1920),2 rail cranes, several
dozen MOW units and hundreds
of log flatcars. There are summer
passenger operations from Woss, with #113 hauling one ex-CPR
day coach and one or more flat cars equipped with benches.
RAIL CANADIEN -442
THE
ROYAL HUDSON
NORTH VANCOUVER
TO
SQUAMISH
EXCURSION
The Royal Hudson train which runs between North Vancouver
and Squamish.
21. NORTH VANCOUVER -CANADIAN NATIONAL
RAILWAYS LYNN
CREEK YARD
a. Rail access -CNR Greater Vancouver Telminal, Zone
N.
b. Street address -1155 Cotton Drive, North Vancouver V7J-IB9
(665-5462).
178 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
c. Category & Types -M-I.
d. Operating -1970-1994.
e. Description -The main North Shore yard for interchange with
BCR to the west and to various private waterfront yards (#24
below). Two or more GP9RM units
in the 7202/09/22/43/78-80
series, each with slugs in the 200-03/11-13/26/78-80 series are
stationed here, while most grain unit trains are headed
by two
SD40/40-2W/50F/60F units from the East.
22.
NORTH VANCOUVER -BRITISH COLUMBIA RAIL WA Y
ENGINE DEPOT
a. Rail access -BCR Squamish Subdivision, mile 0.7.
b. Street address -1381 McKeen Avenue, North Vancouver V7P-
3H9 (984-5533).
c. Category & Types -M-I,p.
d. Operating -1965-94.
e. Description -Located just west of North Vancouver Passenger
Depot and the wye leading
to the barge load, this depot services
diesel-electric mainline and yard engines (including several
slug
units), and the Budd cars used on the daily passenger services.
South
of the depot is the Vancouver Wharves operation (now
owned
by BCR), unloading mineral hopper & gondola cars on the
waterfront, using 4 ALCO/MLW switchers (built in 1956/59) and
2 EMD switchers (built in 1965/66) -street access to VW
is via
1995 West 1st. Street, North Vancouver V7P-IA8 (980-9331).
23.
NORTH VANCOUVER -ROYAL HUDSON STEAM
TRAIN
a. Rail access -BCR Squamish Subdivision, mile 2.4; west of &
adjacent to North Vancouver Passenger Depot.
b. Street address -1311 West 1st. Street, North Vancouver V7P­
lA6 (688-7246).
c. Category & Type -M-J, R-I.
d. Operatlllg -1973-94.
e. Description -The maintenance and rebuilding of the two steam
locos used in regular Royal Hudson summer passenger service
from North Vancouver
to Squamish: ex-CPR class H-Ie 4.6.4
#2860 (ML W 69292, built in June 1940) and ex -CPR class N2B
2.8.0 #3716 (MLW 61628 built in 1912).
24.
NORTH VANCOUVER -WATERFRONT PRIVATE
YARDS
a. Rail access -CNR Greater Vancouver Tenninals, Zone N.
b. Street addresses -Pioneer Grain Terminal Ltd. elevator, 375
Low Level Road (987-8855); Neptune Bulk Terminals (Canada)
Ltd.,
1001 Low Level Road (985-7461); Saskatchewan Wheat
Pool,
801 Low Level Road (985-4812)1 all three are just west of
Lynn Creek Yard, North Vancouver.
c. Category & Types -M-f.
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
d. Operating -1970-94.
e. Description -The delivery and the dumping of grain hopper cars
(PG, using two Plymouth switchers, built in 1979; SWP, using CN
switchers from Lynn Creek) and mineral hopper & gondola cars
(NBT, using 3 Alco switchers, built in 1955/68).
a~————~a
RAIL
LOGGING
AT
PORT ALBERN.
TWO SPOT
A 1912.
Shay Locomotive
Albernl Valley Museum
C
Vancouver Island. British Columbia
~————~
The Rail Logging display at Pori Alberni includes 3-truck Shay
locomotive
No.2.
179 CANADIAN RAIL -442
25. PORT ALBERNI -ALBERNI V ALLEY MUSEUM
a. Rail access -CPR/E&N Port Alberni Subdivision, mile 37.0.
b. Echo Centre, 4255 Wallace Street, Port Alberni V9Y-3Y6 (723-
2181), on Vancouver Island.
c. Category & Type-M-I,p,R-I,p.
d. Operating -1981-94.
e. Description -A restored 2-TruckShay loco #2 (LIMA 2548,
built
in June 1912) and other rail logging vehicles are open to
public display. A summer passenger service is operated by the
Shay and an ex-CPR day coach.
26.
PORT COQUlTLAM -CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWA Y
POCO YARD & DEPOT
a. Rail access -CPR Cascade Subdivision, mile 111.9.
b. Street address -General Yardmaster, 760 -2775 Lougheed
Highway, Poco V3B-l B6 (944-5730); Diesel Shop, 1500 Lougheed
Highway, Poco V3B-5P5 (944-5771).
c. Category & Type -M-f,I,m.
d. Operating -1890-1994.
e. Description -The yard is the main West Coast centre for
collecting & distributing freight cars
to other yards in loco,
Vancouver Waterfront & South Vancouver. Locos: 67 diesel units
of 8 different types are assigned here for regular maintenance.
Visiting road units (& leased power) come in from all over the CPR
system. Two or more GP9U units in the 15XX and 16XX series
switch the large yard.
27.
PORT MANN -CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
THORNTON YARD & DEPOT
a. Rail access -CNR Great Vancouver Tenninais, Zone P, mile
116.0.
b. Street address -11717 -138th. Street, Surrey,V3R-6T5 589-
6514
c. Category & Type -M-f,I,m.
d. Operating -1980-1994.
e. Description -The yard is the main West Coast centre for
collecting and distributing freight cars
to other yards along Vancouver
Waterfront, in North Vancouver and in Richmond.
Locos: 56 diesel units
of 5 different types are assigned here for
regular maintenance. Visiting road units come in from all over
the CNR system. Two or more SW1200RS units
in the 12XX &
13XX series switch the very extensive yard.
28.
PRINCE GEORGE -BRITISH COLUMBIA RAIL YARD
& DEPOT
a. Rail access -BCR prince George Subdivision, mile 460.4.
b. Street address -1108 Industrial Way, Prince George, V2N 2K8
(561-4074).
RAIL CANADIEN -442
c. Category & Type -M-f,m.
d. Operating -1983-94.
e. Description -Regular work
is undertaken on the coal hopper
cars used in captive coal train service with
CNR between Tumbler
Ridge BCR
& Ridley Island in POlt Rupert CNR and on MOW
equipment.
29. PRINCE GEORGE -CANADIAN NA TIONALRAILW A YS
YARD & DEPOT
a. Rail access -CNR Fraser Subdivision, mile 146.1.
b. Street address -855 River Road, Prince George V2N 2S6 (565-
8203).
c. Category & Type -M-f,I,m.
d. Operating -1916-1994.
e. Description -The main
CNR yard for northern Be. Locos: 17
diesel units 4 different types are assigned here for regular
maintenance.
30 PRINCE GEORGE -CENTRAL B.C. RAILWAY &
FOREST INDUSTRY MUSEUM
a. Rail access -CNR Nechako Subdivision, mile 1.1.
b. Street address -Cottonwood Park, P.O. Box 2408, 850 River
ROflcl, Prince George V2N 2S6 (563-7351).
c. Category
& Type -R-f,l,m,p.
d. Operating -1984-94.
e. Description – A very large collection
of about 48 rail vehicles
(including ex-CNR 4.6.0 #1520, built by
CLC in 1906) and
buildings. This is the largest group
of rail artifacts open for
public display
in this province.
31. PRINCE RUPERT -CANADIAN NATIONAL RAIL WAYS
YARD
a. Rail access -CNR Skeena Subdivision, mile 94.6
b. Street address -VIA Depot, Station Street, Prince Rupert (627-
0724).
c. Category & Type -M-f.
d. Operating -1916-1994.
e. Description -The Pacific terminal
of the northern BC line and
the terminus
of the VIA Rail Skeen a service from Edmonton
viaJasper
& Prince George, the station here is another National
Historic Site. Fairview Grain Terminal, to the east on Ridley
Island (mile 92.27),
is switched by two EMD units.
32.
REVELSTOKE RAILWAY MUSEUM
a. Rail access -CPR Shuswap Subdivision, mile 0.6.
b. Street address -1st. Street W & Boyle Avenue, P.O. Box 3018,
Revelstoke VOE
2S0 (837-6060).
c. Category
& Type -R-f,l,m,p.
180 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
d. Operating -1993-94.
e. Description – A newly built Museum building contains a
growing collection
of rail vehicles, including ex-CPR 2.8.2 #5468
(built
MLW in Sept. 1948) from CRM DeJson, open for public
display.
33. RICHMOND -COLUMBIA CRANBERRIES RAILWA Y
a. Rail access -None. (About 3 km. southwest
of the CNR Greater
Vancouver Terminal, Zone D,Lulu Island Line, Mile 7 Yard).
b. Street address -15300 Cambie Road, Richmond V6V 1 HI
(278-8127).
c. Category & Type -M-f,!.
d. Operating -1982-94.
e. Description-A 24 gauge rail operation is in use for the
annual cranberry harvest only. October to November, using 4
diesel-mechanical units built in Austria, England & the USA. An
American 4.4.0 steamer also operates at rare intervals, pulling 3 2-
truck passenger cars, with a 1915 Sawyer-Massey steam road
tractor
on view also, nearby. (CNRs Mile 7 Yard is switched by
2 GP9RM units in the 7004-13/44-49 series, with a slug apiece
from the 200+ series. Street access is
off River Road)
34.
RICHMOND -NATIONAL METAL CORP. LTD.
a. Rail access -CNR Yale Subdivision, Lulu Island Line, mile 8.5.
b. Street access -14600 River Road, Richmond V6V IL4 (276-
4621).
c. Category & Type -S-f,m,p.
d. Operating -1978-94.
e. Description -The dismantling and cutting up of SRBC boxcars,
CNR hopper cars
& a plough and VIA steam generator cars in
1992-93, also many
BC Transit diesel buses and 2 PCC streetcars
ex-TIC (in 1993). 5 rail-mounted American & Industrial cranes
(inc1uding one ex-UPR) are in use to separate and transfer scrap
pieces around the very busy yard.
35.
RICHMOND -NORTRAK LTD.
a. Rail access -CNR Yale Subdivision, Lulu Island, mile 7.8.
b. Street address -16160 River Road, Richmond V6V IL6 (273-
3030).
c. Category
& Type -Cot, Sot.
d. Operating -1980-94.
e. Description -The renewal & relaying of trackbed, rails and
switches and reclaiming
of disused track components.
36. RICHMOND -STEVESTON INTERURBAN
RESTORATION SOCIETY
a. Rail access -CPR Vancouver Terminal, Van Horne Spur, end
of track (mile 3.1).
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
b. Street address -South foot, #1 Road (in Steveston), c/o 6751
Chelmsford Street, Richmond V7C 4J 1 (274-0280).
c. Category & Type -M-p. R-p.
d. Operating -1993-94.
e. Description -The restoration of ex-BCER 2-truck interurban
tramcar #1220 (built
SI. Louis 1913) for eventual operation
within the City
of Richmond over part of the CPR Van Horne Spur
(ex-Vancouver
& Lulu Island Railway), once operated by BCER.
37. SAVONA -NELSON
MACHINERY CO. LTD. (NELMACO)
a. Rail access -CPR Thompson Subdivision, mile 25.2.
b. Street address -P.O. Box 279, Trans-Canada Highway, Savona
VOK
210, (373-2427), 40 Km. west of Kamloops.
c. Category & Type -C-t, M-I,R-l,S-f,I,t.
d. Operating -1950-94.
e. Description – A supplier
& maintainer of all kinds and (all
narrow) gauges
of mining & tunnelling equipment, i.ncluding
diesel-mechanical, diesel-electric
& compressed-air locos.
Previously located
in North Vancouver, but now in the dry
belt, where rust and
cOITosion are minimal, this yard contains
the largest pennanent collection
of several hundred dead and
alive rail equipment pieces anywhere in this province.
38.
SKAGWA Y -WHITE PASS & YUKON ROUTE
WORKSHOPS
a. Rail access -WPYR mainline, mile 2.0.
b. Street access -23rd. Avenue, Skagway AK (1-983-2217).
c. Category
& Type-M-f,l,m,p,R-f,l,m,p,S-f,l,m,p.
d. Operating -1969-94.
e. Description -This is the main facility for the 36 gauge WPYR,
operating diesel units for the daily passenger service to Fraser
Lake BC and Carcross
YT. It also operates a summer passenger
service from/to Skagway Docks on cruise ship trains
to White
Pass, hauled
by 2.8.2 #73 (built by Baldwin in May 1947). There
are many withdrawn boxcars, refrigerator cars and cabooses
in use
in the yars
& in residential areas as storage sheds, shops, garden
sheds, house extensions and childrens play houses, plus two
steam locos on public display
in Skagway (& one diesel in #8
above).
39.
SQUAMISH· BRITISH COLUMBIA RAIL WORKSHOPS
a. Rail access -BCR Squamish Subdivision, mile 42.0.
b. Street address -39500 Government Road, Squamish BC VON
3GO (898-2420).
c. Category & Type -C-f,t,M-f,l,m,p,R-f,l,m,p,S-f,l,m,p.
d.
Operating -1972-94.
e. Description -The main BCR Works (ex-PGER), providing for
all
of the needs of the Companys vehicles.
181 CANADIAN RAIL -442
THE
SOOKE
RIVER
RAILWAY
PRESERVATION
SOCIETY
Enjoy a ride on historic rails through
the hills aiOtlg the Sooke River.
The Sooke River Preservation Society.
40. SQUAMISH. WEST COAST RAILWAY MUSEUM
a. Rail access -BCR Squamish Subdivision, mile 42.1.
b. Street Address -39650 Government Road, Squamish BC VON
3GO (327-2876). Located across street and north of BCR Works
in Squamish.
c. Category & Type -R-f,l,m,p.
d. Operating -1993-94.
e. Description – A large collection of about 46 restored vehicles,
open for public display, including the ex-CPR business car British
Columbia (built
by Bamey & Smith in 1890).
RAIL CANADIEN – 442
41. SURREY -AMI X SAL V AGE & SALES LTD.
a. Rail access -CNR Yale Subdivision -Greater Vancouver
Terminal, mile 117.0.
b. Street address -12301 Musqueam Drive, Brownsville, Surrey
V3V 3T2 (580-0251). Located between Fraser River Swing
Bridge and CNR Thornton Yard at Port Mann.
c. Category & Type
-S-l,p
d. Operating -1980-94.
e. Description -The scrapping of switching locos (ex-UGG #1,
1990), sleeping cars (ex-CPR, 1991), and baggage cars (ex-CNR
#74381,1994) using a crusher/compactor to prepare scrap items
for shipment.
42. SURREY -TITAN FOUNDRY LTD.
a. Rail Access -SRY Fraser Valley Subdivision, mile 7.7.
b. Street address -13101 78A Avenue, Surrey V3W 9B6 (596-
1781).
c. Category & Type -S-f,.
d. Operating -1970-94.
e. Description -The scrapping & smelting
of rail equipment
including 2 ex-RAR English-built diesels in 1976) in an electric
furnace, using one rail-mounted American electro-magnetic crane
to unload & transfer scrap shipments.
43. VANCOUVER -CANADIAN NATIONAL RAIL WAYS
WATERFRONT YARD
a. Rail access -CNR Greater Vancouver Terminal, Zone W.
b. Street address -Off Heatley Avenue, at Ballantytne Pier,
Vancouver.
c. Category & Type -M-l.
d. Operating -1980-94.
e. Description -The main waterfront yard, with interchange
to
BNR& CPR, including a short spur to house the two switches
normally allocated here for a week at a time (usually 2 GP9RM
units in the 7044-51 series).
44. VANCOUVER -CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
MARPOLE 0 YARD
a. Rail access -CPR Vancouver Terminal, Marpole Spur, mile 5.8.
b. Street address -200 East Kent Avenue N (at Main Street), South
Vancouver.
c. Category & Type –
M-l..
d. Operating -1960-94.
e. Description -The main distribution yard for freight trains
from Poco
to here over the Westminister Sub., then sent forward
over the Marpole Sub.
to Vancouver & over the Van Horne Sub.
to Richmond. It includes a shorl spur to house the local switcher
(one SW1200RSu unit
in the 1237-39 series and one caboose).
182 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
45. VANCOUVER -CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
WILLISTON YARD (a.k.a. WATERFRONT or L YARD)
a. Rail access -CPR Vancouver Terminal, mile 127.5).
b. Street address -351 North Victoria Drive, Vancouver V5L 4Cl
(643-6501).
c. Category & Type -M-l.
d. Operating -1990-94.
e. Description -The distribution yard for grain hoppers destined
for various waterfront silos on Burrard Inlets south shore (see #48
below), usually hauled from Poco
by two SD40-2 units. Switching
chores are handled by 6 units (4 SW1200RSu
in the 1206-10 &
8100//06/13/15 series & 2 GP9u in the 1520 & 1600 series).
46. VANCOUVER -ROUNDHOUSE & ENGINE 374
a. Rail access -None. (Originally, off CPR English Bay Branch).
b. Street address -431 Pacific Boulevard, Vancouver V6B 5M6
(738-9818) –
just south of BCTs Stadium Station on SkyTrain.
c. Category & Type -M-l.
d. Operating -1993-94.
e. Description -The ex-CPR Drake Street Roundhouse is now a
community centre
in the Concord Pacific redevelopment of the
EXPO
86 lands, along the north side of False Creek. After
sitting on the turntable outside from 1986
to 1993, ex-CPR 4-4-0
#374 (built in June 1886)
is now housed inside the Roundhouse (a
National Historic Site) -this loco hauled the first transcontinental
passenger train into Vancouver
in 1887. Plans are to put it on
permanent public dispaly inside a glass structure attached to the
east end
of the Roundhouse.
47. VAJIICOUVER-VlARAILCANADAINC.MAINTENANCE
DEPOT
a. Rail access -CNR Yale Subdivision, through VIA Rail Coach
Yard,
mile 131.2.
b. Street address -1150 Station Street, Vancouver V6A 2X7 (640-
3702). Located adjacent
to and east of CNR/VIA Terminal
Depot (now called Pacific Central Station and housing a long­
distance bus terminal as well).
c. Category &
Type -M-p.
d. Operating -1990-94.
e. Description -This depot undertakes all maintenance & repair
of all VIA coaching stock in use west of Winnipeg MB, which are
switched by a VIA 4-Wheel HiRail vehicle #4500. The Pacific
Centre Station is the terminus for the Canadian service from
Montreal via Winnipeg & Edmonton.
48.
VANCOUVER -WATERFRONT PRIVATE YARDS
a. Rail access -CNR & CPR, Vancouver Terminal areas.
b. Street access -Foot of Vernon Street (for United Grain
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
Growers), 1300 Stewart (for Vanterm), Foot of Salsbury Drive,
off Steweart (for Pacific Elevators) & Commissioner Streets
(for Coastal Containers at #2525 and Columbia Containers at #
2775), along Burrard Inlet, Vancouver.
c. Category & Type -M-l.
d. Operating -1994.
e. Description -The switching operations of grain hopper cars
onto piers, docks & silos on Burrard Inlet.
The locos used are:­
UGG #3 (Built
by EMD in 1966),3 Pacific Elevators units (built
by Hunslet in 1968/71/74); and CNR & CPR switchers elsewhere
(see #43 & 45 above).
49.
VICTORIA· GREATER VICTORIA ELECTRIC
RAILWAY SOCIETY
a. Rail access -None
b. Street address -c/o B. MacDonald, Box 8737 Victoria V8W 3S3
on Vancouver Island (383-1171).
c. Category & Type -M-p,R-p.
d. Operating -1990-94.
e. Description -The restoration of ex -BCER 2-truck interurban car
#
1231 (St. Louis 1913), for public operation within the City of
Victoria.
SO. VICTORIA -ROUNDHOUSE MUSEUM SOCIETY
a. Rail access -CPR/E&N Victoria Subdivision, mile 1.5.
b. Street address -95 Esquimalt Road, Victoria V9A 3K8 on
Vancouver Isl.and (c/o P.O. Box 68, Victoria V8W 2Ml (380-
3996).
c. Category -R-f,l,m,p.
d. Operating -Planned, from 1995 on.
e. Description -This wi U house a collection of mainline equipment,
on public display in the ex-E&N roundhouse, built
in 1912-13 &
now a National Historic Site.
CONCLUSION
In addition to the above, there are several other interesting
sites, where a building or a locamotive or a major construction can
be seen. These include: the CPR Mount Macdonald Tunnel at mile
84.9
of the Mountain Subdivision, between Ross Peak and Rogers;
the CPR Spiral Tunnels, between Partlidge at mile 128.0 and
Cathedral at mile 132.4 about
10 km. east of Field on the Laggan
Subdivision; the Northwood Pulp & Timber operation at Fraser
Flats (northeast
of Prince George), where two EMD switchers are
at work; the VIA/CNR Pacific Central Station, the western terminal
for
VIAs Canadian service and another National Historic Site;
the preserved British-built 4-wheel battery-electric mine loco
in
Clayburn Village at 4315 Wright Street; the track of the defunct
183 CANADIAN RAIL -442
Sooke River Railway in the Galloping Goose Linear Park in Sooke
(Vancover Island); the rotary coal dumping operations at CPR Port
Moody; the Canadian Occidental Petroleum Plant
in North Vancouver,
where another two
EMD switchers are at work; the twin rotary coal
dumping operations (soon
to be joined by COFC and unit grain
trains) at Roberts Bank Superport
in Delta (where the rail operations
are controlled by BCR); the 3 locos and 3 passenger cars on display
outside the motel at Three Valley Gap, west
of Revelstoke; and the
last Spike site (and ex-CPR caboose) at Craigellachie, also west
of Revelstoke. Many other single items of rail equipment are also
preserved in local museums
or are in use as part of private homes.
To find these, the most useful source
is the annual Canadian
Trackside Guide.
SOURCES
British Columbia Telephone Co., Provincial Telephone Directories.
Burnaby BC: BC Tel., 1993.
Bown, Paul et ai, Canadian Trackside Guide 1994. Ottawa ON:
By town Railway Society Inc., 1994.
Burrows, Roger, Railway Mileposts: British Columbia. Vol. 1.
North Vancouver: Railway Milepost Books, 1981.
Cohen, Stan, The White Pass & Yukon Route. Missoula MT:
Pictorial Histories Publishing, 1990.
Green, Mervyn T. Mike, Industrial Locomotives. Vancouver
BC: PCD -CRHA, 2nd. edition 1993.
Foreign Locomotives & Power Units
in BC,
in Canadian Rail #439. Montreal, Que.: CRHA, Mar.-Apr. 1994,
pp. 43-58.
Mining & Tunnelling Locomotives
in BC
Today, in Canadian Rail #423. Montreal Que.: CRHA, July­
Aug. 1991, pp. 111-121.
Personal Interviews & Correspondence -Garry Anderson,
of
Cranbrook; Douglas Battrum, of Coquitlam; Paul Crozier-Smith,
of Victoria; David Davies, of Kamloops; Mike Jeffrey, of Savona;
Ron Meyer,
of Vancouver; Ted Monck, of Keremeos; Lome
Nickiason,
of Surrey; Brian Peters, of Surrey; Rick Shantier, of
Vancouver;
Vic Sharman, of Richmond; Robert Turner, of Victoria.
Westren, Mike, Where
to Now, Cranbrook? in Canadian Rail
#432. Montreal, Que.: CRHA, Jan.-Feb. 1993,
pp. 3-12.
Working Timetables for: BC Hydro & Power Authority Railway
Division (now SRY), Timetable 87, New Westminster BC. 1974;
BC Rail, Timetable 8, North Vancouver, 1981; BNR Northern
Corridor,
Timetable 1, St. Paul MN, 1993; CNR Mountain Region,
Timetable 5, Edmonton AB, 1992; CP Rail System, Timetable 87,
Montreal, Que., 1992.
RAIL CANADIEN -442 184 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
The Fire At the Salem and Hillsborough Railway
Early in the morning of Friday,
September 16, 1994 a disastrous fire
completely destroyed the main building
of
the Salem and Hillsborough Railway in
New Brunswick. This building housed the
offices, maintenance bay, woodworking
and metal shop and parts storage area in
addition
to the rolling stock kept in the
building. A large number
of smaller artifacts,
as well as much
of the archives maintained
by the S&H, were also destroyed. By
coincidence, September
16 was also the
date
of the tragic fire at Montreals Hochelaga
car barn in 1898, when 76 street cars were
destroyed.
It
is reported that 12 pieces of rolling
stock were in the building and were either
destroyed or badly damaged in the fire.
According
to the latest reports, the following
is the status of these pieces
of equipment as
of October 10, 1994:
r
29. Ex CPR4-4-0, built 1887. Badly damaged View of the ruins of the building, October 10, 1994.
but fully restorable. Photo by Fred Angus.
208. Ex CN 8208, ALCO RSI diesel, built
1946. Had been operational. Completely destroyed, being scrapped.
209. Ex CN 8209, ALCO RSI diesel, built 1950. Had been held
for parts. Burnt
to frame, being scrapped. 1001. Ex CN lounge car 2310, built 1920. Burnt and buckled,
being scrapped.
4381. Ex CN baggage car. Had been used to store artifacts. Burnt
and buckled, being scrapped.
.. -. -.~ ..
58976. Ex CN business car VIOLET, built
1896, rebuilt 1954 and 1974. Burnt
to frame,
remains being scrapped.
56471. Ex CN flanger, built 1952. Burnt to
frame, but
is a candidate for rebuilding.
662101. Ex CN flat car, built 1944. Deck
burned completely off frame,
wiLl be rebuilt.
70005. Ex CN 40-foot box car, built 1927.
Burned and buckled, being scrapped.
8665. Ex CN 77-foot mail car, built 1923.
Scorched on one end; will be repaired.
6578. Open air passenger car, originally 40-
foot box car, built 1930, converted 1984.
Woodwork destroyed, but can be restored.
6581. Open air passenger car, originally 40-
foot box ,car, built 1931, converted 1984.
Woodwork destroyed, but can be restored.
Ex CPR No. 29 looks a bit the worse for wear, but still in suprisingly good condition after
In addition, two lightweight sleeping cars,
acquired from VIA, are being scrapped as
they were found
to be in poor condition, even
though they were not burned
in the fire,
its jielY experience, Photo by Fred Angus, October 10, 1994,
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
All scrapping is being carried out
by Tri-Provinces Enterprises
of Moncton,
who have been cutting up the steel parts
prior to their removal
as scrap.
Ex CP 29 was removed from the
fire area
on its own wheels and, upon
examination, it was found that damage was
limited to all wood and paint being burned.
This includes all the woodwork in the cab
(but not the cab itself as the latter is
of
steel), the tender floor, front and rear pilot
beams and all beams under the tender.
It is
planned to restore this locomotive to operating
condition.
A number
of hand steam tools and
some parts have been recovered from the
JUins. However all
of the specialized
machinery, consisting
of lathes, milling
machine, compressor, welder, air tools etc.
have been destroyed.
In addition, all of the
spare and specialized tools for diesel
maintenance have been lost.
Ex CN 4-6-0 I 009 was parked outside
less than ten feet from the burning building,
and it suffered only a broken rear light
when it was hit
by a beam as a burning wall
came down. Some blistering
of paint was
noted
on the tender top, However the dam!lg~
was minimal since the tender was full of
water. The locomotive was later towed to
the station, repaired and steamed. It made
an unofficial trip out and back, on its own
power eight days after the fire, and it is now
operational.
All the rest
of the rolling stock at
the S&H, including the two passenger cars
from the Canadian Railway Museum, were
some distance from the burillng building
and were not damaged in any way.
The Salem and Hillsborough has
suffered very badly from
th.is disaster and
would welcome donations
of duplicate
material which CRHA divisions and members
may have. They have lost all their records,
office supplies and many
of their tools,
including motor cars (speeders) wh.ich are
of great importance in maintaining the line.
CN had loaned them a motor car for several
months; however they would welcome one
from any source. The S&H is still very
much in business, but
is in need of help.
185 CANADIAN RAIL -442
Ex eN 1009 as it appeared on August 14, 1994. The building which burned is in the
background. 1009 suffered little damage and still looks like this now.
Photo by Fred Angus.
1914 Ex Grand Trunk/irst class coach
on a train a/the Salem and Hillsborough on August 14,
1994. This car, as well as the entire train, were not damaged
in any way by the fire.
Photo by Fred Angus.
By coincidence, the article on CPR 29, beginning on the next page, was scheduled to be printed in this issue of Canadian Rail. In
fact the manuscript was mailed from Hillsborough only two days before the fire and received
by your editor after that tragic event. It is all
the more timely than we realized when the article was planned, and
it is good to know that the story of 29 will continue, and it will be restored.
RAIL CANADIEN -442 186 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
CPR 29 at Hillsborough
By Richard Viberg.
Richard is a third generation railroader and has been involved in the restoration of CN 1009, CP 29 and CN coach 11152. He also
plans to undertake the second restoration
of 29.
29 and 1009 at the head of a passenger train on the S&H on Labour Day weekend, 1987.
Photo by James
L. ODonnell. Collection of Richard Viberg.
CP 29 was moved from the Canadian Railway Museum to
Hillsborough on a flat car during the fall
of 1983, aniving during
the month
of November. For several years thereafter it was at the
head
of a static display adjacent to Main Street where it spent the
summer months.
During 1986 it was felt that, since
29 would be 100 years
old in 1987, we should perhaps have a birthday party on the
Labour Day weekend
to celebrate this event. Pennission was
sought to explore the possibility
of steaming it, and it was agreed
that we would only operate the locomotive
in a double-headed consist. Work began on the refurbishment during the month
of
July, 1987 by the mechanical staff and a few volunteers who
steam-cleaned the flues and tubes which were plugged up solid
with soot. The locomotive was then moved up into the repair bay
and partly dismantled in order
to have a complete inspection by the
provincial boiler inspector. It was during this visit that we discovered
a number
of cracks on the boiler shell water feed connection which
had
to be ground out; also several flexible stay caps had to be
replaced. After this work was completed, we successfully passed
a hydrostatic water test and were ready to reassemble all
of the
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
inside cab equi pment. The locomotive
received one coat
of black paint and
was returned outside to be fuelled
with coal and water.
A week before the dedication
day, the boiler inspector recommended
that we set the pop valves at only 80
lbs. and steam the locomotive only
forthededicationdayevent. A further
inspection would be done
in 1988 to
re-evaluate the boiler and feed
connection which he was concemed
about.
Dedication day sunday on
Labour Day weekend dawned in
sunshine, and the fire was lit for the
first time in 27 years. A final coat
of -.
gold lettering paint was applied to
the tender, and it was topped up with
water. All
of a sudden a small hole
developed on the engineers side. A
quick repair was made, consisting
of
a tree branch jammed in, cut off
flush, covered with black paint to
hide this minor repair, and all was
ready. 29 was pushed backwards down
to
Grays Island to await the returning
tourist train, hauled
by 1009, from
Salem. Finally the two locomotives
were hooked up and came forwards
up the long grade into Hillsborough,
to the delight
of many photographers
on hand to record the event. At the
station a short ceremony was held, a
special cake cut and given out to
those assembled. Old 29 had lots
of
cab visitors and lots of stories told of
how well she had served in service.
Finally it was time to call it a day, the
fire was dumped and the locomotive
was put away.
187 CANADIAN RAIL -442
During 1988, additional work
was carried out and the pop valves
29 at Hillsborough, September 1987.
were reset to 120 lbs. During July, Photo by James L. ODonnell. Collection of Richard Viberg.
1009 lost a tyre and broke a spoke on
the rear driving wheel on the firemans side. Accordingly, for three
weeks,
29 filled in at one end of a push-pull train operation with
RSl No. 8208 (later 208).
On Labour Day weekend of 1988, the New Brunswick
Division hosted the annual CRHA convention, and on the Sunday
we once again featured two double headed excursions with 29 and
1009, to the delight
of all the participants. Later that month we also
ran another double header for the pensioners
of CP-CN-VIA, and
almost 200 pensioners enjoyed a great afternoon
of steam railroading.
29 ran its last trip
in 1989 for a video which was recently
released. It is the only time that the locomotive had pulled a
passenger train on its own since 1960 when it ran a CRHA excursion from Montreal to St. Lin and retum; at the very end
of
CP steam operation.
Bringing back 29 was made possible by the dedication and
hard work
of the mechanical staff of the S&H, complimented by
volunteers from the New Brunswick, Rideau Valley and St.
Lawrence Valley Divisions who were involved with both mechanical
repairs and
in the operation of the locomotive. Thanks for a job of
making a dream in 1986 possible.
·Just before the 1994 fire, repairs were being carried out due
to some leaking tubes. It had been hoped to have 29 back in limited
service
in 1995. Obviously these hopes have had a major set-back,
but it
is still hoped that 29 will run again under its own steam.
RAIL CANADIEN -442 188 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994

SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
OPPOSITE TOP: 29 and 1009 hauling the special
train on labour day weekend,
1987. The building
which was destroyed in the 1994 fire appears
at the
right
of the photo.
OPPOSITE BOTTOM:
29 under steam during its
lOath birthday celebrations.
Both photos
by James L. ODonnell. Collection of
Richard Viberg.
ABOVE: Probably the earliest photo
of No. 29,
originally CPR No. 390, taken
at Carleton Place,
Ontario about 1888, when the locomotive was only
about one year old.
National Archives
of Canada, Photo No. C-3823.
RIGHT: Photo
of 29 as it arrived on a fiat car at
Hillsborough.
Photo by
Jal71es L. ODonnell. Collection of Richard
Viberg.
189 CANADIAN RAIL -442
RAIL CANADIEN -442
RIGHT.-The S&H fire, and the plight of
29 received nationwide coverage. This
article appeared in the Winnipeg Free
Press on October
3, 1994.
190 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
Ed Bowes, right, and Pat McKinley inspect locomotive damllged by fire.
Fire not enough
to derail No. 29
0
ByTom McDougall
Canadian Press
O
LDNO.29isone sorry·lookiog steam
locomotive since the bip,
fire.
Butshes not dead and neither are the
nostalgic excursions af the historic
Salem and Hillsborough
Railroad in southeastern New
Brunswick.
No. 29, built for the Canadian
Pacific Railway in 1887, was one
of Canadas oldest operating
locomot i ves.
But then the railways yard
house in Hillsborough, N.B.,
burned to the ground two weeks
ago with No. 29 inside -along
witb two diesel locomotives, a rare
wooden business car, eight other cars
and all of the railways
tools and spare parts.
No. 29 is begrimed with sooty
residue. The wood trim in her cab
is burned off and the massive
timbers on her undercarriage are charcoal. Her
paint is seared
down tG the bare metal.
For a while, it looked like she
might be a goner.
But when Ed Bowes and another ··of.thetrainbuffswho
run·the·
Salem Hillsborough checked her
out, they found good news.
They climbed into the cab and
tried out the levers -throttle, J
ohnson bar reversing control,
brakes and others. All worked.
They inspected the metal for sags
and warps. They found none.
They refilled the evaporated oil
in her wheel-bearing journals, replaced the
heat·warped rails in
front of her and earlierthis week
they towed her to a siding. She
rolled along fine with no seized bearings.
It wasnt in the hottest part of the fire,
Bowes.said. It should be
OK.
It can definitely be restored ~sa
sWic display, he said, and it might
run again. Until the railways board determines
how or when to
fix up No. 29, it will probably be
sprayed with rust·preventing oil.
Theres a happy precedent for
steam locomotives surviving bad fires.
In 1989, fireenguJfed the roundhouse of the Durangoand Silverton narr
ow·gauge railroad
in Durango, Colo., a similar operation
to Salem Hillsborough
but larger.
All six of the Durango and
Sil vertons steam locomotives
were inside, some of them
severely damaged. But a six·man
crew fixed them all, one at a time.
By April, the least damaged was
running again.
It proves t he skill factor of t he
men who work here, said Valerie
Swanson, the Durango and
Silvertons marketing co·ordinator.
At the Salem Hillsborough, the
burned diesel locomotives are writeoffs.
The one that had been in
operating condition was burned so
badly its crankcase exploded, its
side panels melted and its springs
coUapsed. Products of 1946 and
1950, the two diesels had no great historical
value.
But the business car -with an
open·air platform on t he back­
was a major historical loss. It was
oneofthe few cars left in Canada
with truss·rod construction­tongue·and·groove plank
waUs
held togetber by turnbuckle rods. In terms
of showing early railroad construction,
it was a very significant piece of history,
Bowes said.
Fortunately, the railways other operating
diesel and all of its
operating cars were outside and
sw-vived, along with a lot of
museum pieces ranging from
cabooses to a double·ended
snowplow and a 1913 steam crane.
The railways other steam engine,
No. 1009, barely survived
with nothing but a burned steam
hose.
Meanwhile, the Salem and
Hillsborough hasnt let the fire
stop its Sunday passenger·car excursions
or its dining·car charters. A charter ran
only 12
hours after the fire.
But the fire left the railway
without a spare diesel or a place of
its own to fix its rolling stock. Fortunately, nearby
Moncton is
the.railway .hub of the Maritimes
and siteofCN Rails regional
offices.
CN is lending tools as needed,
along with a motorized car and
trailer for track maintenance. The
Salem and Hillsborough lost both
its motorized cars in the fire.
The building was insured for
$93,000 but the cars and
locomotives werent.
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994 191 CANADIAN RAIL – 442
Two CN Coaches in Nortll Carolina
By Jackson McQuigg
Sharp-eyed readers of Canadian Rail will
find the heritage
of these two pictured cars to be
readily apparent. They are, indeed, Canadian Car
& Foundry coaches builtforthe Canadian National
Railways, and later used
in Montreal area commuter
service. They now reside
in the collection of the
North Carolina Transportation Museum at Historic
Spencer Shops
in Spencer, North Carolina.
The story of thecals passage from Quebec
to Tobacco Road is an interesting one. A 1991
equipment planning survey by Jim Wrinn
of the
N.C. Transportation Museum and Clare Arthur,
Collections Curator for the
Museums parent
entity, the North Carolina Historic Sites Section,
pointed up a great need for additional coaches
within the
Museums fleet. While the Museum had three ex­
Reading Rail.road commuter coaches capable
of servicing the
Museums on-site train ride, extensive use
of the coaches with
little down time for maintenance was resulting
in increased
equipment failures. When combined with the Reading equipments
reliance on non-standardized wheels, this fact provided a real
impetus for a search for coaches which could quickly be added
to the Museums pool of available equipment.
It was a twist of fate that brought the CN cars to North
Carolina, however.
In the spring of 1992, I happened upon
Canadian Rails editor Fred Angus aboard an excursion over the
Lancaster and Chester Railroad, a shortline which runs between
its namesake cities in South Carolina. Conversation eventually
turned to the cx-CC&F fleet in Montreal and I soon found out
that a number
of the cars would be for sale in shOit order. Upon
returning to Montreal, Fred helped the Museum in North Carolina
with some
of the legwork in investigating the availability of the
equipment and even went so far as to recruit volunteers from the
Canadian Railway Museum to inspect a group
of the coaches as to
their mechanical condition. The N.
C. Transportation Museum
remains grateful for this assistance.
After arranging the sale with CANAC, CNs division for
equipment sales, and enlisting the help
of a customs broker, cars
4953 and 4955 began an arduous trip in freight service to North
Carolina.
They arrived at the Museum, which is located at a former
Southern Railway shop facility,
in the fall of 1992.
The cars have already proved their worth to the Museum
in this new incarnation of life for the coaches. The high-density
seating and the durability
of the seats themselves makes the cars
perfect for school groups, notes Kelly Wrinn, Programs Specialist
for the Museum. Indeed, the high seating capacity
in each car
allows for groups from one particular school to stake out an entire
car, rather than be forced
to split a single group up between several
cars, as was required when the Reading coaches were used for
school groups.
The Museum has, at this point, only put minimal capital in
the equipment. Both cars received rubberized roof skins. The
CC&F cars are all steel except the roofs, which are made of wood.
These wooden roofs are problematic, but the advantages
of the
equipment, even when this fact
is taken into consideration, still far
outweigh the disadvantages.
In addition, car 4955 has received
new paint (Pullman green) and now bears the name
James A.
Bistline.
Mr. Bistline, on the board of the support organization for
the Museum, is the retired General Council
of the Southern
Railway. He is perhaps best known for his role as Vice-President,
Steam Operations during his years with the Southern and Norfolk
Southern Steam Excursion Program. Car 4953, still
in CN -applied
paint,
is held in reserve service and is scheduled to be repainted this
winter. It has, however, operated at peak periods at the Museum,
the only evidence
of its change of ownership being the removal of
the CN wet noodle logos that were once on the car.
One final note: During 1993 repair work on the cars,
Museum volunteers were replacing a masonite panel in the ceiling
of one of the cars when they noticed a bit of exposed wood veneer
under the section
of masonite which they had just removed.
Delicate use
of a stripping compound revealed that the original
wood veneer work in the cars had not been removed when the cars
were modernized by
CN in the 1960s; rather the woodwork was
merely covered with latex paint.
It is hoped that perhaps one day
the cars can undergo extensive reworking and that the veneer can
be brought back to its original glory.
RAIL CANADIEN -442 192 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
Dunrobins Trip to Railfair 91 at Sacramento
By Ernie OUewell
Dunrobin on turntable at Sacramento Railfair, May J to 12, 1991
All photos by the author.
This event all started for Dunrobin and crew with an
invitation from the California State Railroad Museum (CSRM) to
bring this 1895 locomotive for display.
It would be required to be
under steam for display daily with moves around the area
as
required to get coal and water.
The crew consisted
of Jim Deck, second engineer, Dave
Morley and Doug Howg from Fort Steele Heritage Town, and me
as first engineer.
The engine was loaded for transport at both places by using
two cranes. This was the fastest way to do the
job as Dunrobin is
not top heavy; when it is in slings it hangs like a plumb bob. On arrival at Sacramento, there was a difference
of
opinion as to how the engine was to be unloaded. CSRM
wanted to ramp it off, but we insisted
in using cranes; this
was done after absolving both CSRM and the crane
company
of responsibility. We knew this would work as
the engine had been handled the same way when it went
to Vancouver in 1986 for Steam Expo.
Amtrak transported crews, wishing to use rail
transport,free. Our trip began by my driving from Revelstoke
to Cranbrook; once there we all went
in Dave Morleys car
to Sand Point, Idaho where we boarded Train No.
7,
Empire BuildeI
J
, at 0054. At Spokane, our portion of the
train was cut
off and became the Portland section, No. 27,
arriving at Portland at 1015. There was a wait until 1510
for No.
11, Coast Starlight which arrived at Sacramento
at 0618 the next morning.
We were all impressed with the
accommodation, food and handling while on the train.
At Sacramento, we were booked into the Capitol
Plaza Holiday Inn which
is just across Interstate 5 from
CSRM
in Old Sacramento. The days were long as we had
to get up
in time to have breakfast in the Amtrak station,
then go to prepare the engine for showing from 0900
to
2000. The work consisted of cleaning the firebox, washing
the engine inside and out, wiping the rods and wheels, as
well as putting out printed matter for distribution.
We
were helped for a few days by Mike and Helene Westren
and Jim Cullen from Calgary; all three are members
of the
Calgary and Southwestern Division
of the CRHA.
Due to the limited space available at the site, a
parade, such as took place at Vancouver in 1986, was just
not possible. However we were not static either; moves
were made by all engines to go out to get coal, water or oil,
and engines were also placed on the turntable and slowly
turned so both sides could be photographed. For an
English magazine, Steam World, it was arranged to
have
Dunrobin and an 0-6-0, No 1247, built in the same
place as
Dunrobin, on the turntable. The 0-6-0 was four
years younger, having been built in 1899.
Attending Railfare along with No. 1247 was the
replica
of the 1825 Stockton & Darlington Locomotion. This
replica was built in 1975
by Mike Satow who was along with the
engine. He also builtreplicas
of Rocket, Sans Pareil, Trevethicks
1804 gear operated ~ngine and a Great Western broad gauge
locomotive.
There were about 20 standard gauge steam engines and a
number
of diesels from early F series GM to latest GE freight
engines. Amtrak exhibited a three coach set. There was one two­
foot gauge wood burner, three 15-inch engines and a number in 7
1/2 inch gauge, but the latter were not
in steam.
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994 193 CANADIAN RAIL -442
Three times a day,
at 1100, 1500 and 1900,
there was a musical review
abou t development of
transportation; it also used
engines
of different periods
to illustrate the scene. Seats
were set up for about 1800
viewers, and these all seemed
to be full any time we went
by the site. All the exhibitors
were invited for the final
dress rehearsal on May
2.
Total attendance
was hard to determine as
local papers had it at 180 to
200,000. Terry Stefani,
operations manager, told me
the first day was 16,000,
the second day 22,000 and
the third day 26,000, after
that I lost count. I do know
we took down 8000
brochures on Fort Steele and
most of them were
distributed. Not all the
people going through the
engine took brochures, lots
of family groups took only·
one, so I do not think it
would be too far wrong to say
we had about 10,000 through
Dunrobin in 10 days.
On Thursday, May 10,
1991, a telegraphic hook up
was made with Promontory
Utah to celebrate the 122nd
anniversary of the driving
of
the last spike in 1869. To
mark this event. CSRM engine
Union Pacific 4466 was to
blow its whistle at the required
time but, as4466 was required
elsewhere that day,
Dunrobin
was asked to do the honours.
At the signal I was to blow
one
long whistle, to be
followed by every engine with
a whistle to blow for ten
seconds. This was done with
great enthusiasm.
Railfair was a
complete success, and the staff
of
CSRM are to be con­
gratulated. The show was only
ten daysbut the planning took
years to accomplish.
Ernie Ouewell, then President of Selkirk Division of the CRHA, doing another TV interview at Sacramento.
This happened as many as three times a day.
Ernie Ottewell trying a
15 gauge Shay. Unlike her full size sisters, this one runs quiet!
RAIL CANADIEN -442 194 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
More Music and Trains
The popularity of Lynne Macleods recent article Music
at the Railway Station in our May-June 1994 issue hasprompted
another article on the same subject.
In particular, we have the
pleasure to review two very fine recent recordings, both
of which
contain music related
to railways. Of even more interest is the fact
that the recordings differ greatly in the type
of music, yet the
railway theme
is prominent in each.
NATURAL
By The Sharecroppers
11 Ross Avenue
Pasadena, Newfoundland
AOL lKO
This recording, available on both tape and compact disc,
contains thirteen songs, all but one original compositions, dealing
with life
in Newfoundland. While only one is directly related to the
railway (The Engineers Song), others touch on topics connected
with the railways, and all depict the Newfoundland way
of life, of
which the railway was so long a part.
A mere list
of the names of the songs is enough to make one
realize how well they portray the spirit and tradition which is so
much a part
of the Newfoundland story. The recording offers:
One Room School The Mill Whistle, Engineers Song,
Katies Tune, The Kyle, The Legionnaires, Newfoundland
Autumn, Freddies Tune, Yesterdays Fishermen My
Grandfathers Fiddle,
Newmans Reel, Melmaid, Twenty­
Five Miners. All are excellent, but three should
be noted especially
from our point
of view. The Engineers song is a nostalgic lament
by a retired engineer thinking of the old days on the Newfoundland
Railway, abandoned in 1988.
In the first chorus he says The days
on the rails may
be over, but that doesnt mean its all gone. The
memories can live on forever,
as long as were singing our song.
The second chorus says
All aboard, all aboard, were off to the
Gaff Topsail Plain. Come hell or high water, come blizzard or rain,
well take you
to heaven and back home again. All aboard, all
aboard, and gaze through the side window pane, with scenery so
lovely and a rush
in your veins, were off to the Gaff Topsail Plain. Songs like this will go a long way
to ensure that the memories do,
indeed, live on forever.
Another song concerns the Kyle, the famous ship, once
owned
by the Reid Newfoundland Company, and later the CNR,
which has for many years being lying aground at Harbour Grace.
At the present time there
is some interest in preserving this ship and
restoring it in time for the
SOOth anniversary of the landing of
Cabot in 1497.
The Legionnaires tells
of the veterans of both world
wars, and their desire
to keep alive the memories of their comrades
in arms who died in battle, This song appears to be the most popular
of the series and helps to preserve the memories of these brave
Newfoundlanders.
The Sharecroppers, a trio consisting
of Ed Humber, Mike
Maddigan and Guy Romaine, are teachers who combined their
musical talents
to perform; as they put it, a hobby gone
wonderful. They got their first big break when John Bonnell
of
Cable Atlantic asked them to do a 30 minute special on
television. The show began
at the artistic Newfoundland Emporium,
swung through the Comer Brook Pulp and Paper Mill, with the
song The Mill Whistle, examined the old locomotive and
train museum in Humbermouth with The Engineers Song,
took a quick jaunt
to Harbour Grace to sing about The Kyle,
then ended back in Corner Brook with Newfoundland Autumn.
All three write, but there
is a difference in the songs which
reflects each members background. Mr. Romaine
is from an
outport so his songs reflect the fishery or growing up in an
outport. Mr. Humber wrote The Mill Whistle, which is
obviously proof
of roots in Comer Brook, while Mr. Maddigan
writes about his family, and he wrote
The Kyle while teaching
in Harbour Grace. Other tunes getting lots of air play are one
Room School, Yesterdays Fishermen and The Legionnaires
-Lest We Forget, played across Canada on Remembrance Day.
Al! in all, this is a great recording, and we look forward to
further releases by The Sharecroppers in the future.
MOSTLY RAILROAD MUSIC
By Eldon Rathburn
This compact disc contains nineteen instrumental selections,
all but one
of which are his own compositions, and most of which
deal with, or are inspired by, railway subjects. Mr. Rathburn, a
long-time CRHA member, was born in 1916
in Queenstown, New
Brunswick, and studied composition with Healy Willan at the
Royal Conservatory
of Music in Toronto. He was a staff composer
with the National Film Board
of Canada from 1941 to 1976. Since
then he has written scores for IMAX films and has been researching
the subject Music and Railroads. His film scores include The
Romance
of Transportation, City of Gold , Universe, Canon,
The Railrodder, Labrynthe (Expo 67), and the IMAX films
Circus World, Skyward, Beavers and Transition and
Momentum (Expo 1992, Seville, Spain).
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
The selections on this recording are:
The St. Lawrence Tubular Bridge Polka Mazurka. This lively
piece was written in 1854, by a composer known only as
WH,
to commemorate the start of construction of Victoria Bridge at
Montreal. It
is here arranged by Mr. Rathburn and played on a
steam .calliope.
Stravinsky on the Delta Queen. Let us imagine the great man
enjoying a cruise on the broad Mississippi. The calliopist
depalts from his usual repertoire
of popular tunes and plays this
short tribute
to the great composer. Stravinskys reaction is not
known.
Honky Tonks (from City of Gold). The NFB film depicts life
in Dawson City during the Gold Rush of 1898. The honky-tonks
were one source
of pleasure for hard working gold seekers.
June/ion. Clapham Junction, London, 1959. A bewildering
array
of trains coming and going from all directions, different
speeds, overlapping sounds.
The Rise and Fall of the Steam Railroad. If confronted with the
question would you like to see a return to the days
of steam
railroading with its belching smoke and shrieking whistles? the
answer from most railroad enthusiasts would be yes!. After
some dramatic gestures this piece settles down into bright
dialogue between the instruments. Part two features percussive
elements suggesting the rhythm
of the rails and passing trains.
The appearance
of the synthesizer (the villain of the composition)
evokes the modern, confused computer age. This orgy
of sound is
wiped out by pounding steam blasts. Although doomed to die, the
steam locomotive has its final revenge. There remains the sad
.throaty wail
of the.calliope accompanied· by ·light wisps of. banjo
and funereal
Jews harp triads.
Ghost Train. This piece sets on a comfortable road bed in C minor
with its roots
in boogie-woogie. It could depict a slow freight with
a mysterious cargo
of a look back at a troubled train in the past.
Great little Train of Wales. They operate on narrow-gauge track
and were first used to transport minerals from the quarries
in the
hills during the middle
of the 19th century. They attract tourists
from all over and are beautiful to see, winding their way through
the hills and forests
of Wales.
Tiddles of Paddington. This huge cat, now deceased, occupied a
special place
in Paddington Station, London. This is a lullaby for
Tiddles as she dreams about Scarlattis cat pawing out the subject
of a fugue, Confreys Kitten on the Keys.
Spiral Tunnel Boogie. A twisty trip through a spiral tunnel in the
Canadian Rockies,
the biggest corkscrew in the world.
In Memoriam -Jumbo. The famed Barnum and Bailey circus
elephant Jumbo was killed by Grand Trunk locomotive
88 on
September 15, 1885 at
SI. Thomas, Ontario. Always remembered
by the circus community.
Thoreaus Train. Thoreau was not a lover of the railroad. The
roaring of the passing train near Walden Lake interrupted his
transcendental thoughts. That devilish Iron Horse.
Amtrak. Pennsylvania Station, New York. Trains to the north,
south and west. A sweaty confused mixture
of crowds and rails, but
very exciting.
The Iron Horses of Delson. The Canadian Railroad Historical
Associations museum at Delson, Quebec houses all varieties
of
steam locomotives. They are kept well groomed, but appear like
corpses in a funeral home. Let
us imagine their breaking out of
195 CANADIAN RAIL -442
MOSTLY
:-..og–;CRYSTAL ®
: . : RECORDS
~_ ;OIGITAL C0520
RAllR~
ELDON RATHBURN
their prison and scurrying all over the country, only to return to
reality.
Schonberg VS. Gershwin. Friendsin Hollywood, partners in tennis,
both ends
of the musical pole. Their melodies rub elbows wirh each
other, sometimes are violently contrasted, but always in good
humour.
Dorion Crossing. One October night in the mid-60s at Dorion,
Quebec, a greup
of yeung peeple were on their way to a party. They
never made it. Their bus was hit at a railroad crossing and 22 lives
were snuffed out. As a frequent train passenger between Montreal
and Ottawa, I relived this accident every time the train approached
Dorion. This piece is in memery
of those yeung people.
DVOIakat 155thStreet. During Dvoraks stay in New York he was
often seen at 155th Street watching the trains going
in and out of
Grand Central Station. Dverak was an ardent railroad buff, but it
was not reflected in his music as far
as we knew.
Hindemith Rides the Merchants Limited. We knew that Hindemith
was interested in perusing railread timetables and in medel trains.
This piece suggests a trip from Yale University to New Yerk,
possibly to attend a performance
of one of his Kammermusiks
or maybe
just fer a rest from his teaching activities.
The Nomadic Five. After a cranky tune-up, a group of strolling
musicians are
eff in many directions including some Handel, a
flash
ef an old pop tune, a bow to. Liszt, Beethoven, Shostakovick,
and ragtime. After a soulful tuba solo they finish with a spicy
cadence.
Turbo. The CNRs experimental Turbo was doemed from the
start. It frequently broke down and once even caught fire. This
piece recalls one
of its trips. After a struggling start, it is on its
merry way, only to encounter another breakdown. After a series
ef
solos con frustrato, the Turbo is on its way two. hours late.
This recerding is a great easy-listening selection with lets
ef inspiration frem the railways, past and present.
RAIL CANADIEN -442 196 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
Rail Canada Decisions
By Douglas N.W. Smith
FAREWELL TO THE
QUEBEC CENTRAL
The Agency auth­
orized CP tear up all the
remaining 237.4 miles
of
trackage of the fOimer Quebec
Central Railway on August
10, 1994. At this time the
rails remained between
Sherbrooke and Harlaka, near
Levis, Scott Junction and
Diamond, a
nd Va lIee Junction
and Lac Frontiere.
. -~ -.-
The Quebec Central
had its origins in two ill­
fated companies, the Sher­
brooke, Eastern Townships
and Kennebec Railway and
the Levis and Kennebec
Railway. Both companies
were incorporated by the
Quebec legislature on April
15, 1869. This legislation
established five colonization
railways
to open the hinter­
lands
of the province to
settleme
nt. As traffic volumes
were expected to be
light,
these railways were
to be
built with wooden rails rather
A £100 bond authorized by the Levis and Kennebec Railway Company in 1874 and sold in England in 1876.
It was to pay 7% interest and mature in January 1894. Notice the attached coupons; no interest was paid on
this bond after January
1877! A small hoard of L&K bonds were found in the 1980s.
than the more expensive iron
rail
s. Two of these colonization railways, the Quebec & Gosford
and the Drummond Richelieu & Athabaska Railway, were built
with wooden rail
s. These rails did not stand up to the rigours of the
climate
and were quickly discredited. In 1873,
the SET&K or the
L&K decided to use iron rails.
Under the terms
of its charter, the SET&K was to build
eastwards from Sherbrooke to the Chaudiere River where it would
effectajunction with theL&K.
The latter company had international
-ambitions
as its line from Levis, opposite Quebec City, was to run
to the Maine border where it would link up with a projected line
from Wiscasset on the Atlantic Coast.
The L&K was the first to lay rails. By the end
of 1873, the
company had laid its rails from Levis to
St Fereole;a distance of
seven miles, The following year the SET&K opened its line from
Sherbrooke to Westbury, a distance
of 13.7 miles. The SET&K
was reorganized
as the Quebec Central Railway the following
year. The new company successfully sold its bonds
in the British
financial markets and
its rails crept ever eastward. Twenty three
miles
of track were laid to Weedon in 1875; 21 miles to Coleraine
by 1877,
18 miles to Robertson in 1878; 10 miles to East Broughton in 1879; and the final
15 miles to the banks of the
Chaudiere River, opposite the L&K
in 1880,
In contrast to the QC, the L&K had a chequered existance.
The initial contract to build the line was given to
Mr Hulburt, the
gentleman who had promoted the concept
of the wooden railway
in Quebec. With the failure
of the Quebec & Gosford Railway and
general deterioration in the North American economy, Hulburt
became financially embarassed
in 1873. Like the QC, the L&K
turned to British sources for its capital. The first three mile section
of track was completed from Carrier, on the Grand Trunk, to St
Henri de Levis on October 4, 1873.
In 1874 sufficient resources
were scraped together to pelmit laying four miles
of track from
Levis to CatTier. ,The.Jollowing year, the company complete,d
twenty one miles
of line to Scott Junction, which was expected to
be the meeting point with the SET&K. This accomp]jshment was
marked by an excursion which officially opened the track on June
23, 1875. This was followed by the construction
of an additional
15 miles of line. While it was heading for St Joseph, the company
ran out
of steam in 1876 on the banks of the Riviere Doyen. some
two miles short of its goal. Nothing daunted. the L&K simply built
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
a station at the end of track and
called it St Joseph.
The L&K
lurched along
for the next five years before
sucumbing to the inevitable
foreclosure·. It was sold ata sheriffs -…
sale on March 22, 1881
to none
other than the Quebec Central.
197 CANADIAN RAIL -442
As if to celebrate its
acquisition and point out the new
state
of affairs, one of the first
measures taken by the QC
in 1881
was to extend the L&K line the
two miles
to St Joseph after a five
year hiatus. The other step was
to
compl
ete its bridge across the
Chaudiere
to effect a junciton with
the L&K. On May
23,1881, the
QC began
to operate through
passenger trains between Sher­
brooke and Levis and between
St
Joseph and Levis.
Quebec Central 4-6-2 No. 2536 hauling a CPR wooden caboose. This locomotive was built at CPs
Angus Shops in March 1908 as CPR 1136.1n September
1912 it became 2536, and in May 1926 it was
sold to the Quebec Central where it became No. 60. In July 1935 it became QCR 2536, and it remained
The QC was hamstrung by
in service until October 1959 when it was retired and scrapped.
the location of its station in the
CRHA Collection.
uppertownatLevis. All passengers
and freight had
to surmount the
preciptious cliff which led
to the St Lawrence River wharves and
ferry
to Quebec City. During 1881, it approached the federal
government seeking a subsidy for a new line from
St Henri to the
Levis waterfront. As the ICR was planning
to build a new line
along the greater part
of this alignment to bring its Maritime trains
directly into Levis, the government demurred. When the ICR
completed the new line in 1884, the QC abandoned the original line
to Levis. It built a new line from St Henri to Harlaka, the junction
point with the new ICR line.
Pursuing the dreamed
of connection to the Maine coast, the
QC extended the track from St Jospeh
to Beauceville in 1886. As
the Dominion government refused to offer a subsidy
to the portion
of the line
to be built in Maine to achieve a connection with the
American railways,
the company shelved plans for further
construction. When CP completed its short line in 1889 between
Montreal and Saint John, NB, Quebec City interests again took up
the cause
of a new link to reach Atlantic tidewaters. The QC settled
upon the Tring Junction-Megantic line as the shortest and cheapest
means
to make the connection. This line was completed in 1895.
After the tum
of the century, the QC extended its Line from
Beauceville
to Lac Frontier between 1906 and 1915 to open new
timberland
to the forest industry.
Unlike many
of their Canadian ventures, the QC had been
avery pmfitable railway for its British investors. Detennined to
bring the QC into its orbit, the CPR made an attractive offer to lease
the company for a period of 999 years. The offer was accepted and
the property became part
of the CP system on January I, 1913.
After forty five years
of existance, Scott Junction finally
became a junction in more than name when the QC built a line
northward to a point called Diamond, near Charny,
to reach the Quebec Bridge. This line allowed the QC
to operate a number of
its passengeLtrains. directly into Quebec City.
The
final extension to the QC occurred in 1926 when CP
took over the Boston and Maine Railroads line between Wells
River and Sherbrooke. While CP integrated the Wells River­
Newport portion
of this line into its system, it leased the Newport­
Sherbrooke segment to the QCR
on June 26, 1926.
The Tring Junction-Megantic line was the first significant
portion
of the QC to be abandoned. Permission was given to cease
operations
in 1987. The next section to vanish was 31 mile line
between Sherbrooke and Beebe Junction, on the Quebec-Vermont
border. This line and the 2 mile Beebe Junction-Rock Island spur
were abandoned in 1989.
The only other major change was the the
surrender
of running rights over the Quebec Bridge and the
removal
of the junction with the CNR at Diamond.
As a significant number
of QC shares are still in private
hands, CP deferred taking steps
to abandon the remainder of the
system. While the tracks have remained
in place, it has been
several years since the trains have operated north
of Thetford
Mine
s. Service between Sherbrooke and Thetford Mines was
confined
to a once per week local.
OTHER QUEBEC LINES
Harbour Branch Spur: On December 10,1993, CN received
permission
to abandon the easternmost section of its rail line to
reach the wharves along the Montreal harbourfront from Mile 0.4
to 1.3. The Grand Trunk had laid the first poriton of its original line
along the harbourfront in the 1860s. Montreal had long been
seeking
the closure of this track which ran down the centre of a
stJeet for several blocks.
RAIL CANADIEN -442
ONTARIO
Fonthill Spur: CN received permission to abandon this
spur from Thorold, Mile 6.3 to Fonthill, Mile 11.9 on June 9, 1994.
This trackage formed part
of the last section of the Niagara St
Catharines & Toronto Railway to be constructed. Unlike most
interurban track, this line was built
f.or its -freight-potential.
Originally the trackage left the
NStC&T main line at Thorold. The
line reached Fonthill in 1907 and to Weiland in 1908 and Port
Colborne
in 1911. On March 28,1959, this line hosted the final day
of interurban train service in Canada.
Graham Subdivision: On May 31, 1994, CN received
authority to abandon the line beteen
Thunder Bay, Mile 0.0 and
Superior Junction, Mile 159.5.
This line was built to serve as the eastern outlet for the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. Chartered in 1903, the
GTP was the
governments reponse to the boom
in prairie settlement and grain
production. The main line
of the GTP extended from Winnipeg to
Prince Rupert. East
of Winnipeg, the Dominon Government built
the National Transcontinental Railway. Designed to carry grain to
the
St Lawrence, this supurbly engineered line ran far to the north
of the Great Lakes in a direct line to Quebec City.
The Grand Trunk Railways Board
of Directors, who had
less faith
in the abilities of their new western subsidiary to compete
with low-cost water transport, considered
it imperative that its
subsidiary have a line to the head
of navigation on the Great Lakes.
To accomplish this end, the GTP built its own line from Superior
Junction on the NTR to Westfort, adjacent to Fort William which
is now part .
0fThunder Bay, Ontario. The first sod for this line was
turned by no less a personage than the
Prime Minister, Sir Wilfred
Laurier on September 11, 1905.
As the GTP would be bottled up on the praires without its
access line to the Great Lakes, the company moved to complete its
line to Fort William very quickly. The 160 mile line was opened
for service on November 27, 1908. However, the completion
of the
NTR line between Superior Junction and Winnipeg was delayed by
heavy rock work and sink holes and a dispute with the Canadian
Northern over trackage rights
in the Winnipeg area. While one
experimental grain train ran from Winnipeg to Westford in the fall
of 1909, the poor condition of the NTRs unballasted track stopped
any plans for futher use
of the line. It was not until April 1911 that
the
NTR line was ready for service.
While the GTP was supposed to operate the NTR under a
lease with the government, the
GTP refused to carry out its
agreement with the government. The original contract had set the
annual lease costs as three per cent
of the cost of the NTR. As the
lease was completed before any surveys
of the route of the NTR
were carried out, the original cost estimates proved woefully low.
The cash strapped GTP simply could not afford to fulfill its
agreement. The government turned its unwanted line over to the
Canadian Govenunent· Railways for operation pending resolution
of the impasse on June 12, 1914. The disconnected Superior
Junction-Westfort line was leased
to the Dominion government on
July 1, 1915.
Manitowadge Subdivision: CN was given pelmission to
abandon from Hillsport,
Mile 0.9, to Geco, Mile 22.3, on June 23,
1994. This leaves only a 0.9 mile spur from the transcontinental
198 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
line. The Manitowadge Subdivison was built in 1958 to tap newly
opened mines.
Meaford Subdivision: The Agency ruled CN could not
abandon this line which extends from BalTie to Collingwood and
the Penetang and Pretty River spurs. This marks the second time
the Agency has turned
downCNs application to close·the·line; the
earlier application was refused
in 1990. The Agency said it would
review its decision within two years.
Midland Subdivision: Authorization was given on July 8,
1994 for CN to abandon its trackage between Uthoff at Mile 52.0
to Midland at Mile 75.2 as well
as the Midland and Coldwater
spurs. This decision leaves only the 9.5 section
of line between
Orillia and Uthoff for which CN has filed a notice
of intent to
abandon. A detailed history
of this line appeared in the November­
December 1992 issue
of Canadian Rail.
Petrolia Spur: CN was authorized to abandon this 4.7
mile spur
off the Strathroy Subdivision on June 10, 1994. The line
was built
by the Great Western Railway to Pertrolia to tap the
booming oil traffic
in 1866.
Scarborough Industrial Spur: CP received permission
to abandon this 0.76 mile spur
off the Mile 301.36 of the Belleville
Sub
in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough on August 3, 1994.
MANITOBA
Erwood Subdivision: CN was given authority to truncate
this Subdivision from the current end
of track near Baden at Mile
50.8 to near Birch River at Mile 22.9 as well as the 5.9 mile
spur
to a cement plant off mile 45.3 on June 30, 1994.
The Canadian Northern built this trackage as part
of its line
from Winnipeg to Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. This subdivision
extended from
Swan River, Manitoba to Hudson Bay, Saskatchewan.
The first section from Swan River, north
of Dauphin, to Erwood
was completed in 1900. Remaining portion to Hudson Bay was
officially opened in 1905.
In 1989, the NTA authorized CN to abandon
the western
most 49 mile section
of the line from Baden to Hudson Bay. Now
only a 22.9 mile stub remains of this route.
SASKATCHEW AN
Weyburn, Bengough, and Meadow Lake Subdivisions:
On April 12, 1994, the Agency approved an agreement between
CN and CP to swap trackage. CN will turn over the section
of the
Weyburn Subdivision from mile 13.37
to Mile 39.6 and the
Bengogugh Subdivision from Mile
0 to the terminus at Willow
Bunch, Mile 71.5. CN will acquire the Meadow Lake Subdivsiion
from Mile 0.0 to Meadow Lake, Mile 93.4. CN has been operating
the Meadow Lake Subdivision and
CP the other two subdivisions
since August
1, -] 990.
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Slocan Subdivision: CP received permission on August
2, 1994 to abandon its track from Mile 1.4 to Slocan City at Mile
31.3. This trackage was built
by CP in 1897 under the provisions
of the charter for the Columbia & Western Railway.
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994 199 CANADIAN RAIL -442
CRHA Communications
CRHA CONFERENCE 1994
By Chris Kyle
Reprinted from The Turnout
June 30,
J 994 was the start of the CRHA Conference,
hosted by the Selkirk Division at Revelstoke B.C. Members came
from all across Canada, those from the east flying [due partly
to
lack of suitable train service. Ed.] to Calgary and driving to
Revelstoke. After dinner, the delegates went to the Revelstoke
Museum to register.
After breakfast on July
I, we went to the Revelstoke
Railway Museum to board a bus for a tour
of the Revelstoke
Hydroelectric dam.
We then returned to the Railway Museum to
be present for the dedication of the Museum and CP 5468. Albert
Coughlin provided music for the festivities. Then after lunch, we
watched Revelstokes Canada Day parade and then went
to the CP
Rail yard to observe the demonstration
of CP Rail MOW trucks.
That evening, a bull session was held at the Railway
Museum. The delegates discussed a wide range
of topics including
volunteer burnout, succession planning and communications within
the CRHA.
Activities on July 2 were centred on the Seniors Centre in
the Revelstoke Community Centre. After a hearty breakfast, the
Annual General Meeting
of the CRHA was held. Atthe Board
meeting following the AGM, Walter Bedbrook was chosen President
for another term.
After lunch, there was a series
of presentations. Dean
Handley, President
of the Selkirk Division, host for the conference,
made a formal request for CP No. 5935, a Selkirk.
The locomotive
would be displayed
in the railway museum. This request is tied in
with Revelstokes centemtial in 1999. [This is its centennial as a
city. Revelstoke had existed as early as 1885. Ed.]. Harry Home
reported on the state
of repair of CN No. 6015 in Jasper. He also
discussed plans
to establish a CRHA division in Jasper. Larry
Buchan presented a railway watch
to the Selki.rk Division for
probable display at the Revelstoke Railway Museum.
The Calgary
and South Western Division followed with a presentation
of the
original Connaught Tunnel bronze letters
to the Selki.rk Division.
David Llewellyn Davies followed, with an account on activities in
Kamloops being undertaken by the 2141 Restoration Society, with
a view to retuming the locomotive
to steam.
Ruby Nobbs made a presentation on the history
of Revels toke
before the
aITival of the Canadian Pacific Railway. This was
followed by the National Film Board Video Snow Wars and a
program
of sl ides on the building of the Mount Macdonald TurUlel.
That evening, at a banquet attended by over seventy
persons, including civic officials and CP Rail management, we
were all regaled
by Nicholas Morant on his activities with Canadian
Pacific.
We were all enchanted by this truly great Canadian. That
made
me doubly proud to be able to present to him the 1993
Lifetime Achievement Award. I also had the honour
to present the
1993
Book Award to John F. Garden, and the Preservation Award
to Brian Fremantle on behalf of the Nelson Electric Tramway
Society. Albert Coughlins musical entertainment combined
to
make this a high point of the conference.
The
next day, after breakfast, the delegates headed east for
the Rogers Pass. Visits to the Connaught Tunnel and the Mount
Macdonald Tunnel portals, and various historic sites, took
up the
balance
of the morning and the afternoon. A highlight was a
tailgate lunch at the east portal
of the Mount Macdonald Tunnel.
The fellowship developed over the course
of the conference
augers well for the Association.
1993 ANNUAL A WARDS
By J. Christopher Kyle
I am pleased
to announce the winners of the 1993 CRHA
Annual Awards.
Lifetime Achievement: Nicholas Morant.
Also nominated were Walter Bedbrook and Ed Bowes.
Preservation: Nelson Electric Tramway Society.
Also nominated was the Museum
of the Highwood, High River
Alberta, for the restoration
of ex-CPR mail-express car No. 3622.
CRHA Article: Fred F. Angus for The Canadian Railway Troops
in World War I -Lest We Forget, Canadian Rail issue 437.
Also nominated were:
David
Ll. Davies for The Railway History of Kamloops B.C. – A
Century Old Story, Canadian Rail Issue 436
Mervyn
T. Green for Point Grey – A Railway Wasteland? Not!,
The Sandhouse, March 1993, and Canadian Railway Cartophily
-Canadian Railways in British Cigarette Cards, The Sandhouse,
December 1993.
Non-CRHA Article: Adolf Hungry Wolf for Cranbrooks
Wheels
of Luxury, Locomotive and Railway Preservation, May­
June 1993.
Also nominated was Stafford Swain for Canadian Nationals
1937 AAR Design 40-foot Steel Boxcars, Railroad Model Craftsman,
August 1993.
Book: Jollll
F. Garden for Nicholas Morants Canadian Pacific,
Footprint Publishing.
Also nominated were:
Adolf Hungry Wolf for Route of the Cariboo -PGE / BC Rail,
Canadian Caboose Press.
Charles Bohi and Les Kozma for Canadian Pacifics Western
Depots.
Mervyn T. Green for Industrial Locomotives, Second Edition,
Pacific Coast Division, CRHA.
Lawrence
A. Stuckey for Prairie Cinders, Nickel Belt Rails.
All
of these nominees are to be commended on the high
quality
of their achievements.
I also wish
to thank the members of the Awards Committee
and the Judges Panel for their contribution
to the success of the
Annual Awards programme.
RAIL CANADIEN -442
Committee: Chairman -J. Christopher Ky Ie. Toronto,
Ontario.
Walter
J. Bedbrook. Picton, Ontario.
Hadrian Evans. Calgary, Alberta.
Robert V.V. Nicholls. Merrickville, Ontario.
R. Dyson Thomas. Saint John,
New Brunswick.
Judges Panel: Raymond Corley. Scarborough,
Ontario.
Gerard Frechette. Montreal, Quebec.
Colin Hatcher. Edmonton, Alberta.
Derek Booth. Lennoxville, Quebec.
Allan Graham. Alberton, Prince Edward Island.
Christopher Andreae. London, Ontario.
Robert D. Turner. Victoria, British Columbia.
COMMENTS
Mr. Don McQueen of London, Ontario makes
the following very interesting comments on the
photo that appeared on the back cover
of our July­
August 1994 issue:
Its what you say and dont say in the caption
for the private car 103
SHAWINIGAN (on pp 163-
164 July-Aug 1994 issue
of Canadian Rail) that
intrigues me.
200 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
The 1993 Lifetime Achievement Award was awarded to Al Patterson
and the late Dick George. RIGHT: The Award
is presented to Margaret
George, Dicks widow. TOP: The award is presented
10 Al Patterson.
Bothpresentations took place at the T&Y Annual Dinner May
14,1994.
ABOVE: The 1992 Preservation Award is presented at Cranbrook in
September, 1994.
If the photo was taken in 1903, then Officials of the
Canadian Northern Quebec Railway Co. are there three years too
soon;-
CNQ came into existence on July 19, 1906. [This is an
editorial
goof on my part. Ed). What likely is going on is the
inspection trip
of the Great Northern Railway of Canada officers.
That
companys principal owners, H.H. Melville (of Boston) and
J. McNaught (also president of the NP&Man Rwy), on behalf of
the Mackenzie, Mann & Co., acquired the M&GCRy ata bankruptcy
sale on October 3, 1902. Within four months
of this purchase
(January 22, 1903) these two had sold their controlling interests
in
SEPTEMBER -OCTOBER 1994
the GNRC to Mackenzie and Mann. Melville and McNaught then
sold the
M&GCRy to the GNRC on February 10, 1903. Could
some of the officials on the vestibule of SHA WINIGAN be
Melville and McNaught,
or even Mackenzie or Mann?
But what the private
car SHAWINIGANs subsequent
history was
is also interesting. Ive outlined what is known about
it from my research files, and have included two
CNR diagram
sheets that suggest the car was basically unaltered during its
41-
year (or more) history. [Unfortunately, the diagrams would not
reproduce well enough for printing here. Ed.}.
If the person who
has the print
would scrutinize the faint lettering on the letterboard
above the windows, over the word SHA WINIGAN, I wonder
if it
would say Great Northern Railway
of Canada? That tid-bit would
help confirm the date
of the photo and add more detail to the cars
history. [EditorS note: Examination of the photo reveals the words
Northern Ry.
of faintly visible on the letterboard. This confirms
Mr.
McQueens theory.}
Thanks for a great historical photo; and the memory
of my
trip to Huberdeau with the CRHA and
GMD-I No. 1914 on
October 15, 1960!
Brief history of the car SHA WINIGAN
Built by Jackson & Sharp of Wilmington, Delaware for the Great
Northern Railway
of Canada, as car 103. Date unknown. GNRC
existed 1883 to 1906, and was amalgamated into Canadian Northern
Quebec.
About 1906 became private car 103
of CNQ.
By 1916 it was listed as Canadian Northern Railway.private car
SHA WINIGAN, weight 66,500 Ibs.
About 1918, became CaNor private car 25.
Also about, 1918 became
CNR business car 25 (1 st.).
In September 1926 it was converted into a school
car by the CNR
and was
known as School car No. 1 and was used by the Ontario
Government. It was wired for 110 volts to connect with station
lights.
The car was displayed at the Canadian National Exhibition
in Toronto in 1926.
In February, 1941 it was retired and scrapped at London, Ontario.
CORRECTION
Mr GJ. Cavanagh of Etobicoke, Ontario, writes:
Regarding your issue May-June 1994, which I thoroughly
enjoyed, I noticed a slight error
in the picture caption on page 99.
The picture illustrating MSR 274 is actually on St. James Street
(not Notre Dame Street).
The Royal Bank building is on the
extreme left, the Ottawa building, the James Walker hardware
store and, finally, Hemslys
clock, just to the left of the streetcar,
clearly identify the view as looking east from McGill Street.
MORE CORRECTIONS
Mr Ray Corley submitted the following corrections to the
article on Public Transportation
in Toronto which appeared in
the July-August issue:
Page 143. Yonge route opening ceremonies were on September
201 CANADIAN RAIL -442
10, 1861. Public service commenced on September 11.
Page 144. The charter stated that the gauge was to be such that
ordinary vehicles may travel on the tracks. No dimension was
given. Easton
complied by selecting 4 107/8.
Page 146. An independent company was responsible in 1883. Van
de Poele took over in 1884 using an improved conduit system.
In
1885 he introduced the rudimentary trolley pole. 1.1. Wright took
over in 1886.
Page 146. The Church route was as described in references (2)
and
(3). The lady picked up at Carleton, when her horse car was
removed, was on a trial run on August 10. She paid no fare.
Page 147. Mr. Zwick leaned out of his car and hit his head as he
passed the stationary electric car. He then fell out on to the road and
injured himself further.
The electric car never moved.
Page 147. The 47(?) old horse cars which were electrified were all
withdrawn by 1900.
Page 147. The TRCs subsidiary, the Convertible Car Company,
built cars,
or car components, for: Montreal, Winnipeg, London,
Hamilton, Woodstock, Saint John, Oshawa, Toronto & York
Radial Railway, Monterray (Mexico).
Page 148. The T&Y beyonds were: Metropolitan -to Sutton,
Scarboro -to
West Hill, Mimico -to Port Credit. The TSR original
main line was via Lambton to Guelph.
Page 148. The Metropolitan race track was at Glengrove (park) –
stop 26.
Page 149. The PCC test -downgrade through Mount Pleasant
cemetery -is apocryphal. Balancing speed on the level was 42
MPH -It was estimated the car was doing 60.
Page 149. Yonge subway opened March 30, 1954.
Page 149. The UTDC caused the carto be developed in Switzerland.
200 cars were to
be built -lOin Switzerland, 190 in Canada, but
parts
of4 Swiss cars were withheld to possibly build 2 articulated
prototypes. (This refers to the following paragraph where UTDC
built one articulated
car using some of these components).
Page 149. The first CLRV was delivered in December, 1977.
Page 149. A LRV demonstrator, numbered TIC 4900, was
operated
on the
Queen route until February 25, 1983. It was then
stored and used for special (VIP / charter) trips until 1987 when it
was returned to UTDC.
HELP WANTED
Mr. Lee Burbage, BMCM USGC-Ret., P.O. Box 143,
Ocean View DE. 19970-0143 U.S.A. writes:
I am a retired serviceman and Railroader and for years I
have been collecting Switch Keys and I have been searching for a
key from the old Montreal and Southern Counties Ry. for my
collection.
Would any member
of your Association know of anyone
who worked for this line
or of someone who could help me locate
a key?
I would appreciate any help and reply in this matter pJease.
Maybe I could help someone up there too.
RAIL CANADIEN -442 202 SEPTEMBRE -OCTOBRE 1994
The Business Car
NEW STAMP DEPICTS SAINT JOHN STREET CAR
On August 19, 1994, Canada Post issued a set of six very
attractive stamps depicting public service vehicles. This
is the
second set in a series
of historic land vehicles. The stamps come
in small sheets containing one
of each of the six stamps, two of 43
cents (an ambulance and a police patrol wagon), two
of 50 cents
(a snow blower and a fire engine) and two
of 88 cents (a street car
and a bus). The street car depicted is
car No. 40 of the Saint John
Railway Company (Saint John N.B.) which was built by the
Ottawa Car Company
in 1894. Your editor played a small part in
the design of this stamp, by advising the designers on such points
as the correct colours (thanks
to the existence of an 1896 scale
model in the CRHA collection) and making corrections
to the
preliminary drawing originally submitted. Several exchanges
of
correspondence, phone calls and a trip to Ottawa, resulted in all the
suggested modifications being adopted in the final design. This
is
one of the few times that a Canadian stamp has shown a street car,
and the result
is first rate. By coincidence, it was exactly 100 years
ago, in 1894, that the Saint John Railway Company was organized
following the bankruptcy
of the earlier company. Canada Post is
to be congratulated on the choice of subject, and for the production
of this fine stamp.
ATLANTIC TO BE DISCONTINUED DECEMBER IS
In the first cut to Canadian long-distance passenger rail
service since the massive reductions
of January 1990, VIA Rail has
announced that its eastern transcontinental train the Atlantic
will be discontinued on December 15, 1994.
The final runs will
depart from Montreal and Halifax respectively on Thursday,
December
15, and reach thei.r destinations the following day. At
the same time, VIAs other eastern transcontinental, the Ocean,
will start operating six days a week; thus passengers between
Montreal
and points between Moncton and Halifax will not be
affected. However points between Richmond Que. and Sussex
N.B. will lose all service.
An interesting coincidence is that the two
largest cities affected, Sherbrooke Que. and Saint John
N.B., are
represented in the Canadian Parliament
by the only two Conservative
members
to be elected.
Beutel, Saint John, N.B.
The reason for the discontinuance
is,
of course, CP Rails authorized
abandonment of the Short Line through
Maine effective January I, 1995. Why VIA
has chosen
to discontinue the service more
than two weeks early
,just before the holiday
season, is not clear. In September,
negotiations for CP to sell the I ine to Nortrak
fell through; however there
is a good chance
that some, or all will be sold.
The discontinuance of the Atlantic
will mean that Saint John New Brunswick
will lose all passenger train service for the
first time since 1857 when the first train left
the city for a three mile trip on the line that
eventually (in 1860) reached Moncton, and
is now part of the Canadian National system.
CPs Short Line through Maine opened on June 2, 1889, and
passenger trains on this line continued until November 15, 1981
when service was discontinued. However service from Fredericton
to Halifax, via Saint John, continued. After a 1293-day hiatus, the
Atlantic was reinstated on May 31, 1985.
If you have not ridden
this scenic and
historic international line, better do it soon!
CANADIAN
PACIFIC MAKES OFFER TO PURCHASE
CNS EASTERN LINES
Recently it was announced that Canadian Pacific has
offered
to buy all of Canadian Nationals lines east of Winnipeg.
This follows the collapse
of talks involving a merger of certain
lines, and the creation
of a joint corporation, tentatively named
Newco. It remains
to be seen whether the offer will be accepted
and what effect this will have on Canadas rail network.
SEPTEMBER· OCTOBER 1994
BOMBARDIER TO ASSEMBLE
RAIL WAY CARS IN
PLATTSBURGH
On Seplembcr 9, 1994,
203 CANADIAN RAIL· 442
Bombardier Inc. announced thai it is
building II railcar assembly plant al the
fonner Plallsburgh Air Force Base in
Plattsburgh, NY, and also that il has
been awarded
II S59.3-million contract
10 build commuter coaches for Metro
North Railroad of New York. TIle deal
also carries an oplion for 15 addilional
push-pull COfIllllUler ca~ valued al $24.9
million. The car bodies would be buill
in Bombardiers planl in La Pocalii
e,
Que., and will be assembled al the
Plattsburgh fscLOry.1beorder iscxp€cted
to be completed in August, 1996. Since
the end of the Cold War, the Air Force
SkpiIlX COT ~Eurtk.o 01 If/( Cunodiml R(li/W(1Y MUS(Uffl in July. 1994.
Pholo by David ,llonis.
Base has been closed, and the Bombardier plant will be a welcome
industry for the Plattsburgh area. It will Ilso mean that commuter
equipment
for New York will be assembled in the sam~ siale.
Bombaniicr previously built 825 subway
can fOf New York Ciry.
and 106 push-pull oolllmuler cars for MellO North. The 825 cars
built for New
Yori:: constituted the largcst single group of cars ever
acquired
by that transit authority.
SLEEPING CAR FOR CANADIAN RAILWAY MUSEUM
The lalest aduilion to the colleclion of the Canadian
Railway Muscum is the sleeping car Eureka. built for Canadian
National Railways
in 1954 as part of their great modernization
program
of [he 1950·s. This car saw almOM four decades of service
with
eN. and bter with VIA, before being It:lired. A few similar
(.an; are still in service. The Eureka will tl:-a very significant
addition
to the collection,
ABOVE: Whal is almOSI certaill/y IliA HlIils mosl remOlI!. sen·icl!. i.~ Ihe OIlce,·I((k nll:ltd lraill op MOllitoba. T raill 295 olJeT(1tu norlh/mm Wabo … dl:l1 to Gil/am 011 Sill/day. GillolII to Cillfrchil! all MOllda),. Voliile No. 294 rllllS sUlllh [rolll
Cllllrcllilf 10 Gillam 0/1 Wednesday. olld Gillam 10 Wa/)owl/ all Saturday. Pa.fStIIRtr l/Icommodaliml is prulided by Ollt combint C(lr 011
tM end of what is (ul/i>d loc(lI/), 7he Wll)frtigllt~. lIert we set combille 7101 … ·{litillx (11 Wohmwlellfor a/reight COllllectiOlI from tht .mmh
on
SUII(/a). OClober 2. 1994. Photo by Fred Anglls.
BACK COVER: Thl date 11(1.f JUIIC 2. 19561ohlII MOII/rcol (/Ild 501llh£111 COlllllils car No. 605. wailed (1/ SI.I..omhi.n.fl{llioll prIOr 10 ir.f
dll(/l/lIrc/or Marier;lIe.
flri.I arll/lIgcmelll IUI(J ~I{/II({I 011 Jlllle 19. 1955 wlrell M&CS ((/r.5 ceased cro.ning Vic/orio Bridxe 10 MI)/IIrf:u/.
A shunl Iroill look pmsclIgllS [rolll Mall/reals Cell/rat 5/(11ioll to SI. /mllherr when Ihcy /Joarded Iht M&SC. ,lIIlOllgh a ,om11 (/11. 605
W(fS buill by National Slnl CllT ill 19/ J. ElII/Y ill Iht fI1Ollling u/OClOher /4. 1956, (/ /ill/e II/ore 111(111 [our (l1If/ a hal[ //lOll/irs aflcr Ilris photo
>
WlS talrel1. the M&SC mOlle iufilwl rull. PJI()IO by Fred Al/glI.f.

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