Consulter nos archives / Consult our archives

La majorité des documents conservés par le Centre d'archives et de documentation de l'ACHF sont disponibles pour consultation.

Most of the documents kept by the ACHF Archives and Documentation Center are available for consultation.

Canadian Rail 432 1993

Lien vers le document

Canadian Rail 432 1993

••
CANADIAN RAIL
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
EDITOR: Fred
F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: Douglas N. W. Smilh
PRODUCTION: A. Stephen Walbridge
CARTOGRAPHER: William A. Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Fred F. Angus
PRINTING: Procel Printing
For your membership in the CRHA. which includes a
subscription to Canadian Rail, write to:
CRHA, 120 Aue St-Pierre, 51. Constant, Que. J5A 2G9
Rates: in Canada:
outside
Canada:
$30 (including GSn.
$27.
50 in U.S. funds.
r———TABLE OF CONTENTS
WHERE TO NOW, CRANBROOK? …………………………………………… MIKE WESTREN…….. … ……… 3
A BRIEF HISTORI
CAL OVERVIEW OF FAIRVILLE STATION ……….. HAROLD WRIGHT ………………. 13
MEDITATIONS IN A LOWER BERTH …………………………………………. BRUCE HUTCHiSON …………… 20
THE DAY THE
PRINCE OF WALES RODE THE CRL & P …………….. FRED F. ANGUS ………………… 22
DRAWINGS
OF CANADAS RAILWAYS IN WORLD WAR 11.. ……….. THURSTAN TOPHAM…………. 27
QUR REVISED ByLAWS………………………………………………………… . …………………………………………… 28
BOOK REVIEW (VICTORIA & SIDNEY RY. BY DARRYL MURALT). DOUGLAS N.W. SMITH ……….. 34
THE BUSINESS CAR ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 35
Canadian Rail is continually in need of fleWS, stories, historical data, photos. maps and other material. Please send all contributIOns 10 the
edilOl: Fred F. Angus, 3021 Tra/algar Ave. Montreal. P O. H3Y lH3. No payment can be made lor comrlbutions, but the comributefwil!
be given credit for material submitled. Matena! will be returned to the comributor it requested. Remember Knowledge is of titlle value unless
it
is shared with others.
NATIOIJAL DIRECTORS
Frederick F. Angus Huguas W. Bonin J. Christopher Kyle
Jack A. Beatty
Roben Carlson William La Surf
Charles De Jean Bernard Martin
Walter J. Bedbrook Gerard Frechette Robert V.V. Nicholls
Alan C. Blackburn David W.
Johnson Andrew W. Panko
The CRHA has a number of local divisions across the country. Many hold regular meetings
and issue newsleuers. Further inlormation may be obtained by writing to the division.
NEW BRUNSWO< DIVISION
po eo.. 1162
SairJI..iohrI H e E21 4G7
ST LAWRENOE VAUEY DlVISlON
po. Box 22, s.-. 1t
I.b1IrMl
PO. ti38 3J5
RIDEAU VAlLEY OMSION
p.o. eo. ge2
SmIIh, F …. 0nI. 1<7A 5A5
KINGSTON OMSKlN
PO, 80. 103. SIadMA
KrqsIon.
Onl. K7M ePII
TORONTO a YORK DlVISKlN
PO eo.. S&lQ. T ………. A
T 1lfOrtO. O!C. I.I5W I P3
CALGARY SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
00· 111(10 -4111 AveH.E.
c.I(pry • ….,.,. T2A 5ZS
AOCKV UQUNT …… OMSION
po. Bo>; 11102, s.ionC
E<)-nooIon. AlIeNo T58 2NO
SEU P.O. 80.39
~.B.C VOE2S0
CAQWSNEST KETTLE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O.8a.~
Cra NEl.SCN ELECTRIC TRAMWAV SOCEn
123V_S1JMC
Nelson. B C. V1L2V8
PRINCE GEORGE·NEO P.O. 80. 2.t08
Prina.> a…o.Qt. B,C V2N 2S6
NIAGARA DIVISION
P.O. eo. W3 PAC1F(: COAST DIVISION
Sl. ~-Onl. L2A 61/8 PO. eo. 1006. SlaIIctIA
_______________ ~~.e.c veG2Pl
Douglas N.w. Smith
Lawrence M. Unwin
Richard Viberg
A. Stephen Walbridge
John C. Weir
FRONT COVER: Canadian NmiOlwl
Railways £,/O-a Mogul
902 heading II
inighl (rain Iltor HamillOlI. Onlario on
Augusl 10, /944. 902 ~gall lift ill 1910
…. ·hell. as GrmldTrlIllk 1000. il …. ·os buill
by Ihe Kin~s(ol/ LocomO/;·t IVnr.h
(builders l/J/mlHr 913). La/er CNR 902.
il was rCl1llllriwrcd 80 ill OClOber 1951.
and
was scrapped ill AI/gusl J957.
Pallerson • Gtor~t Col/ecfioll.
As part of Its activities. lhe CRHA operates
the Canadian Railway Museum at Delson I
51. Constant, Que. which is aboutt4 miles
(23 Km.) from downtown Montreal. 1 is
open Irom late May to early October (daily
until Labour Day). Members. and their im­
mediate amilies, are admitled free 01 charge.
GCW.. ~ TIE ASSOCIATlON TIE CCllLECTlON. PflESERVATIOIi AKJ DISSaIINATION ~ ITEMS RELATING TO nE HISTORY OF RAILWAYS IN CNWlA
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 3
Where To Now, Cranbrook?
By Mike Westren
The site as it appeared on December 3,1992. From left to right the Trans Canada Limited, Strathcona and Curzon preview
the effect to be created in the Canadian Museum oj Rail Travel as trains of different eras appear poised for departure.
All photos
by the author.
Some fifteen years ago, the Cranbrook Railway Museum
set
out to reassemble one complete train set from the luxurious
1929 Trans Canada Limited. That object
is now substantially
completed, but the museum is engaged in putting together four
more sets. Research and
location of possible constituent artifacts
began
in 1985. As promised in issue No. 428 of Canadian Rail, this
plan
is revealed here.
What is the master scheme as the Cranbrook Railway
Museum embarks on this ambitious plan to develop the Canadian
Museum
of Rail Travel? Definitely it has a Canadian Pacific bias,
but
that can be justified and rationalized by the unbroken development
of passenger equipment by CPR between the 1880s and the
1950s.
The five sets will represent distinct eras, namely the
following:
1. 1886. The Pacific Express.
2. 1907.
The Soo-Spokane Train De Luxe.
3. 1929.
The Trans-Canada Limited.
4. 1936. The Chinook.
5. 1955.
The Canadian.
Plus a further grouping:
6. Special interpretive passenger cars, Royal cars,
cars
of state, business cars.
Let us take a look at
these sets or groupings in order.
Page 4 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
1. THE PACIFIC EXPRESS 1886
BAGGAGE 110027
(Arr.1992)
The westbound Pacific Express and its eastbound counterpal1,
Atlantic Express, represent the
inauguration of transcontinental
passenger train service
in Canada and the physical tying together
of this nation. This represents a logical starting point for the
Canadian Museum
of Rail Travel. Whats more, it could still be
just possible to reassemble a representative train, as shown in
the
concept sketch at the head
of this section. It should be understood
that this will not be the actual original consist.
The oldest surviving Canadian Pacific passenger car, the
celebrated first class
coach No. 52, was built by Harlan &
Hollingsworth in 1882 and is held in storage at the Cranbrook
Rai lway Museum. Although far from complete, Car 52
is neveltheless
a most important piece. After its rediscovery in the Crowsnest
Pass
in 1981, the car was rescued from certain destruction in the
FIRST CLASS No. 52
(Arr.1986)
PARLOUR CAR
path of a highway building project in 1983. In 1986 it came to
Cranbrook where it remains on hold waiting rehabilitatio
n.
Just as this article had been completed, a period baggage
car joined the collection. While not Canadian Pacific, the 1877
Intercolonial
car No. 736 is certainly an excellent substitute. In
fact this car was used during the shooting of the CBC -Pierre
Berton television documentary
The National Dream. One outcome
of the Alberta Pioneer Railway Association-s rationalization of
its collection was the release of No. 736 to Cranbrook.
Other components
of this portrayal of the Pacific Express
have been considered. Suitable candidates for the parlour
car have
been located. Negotiations for possible acquisition have been
initiated but not yet concluded. So far no locomotive has been
sought to head up this display.
Car 52, most probably used on the Pacific Express, sits forlornly ill Heritage Park, CalgGlY, 011 September 5, 1983.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 5
CP switcher 8111 moves baggage car 736 around Cranbrook yard on November 5, 1992 shortly after the cars arrival from the
Alberta Pioneer Railway Association in Edmonton
2. THE SOO-SPOKANE TRAIN DE LUXE 1907
BAGGAGE .4144
(ArT. 1989)
TOURIST CAR
SLEEPER
This train represents composite transcontinental Soo Line
and Canadian Pacific international operations. Some minor liberties
or rationalizations have to be taken
or made to get the best
interpretive mileage out
of an eighty to eighty-five year old
consist. However, the anticipated effect and value should be first
class. Displayed will be a combined grouping
of cars representative
of CPRs Imperial Limited and Soo Lines Soo-Spokane Train-de­
Luxe
of the era circa 1907. The latter train would leave the twin
cities
of Minneapolis and St. Paul heading for Portal on the
Saskatchewan border. Along CP
s main line to Dunmore, near
Medicine Hat,
tl1e Soo-Spokane would head south tluough Lethblidge,
Cranbrook, and over the Curzonswitch to the Spokane International,
FIRST CLASS No. 621
(Arr.1989)
COMPARTMENT/OBSERVATION
CURZON (Arr. 1992) DINER
finishing up in Spokane and, by 1909, in Portland. The Imperial
Limited, meanwhile, ran between Montreal and Vancouver.
Three out
of the six projected cars for this consist are
already
in the museums possession. The head-end baggage car
No.
4144 of 1913 was acquired in 1989, courtesy of the Vintage
Locomotive Socie
ty in Winnipeg. While much repair will be
needed to put it into display condition, the car
is considered
complete.
First class
car No. 621 was discovered built into a summer
cottage at Priddis, Alberta. The structure became surplus
in 1984,
Page 6
and the owners graciously made
it available to the
Cranbrook
Railway Museum. The
surrounding building was
carefully dismantled, and the
almost-complete
car body was
transported toCranbrook
in 1989.
It truly will be a
magnificent
example with its bevelled glass
windows, Pintch
gaslight fixtures
and empire style ceilings! No.
621 was
constructed in CPs
Hochelaga shops
in 1901, and
originally would have sported a
varnish exterior finish.
The jewel in this crown
will surely be the tail
end car,
Curzon. This
Soo Line sleeper­
buffet -library-observation
car was
built
in 1907 by Barney & Smith.
Several years of patient
negotiation have resulted in this
car coming to British Columbia
from the United States as a pie
ce
of Canadian-American cultural
property. Curzon is in
remarkably original condition.
It contains original furniture, rugs,
uphOlstery,
stained glass and
varnished mahogany and walnut
panelling. Wonderful Art
Nouveau inspired inlaid designs
grace the woodwork. The
u nderframe and ru nning gear from
a sister car. long relegated to
work train service and now
demolished in order to supply
these vital parts, have been
obtained to support this car body.
When restored to exhibition
standard. the Curzon, which
had been used as a lakeside cottage
since 1933, will be a magnificent
piece. The restoration
of this car,
which is beginning now, will
likely be subject to more in-depth
case study at a later date. As a
footnote,
an identical sister car,
once owned by the
CPR and long
since scrapped, was called
Cranbrook.
Three more cars are
required to make up this
RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
This interior view of car 621 was taken on October 7, 1984 when the car was slil/ a collage near
Priddis. Alberta.
It gives a tantalizing glimpse of what will be possible once Ihis piece is restored.
representative consist. Examples have been located, and negotiations
can best be described as being
in the very early stages.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 7
ABOVE: Baggage car 4144 is seen
coming through the CN to CP
interchange in Calgary on August
26, 1989 during transfer from
Winnipeg to Cranbrook.
LEFT: Curzon has just been given
afresh set
of wheels in this November
1992 view. The octagonal wale
rtower
in the background also belongs to
the museum and
is due to be moved
across to the main site in the near
fUlure.
Page 8 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
3. THE TRANS CANADA LIMITED 1929
Jii1iiI[2 ;Jt:s: MS2m&.? ¥
G3d PACIFIC No. 234 I BAGGAGE No. 4481
(Arr.197B)
COMBINATION No. 4489
(Arr.1986)
SLEEPER SOMERSET
(Arr.1989) DINING CAR ARGYLE
(AfT. 1977) SLEEPER GLENCASSIE
(Arr.1989)
SLEEPER RUTHERGLEN
(Arr.1979) PARLOUR No. 675 I
(Arr.1989) SOLARIUM -LOUNGE RIVER ROUGE
(Arr.I980)
The saga of the collection and restoration of this train set
has been described periodically
in Canadian Rail over the past
fifteen years. Most recently was an update in issue No. 428
of May­
June 1992.
All cars have been secured, restored and placed on display.
To head up this train, locomotive 2341, a CPR G3d heavy Pacific
of 1926, has been allocated for inter-museum long telm lease
between the Canadian Railway Museum and the Cranbrook Rai
I way
Museum. Although the service began in 1919, this train was re­
equipped with newly-built equipment in 1929 purposely for
lUXUry
duty. Since 1929 was the year of the start of the Great Depression,
the service only lasted two seasons.
The cars were relegated to less
prestigious assignments and, many years later, some ended up in
work train service. Now all have been restored
to their 1929-1930
sumptuous quality, and wondelfully portray a travelling life style
almost forgotten.
4. THE CHINOOK 1936
FIA JUBILEE: MAIL -EXPRESS COMBINATlON I BUFFET
tl::: .-••••.••. lm:M …… ~
DAY COACH
The concept of lightweight rolling stock emerged as
recovery from the Depression was taking place.
The original sets
produced in 1936 were semi-streamlined, short cars only 70
feet
long, with smooth sides broken only by three rivet lines. Later
semi-streamlined equipment would be ful1length, 85 feet, and all­
welded construction.
These new train sets were
put to work on fast inter-city
services, the Royal York in
the east and the Chinook between
Calgary a
nd Edmonton. Unfortunately, none of the 3000-class
Jubilee 4-4-4 locomotives survived, but sufficient representative
examples
of the cars to make up a train set stilJ exist. So far, only
SMOKING CAR 411700
(Arr.1990)
smoking car No. 1700, built in 1938, has been fonnally acquired,
although preliminary negotiations have been entered into for the
others. It is hoped some day
to secure a 4-4-4 CPR locomotive to
head up this display at our museum.
Canadian Pacific sold No. 1700
to the Montreal Urban
Community Transit Corporation in 1982 as No. 840. Repainted in .
commuter service blue-and-white striped livery, the car saw
limited service until 1990 when it was acquired by the Cranbrook
Railway Museum.
The original number, 1700, had been restored,
and a new
coat of Tuscan Red paint applied. The car has recently
seen some corporate and promotional use on CP Rail
in British
Columbia.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 9
Smoking car 1700 from the original Chinook set shows off a new coat ojTuscallled paint in Cranbrook on September 6,1992.
S. THE CANADIAN 19S5
FA2114090
(Arr.1992)
FB2114469
(Arr.1992)
—-:; __ .&.0 –
DINING CAR
BAGGAGE
The Canadian was perhaps the ultimate in the development
of Canadas modem transcontinental trains, and the Cranbrook
Railway Museum believes its projected Canadian Museum of Rail
Travel is the ideal showcase for this equipment. The museums
aspirations and credentials have been fully disclosed to the present
owners
of this equipment.
Meanwhile, Canadian Pacific has designated a pair
of
diesel-electric locomotives to be transferred from its historic
colle
ction in Quebec City to Cranbrook in readiness for display
with
this train. FA-2 No. 4090 and FB-2 No. 4469 represent 1950s
DAY COACH SKYLINE
streamlined power, and are externally similar to the first-generation
passenger locomotives used in this service. These units were
transferred to Cranbrook by rail, and they arrived on November 20
and
21, 1992.
Now
if only someone, somewhere would do the same for
Canadian National and its predecessors. It may already be too late,
for example, to reconstitute a total Super Continental train set.
Before too long, steps should be taken to designate a VIA LRC set
for preservation. Although
not transcontinental, it does represent
an important Canadian passenger train development.
Page 10 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
MLW FA-2 No. 4090 and FB-2 No. 4469 sit quietly in the Cranbrook yard on December 3, 1992 awaiting tender loving care.
6. SPECIAL INTERPRETIVE PASSENGER CARS
SLEEPER REDVERS STEEL CAR NEW CASllE SLEEPER GRAND PR~ BUS. CAR BRITISH COLUMBIA
~100~ ~1~) ~1~ ~1_
INTERPRETIVE CAR
A group of specially selected cars is being assembled to fill
in particular gaps in the story line, and demonstrate significant
features and uses for passenger type equipment.
The 1928 CPR SuperintendentS car British Columbia
STRATHCONA
(Arr.19901
has been displayed at the museum since its retirement from active
duty
out of Nelson B.C. in 1983. This gives a perfect example of
a car, contemporary with the Trans Canada Limited, that was
dedicated to internal company service.
The car is on permanent
loan from the B.C. Heritage Trust.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 11
Modernized sleeping car Redlers seen in the Cranbrook yard 011 November 17, 1992 ready to be moved onto the museum site the
following week.
Only ten Grand class sleepers, fitted out with fourteen
s
ingle bedrooms, were built. The Grand Pre, built in 1930, had
its hour in the sun as the valet car on the 1939 Royal Train.
Althou
gh the car is now in partially gutted condition after years of
work train service, the plan is, ultimately, to return it to its royal
blue livery, aluminum leaf window panels and opalescent
roof as
it appeared
in 1939.
No particular claim to fame is exercised by the 1921
sleeping
car Newcastle, although it was one of the CPRs first
all-steel first-class sleepers, the
N series of 68 cars built between
1921 and 1924. Cars
of this type were used on the early Trans­
Canada Limiteds as well as most overnight trains tluoughout
the
system. A plan has been devised
to section what is left and
demonstrate the structure and progressive interior finishing
of a
heavyweight car. A sister car, Neville, resides at the Canadian
Railw
ay Museum in Delson.
A very recent acquisition is the modernized
R class CPR
sleeper Redvers. A sister
to om Rutherglen of the 1929 Trans
Canada Limited, this
car will be retained and displayed in its 1952
configuration. Until late 1992, Redvers had been part
of the
Alberta Pioneer Railway Association
s collection. In section 2, describing the 1907 Soo-Spokane Train
DeLuxe, reference was made to the demolition
of a work car to
recov
er the underframe for use with the Curzan. Some complete
sections were salvag
ed from this car, pieces which have great
potential interpretive value
in demonstration wooden carconstmction.
Another gem
in the collection is the 1927 official car
Strathcona. This was Canadian Pacifics Board of Directors
night car, paired with day use
or entertainment car Mount
Stephen. These two cars were host to royalty, statesmen, dignitaries,
and attended many functions and events
of national and international
importance.
The Strathcona was declared surplus in 1978 and,
after a period
of service with Conklin and Garnet Shows, came to
the Cranbrook Railway Museum in late 1990, after being declared
Canadian Cultural Property. Its five deluxe bedrooms, with shower­
equipped bath tubs ensuite, and unpainted circassian walnut
panelling, will make quite a display.
Other significant pieces will likely be added
to this interpretive
line
up over time. At present only the British Columbia is on
public display at the museum, with Strathcona and Redvers
expected
to be available on-site in 1993.
Page 12 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
Executive sleeping car Strathcona was also being prepared to move onto site when photographed on November 17, 1992.
DEVELOPMENT PLANS
A date of 1998, the centennial of the arrival of the railway
in Cranbrook, has been set as the target opening date for the new
site and building for the Canadian
Museum of Rail Travel. Plans
call for all five trainsets, as they are assembled and restored, plus
the interpretive cars, to bedisplayed undercover and environmentally
controlled in an
environment simulating a train shed. The concept
of walking into a grand entrance hall and, in effect, seeing trains
of five different eras poised for departure is pure drama! Definitely
an ambitious and creative vision, the Cranbrook Railway Museum
believes it can and will be done. In fact the name change
is
happening sooner, phasing in with expansion of the present site to
capacity in 1993.
The present exhibit, the 1929 Trans Canada Limited, is
itself a National Heritage Treasure. The additional trains will
undoubtedly be
worthy of s.i[l1ilar [~cogpjJion. Mr Ro.bert TI.!Jtler,
Chief of Historical Collections at the Royal British Columbia
Museums
of Victoria, is undertaking a study to demonstrate the
national and international significance
of such a collection and
display
of complete train sets. He has made the following preliminary
statement:
1 feel confident in saying that the Cranbrook Railway
Museums collection is
of international importance. The train sets
represent far more than simply Canadian Pacific trains from
different eras. They reflect vefY clearly the levels
of technology,
standards
of travel, types of accommodation, tastes and social
conditions
of the eras they are from. Similar equipment could be
found on the name trains
of the other major North American
railroads such as the Great Northern, Union Pacific
and Santa Fe.
But no sets
[other than that of the Union Pacific, Ed.1, and velY few
cars ,from any of the other name trains have been preserved, much
less restored
to highmuseumstandards. The collections at Cranbrook,
as a result, are
of great interest and importance far beyond British
Colllll1biaandwesternCanada … 1 suspect there is nothing comparable
anywhere else in the world.
CONCLUSION
With a single-minded collections policy, appropriate
imaginative leadership, practical clear management and a number
of dedicated individuals, an ambitious and important vision of this
magnitude can be brought to reality. Admittedly the Canadian
Museum
of Rail Travel shows a clear bias towards the Canadian
Pacific. At the
same time, it should be remembered that the CPR
has a continuous record of passenger equipment development
from the 1880s to the 1950s. This
is what is being portrayed.
Cranbrook knows where it
is going!
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 13
A Brief Historical Overview of Fairville Station
By Harold Wright
The Canadian Pacific Rai I way opened its line from Montreal
to Saint John N.B.
in 1889. At this time Fairville, now a part of the
western portion
of Saint John, was a separate community lying on
the west side
of the mouth of the St. John River. A small passenger
station and car shed had existed for the Western Extension
of the
European
& North American Railway since that line had opened
in 1869. From 1869 to 1885 Fairville was the eastern terminus of
the Western Extension (and its successors the New Brunswick
Railway and, later, the CPR), but
in 1885, upon the completion of
the cantilever bridge across the Reversing Falls, trains began
running through
to Saint John. Thus Fairville became simply a
suburban stop.
In 1893 the
CPR contracted with George V. Beatteay to
build a new station at Fainille. The cost was $380, with an
additional $90 for the platfOlm. Work commenced on September
25th and was completed on November 18, 1893. The construction
occupied a total
of 167 man days. The contract was extended by
$30 to permit the addition
of two water closets.
George V. Beatteay was a prominent contractor
in Carleton
and Fairville. He specialized
in wood construction, arid his Work
included homes for many of the prominent citizens of Saint John
and area, commercial buildings, churches, river and harbour
steamboats, wood sailing ships and at least one project for the
Dominion Government -the expansion
of the Partridge Island
quarantine station.
Extensive records exist of his work but,
unfortunately, these do not include the Fairville station.
On January 21, 1909 the
CPR Resident Engineer, T.B.
Tapley, finished plans for proposed alterations to the station.
These were approved by the Division Engineer, G.L. Wetmore.
This alteration consisted
of the addition of the Loire Valley
Tower and the circular bay.
This bay was the ladies waiting room.
The existing plans for the station make no specific reference to the
addition
of the freight room. However, an examination of the
interior
of this room revealed several handwritten notes on the
walls; the earliest date noted was 1910.
In this modified
fOlm Fairville station served, with little
further change, for more than a third
of a century. Then, starting
on March 26, 1946, the outside walls, waiting rooms and offices
were insulated.
The interior renovations were designed to give
more openness and greater comfort to the office and waiting
rooms. Part
of these renovations involved converting the stations
water system from a well to the Saint John water supply. Water was
connected to this supply
on May 10, 1947.
In 1953 Fairville and other communities in the area were
amalgamated into the city
of Lancaster. Accordingly, the name of
the station was changed to Lancaster. In 1967 Lancaster and other
communities were amalgamated into the city
of Saint John. This
area
is today referred to as West Saint John, although older
residents continue using the older names
of Fairville and Lancaster. On the opening
of CP Rails new station on Dever Road in
West Saint John
in 1970, the old Lancaster (nee Fairville) station
became redundant and was closed. It has not been used
as a station
since that time.
On May 9, 1990, the Canadian Atlantic Railway (CAR), a
division
of CP Rail, wrote to the Saint John Preservation Review
Board concerning the intended demolition of the Fairville station.
CARs General Manager, F.J. Green, asked the Board if there was
any concern about this plan.
The Preservation Review Board
contacted
CAR to discuss the possible municipal designation of
the station, or alternative plans to salvage the building.
The staff report of May 23, 1990 pointed out that the
station was the sole surviving historic rai Iway station
in Saint
John, as all others had been demolished. However
it was not
possible at that time, due
to lack of historical and structural
information, to recommend designation
under the Municipal
Heritage Preservation Act. The Preservation Review Board undertook
to contact the major corporation in the area, Moosehead Brewery,
about possible reuse for the station. Moosehead informed the
Board
that they were unable to use the station. The Board also
contacted the CAR and informed them
of Bill C-205, the Federal
Heritage Railway Stations Act.
The Preservation Review Board visited the station on June
13, 1990. Following this, the Board decided not to designate the
station as a municipal preservation area. They wrote to CAR and
thanked them for their interest
in exploring an avenue to save the
building.
The Board also recommended that the New Brunswick
Museum be contacted about possible artifact retrieval.
The railway
was also invited to sell the station for
$1 for removal from the site.
The CAR contacted the New Brunswick Museum and
donated five artifacts and two architectural drawings.
The drawings,
in red and black ink on linen, are dated January 21, 1909, revised
March 26, 1946. The artifacts are two wooden snow scoops, two
coiling devices and a sling chair. One
of tbe snow scoops was
retained by the N.B. Museum, the other four artifacts were later
transferred to the Museum
of Industry in Stellerton, Nova Scotia.
On November 14, 1990, the Preservation
Review Board
wrote to the Historic Sites and Monuments Board
of Canada
requesting that the Fairville station be considered for designation.
In 1990 a local businessman, Jim Wilson, expressed interest in
preserving the station. He spoke to the member of the New
Brunswick Legislature for that riding, the Hon. Jane Barry, who
also expressed an interest
in the station. A local contractor, Bruce
Martin, offered
to provide men and equipment to help move the
station
if required. Unfortunately, the National Historical Sites
and Monuments Board failed
to give status to the station. Accordingly
the group gave up its efforts and returned all photos, maps etc. to
their owners. Thus the prospects for Fairville station are very poor
and it will likely be torn down
in the year of the 100th anniversary
of its construction.
Page 14 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
C.P.R. Station. Falrvl11e. N.B~ Canada
ABOVE: Fairville station as it appeared soon
after the round-end extension
was built. This
view
is from a postcard printed ahout 1910.
Collection
of the Partridge Island Research
Projec
t, Saint John N.B.
LEFT: Changing the name from Fairville to
Lancaster
in Augllst 1953. Depicted ill the
ph
aro are : JR. Strother, General Superintendant
of the CPR, Jim LUI/on, CPR Agent, M. Duhe,
Assistant Superintendant, Tom Horsier, Mayor
of Lancaster, T. W. Bardsley, Station Master.
Photo by Joe Michaud. Source: J. James
Collection, Partridge Island Research Project,
Saint John
NB.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 15
ABOVE: The former Fairville station as it
looked in 1990 at the time of the ill-fated
effort
to preserve it.
Partridge Island Research Project, Saint
John
NB.
LEFT: Another view taken on February 21,
1992. Some new plywood has been placed
over the windows, but little
is changed as
the station slowly decays.
Photo by Dyson Thomas.
FOLLOWING FOUR PAGES: Reproductions
of official CPR plans of the station drawn il11909 at the time the extensions and alterations
were made
to the original huilding of 1893. The drawings were made to a scale of One-quarter inch to the foot, and have been reduced
by one-half
to fit these pages. Hence they are shown to a scale of one-eighth of an inch to the foot. Anyone wishing to model this station
should enlarge these plans to 110%
for HO scale, 200% for 0 scale, and other scales in proportion.
Diagrams courtesy
of Archives of the New Brunswick Museum.
Page 16 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
§
R
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
~
/~;::J
.,. … –,,
~
~<~
~/:;//
Ill! II111 i I 11 I I II
00
1JO
Bg
C!0,_, -!l
Norclv E.1-evo.CiOIV,
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993
m
00
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
CANADIAN RAIL
~::>
….. ~~,..~ ……….
c . P . R.
ATLANTIC DIVISION
FAIRYILLE, N.B.
PROPOSED ALTERATION TO OTATION
Re5ident Enqineers Off,ce
:st John.N.B. Jon~/.I I~09.
06f7J1~
Rel.ident flngi.{eer
Page 17
Page 18 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
Low Platform
<
–x-
7.,..
r————– ———– ———————————————————.
I .~
-i ru-;-t========:=;[;:;;-::;;t; ::::::JI., .)
I
I
I
I
I
I
I I
I
I
I
, r-
: I ~
I
I
I
,
L
I
I
I
I
I
,
,
I
I
i
I
4·oL
, f
I
I
I
I
r–
L __ I
Freight
Bond
Room.
-h
1k~=======4~J
[ ~.-1
.5l-lSt-;onr~
IL
Filing
Cupboo …. d.
I
., __ n, =+=::;:;:;::;::;::;::;:;::;::;:;:;::;:;:;::;:;;:;:;i~~:;=J —–; .. –..,.~ .. ~.-r==r=c=:],:::-~-t, ========~t=.-=–=]::J 5id
in
o.Doar
I ~-… L_J L __ J
L ____ _
—–
—–
I t:~= ===-:;;::.
r–,
L r.:~=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
Room
L ___
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL
_________________________________________ 1 ________ . ______ _____ _ ___ —_. –_
. –;
~ce Room
5eot
. ,; 5eo::; rcccOICC;
POC …. 0 boc.Y,
cenet·
t-
.~
Men,;Woitinq
Room
~ookin~ Room.
Ooube
Oe~V.
Oe.sr …
Il··~· 6·9
otr;c(t Futn~rure
~c be .. docohA.
1:0 c..uit flo.ltcfl!.
(Ice
LodiesWoiting Room
C P,R
ATLANTIC DIVIoION
FAlRVILLE N B
PROPOSED AL.TERATION TO STATION
Resident [.n3in~r·s OH1c.e
SI John·N.B. Jon~ ZOo ~D3.
Rev;~od 10 .P~~
RU,uV1f £~;nee/
Page 19
Page 20 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
Meditations In A Lower Berth
By Bruce Hutchison
In September 1992, veteran newspaper man, writer, and radio broadcaster, Bruce Hutchison died at his home near Victoria, British
Columbia.
What was perhaps his best known book about Canada, The Unknown Country, was a best seller. In the September 1944 issue
of Canadian National Magazine was an article which combined his love of train travel and of the country. The full text of this article follows.
A lower berth is a front row seat, and a luxurious one, at the
greatest show on earth. Lying there,
in your sleeping car, you
watch 3,000 miles
of Canadian motion picture stream by the
window and you feel, as nowhere else, the size, the substance, the
peculiar quality, the loneliness and mystery
of Canada. This is not
merely a visual process, for you can also see Canada from an
automobile,
or an airplane, from the back of a horse, or on foot.
The unique feeling of the train comes from a deeper source. On a
train you travel
in something like a spiritual vacuum. You are
. separated from the eatth. You.are
i~plated from all the concerns
of the world. You are living, as it were, in a special little traveling
world
of its own, and all the cares of the world back home drop
from you.
The same may be said of an airplane, but an airplane is
far from the earth which, from it, becomes a map only. In a
sleeping
car berth, staring out your window in the moonlight, or in
the first light
of dawn, you are close to the earth and can discern
its rocks, its rivers, its fields and even the individual plants
of its
growth. You are with the earth,
but no longer of it, and that is why
a train
journey provides so much more than physical rest; why it
completely rests the spirit by detaching it from your accustomed
toil
and allowing you to look at everything as a luxurious spectator,
as a god on wheels.
From the days when, as a small boy, I
made my first
journey across Canada I have never lost the small boys excitement
at the flowing spectacle beside the train window. Hence
r seldom
sleep
much in a lower berth. I am too interested in the moving
spectacle outside, and while I have seen all the main railway lines
many times now, the scene never seems to be the same. Every
season, every month, almost every day seems to bring
some
change in the landscape. Every night is full of different shadows.
Every sunrise presents new colours.
The prairies and the mountains
never repeat their patterns and every
(iitil infhe tracks presents
some
new touch of Canadian life, some little cabin or farmhouse
you
never saw before, some unknown Canadian toiling upon the
land and looking up, with longing eyes, at the great train as it
sweeps by.
The train, in some ways, is the deepest symbol of life in
Canada. It made the
nation,physically and economi~ally, and the
whole flesh
of the nations body is built around this vast skeleton
of steel. But the fascination which the train holds for the Canadian
cannot be explained in physical
or economic terms. It goes much
deeper.
To the Canadian on this huge and empty land the train,
moving like a projectile across the prairies,
or coiling like a patient
worm among the peaks
of the Rockies, is a kind of messenger
which assures him
of his countrys life and health. Most Canadians
do not see the distant parts
of their country. The other side is a
legend only, a
vague rumour, an imaginary land. The train,
hurtling out
of this far-off region, is daily proof that it exists, that
all the remote and unseen Canada is working, is producing, is
living and breathing -that the nation is a cohesive whole,
of single
organism.
Of this organism the railway is the bloodstream, and the
moving train, which he watches from his town
or cabin, contains
the very spirit, and carries with it the mighty dream
of Canada.
And how deeply you can feel
thequaJityof thisDream as .
you watch Canada rushing by from
your lower berth! Every
segment and aspect
of Canada is there for you to watch with
godlike detachment.
The white fishing villages of the Maritime
coast, the narrow river farms
of Quebec, the fat barns and stone
houses
of Ontario, and then the cold blue lakes, the glacial country
of rounded stone and little trees, which contains its own stark
beauty.
But I confess that I like best the lower berth from Winnipeg
west. It
is here, in the unbroken distances of the prairies, that you
grasp best the sweep and
volume of this country. The prairies seem
to spin in circular motion as the train moves, like a revolving
platter, and the fence rows, the tree clumps, the farm houses and
. the cattle
in the fields move like a childs toys. No Canadian can
fail to understand the essential purpose of this earth which feeds us,
which feeds millions
of hungry people in other countries, this
surging, fertile earth on which the nation lives. Here
is the
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993
heartland of Canada and the Chemistry of it, the special anangement
of the molecules and atoms in this soil, is the greatest single fact
of the nation, without which it could not prosper or live.
Watch closely, therefore, the men and women of this land,
the farmer
marching behind his plow, his wife looking from the
kitchen door at the daily
passage of the train. These people, so far
apart,
so lonely, so small in the lands immensity, are the economic
base of Canada and let them but suffer poor crops or low prices for
a single year and all
of us are instantly the poorer.
Best of all, from the lower berth, is the prairie sky, an ever­
changing palette of vivid colour. As you go to sleep at night, the
sky to the west is unbelievably tinted and the whole world seems
to revolve in a mist
of gold dust. In the morning when you awake
the whole east is a single splash of scarlet before the sun comes up.
If you are lucky, all through the night the northern lights will play
outside your window, in moving, vibrating bands of colour. And
always the prairie sky is splashed with fantastic cloud shapes on a
scale which dwarfs all
our other Canadian skies.
Then one moming you awake to find the land rolling in
rounded hillocks, from which the white-faced and
scowling beef
cattle glare at the passing train. This is the first faint swell of the
Rockies
westofEdmonton and, in the green of the spring bUl1chgrass,
or in the reckless yellow
splash of the autumn poplars, it is one of
the loveliest regions in our country. Also, it contains the last
straggling remains
of settlement and agriculture at the edge of the
cruel, inhospitable mountains.
As the train glides into the defiles
of the Yellowhead Pass
you realize, as you lie observing it, that this is no longer
mans
country, land which he can bend and shape to his will. He can only
carve this little road
of steel through the passes and a few yards
beyond, the mountains stand exactly as they stood a million
or fifty
million years ago, as they will stand, perhaps, long after that
interesting animal, man, has
disappeared altogether from the face
of the world.
The mountains are so close together and so close to the
train th
at the slow, wheeling movement of the far-flung prairies
suddenly changes as
soon as you are in the Rockies, as if someone
had speeded
up the movie film outside your window. The peaks
dodge quickly behind one another, emerge and disappear again,
like the flashes
of montage which the hollywood directors like to
crowd together to represent the passage
of time and events. All
lime upon the earth
is compressed, for those who have eyes to see
it
in the jumbled, moving images of these mountains, and all
human events, since the begirmillg of human life, are like the
passage
of a moment to these unchanging cliffs and canyons.
CANADIAN RAIL Page 21
To the inhabitant of the Pacific coast the most exciting
moment of the westward trip is the first sight of the fat and muddy
Fraser [River).
The water is now moving westward. The train is
over the hump and racing downwards to the sea. We are going
home.
The sights are now all familiar along the railway -the
streaked bulk of Mount Robson, the first frail waters which swell
into the North
Thompson [River], and then the Dry Belt, the hills
of clay, kneaded like loaves of bread, streaked and gouged as if by
clawing fingers, the clay canyons
of the river.
Then the last barrier, the mountains of the coast. Through
them runs the mightiest canyon
of Canada, the black scarred and
tortured canyon
of the Fraser where there is hardly an inch to spare
for the railway beside the river torrent.
Lying comfortably in your
berth, you can imagine how
our grandfathers toiled up this canyon,
with oxen and mule teams, to build the
Cariboo Road, and reach
the gold fields
of Barkerville; and how before that, the frai I canoes
of Simon Fraser rushed down these mad, churning waters, through
the maelstrom
of Hells Gate.
This canyon .resents the intrusion of man. It constantly
hurls its boulders and gravel and
snow down upon his railways and
his road. It provides no living for him, hardly an acre
of ground that
he can cultivate. But, careless whether he observes them or not, it
presents
at every turn of the river a new and appalling shape of cliff
and naked rock, some strange and vivid colouring on its barren
sides; and, best
of all, in the night it seems to capture and hold the
moon, hugging it tightly to the bosom of its river, which flows like
melted, bubbling and glistening lead.
In the morning you look out upon a new world, the wide,
lush delta which the Fraser has piled up here, particle by particle
th.rough the ages, until it swells up with green
crops and everywhere
the thoughtful dairy cows look up idly at the train and return,
unimpressed, to their grazing. And now,
most moving of all to the
coastal man, the first glimpse
of the coast at New Westminster.
Here, as the train crosses the Fraser on a high bridge, you can see
the ships loading by the docks, loading their
Canadian cargoes for
ports at tbe other side
of the world. You can see the great brown
booms
of logs which lie beside the sawmills, the white, whirling
gulls, and you can smell the salt
of the ocean.
As the train glides into the outskirts
of Vancouver, the
housewife stands at her back door to watch it, the girls in factories
hang
out the windows to look down upon it, for they feel the
mystery and the meaning
of the train -it has come from the distant
places where they long to go, and it brings to them a sudden,
poignant sense
of this lands immensity and the smallness and the
brief life of man upon it.
Page 22 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
The Day The Prince Of Wales Rode The QRL & P
Sometimes the discovery of a small item leads
down a trail
of history and uncovers an interesting story.
Such a case occurred recently when the finding of a small
gold medal uncovered the account
of a great historical
pageant eighty-five years ago, as well as a Royal train on
an interurban line. This
is that story.
In 1908 the city
of Quebec celebrated the 300th
anniversary
of its founding. The celebrations wereextensive
and elaborate, and extended over a twelve day period from
July
20 to July 31. Many dignitaries attended, but the most
important person present was
His Royal Highness George,
Prince
of Wales who WOUld, less than two years later
succeed to the throne as King
George V. It was not his first
visit to Canada since he had visited, as Duke
of Cornwall
and York,
in 190 I. In 1908 he was present to represent
King Edward
Vil who had, as a matter of interest, himself
visited Canada as Prince of Wales in 1860, on which
occasion
he had officially inaugurated the Victoria Bridge
at Montreal.
The highlight
of the celebrations was a series of
eight historical pageants held on the Plains of Abraham,
and which depicted noteworthy events in the
history of
Quebec. In addition, however, there were many other
events including a visit of part of the fleet of the British
Navy as well as battleships from France and the United
States.
The Prince of Wales arrived on July 22 and
remained until July 29 when he sailed for England.
After attending pageants and numerous activities
in Quebec City, the Prince visited, on July 27, the old
village
of St. Joachim. This village is about 27 miles
downstream from
Quebec City and was the terminus of the
Montmorency division
of the Quebec Railway Light and
Power interurban line.
This line was built, as the Quebec
Montmorency
& Charlevoix Rail way in 1889, was electrified
in 1900, and survived as an electric line until 1959.
Interestingly,
some of the original coaches of 1889 remained
in service, as electric trailers, until the end of passenger
service –
seventy years.
A special train was operated on the
QRL & P to
carry the Prince,
members of the official· party, lnd tllose
travelling with them.
This must be one of the few cases in
Canada where a Royal train was run on an interurban line.
However, it appears that the party did not travel in an
electric car. Although the line had been electrified for
eight years, some steam locomotives were used for many
years thereafter, and it
would appear, from contemporary
By Fred Angus
1608 ·1908
Jbl
~i~
The cover of the elaborate souvenir programme telling about the events
of the Quebec 300th anniversaJ), celebrations. The cover was in full
colour,
and the events covered inelude the visit to St. Joachim on July 27.
Collection
of Fred Angus.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 23
LEFT: His Royal Highness George, Prince of Wales as he
appeared
ill 1908 at the time of the celebrations marking the
300th anniversmy
of the founding of Quebec.
BELOW
An interurban car of the Quebec Railway Light and
Power Co. photographed about the time
of the celebrations of
1908. This was the type of car regularly in service at the lime, but
it appears as
if the Royal party travelled to St. Joachim aboard
a steam-hauled train and did not use the electric cars. This
particular car, No. 401, was built
in 1902, served until the end of
service in 1959, and is now preserved at the Canadian Railway
Museum.
National Archives
of Canada, Merrilees Collection, Photo No.
PA-149484.
Page 24 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
.<,J. ••
Quebec Railway Light and Power Co. steam locomotive No.3. This locomotive may have been the on~ that pulled the Royal train of
1908 when the Prince of Wales visited St. Joachim.
National Archives
of Canada, Merrilees Collection, Photo No. PA-165236.
accounts, that this Royal train was hauled by a locomotive. In
addition, the trip was only one-way since the Prince returned
to
Quebec city by automobile, which must have been quite an
adventure considering the state of the roads in Quebec
in 1908!
Although the excursion was intended to be more or less
of a
relaxing outing after the recent hectic schedule
of events, there was
some ceremony
as well, and the event was duly covered in the
press. The Quebec Chronicle,
in its issue of July 28, 1908, reported
as follows:
PRINCE OF WALES HAD PLEASANT VISIT -HIS ROYAL
HIGHNESS ON HISTORIC GROUND
One
of the most delightful of the Prince ofWales experiences
during his recent visit
to Canada occurred yesterday, when he
visited the quaint old village
of St. Joachim, and was entertained
by the reverend gentlemen
at the Seminary. His Royal Highness
was taken over the ground hallowed as the velY cradle
of Canadian
history, where Champlainfounded
hisfarm, and where the sites of
ancient forts nfark the scenes of many aJi-erce:conflicLullder-the
shadolV
of the huge rock of Cape Torment, while the buildings at
the chateau are among the oldestlsic]
ill the country; dating back
to
1779, since which time they have served as a summer resort for
the secular priests connecled with Laval. The Prince evidently enjoyed the momentary lapse from
stale functions, and displayed a keen interest
in the ancient scenes,
as well as the people
of the village, who turned oul in full force to
welcome their future king. Considerable effort had been made to
keep the Princes visit as private as possible, so that for the day he
could enjoy
himself almost as a simple gentleman. The result was
that a band awaited the cortege at the railway station, while the
engine
of the special train was elaborately disguised in the Royal
Standard.
On arriving
at St. Joachim the Prince and his party were
met by Mgr.
J.UK Laf/amme, rector of Laval; Archbishop Begin,
and other church dignitaries, including Mgr. Baretti, the Papal
delegate, and the whole party were driven
in automobiles to the
ancient chateau, a distance
offour miles, through some of the most
picturesque scenery
ill this province, the road winding under the
Laurentides, through the straggling old village, which looked like
a chapter out
of the century before last.
On arriving at the chateau lunch was served on the lawn
under stately old pine trees. Mgr. Mathieu presided at the table
of
honor, and with him at the table of honor were His Royal Highness,
His Excellency, Earl Grey
[Governor General of Canada], Mgr.
Barelli, Archbishop Begin, the Duke
of NO/folk, Lord Strathcona,
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 25
The Prince of Wales in an automobile at St. Joachim on July 27,1908. Notice the uniform of the chauffeur. The Prince is in the rear seat
behind the chauffeur. In those days a spare tire was a real necessity.
Natiollal Archives
of Canada, Photo No. PA-123472.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier
[Prime Minister of Canada] and Lady Grey.
Amongst other guests were Sir Thomas Shaughnessy
[President of
the CPR], Sir LomeI Gouin, Lord Loval, Sir J.G. Gameau and
others ……….
..
Later photographs were taken of the entire group, with the
Prince and ecclesiastical dignitaries, the Duke
of NO/folk and
Lord Strathcona in the centre, and the whole thing broke up with
a burst ofillformalmerrimellt as the Prince rallied
[sic] His Grace
upon the fact that he had thrice been the victim
of the camera mall
that. day.
Later the party left in automobiles
for Quebec, visiting the
famous Shrine
of Ste. Anne de Beaupre 011 the way.
It appears to have been the case that the Prince of Wales
presented medals to certain persons that assisted the Royal party
at various functions.
The Railway and Marine World mentions the
presentation
of small gold medals to the pilots who brought the
British warships up the 5t. Lawrence liver to Quebec. This article
was inspired
by the discovery of such a medal. It is made from a
gold sovereign
of Edward VD, and would have been a current coin
in Britain at that time. The coin from which the medal was made
appears to have been new since there is no wear on the head side
which
is fully intact. The sovereign was a gold coin, about fhe size
of a modern five cent piece. It weighed slightly less than a quarter
of an ounce and was current for one pound sterling (then worth
$4.862/3). Until World War I sovereigns were used as circulating
Page 26 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
The obverse and reverse of the gold medal given by the Prince of Wales to J.J. White in 1908. The obverse (head side) is the head of Edward
VII,
and is the unaltered design of the gold sovereign. The reverse bears the special inscription. Actual size of the medal is about the size
of a modern nickel five-cent piece.
Collection
of Fred Angus.
money throughout the British Empire (some were even minted in
Ottawa between 1908 and 1919) and are still minted for coUectors.
This particular sovereign has been treated in one of two ways.
Either it has had the reverse design (St. George and the dragon plus
the
date) carefully ground away in such a way as to preserve the rim
with its beading, or it was struck to order with a special blank
reverse die combined with the regular obverse die. It has then been
engraved with the following inscription in five lines H.R.H. /
Prince of Wales / St. Joachim / 27th July 1908/ J.J. WHITE, and
a s
mall loop was attached so the medal could be suspended from
a
chain.
Research into the newspaper files quickly revealed the
events of July 27 1908 and the visit to St. Joachim outlined above.
Thus half the story was known, but the question remained, who was
J.1.
White? This was also quite easy to determine by consulting the
Quebec & Levis Directory for 1907 -1908 published by Boulanger
& Marcotte. On page 732 was the following entry: White J.J.,
train
dispatcher Q.R·L & P. Co., expediteur de trains, St Paul 310,
res. St. Julia 44. This answered the question. 310 Rue St Paul was
the address of the old QRL & P station, remembered by railway
enthu
siasts welJ into the 1950s. IJ. White was most likely the
dispatcher on duty the day of the operation of the Royal train, and
he was presented with the gold medal by the Prince of Wales.
There remains only one question. Where and when were
the medals prepared and when were they presented? It is highly
unlikely that they were done in England since it is virtually
impossible that those in charge would know who was going to be
on duty as dispatcher on July 27. What is more likely is that the
Prince
of Wales had a quantity of gold sovereigns prepared in
England, leaving the reverse blank. The medals could then be
suitably
engraved in Quebec before being presented. A good
engraver could do this very quickly, so the medals could presented
at the event or very soon thereafter.
The Prince of Wales departed for England on July 29,1908
and he never returned. On May 6, 1910 King Edward VII died and
the
Prince became George V. Four years later World War I broke
out. After the war the new Prince of Wales made a great tour of
Canada, and he too succeeded to the throne as Edward VIII in 1936
upon the death of George V, only to abdicate later the same year
in fa
vour of his brother who became George VI. The present Queen
is thus the grand daughter of the Prince of Wales who visited
Canada in 1908. There have been many Royal tours and Royal
trains since, especially with the ease of air travel today, but few
have involved travel on an interurban line, even if a steam
locomotive was used. This little medal is a memento of that long
forgotten event, the day the Prince of Wales rode the QRL & P.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL
The Railway and the War
By Thurstan Topham
Th..e wM ha5 CY?3ted tY (3+ ion. The (ana.dlLV1. tel<.>qrupn cornpani (S, bLJ increo.sinq their faci I it i e 5.
h.aJe kept piCQ with th.is 0it61 pll.l~S~ of (DnoQuS lI)..lt effort
Page 27
War brouqh.t tlteMessenq<.>rette.s:
1he4 are replc.cin.q you.no lads
wi-tc have en.1 i~ted
Tttl? maQIC of Wired .l)we!ess:ih by the Canadii:
NationAl TelelY3ph5. In
1~21 enlililes the simuitaneoLl5 exchMCJ th.rouqh r,di£l frcQu(>I1Clj cn.lInnels quided Ixj one pirofwirls
War brouqht Co Tremendous increils~ in
rcli/ tr6vel.bu1 efficient pea mlntenance of rO<,dbed and equi pment
has enc.b/I?d ihe Conadit-n Railw3tjs to
(ope wiih 111i5 abnormal trffic. There
are constant and heavy troop movements
-between c~mps.?irtr~ininqcelttres.and
~Mninq depots, to Md from emba.rkui-
IOn ports -and mMy tllousands of
ciuillMS are triuell inq d~illJ on war
business.Theco6peration of the
public. is qreaily Msistinq tile r(.ilU)~vs
inUyryinq out this bi9 U)uriime job.
C.UDIU unOlUl RAIL.AU
_ … —Goo.O-.~–
There are only three

; ~ transcontinental rawatj
r1 r rl IF ~r;p ~ ~ lines In North Amerlca,AII
~~~i{t~~7 .. ~.- ~ ~ ~l :~e~::r~t~~ ~~~ .T(OO
r!Pf~~:fll 7—ir.~~ NQ~io:~;~~~.~j~
Thetr~nsport of troops reqUlre~ uQr~ exaci-r/ >, r-/ .::,1 ~
ing schedules of trZltn mQuemenh.Thefir.rl . -..l .
CMadian conlinqenttil.)5 moued ::; r:! ~:..!.::
The f in purple and qold, hauled the
Roy~lTro.n in 1939. IS now inwor
servic.e hcncllin Og£%;j~
to3. 0:madinnport-in 17 :;p~cinl ~ ~~~II1. ~~:
Na-jion~1 R~ilwllj5troO[ltrl1ins,1h.e5e ~-=.~
Sp~da/lIJ equippd CNH 1rllin5 for
munil,ons workers :;erve biq Wur
planb in VC
IOUS pLlris of (anadi:l
A new tljpe of (ill wh.idt s~ots lZ2
p1SSenqer.s Wi)S desiqrted hy mec­
hankul engi neers oHh.1! Naiional
Sysiern. for use ill ih.e~e tr ~~;!l!;!:_u)er~CJe riljllllilj c;oac.h. 5ea1S 70·
arrillQd b.i th.e shIpsside at two hour
in:le ruals, ~~~~~L~
Page 28 RAIL CANADIEIJ JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
Our Revised Bylaws
One of the important accomplishments at the 1992 CRHA Convention was-the ratification of the revised bylaws of the Association.
For almost a year, a committee had been studying the existing bylaws and making modifications to bring them into line with current
conditions.
These revisions were then approved by the CRHA Board of directors, and the revised bylaws were then approved by the members
at a meeting held
on May 17, 1992, during the convention. Because of the importance of these bylaws to the members, we print them in full.
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
BY-LAWNO.4
BEING A GENERAL BY-LAW REPLACING ALL BY-LAWS
CONTAINED IN THE LETTERS PATENT AND MEMORANDUM OF
AGREEMENT OF THE ASSOCIATION AS WELL AS ANY
ADDITIONAL BY-LAWS SUBSEQUENTLY ENACTED OR
MODIFIED.
BE IT AND IT IS HEREBY ENACTED AS A BY-LAW OF THE
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
(HEREINAFTER CALLED THE ASSOCIATION)
BY-LAW NO.4
INTERPRETATION
1. IN ALL BY-LAWS OF THE ASSOCIATION WHERE THE
CONTEXT SO REQUIRES OR PERMITS, FHE SINGULAR SHALL
INCLUDE THE PLURAL AND THE PLURAL SHALL INCLUDE THE
SINGULAR, THE WORD PERSON SHALL INCLUDE FIRMS AND
CORPORATIONS, AND THE MASCULINE SHALL INCLUDE
THE
FEMININE, AND WHEREVER REFERENCE IS MADE TO THE
COMPANIES ACT, IT SHALL INCLUDE THE COMPANIES ACT OF
CANADA AND EVERY OTHER STATUTE AMENDING OR
SUBSTITUTlNG FOR THE SAME.
REPEAL OF FORMER BY-LAWS
2. ALL FORMER BY-LAWS AND AMENDMENTS THERETO
ARE HEREB Y REPEALED.
HEAD OFFICE
3. THE HEAD OFFICE OF THE ASSOCIATION SHALL BE
LOCATED IN
THE CITY OF MONTREAL, IN THE PROVINCE OF
QUEBEC, AND AT SUCH PLACE THEREIN AS THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS OF THE ASSOCIATION MAY FROM TIME TO TIME
DECIDE.
4. THE ASSOCIATION MAY ESTABLISH SUCH OTHER
OFFICES ELSEWHERE AS THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS MAY, BY
RESOLUTION, DEEM EXPEDIENT.
INSIGNIA AND SEAL
S. THE ASSOCIA TION SHALL EMPLOY EITHER OR BOTH, AS
APPROPRIATE, OF TWO INSIGNIAE DIFFERING FROM EACH
OTHER ONLY
IN THE LANGUAGE OF THE INSCRIBED WORDING;
ONE DESIGN HAVING INSCRIPTIONS IN THE ENGLISH
LANGUAGE, THE OTHER HAVING INSCRIPTIONS IN THE FRENCH
LANGUAGE. THE FORM OF
THESE INSIGNlAE SHALL BE A DISC
WITH THE ENCIRCLING INSCRIPTION CANADIAN RAILROAD
HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION FOR
THE ENGLISH-LANGUAGE
INSIGNIA, AND THE WORDS ASSOCIATION CANADIENNE
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993
DHISTOIRE FERROVIAIRE FOR THE FRENCH-LANGUAGE
INSIGNIA, IN BOTH CASES TERMINATED BY A SMALL IMAGE OF
A MAPLE LEAF. IN THE FIELD SHALL BE THE IMAGE OF A
LOCOMOTIVE AND TENDER ON A SECTION OFTRACK BENEATH
WHICH
ISTHEIMAGEOFA RECTANGULAR PLATE BEARING THE
NAME DORCHESTER. IN THE BACKGROUND SHALL APPEAR
THE CONTOUR OF A CONICAL-SHAPED MOUNTAIN
SURMOUNTED BY THE WORD ESTABLISHED IN THE ENGLISH­
LAJlGUAGE INSIGNIA AND
FONDEE EN IN THE FRENCH­
LANGUAGE INSIGNIA. BENEATH
THE LOCOMOTIVE AND NAME
PLATE SHALL APPEAR
THE NUMERALS 1932.
6. THE CORPORATE SEAL OFTHE ASSOCIATION SHALL BE
IN THE FORM OF A
DlSC WITH THE ENCIRCLING INSCRIPTION
CANADlAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION, AND THE
FIGURES 1932 AT THE BASE. IN THE FIELD SHALL BE THE
IMAGE A LOCOMOTIVE AND TENDER, THE LATTER BEARING
THE NAME DORCHESTER. IN
THE BACKGROUND SHALL
APPEAR
THE CONTOUR OF A CONICAL-SHAPED MOUNTAIN
SURJvl0UNTED BY THE WORD INCORPORATED, AND BENEATH
THE LOCOMOTIVE SHALL APPEAR THE NUMERALS
1941.
THISSEAL,ANIMPRESSIONOFWHICHAPPEARSONTHEMARGIN
OF THESE BY -LA WS, IS HEREBY ADOPTED AS THE CORPORATE
SEAL OF THE ASSOCIATION.
MEMBERS
7. THE MEMBERSHIP OF THE ASSOCIATION SHALL CONSIST
OF THE FOLLOWING CLASSES;
A). REGULAR MEMBERS: REGULAR
MEMBERSHIP SHALL BE A V AlLABLE TO THOSE WHO WISH TO
PARTICIPATE FULLY IN THE AFFAIRS AND BUSIJTESS OF THE
ASSOCIATION, AND TO ASSUME ALL THE OBLIGATIONS AND
RESPONSIDILITIES THEREFOR. REGULAR MEMBERS SHALL
ENJOY ALL THE PRIVILEGES OF THE ASSOCIATION AND SHALL
HA VE THE RIGHT TO VOTE AT ALL THE MEETINGS OF THE
MEMBERS. REGULAR MEMBERS SHALL PAY THE FULL
MEMBERSHIP DUES, AND MUST BE OF THE FULL AGE OF
EIGHTEEN (18) YEARS.
B). JUNIOR MEMBERS: JUNIOR MEMBERSHIP
SHALLBE AVAlLABLETO APPLICANTS UNDER THE FULL AGE
OF
EIGHTEEN (18) YEARS. JUNIOR MEMBERS SHALLPA Y THE SAME
DUES AS REGULAR NlEMBERS AND SHALL ENJOY THE SAME
PRIVILEGES AS REGULAR MEMBERS EXCEPTTHA TTHEY SHALL
NOT
HAVE THE RIGHT TO VOTE. JUNIOR MEMBERS, ON
ATTAINTNG THE FULL AGE OF EIGHTEEN (18) YEARS, MID UPON
GIVING NOTIFICATION OF THIS FACT TO THE SECRETARY,
SHALL, SUBJECT TO THE APPROVAL OF THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS, BE TRANSFERRED TO REGULAR MEMBERSHIP,
RETAINING THEIR MEMBERSHIP NUMBER.
C).
CONTRIBUTING MEMBERS: PERSONS
WISHING TO GIVE FURTHER SUPPORT TO THE ASSOCIATION
MA Y
BE DESIGNATED CONTRIBUTING MEMBERS UPON
PA YMENT OF AN INCREASED MEMBERSHIP FEE WHICH SHALL
CONSIST OF THE REGULAR ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP FEE PLUS A
DONATION. THE AMOUNT OF SUCH DONATION REQUIRED FOR
CONTRIBUTING MEMBERSHIP SHALL BE DETERMINED BY
THE
BOARD OF DIRECTORS AT THE TIME WHEN THE MEMBERSHIP
DUES FOR THE ENSUING YEAR ARE BEING SET. CONTRIB UTING
MEMBERS SHALL ENJOY ALL THE PRIVILEGES OF REGULAR
MEMBERSHIP INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO VOTE.
D). HONOURARY MEMBERS: THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS MAY ELECT TO HONOURAR Y MEMBERSHIP
PERSONS, WHO NOT BEING REGULAR MEMBERS OF THE
ASSOCIATION,HA VEMADEOUTSTANDINGANDNOTEWORTHY
CONTRIBUTIONS, EITHER OF TIME AND WORK
OR TANGIDLE
CANADIAN RAIL Page 29
ASSETS, TO THE ASSOCIATION OR TO ITS PROJECTS AND
OBJECTS. HONOURARY MEMBERS
SHALL HAVE ALL THE
PRIVILEGES OF REGULAR
MEMBERS,BUTSHALLNOTPA Y DUES
MID MAY NOT VOTE. ANY HONOURARY MEMBER MAYBE
ELECTED AN HONOURAR Y OFFICER.
E).
HONOURARY LIFE MEMBERS: AN
HONOURARY LIFE MEMBERSHIP MAY BE CONFERRED UPON
ANY PERSON WHO HAS RENDERED EXCEPTIONALLY
MERITORIOUS AND LOYAL SERVICE TO THE ASSOCIATION.
SUCH HONOURARY LIFE MEMBERSHIP MUST BE PASSED
BY
RESOLUTION AT A MEETING OFTHE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND
CONFffiMED AT A SUBSEQUENT GENERAL MEETING OF THE
MEMBERS. HONOURARYLIFEMEMBERSSHALLENJOY ALL THE
PRIVILEGES
OF REGULAR MEMBERS, INCLUDING THE RIGHTTO
VOTE, BUT SHALL NOT PAY DUES.
VOTING
8. REGULAR, CONTRIBUTING AND HONOURARY LIFE
MEMBERS MAY VOTE AT ALL THE MEETINGS OF THE
ASSOCIATION PROVIDING THEY HAVE PAID THEIR ANNUAL
DUES APPLICABLE TO THE YEAR
IN WHICH THE MEETING IS
HELD, AND ARE OTHERWISE IN GOOD STANDING WITH THE
ASSOCIATION. SUCH MEMBERS ELIGIDLE TO VOTE SHALL BE
REFERRED HEREIN
AS VOTING MEMBERS. ALL VOTING SHALL
BE IN PERSON AND NOT BY PROXY.
ELECTION OF MEMBERS
9. EVERY APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP SHALL BE
SUBMITTED FOR APPROVAL TO THE BOARD OF DlRECTORS OR
TO SUCH PERSON OR PERSONS
AS THE BOARD MA Y DELEGATE
FOR THAT PURPOSE. THE BOARD SHALL HAVE THE RIGHT TO
OVERRULE ANY SUCH DECISION
MADE BY SUCH DELEGATEE.
IN
ADDlTION ANY APPLICANT FOR MEMBERSHIP WHOSE
APPLICA TION IS DENIED HAS THE RIGHT TO APPEAL THIS
DECISIONDIRECTL
YTOTHEBOARD OF DIRECTORS. THE BOARD
MA Y ACCEPT ANY APPLlCA TION FOR A CLASS OF MEMBERSHIP
OTHER THAN THE ONE APPLIED FOR.
MEMBERSHIP NUMBER
10. EVERY MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATION SHALL, ON
BEING ADMITTED TO MEMBERSHIP, BE
GIvEN A MEMBERSHIP
NUMBER WHICH SHALL BE ASSIGNED IN CONSECUTIVE ORDER
BY THE PERSON DELEGATED TO MAINTAIN THE MEMBERSHIP
FILE. EACH MEMBERSHIP NUMBER SHALL BE UNIQUE TO THAT
MEMBER AND
SHALLNOTBE ASSIGNEDTO ANYONE ELSE EVEN
IF
THE ORIGINAL ASSIGNEE CEASES TO BE A MEMBER OF THE
ASSOCIATION FOR ANY REASON WHATEVER.
RESIGNATION OF MEMBERS
11. ANY MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATION MAY AT ANY
TIME, BY A NOTICE IN WRITING ADDRESSED TO THE
SECRETARY, RESIGN AS A MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATION, AND
UPON RECEIPT FROM THE SECRETARY
OF A NOTICE OF THE
ACCEPTANCE OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF SUCH
RESIGNATION, SUCH MEMBER SHALL THEREFORE CEASE TO BE
A MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATION. RESIGNATION DOES NOT
RELIEVE THE MEMBER FROM THE PAYMENT OF ANY
OUTST MIDING OBLIGATIONS DUE TO THE ASSOCIATION FROM
THE MEMBER.
LAPSE OF MEMBERSHIP
12. IF A MEMBER SHALL NOT HAVE PAID HIS DUES BY
MARCH 31 IN ANY YEAR HE SHALL BE CONSIDERED
DELINQUENT AND SHALL NOT ENJOY ANY PRIVILEGES OF
Page 30 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
MEMBERSHIP UNTIL HIS DUES FOR THAT YEAR ARE PAID. TFHIS
DUES REMAIN UNPAID BY DECEMBER
31 OFTHESAMEYEAR, HIS
MEMBERSHIP
SHALL BE CONSIDERED TO HA VELAPSED AND HE
SHALLCEASETOBEAMEMBEROFTHEASSOCIATION. LAPSE OF
MEMBERSHIP DOES NOT RELIEVE THE MEMBER FROM THE
PAYMENT OF ANY OUTSTANDING OBLIGATIONS DUE TO THE
ASSOCIATION FROM THE MEMBER EXCEPT FOR THE DUES FOR
THE YEAR
IN WHICH HIS MEMBERSHIP LAPSED.
EXPULSION OF MEMBERS
13. ANY MEMBER MA Y, FOR JUST CAUSE, BE EXPELLED
FROM THE ASSOCIATION BY RESOLUTION PASSED BY A
MAJORITY OF
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND RATIFIED AND
CONFIRMED AT THE NEXT GENERAL MEETING OF THE
MEMBERS. A MEMBER WHO IS EXPELLED HAS THE RIGHT TO
APPEAL THIS DECISION DIRECTLY TO THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS. EXPULSION DOES NOT RELIEVE THE MEMBER
FROM THE PAYMENT
OF ANY OUTSTANDING OBLIGATIONS DUE
TO THE ASSOCIATION FROM THE MEMBER.
REINSTATEMENT OF MEMBERS
14. ANY PERSON WHO WAS FORMERLY A MEMBER, BUT
WHOSE MEMBERSHIP HAS CEASED FOR ANY REASON, MAY BE
READMITTED TO MEMBERSHIP UPON MAKING A NEW
APPLICATION AND HA VING SUCH APPLICATION CONSIDERED
IN THESAMEMAJlNER AS A NEW APPLICANT. IF,HOWEVER, THE
FORMER MEMBER HAD BEEN EXPELLED FROM THE
ASSOCIATION, THE APPLICATION FOR REINSTATEMENT MUST
J:iE ~ONSiqERED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND MAY NOT
BE DELEGATED. A REINSTATED MEMBER SHALL BE GIVEN A
NEW ·MEMBERSHIP NUMBER UNLESS HE PAYS THE FULL
MEMBERSHIP DUES FOR THE YEARS THAT HIS MEMBERSHIP
W
AS IN ABEY ANCE, IN WHlCH CASE HIS ORIGINAL MEMBERSHIP
NUMBER
MAYBE RESTORED TO HIM.
INTEREST OF MEMBERS NOT TRANSFERRABLE
15. THE INTEREST OF MEMBERS IN THE ASSOCIATION
SHALL NOT BE TRANSFERRABLE BY ANY MEANS WHATSOEVER,
BUT SHALL
LAPSE AND CEASE TO EXIST UPON THE DEATH OF A
MEMBER
OR WHENEVER A MEMBER CEASES TO BE A MEMBER
OF THE ASSOCIATION BY RESIGNATION, EXPULSION OR
OTHERWISE IN ACCORDANCE WITH
THE BY -LA WS FROM TIME
TO TIME IN FORCE. UPON SUCH CECESSION OF MEMBERSHIP,
AllY DUES PAID FOR
THE CURRENT YEAR SHALL NOT BE
REFUNDABLE, EITHER IN WHOLE OR IN PART, TO THE MEMBER
OR, IN
THE EVENT OF THE MEMBERS DEATH, TO HIS HEIRS OR
ESTATE.
DIVISIONS
16. UPON THE APPLICATION OFTEN (IO)OR MORE VOTING
MEMBERS RESIDING IN A GIVEN MUNICIPALITY
OR AREA, WHO
DESIRE TO FORM A DIVISION
OFTHE ASSOCIATION, THE BOARD
OF DIRECTORS
MAY AUTHORIZE THE FORMATION OF SUCH A
DIVISION TO BE KNOWN AS THE —–DIVISION OF THE
CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION AND MA Y
THEREUPONISSUEACERTlFICATEDEFININGTHEJURISDICTION
AND POWERS
OF SUCH DIVISION. MODIFIED POWERS MAYBE
ALLOWED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS EITHER ON ITS OWN
INITIATIVE
OR UPON DUE APPLICATION THEREFOR IN WRITING.
IN EXCEPTIONAL CASES THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS MAY
AUTHORIZE THE FORMATION OF A DIVISION HAVING LESS
THAN
THE MINIMUM NUMBER OF MEMBERS HERETOFORE
REQUIRED.
17. MEMBERSHIP IN A DIVISION IEED NOT BE CONFINED
TO VOTING MEMBERS
OF THE ASSOCIATION, HOWEVER AT
LEAST TEN PERCENT (10%) OF THE MEMBERS OF THE DIVISION
MUST BE VOTING MEMBERS OFTHE ASSOCIATION, WI-I1CH TEN
PERCENT MAY INCLUDE THE MINIMUM OF TEN VOTING
MEMBERS REQUIRED TO FORM AND CONTINUE THE DIVISION.
18. EVERY DIVISION THUS CONSTITUTED SHALL HAVE
THE POWER TO ELECT AN EXECUTIVE AND TO MAKE BY-LAWS
AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING ITS
OWN ACTIVITIES, SO LONG
AS THEY ARE CONSISTENT WITH
THE GENERAL BY-LAWS,
REGULATIONS AND PRINCIPLES
OF THE ASSOCIATION. ALL
SUCH BY -LAWS AlID REGULATIONS MUST BE SUBMJTTED FOR
APPROV AL AND CONFIRMATION TO
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
OFTHE ASSOCIATION AND SHALLNOT BE EFFECTIVE OR ACTED
UPON UNTIL SUCH APPROVAL
IS GIVEN. A NEWLY-CREATED
DIVISION MUST SUBMIT ITS INITIAL BY -LA WS WITHIN SIX (6)
MONTHS
OF THE GRANTING OF ITS CERTIFICATE. FAILURE TO
SUBMIT SUCH BY -LAWS WITHIN THE TIME LlMIT, UNLESS SUCH
TIME LIMIT
IS EXTENDED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OFTHE
ASSOCIATION, WilL MAKE THE CERTIFICATE NULL AND VOID.
19. EACH DIVISION SHALL SUBMIT TO THE BOARD, ONCE
A YEAR, OR UPON REQUEST, AUDITED STATEMENTS AND OTHER
SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS REGARDING ANY FINANCIAL
TRANSACTIONS MADE BY THE DIVISION DURING THE
PRECEDING YEAR. FAILURE TO SUBMIT SUCH STATEMENTS
MA Y BE GROUNDS FOR
THE REVOCATION OF THE DIVISIONS
CERTIFICATE.
20. EACH DIVISION SHALL BE SOLELY AND ENTIRELY
RESPONSIBLE FOR ALL ITS OWN DEBTS AND OTHER
OBLIGATIONS.
21.
NO OFFICER OR ANY OTHER MEMBER OF ANY
DIVISION SHALL MAKE ANY PUBLIC STATEMENT, ORAL OR
WRITTEN,WITHRESPECTTOTHEPOLICYOFTHEASSOCIA1l0N.
22. IN THE EVENT OF A DIVISION FAILING TO MAINTAIN
THE MINIMUM MEMBERSHIP PROVIDED FOR UNDER ITS
CERTIFICATE, OR ACTING BEYOND
THE POWERS LAID DOWN
FOR
ITBYTHEBOARD OF DIRECTORS , OR OTHERWISE ACTING IN
A MANNER DEROGATORY
TO THE REPUTATION AND BEST
INTERESTS
OF THE ASSOCIATION, THE CERTIFICATE OF THE
DIVISION MAY
BE REVOKED AT ANY TIME BY RESOLUTION OF
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS.
MEETINGS OF THE MEMBERS
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
23. THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE VOTING
MEMBERS
OF THE ASSOCIATION SHALL BE HELD IN CANADA
ONCE IN EACH YEAR, ON A DATE AlID AT A PLACE TO BE FIXED
BY
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AT LEAST THIRTY (30) DAYS
BEFORETHEDATEOFSUCHANNUALGENERALMEETING. THE
PURPOSE OF THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING SHALL BE TO
RECEIVE THE ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE DIRECTORS, THE
BALANCE SHEET, A GENERAL STATEMENT OF INCOME AND
EXPENDITURES AND THE REPORT
OF THE AUDITOR OF THE
ASSOCIATION, ALSO TO ELECT DIRECTORS AND TO APPOINT AN
AUDITOR FOR THE ENSUING YEAR AND TO TRANSACT THE
GENERAL BUSINESS OFTHE ASSOCIATION. NOTICE IN WRITING
OF THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING MUST BE MAILED OR
OTHERWISE TRANSMITTED TO EACH VOTING MEMBER
OF THE
ASSOCIATION, TO HIS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS, AT LEAST
THIRTY (30) DAYS BEFORE THE DATE FIXED FOR THE HOLDING
OFTHEMEETING.
OTHER GENERAL MEETINGS
24. OTHER GENERAL MEETINGS OFTHEMEMBERS OFTHE
ASSOCIATION MAYBE HELD AT ANY TIME UPON THE CALL OF
THE PRESIDENT, OR AT THE REQUEST OF A MAJORITY OF THE
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993
BOARD OF DIRECTORS, OR UPON THE WRITTEN REQUEST,
ADDRESSED TO
THE SECRETARY, OF ANY FIFTEEN (i5) VOTING
MEMBERS OF
THE ASSOCIATION. NOTICE OF SUCH MEETINGS
SHALL BE MAlLED OR OTHERWISE TRANSMITTED, SEVEN
(7)
DAYS IN ADVANCE OF THE DATE FIXED FOR THE MEETING, TO
ALL REGULAR, JUNIOR, CONTRffiUTING, OR HONOURARY LIFE
MEMBERS.
THE NOTICE SHALL SPECIFY THE TENTATIVE
AGENDA TO BE FOLLOWED AT THE MEETING.
QUORUM
25. AT ANY MEETING OF THE MEMBERS OF THE
ASSOCIATION, FIFTEEN MEMBERS ELIGIBLE TO VOTE SHALL
CONSTITUTE A QUORUM.
VOTING
26. EACH VOTING MEMBER PRESENT AT A MEETING
SHALLHA VEONEVOTE.
IN THE EVENT OFA TIE,THECHAIRMAN
SHALL
HA VE THE RJGHTTO CAST A DECIDING VOTE.
DIRECTORS
27. THE AFFAIRS OF THE ASSOCIATION SHALL BE
MANAGED BY A BOARD OF DIRECTORS WHO SHALL NOT BE
REM
UN ERA TED FOR THEIR SERVICES TO THE ASSOClA TION.
28. DIRECTORS SHALL BE OF TWO KINDS, ELECTED AND
APPOINTED.
THE ELECTED DIRECTORS SHALL BE 12 IN NUMBER
AND SHALL BE ELECTED BY THE VOTING MEMBERS AT
THE
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION OR AT ANY
SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING CALLED FOR
THE PURPOSE. IN
ADDITION, EACH DIVISION HAS
THE RIGHT TO APPOINT OlJE
DIRECTOR. ALL DIRECTORS, WHETHER ELECTED OR
APPOINTED, SHALL HAVE THE SAME POWERS AND
RESPONSIBILITIES.
QUALIFICATIONS FOR DIRECTOR
29. THE QUALIFICATION OF A DIRECTOR SHALL BE
VOTING MEMBERSHIP IN THE ASSOCIATION IN GOOD STANDING
AT THE TIME OF HIS ELECTION AND CONTINUOUSLY
THROUGHOUTHlS TERM OF OFFICE. DIRECTORS MUST ALSO BE
CAIJADIAN CITIZENS.
POWERS OF DIRECTORS
30. THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS SHALL HA VE THE FULL
POWER AND AUTHORITY TO MANAGE, CONTROL AND
ADMINISTER THE AFFAIRS AND BUSINESS OF THE
ASSOCIATION. IN ADDITION TO THE POWERS AND AUTHORITY
BYTHESEBY-LAWSEXPRESSLYCONFERREDUPONTHEBOARD,
THE BOARD MAY EXERCISE ALL SUCH POWERS OF THE
ASSOCIATION AND DO ALL SUCH LA WFUL ACTS AS ARE NOT BY
STATUTE OR LETTERS PATENTOR THESE BY-LAWS REQUIRED
TO BE
EXERCISED OR DONE BY THE MEMBERS OF THE
ASSOCIATION AT GENERAL MEETINGS.
31. WITHOUT PREruDICE TO THE GENERAL POWERS AND
AUTHORITY ABOVE MENTIONED, AND THE POWERS
OTHERWISE CONFERRED BY STATUTE, THE LETTERS PATENT OF
THE ASSOCIATION AND OTHER BY-LAWS, IT IS HEREBY
EXPRESSLY PROVIDED THA TTHE BOARD OF DIRECTORS HAVE
THE FOLLOWING POWERS, THAT
A). TO PURCHASE, OR OTHERWISE ACQUIRE, FOR
THE ASSOCIATION ANY PROPERTY, RIGHTS, PRIVILEGES,
STOCKS, BONDS, DEBENTURES OR OTHER SECURITIES WHlCH
THE ASSOClATlON IS AUTHORIZED TO ACQUIRE, ATSUCHPRICE
OF CONSIDERATION AND GENERALLY ON SUCH TERMS
A1,TD
CONDITIONS AS THEY MA Y THlNK FIT.
CANADIAN RAIL Page 31
B). TO BORROW MONEY UPON THE CREDIT OF THE
ASSOCIATION, TO HYPOTHECATE OR MORTGAGE THE
IMMOVABLE PROPERTY OF THE ASSOCIATION OR PLEDGE OR
OTHERWISE AFFECT THE MOVABLE PROPERTY, EXCEPT THAT
WHICH
MA Y BE VESTED IN A BOARD OFTRUSTEES, OR GIVE ALL
SUCH GUARANTEES TO SECURE
THE PA YMENT OF LOANS AS
WELL AS THE PAYMENT OR PERFORMANCE OF ANY OTHER
DEBT, CONTRACT OR OBLIGATION OF
THE ASSOCIATION.
C).
AT THEIR DISCRETION TO PAY FOR ANY
PROPERTY, RIGHTS, PRIVILEGES, STOCK, DEBENTURES OR
OTHER SECURITIES ACQUIRED BY
THE ASSOCIATION EITHER
WHOLLY OR PARTLY
IN MONEY, STOCK, BONDS, DEBENTURES
OR OTHER SECURITIES OWNED BY
THE ASSOCIATION.
D). TO BUY, SELL, LEASE OR OTHERWISE ACQUIRE
OR DISPOSE OF ANY PROPERTY, REAL OR PERSONAL, ASSETS,
INTEREST OR EFFECTS FOR AND ON BEHALF OF THE
ASSOCIATION, EXCEPT WHERE SUCH EFFECTS SHALL HAVE
BEEN VESTED IN A BOARD OF TRUSTEES, FOR SUCH PRICE OR
CONSIDERATION AND GENERALLY ON
SUCH TERMS AND
COlTDITIONS
AS THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS MA Y THINK FIT.
E). TO APPOINT ANY PERSON OR PERSONS OR
CORPORATION TO ACCEPT AND HOLD IN
TRUST FOR THE
ASSOCIATION ANY PROPERTY BELONGING TO THE
ASSOCIATION OR IN WHICH IT IS INTERESTED OR FOR ANY
OTHER PURPOSE, MTDTO EXECUTE AND DO ALL SUCH DEEDS
AS
MAY BE REQUISITE IN RELATION TO SUCH TRUST.
F). TO AUTHORIZE AND DETERMINE WHO SHALL,
IN THE NAME OF THE ASSOCIATION, DRAW, MAKE, ACCEPT,
ENDORSE, SIGN OR OTHERWISE EXECUTE AND DELIVER BILLS
OF EXCHANGE, CHEQUES, PROMISSORY NOTES, OR OTHER
SECURITIES OR UNDERTAKINGS FOR
THEPA YMENTOFMONEY.
TERM OF OFFICE
32. THE ELECTED DIRECTORS SHALL HOLD OFFICE FOR A
TERM OF THREE (3) YEARS OR UNTIL THEIR SUCCESSORS ARE
ELECTED OR APPOINTED. FOUR (4) DIRECTORS SHALL BE
ELECTED EACH YEAR WHILE THE TERMS
OF THE OTHER FOUR
ELECTED DIRECTORS CONTINUE UNTIL
THE FOLLOWING YEAR,
AND THE TERMS OFTHE REMAINING FOUR ELECTED DIRECTORS
CONTINUE UNTlL THE NEXT-BUT-ONE FOLLOWING YEAR. A
DIRECTOR APPOINTED BY A
DrvlSION SHALL HOLD OFFICE FOR
A
TERM OF ONE (i) YEAR OR UNTIL HIS SUCCESSOR IS
APPOINTED BY THE DIVISION HE REPRESENTS.
33. RETIRING DIRECTORS SHALL BE ELIGIBLE FOR RE­
ELECTION rF
OniERWISE QUALrFIED. A RETIRING DIRECTOR
SHALL RETAIN OFFICE UNTIL THE DISSOLUTION OF
ADJOURNMENT OF THE MEETING AT WHICH HIS SUCCESSOR IS
ELECTED.
34. VACANCIES
OCCUR.R.ING AT ANY TIME IN THE BOARD
OF DIRECTORS MA Y BE FILLED
BY SUCH DIRECTORS AS REMAIN
IN OFFICE, EVEN IF LESS THAN A QUORUM. ANY PERSON THUS
ELECTED OR APPOINTED TO FILLA
VACAIICYINTHEBOARDOF
DIRECTORS SHALL HOLD OFFICE, SUBJECT TO THE LETTERS
PATENT, SUPPLEMENTARY LETTERS PATENT AND THE BY­
LAWS OF
THE ASSOCIATION, FOR THE BALANCE OF THE
UNEXPIRED TERM OF THE VACATING DIRECTOR.
VACATION
OF OFFICE
35. THE OFFICE OF A DIRECTOR SHALL BE IPSO FACTO
VACATED IF
THE DIRECTOR: A). BECOMES BANKRUPT OR
SUSPENDS PAYMENT OR COMPOUNDS WITH HIS CREDITORS OR
MAKES AN UNAUTHORIZED ASSIGNMENT OR
IS DECLARED
INSOLVENT. B).
IS FOUND TO BE MENTALLY INCOMPETENT
BECOMES OF UNSOUND MIND OR
IS INTERDICTED FOR ANY
Page 32 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
REASON WHATSOEVER. C). CEASES TO BE A VOTING MEMBER
FOR ANY REASON WHATSOEVER. D). BY NOTICE IN WRITING TO
THE ASSOCIATION, RESIGNS
THE OFFICE OF DIRECTOR AtID
THAT RESIGNATION
IS ACCEPTED.
36. IF A
DIRECTOR, WITHOUT JUST CAUSE (AS
DETERMINED
BY THE BOARD), FAILS TO ATTEND THREE
CONSECUTIVE REGULAR MEETINGS OF THE BOARD HE SHALL
BE DEEMED TO BE DELINQUENT
AS A DIRECTOR AND, UPON
RESOLUTION OF A QUORUM OF
THE REMAINING DIRECTORS,
HIS DIRECTORSHIP SHALL BE SUSPENDED FROM
THE TfME OF
SUCH RESOLUTION. SUCH DIRECTOR SHALL, HOWEVER,
HA VE
THE RIGHT TO APPEAR IN PERSON AT
THE NEXT REGULAR
BOARD MEETING AND APPEALSUCH A DECISION. LFHISAPPEAL
IS SUCCESSFUL HE
MAYBE REINSTATED AS A DIRECTOR, BUTIF
NO APPEAL IS MADEOR IFSUCH APPEAL IS NOTSUCCESSFULHIS
POSITION ON
THE BOARD SHALL BE DECLARED VACANT, SO
MAKING IT POSSIBLE FOR
THE REMAINING DIRECTORS TO
APPOINT A REPLACEMENT FOR
THE RETIRING DIRECTOR AT
SUCH MEETING.
ELECTION OF DIRECTORS
37. THE DIRECTORS MAY, AT A MEETING OF THE BOARD
HELD AT LEAST
TWO (2) MONTHS BEFORE THE ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING, APPOINT A NOMINATING COMMITTEE
COMPOSED OF THREE (3) OR MORE VOTING MEMBERS
IN GOOD
STANDING. THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE SHALL THEREUPON
PREPARE A LIST
OF FOUR (4) CANDIDATES FOR THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS EACH
OF WHOM MUST BE ELIGIBLE TO BE A
DIRECTOR AND MUST HA VESfGNIFIED HIS CONSENT TO SERVE
AS DIRECTOR IF ELECTED. THIS LIST MUST BE SUBMITTED TO
THE
SECRETARY OF
THE ASSOCIATION BY MIDNIGHT ON THE
LAST DAY OF
THE MONTH IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING THE
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING, OR TWO (2) WEEKS BEFORE THE
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING, WHlCHEVER COMES EARLIER.
AT
ANY TIME AFTER THIS LIST IS DEPOSITED, WITHIN NORMAL
BUSINESS HOURS,
THE SECRETARY SHALL ALLOW ANY VOTING
MEMBER WHO APPLIES THEREFOR TO TAKE COMMUNICATION
OF
THE LIST.
38. IN
ADDITION, ANY VOTING MEMBER OF THE
ASSOCA TlON IN GOOD STANDING SHALL HAVE THE RIGHT TO
PROPOSE ADDITI
ONAL NOMINATIONS FOR THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS,
WHJCH NOMINATIONS SHALL BE DULY PROPOSED
AN D SECONDED IN WRITLIG, MUST BEAR THE CONSENT OF THE
NOMINEETOSERVEIFELECTEDANDMUSTBEINTHEHAtlDSOF
THE SECRETARY BY MIDNIGHT OF THE LAST DAY OF THE
MONTH IMMEDIATELY PRECEDING THE ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING, OR TWO (2) WEEKS BEFORE
THE ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING, WHICH EVER COMES EARLIER.
39. ALL VOTING FOR DIRECTORS SHALL BE
BY BALLOT
AND SCRUTINEERS SHALL BE APPOINTED FROM THE FLOOR BY
THE CHAIRMAN AT THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OR AT
ANY SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING CALLED FOR THIS PURPOSE.
MEETINGS OF THE DIRECTORS
40. MEETINGS OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS, EXCEPT AS
OTHERWISE REQUIRED BY LAW, MAYBE HELD AT SUCH TIME
AND AT SUCH PLACE
AS THE BOARD MA Y DECIDE. A MEETING
MAYBECONVENEDAT ANY TIME BY THE PRESIDENT OR A VICE
PRESIDE
NT, AND, IN ADDITION, A MEETING MUST BE HELD LF
REQUESTED IN WRITING BY AT LEAST ONE-THIRD (1/3) OF THE
DIRECTOR
S.
41. THE DIRECTORS SHALL MEET IMMEDIATELY AFTER
THE AtINUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE ASSOCIATION AT
WHICH THEY
HA VE BEEN ELECTED AND NO NOTICE OF THIS MEETING SHALL BE NECESSARY. OTHERWlSE NOTICES SHALL
BESENTTO EACH DIRECTOR ATLEASTTHREE(3) DA YS BEFORE
THE MEETING IS TO TAKE PLACE.
42. FORMALNOTICEOFDIRECTORS MEETINGS NEED
NOT
BE GIVEN IF ALL THE DIRECTORS ARE PRESENT IN PERSON, OR IF
A QUORUM
IS PRESENT AtlD THOSE DIRECTORS WHO ARE
ABSENT HAVE SIGNIFIED THEIR CONSENT BY WRITING,
TELEGRAPHING OR OTHER FORM OF RECORDED OR
TRANSMITTED MESSAGE TO THE HOLDING OF THE MEETING IN
THEIR ABSENCE, OR IF ALL
THE DIRECTORS PERSONALL Y SIGN
A WAIVER OF NOTICE OF THE TIME, PLACE AND PURPOSE OF
SUCH MEETING.
RESOLUTIONS SIGNED BY ALL MEMBERS OF THE BOARD
43. A RESOLUTION SIGNED
BY ALL MEMBERS OF THE
BOARD OF DIRECTORS SHALL BE AS VALID AND EFFECTIVE AS
IF IT HAD BEEN PASSED AT A MEETING OF THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS DULY CALLED AND CONSTITUTED.
QUORUM
44. SIX (6) DIRECTORS PERSONALLY PRESENT SHALL
CONSTITUTE A QUORUM AT ALL MEETINGS OF
THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS.
CHAIRMANS DECIDING VOTE
45. IN THE EVENT OF AN EQUALITY OF VOTES AT AtlY
MEETING OFTHE BOARD OF DIRECTORS THECHAIRMAN OFTHE
MEETING SHALL BE ENTITLED TO CAST A DECIDING VOTE.
ADJOURNMENTS
46. IF LESS THAN A QUORUM BEIN ATTENDAtlCE AT THE
TIME FOR WHICH ANY MEETING OF THE MEMBERS OR THE
DIRECTORS SHALL HAVE BEEN CALLED, THE MEETING MAY,
AFTER A LAPSE
OF FIFTEEN (15) MINUTES FROM THE TIlvlE
APPOINTED FOR
HOLDINGTHEMEETING,BEADJOURNEDFROM
TIME TO TIME BY THE PERSONS PRESENT, FOR A PERIOD NOT
EXCEEDING TWO (2) WEEKS AT ANY
ONE TLVIE, WITH DUE
NOTICE BEING GIVEN TO DIRECTORS
NOT PRESENT, UNTIL A
QUORUM SHALL ATTEND. ANY MEETING A
TWHICH A QUOR UM
IS PRESENT MAY ALSO BE ADJOURNED IN LIKE .MANNER FOR
SUCH TIME
AS MAYBE DETERMTNED BY MAJORITY VOTE.
47. AT ANY ADJOURNED MEETING AT WHICH A QUORUM
SHALL ATTEND, ANY BUSINESS
MA Y BE TRANSACTED WHICH
MIGHT HA VE BEEN TRANSACTED IF
THE MEETING HAD BEEN
HELD
AS ORIGINALLY CALLED.
OFFICERS
48. THE OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION SHALL CONSIST
OF A PRESIDENT, ONE OR MORE VICE-PRESIDENTS, A
TREASURER, A SECRETAR Y AND SUCH OTHER OFFICERS
AS THE
BOARD OF DIRECTORS MAY BY BY -LA W DETERMINE.
49.
THE OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION SHALL BE
ELECTED BYTHEDIRECTORSFROM Atl10NGSTTHEMSELVESAT
THE FIRST MEETING OF THE BOARD HELD FOLLOWING
THE
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OR WITHIN ADELA Y OF SEVEN (7)
DA YS FOLLOWING THE AtINUAL MEETING.
50. THE OFFrCERS OF THE ASSOCIATION SHALL HOLD
OFFICER FOR ONE
(I) YEAR OR UNTIL THEIR SUCCESSORS ARE
ELECTED OR APPOINTED
IN THEIR STEAD.
DUTIES OF THE OFFICERS
51. THE PRESIDENT AND, IN HIS ABSENCE, A VICE-
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993
PRESIDENT, SHALL PRESIDE AT ALL MEETINGS OF THE
MEMBERS OF THE ASSOCIATION AND ALSO AT ALL MEETINGS
OF
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS AND SHALL EXERCISE A
GENERAL SUPERVISION OVER THE AFFAIRS OF THE
ASSOCIATION. IF THE PRESIDENT AND THE VICE-PRESIDENT
SHALL ALL BE ABSENT OR DECLINE TO ACT, THE PERSONS
PRESENT MAY CHOOSE
SOMEONE OF THEIR NUMBER TO BE
CHAIRMAN OF THE MEETING.
52. THE BOARD
OF DIRECTORS SHALL HA VE POWER TO
ADOPT, BY RESOLUTION, RULES SPECIFYING AND DEFINING
THE DUTIES AND POWERS
OF THE V AR lOUS OFFICERS OF THE
ASSOCIATION. SUBJECT
TO THIS QUALIFICATION AlID IN THE
ABSENCE OF ANY SPECIFIC DIRECTIONS FROM
THE DIRECTORS ,
ALL OFFICERS
OF THE ASSOCIATION SHALL HAVE SUCH
POWERS AND SHALL PERFORM SUCH DUTIES
AS USUALLY ALID
CUSTOMARILY APPERTAINTOTHEIRRESPECTIVEOFFICES,AND
SUCHASMA Y BEREQUIREDBYLA WOR MA YBEDELEGATEDTO
THEM RESPECTIVELY BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS.
53. THE SECRETAR Y SHALL
HA VE THE CUSTODY OF THE
ASSOCIATIONS SEAL.
COMMITTEES
54. THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS MAY, BY RESOLUTION,
ESTABLISH SUCH COMMITTEE OR COMJv1IITEES
AS THEY SHALL
DEEM EXPEDIENT
FOR THE BETTER CARRY!JlG ON OF THE
BUSINESS OF THE ASSOCIATION, AND MAY APPOINT MEMBERS
THERETO.
AGENTS AND
EMPLOYEES
55. THE BOARD MAY APPOINT SUCH AGENTS AND
ENGAGE SUCH EMPLOYEES
AS IT SHALL DEEM NECESSARY
FROM TIME TO TIME AND SUCH PERSONS SHALL HAVE SUCH
AUTHORITY AND PERFORM SUCH DUTIES AS SHALL BE
PRESCRIBED BY THE BOARD AT THE TIME OF SUCH
APPOINTMENT.
56.
THE REMUNERATION OF ALL AGENTS AND
EMPLOYEES SHALL BE FIXED BY THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS BY
RESOLUTION. SUCH RESOLUTION SHALL HAVE FORCE AND
EFFECT ONLY UNTIL THE NEXT GENERAL MEETING OF THE
VOTING MEMBERS WHEN IT SHALL BE SUBJECT TO
CONFIRMATION BY THE VOTING MEMBERS, AND IN THE
ABSENCE OF SUCH CONFIRMATION THEN THE REMUNERATION
OF SUCH OFFICERS, AGENTS OR EMPLOYEES SHALL CEASE TO
BEPAYABLEFROMTHEDATEOFSUCHMEETINGOFTHEVOTfNG
MEMBERS.
SIGNING DOCUMENTS
57. THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS SHALL HAVE THE POWER
FROM
TIMETOTIME BY RESOLUTION TO APPOINT ANY OFFICER
OR OFFICERS
OF THE ASSOCIATION, OR ANY DIRECTOR OR
DIRECTORS,
OR ANY OTHER INDIVIDUAL, TO SIGN AFFJDA VITS,
CONTRACTS,
DOCUMENTS OR INSTRUMENTS IN WRITING
GENERALLY ON BEHALF
OF THE ASSOCIATION, OR TO SIGN
SPECIFIC DOCUMENTS, CONTRACTS AND INSTRUMENTS AND
THE
ASSOCIATIONS SEAL SHALL BE AFFIXED TO SUCH
INSTRUMENTS IN WRlTING AS REQUIRE THE SAME.
BANK ACCOUNTS,
CHEQUES, DRAFTS AND NOTES
58. THEASSOCIATIONS BANK ACCOUNTS SHALL BE KEPT
IN SUCH CHARTERED BANK, TRUST COMPANY OR OTHER FIRM
OR CORPORATION CARR YING ON THEB USlNESS OFBANKING
AS
THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS MAY BE RESOLUTION FROMTlMETO
TIME DETERMINE.
CANADIAN RAIL Page 33
59. CHEQUES ON THE BALlK ACCOUNTS, DRAFTS DRAWN
OR ACCEPTED BY
THE ASSOCIATION, PROMISSORY NOTES
GIVEN
BYIT,ACCEPTANCES, BILLS OFEXCHANGE,ORDERS FOR
THEPA YMENTOFMONEY AND OTHER INSTRUMENTS OFA LIKE
NATURE, MAY BE MADE, SIGNED, DRAWN, ACCEPTED
OR
ENDORSED, AS THE CASE MAYBE, BY SUCH OFFICER OR
OFFICERS, PERSON OR PERSONS, WHETHER OR NOT OFFICERS OF
THE ASSOCIATION, ALID IN SUCH MANNER AS THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS MAY FROM TIME TO TIME DETERMINE FOR THAT
PURPOSE.
60. CHEQUES, PROMISSORY NOTES, BILLS
OF EXCHANGE,
ORDERS FOR THE PAYMENT OF MONEY AND OTHER
NEGOTIABLE PAPER MA Y BE ENDORSED FOR DEPOSIT TO THE
CREDIT
OF THE ASSOCIATIONS BALJK ACCOUNT BY SUCH
OFFICER OR OFFICERS, PERSON OR PERSONS,
AS THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS MAY BY RESOLUTION FROM
TIME TO TIME NAME
FOR
THAT PURPOSE, OR THEY MAY BE ENDORSED FOR SUCH
DEPOSIT BY MEANS OR A RUBBER STAMP OR OTHER MARKING
DEVICE BEARING THE NAME OF THE ASSOCIATION.
AUDITOR
61. AT EVERY ANNUAL MEETING OF THE VOTING
MEMBERS OF THE ASSOCIATION, AN AUDITOR OR AUDITORS
SHALL BE APPOINTED FOR THE PURPOSE
OF VERIFYING AND
AUDITING THE ACCOUNTS OF THE ASSOCIATION AND
CERTIFYING THE ANNUAL BALANCE SHEET. THE AUDITOR
SHALL NOT BE A DIRECTOR OR AN OFFICER OF THE
ASSOCIATION, AND SHALL EXAMINE AND VERIFY THE BOOKS
AND ACCOUNTS OF THE ASSOCIATION ONCE A YEAR.
FISCAL YEAR
62. THE FISCAL YEAR OF THE ASSOCIATION SHALL
TERMINATE ON MARCH 31ST.
DUES AND ASSESSMENTS
63.
THE AMOUNT OF THE ANNUAL DUES OR FEES
PAYABLE BY THE MEMBERS IN EACH CATEGORY OF
MEMBERSHIP SHALL BE FIXED ANNUALLY BY A RESOLUTION
OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS PASSED AT A MEETING HELD NO
LATER THAN THE MONTH OF NOVEMBER. THE BOARD MAY
IN
LIKE MANNER DETERMINE THE CONDITIONS AND TERMS OF
PAYMENT THEREOF,
MD THE EXERCISE OF THESE POWERS
SHALL BE SUBMITTED FOR RATIFICATION AND APPROV AL AT
EACH ANNUAL
OR SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE VOTING
MEMBERS.
MAKING, REPEALING OR AMENDING BY-LA WS
64. THE BY-LAWS OF THE ASSOCIATION MAY BE ADDED
TO, REPEALED OR AMElDED BY BY-LAW ENACTED BY A
MAJORITY
OFTHE DIRECTORS AT A MEETING OF THE BOARD OF
DIRECTORS AND SANCTIONED AND CONFIRMED BY AN
AFFIRMATIVE VOTE OF AT LEAST TWO-TI-DRDS (2/3)
OF THE
TOTAL OF VOTING MEMBERS PRESENT AT A MEETING DULY
CALLED FOR THE PURPOSE OF CONSIDERING
THESAID BY-LAW,
PROVIDEDTHA TTHEENACTMENT, REPEAL OR A MENDMENTOF
SUCH BY-LAW SHALL NOT BE ENFORCED OR ACTED UPON
UNTIL THE APPROVAL
OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE OF
CANADA HAS BEEN OBTAINED.
THESE REVISED BY-LAWS WERE APPROVED AT THE
ADJOURNED ALJNUAL GENERAL MEETING HELD ON MAY 17,
1992 IN ST-CONSTANT,
QUEBEC
Page 34 RAIL CANADIEN JANVIER -FEVRIER 1993
Book Review
Reviewed by Douglas.N.W. Smith.
VICTORIA AND SIDNEY RAILWAY: 1892-1919
by Darryl E. Muralt
Price: $31.20 postpaid, including GST.
Publisher: British Columbia Railway Historical Association
Box 8114, VCPO
Victoria, British Columbia V8W 3R8
The Victoria and 1919. It
is ironic that both the Canadian Northem and BC Electric
lines which were completed during the closing years
of World War
I, both had a much shorter life span than the V &S. All railway
service on Vancouver Islands Saanich Peninsula ceased by the
mid 1930s.
Author Muralt has produced the definitive history
of the
V
&S. In 1966, the British Columbia Railway Historical Association
(BCRHA) published a short history of the line entitled The
Cord wood Limited. The volume became one of the best selling
books
ever written on a
Canadian rail way and has
Sidney was
one of the
many small railway
companies which existed
in Canada prior to the
turn of the century.
Formed in an era before
the rise
of the automobile,
it provided a vital link
carrying both travellers
and freight over the
19
miles between the two
communities in its
corporate title. After the
tum
of the century, the
V &S became an outpost
of the Great Northern
Railway empire. It was
connected
to the GN and
the main land by a
car
ferry and barges. For a
brief period, the V &S and
GN combined
to form a
through route between
Victoria and Vancouver.
Following the conclusion
of the battle between
James Hill and Sir
William Van Horne to
secure control
of the trade
of the southern portion
of the province in the early
1910s, the line faced
difficult times. The
Canadian Northern and
British Columbia Electric
Railways built lines
parallel to the V &S while
autos, jitneys and trucks
THE VICTORIA
been reprinted several
times. The BCRHA
sponsored this new work
to
commemorate the
100th anniversary of the
V&S. Mr Muralt has
AND SIDNEY RAILWAY
1892·1919
.
appeared on the primitive roads in the region. Cast off by the GN
to avoid paying off a large mortgage, the V &S was abandoned
in
produced an
exceptionally detailed
history of the railway
which illuminates many
areas which could not be
covered in the
modest
80 pages of the original
edition
of The Cordwood
Limited. Nautical fans
will be pleased with the
in-depth coverage
of the
steamships,
car ferries,
tugs and car barges
operated as connections
to the V&S. The text is
prodigiously footnoted
and
is supplemented by
several handsome maps,
a chronology, financial
statistics, many
photographs, and a
comprehensive index.
This
236 page soft­
cover book is
recommended to anyone
with an interest in
railways and shipping
during the Victorian and
Edwardian eras. This
book should serve
as a
model for other authors
aspiring to write the histories
of the many other small railways
which
at one time dotted the Canadian landscape.
JANUARY -FEBRUARY 1993 CANADIAN RAIL Page 35
The Business Car
ASSISTANCE WANTED
1nc Vintage LocolllOfive Sociely is trying 10 locale a pholo
of CPR 35-fool official car No. 2J in servin!. The photo appeared
on page 4 of CP R:lil News for March 1988 in an article by the late
Mr. Omer
L:lValJe:e about this car. The Society is presently
restoring No. 21. and would like to obtain the
phOlo which would
show details needed
in the restoration. Anyone haing a print of
this photo. or allY other photos of this car. is nsked to cootact:
K. Gordon Younger
The Vintage LocomOlive Society
P.O. Box
33021
L155 1485 Portage Ave.
W
innipeg. Manitoba R3G
OW4
Mr. RJ. Mepham is. in company with a colleague, seeking
to collate a comprehensi
ve inventory of books. reports, reference
data. leading nlilroad personalities, personal histories, maps. plans
or whal-have·you pertaining to r,lilroading
in the Brockvjlle area.
back to the ineeplion of tile Grand Trunk aod Brochille & Ollaa
railroads in the early 1850s. Of particular interest is infonnation
on the
Penh· William street area iocluding the shops, freight
sheds, crew quaners. gate towers and turntable that ooce were
located there.
At this time they do not seck actual material but
mther repons
of the existence of same. It is their intention to
prepare a publication on the
~t:lIion and freight shed sites. and also
a more ambitious piece should suitable infonnation surface. All
responses will
be acknowledged. Anyone who can help is asked to
contact:
Roben
1. Mepham
61 Newland Crescent
CharlonelOwn. P.E.I.
CIA 4H6
MonEL RAlLWAY SHOW
The Lindsay and district Model &!gineers Show will be
held on April 17 and 18. 1993 at the Victoria Park Annoury, 210
Kent Street. West Lindsay, Ontario. Hours will be: Saturday (April
17)
II :00 A.M. t05:00 P.M .. Sunday (April 18) 12:00 Noon t04:30
P.M. For more infornlalion, phone Wayne Lamb (705)·324-9865
or Eric Poner (705)-328·3749.
CN LINES SPECIAL INTERFST GROUl
This is a non-profit group dedicated to the study of
Canadian National Railways and its subsidiaries, GT, CV. GTW.
DW
& P. Also the GTWs co-owned or now wholly owned
su~idjaries like RRC, DT & I, C & WI etc. as well as Northern
Alberta and Canada
SQUlhem. The group publishes a very fine
quarterly newsletter called CN LINES (previously reviewed
in
Canadian Rail) in which are anicles on both the prototype and
modelling aSp«:t
of CN equipment liS well as reviews on books,
videos, new models, infonll3tion on locomotive rosters. freight car
dala. paint schemes etc. all pertaining
10 the CN family of
railroads. Annual dues are: Regular Canadian S20.00 (Can.),
Sust3ining Canadian $30.00 (Can.), Regular U.S. SI6.00 (U.S.).
Sustaining U.S. $24.00 (U
.S.). Regular intem3lional (surface mail) $24.00 (U.S.),
S~taining lntemational (surface mail) 530.00
(U.S.), Regular International (air mail) $36.00 (U.S.), Sustaining
International (air mai
l) $45.00 (U.S,), Please write to:
Alf. Goodall. Membership Chainnan
112 Mapleton Drive
Winnipeg, Manitoba
R2P I C9
NEW STREET CAR LJNE
On December 18. 1992 the Toronto Transit Commission
(TIC) held a groundbreaking ceremony to signal the sturt of
construction of the Spadina Light Rail Transit ~treet car line. This
line will link the subway
and the waterfront along Spadina A venue.
The 3.65 km. street car line will operate along a reserved right-of·
way down the centre
of Spadina. which will also be newly
landscaped. Construction
is expected to be completed in early
1997. Equipment will
be low-noor fully uceessiblc street cars
which
will leave the Spadina station on the Bloor -Danfonh
subway line
by an underground route which will emerge just south
of Bloor Street 10 avoid traffic congcstion at the Bloor· Spadina
intersection.
TIle Street cars will continue Ihrough, on the surfac1!,
to the Spadina loop at the waterfront where they will integr,lte with
the Harbourfroot LRT line, opened
in 1990. Since new low-noor
equipment will
be used. this may spell the end of the rebuilt PCes
on the Harbourfront line. A clean, healthy city is based 00 safe.
efficient and accessible public transit. Source:
lTC,
CP SEEKS TO A8ANI)ON SHORT LINE
Most members of the CRHA will, no doubt. have heard
that Canadian Pacific has given nOlice of its intention to abandon,
or otherwise divest it
self of, all its lines. presently opcr,ltcd as the
Canadian Atlantic Railway-, east of Megamic Que .. including
the main Short
Line through Mainc, as well as its remaining lines
in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. This would also mean the end
of VIA RaWs tr,lin tnc Atlantic from Montreal to Halifax …. ia
Saint John. so members who have not ridden this scenic line should
consider doing
it this year since it is definitely endangered.
PILFERED PRA YER ROOKS
Some difficulties are being experienced by the Canadian
Pacific
in keeping up the supply of prayerbooks fortileirpassengers
on the Empresses. Some time ago the company installed organs
in
the first-class saloons. and made arrangements for Sunday services.
These ammgemcnts included a supply
of English Church prayer
books with ancient and modem hymns at the back, and handsomc
morocco binding. with C.P.R. crest [sic] on the outside. These
prayer books incrcased lhe interest
in the services very much, but
proved a considerable source
of expense 10 the company. 1be
users of the books liked them so well that a large percentage of
them vanished after each service. being retained by the orshippcrs
as souvenirs. New supplies are being sent out
as f31;t as possible.
but it is altogether likely that the exuberance of the sou …. enir
hunters
…. ill neces:si!.1te a cheaper fonn of prayer book before long.
Source: Montreal Gazelle. August
16, 19.
BACK COVER: Almost jorly yMrs ago. AprillJ. 1953 to be ~.wcl. Olla …. a Transportation Commission street car 806 was slopped at
Brital1nia loop aillit exrremt! wtst {lid oj fhe fonNes/lint! on the orc system. Tht car had just arrilf!dJrom dQl4lIfo.,./1 OIlOWO (lIld had lei
off its pa:m:ngfrs. Tlit mOTorman (/S wki8 (J short break Ixfwe :he car sl(lrted all irs rewrn trip. The car and the loop are fOIlN gone, ami
IIU alice rural arM has /ollg since /Wtll built up: Iro …. el·er a similar car (No. 859) SIIn,jlts (1/ the Cmradion Railway Museum. and car 854
is stored allhe Noriollul Museum of Sciel1Ct and Techn%gy. Photo by Frrd F. Angus.

Demande en ligne