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Canadian Rail 427 1992

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Canadian Rail 427 1992

Canadian Rail a
No. 427
MARCH -APRIL 1992
CANADIAN RAIL
..
PUBLISHED C! MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD :–l:STOHlCAl ASSOCIATION
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: Douglas N. W.
Smith
P
RODUCTION: A. Stephen Walbridge
CARTOGRAPHER: William A. Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Fred F. Angus
For your membership in the CRHA. which includes a
subscription to Can
adian Rail, write 10:
CRHA, 120 Rue SI-Pierre. 5
1. Constanl, Oue. J5A 2G:1
n1.tes: ,I Canada: $29 (including GS, ,-
outside Canada: $26, in U.S. funds.
PRINTING rocel Printing
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE ECONOMIC VIABILITY OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND BRANCH LINES .. PETER D. LOCKE ………. 39
A TRIP TO JAPAN IN 1893 …………………. ………………… . FRED F. ANGUS …………. 46
TORONTO RAILWAY COMPANY TALES
……………………………………………. IVOR SAMUEL. …………… 59
ENGINEER MURPHY AND THE OEAD COW ……
………………………………… . ……………………………. 64
PHOTOS BY WYATT WEBB IN 1932 …………………………………………………… R. WYATT WEBB ……….. 65
Canadian Rail is continually in need of news, stories. historical data, photos. maps and other material. Please send all contributions 10 the
editor: Fred F. Angus, 302t Trafalgar Ave. Montreal, P.O. H3Y 1 H3. No payment can be made for contributions, but the contributer will
be Qiven credit for material submitted. Material WIll be returned to the contributor if requested. Remember Knowledge is of ~ttIe value unless
it is shared with others
.
NATIONAL DIRECTORS
Frederick F. Angus Hugues W. Bonin J. Christopher Kyle
JacI< A. Beany
Robert Carlson William Le Surf
Charles De Jean Bernard Martin
W
alter J. Bedbrook
Gerard Frechette Robert V.V. Nicholls
Alan C. Blackburn David W. Johnson Andrew W. Panko
The CRHA has a number
ollocat divisions across the country. Many hold regular meetings
Douglas N.W. Smilh
Lawrence M. Unwin
Richard Viberg
A. S
tephen Walbridge
John C. Weir
and issue newsletters. Further information may be obtained by writing to the division. I-RONT COVeR: The Canadiall Pa-
NEW BflUNSWICII DIVISION
po 1loJo;1162
SaiIlI Jo/rI N e E0!l407
51 LAWRENCE VAlLEY OMSION
POBox 22. StbIk>n 1r
~PQ Kl83JS
RIDEAU Vl.lEY ONISIOI
POBox 962
SnlIIJ>. f …. 0lI 117A W
KooSTON 0M5l0N
po Box 103, S!f,t>on oJ,,
K.llgsIon. Orr! 117M 6N
TCIFIONTO YORI< OIVISIOH
po Be>: S&l9 TermonaiJ,,
Toronto. DrlI. M5W IPl
P.O. EolC5Q3
St. ~ en. L2A 6W&
w.wn ~u..on ~~t ….
Noo-.. AdwTII
c/o P!taIio; Coal 0MIi0n
CALGNlY SOUTH WESTEfIH DIVISION
60 -6100 ~Ih A …. N E
CaIr,Je ROCI PO EIol 61(Xl. SlabCn C
E~ A.bor1a T58 2NO
SELKIRK OWISION
PO.8o,Je
~_BC. ll0E2S0
CROWSNEST & K£TTLE VALLEY OMSION
PO Bo.~oo
er..-t>-ooO. B,C. VIC ~HI
N£LSON ELECTRIC TRM4WJY SOCIETY
I23V_SU-
NtoIscn. B C. Vll ZV8
PRINCE GEORGE·NECHAKo-FJV.$ER DIVISION
PO 80.2408
Prinoo~. B C, V2N 2Se
P…c1F1(; co.-.sr DIVISION
P.O. 80. 1006. Slat>on A
lIiIN:OUV9t B.C. vee 21>1
ciflc Railway.~ IrtIllSComillfl1Ia/lraill
rWllling throllR SpfcttlclIllIr mO/ll/,
laitl scenery in Ihe early 1890s. fly
Ihis lime Ihe consist was lip
to selell
cars. Ti.~ photo is from (II/ albllm
made by a
li.lilO,-IIho crossed lite
cOlJfinenl
ell mille 10 japan in 1893.
As part of its activities. the CRHA operates
the canadian Railway Museum at
Oelson {
St. Constant. Que. which IS about 14 miles
(23 Km.) from downtown Montrea
l. It is
open from tate May to earfy October (daily
until Labour Day). Members.
and their 1m,
mediate families. are admined free 01 marge.
GOAl. OF THE ASSOCIATlClft 1lE COUEC~. PRESERVATION ANO OISSE~INATION Of ITE~S R£LATING TO THE HIS1QRY OF FVJlWAYS Vo.I CANADA
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CANADIAN RAIL Page 39
The Economic Viability of the
Newfoundland Branch Railway Lines
alld Their Impact on
Main Line Feasibility
By Peter D. Locke
For most Newfoundlanders, the subject of the Newfoundland
Railway when brought up in thought or discussion relates to the
547
mile line of the railway that ran roughly north and then west
from St.
Johns to Port-aux-Basques.
1
The story of this lines
construction, first under the A.L. Blackman Syndicate, and then
from 1890 to 1898 under
Sir R.G. Reid stands as the single greatest
economic and social; achievement of Newfoundland in the later
half
of the nineteenth century2 Of somewhat lesser importance to
the history
of island railroading were the branch railways, which
in their entirety amounted to some 410 miles before the removal
of the partially completed Fortune Bay branch in 1922.3 Despite
their secondary status as veritable tributaries of steel flowing into
the main line, the branch railways were an integral part
of island
transportation from the completion
of the Harbour Grace branch
on II October, 1884,4 until the last trains ran on the Argentia and
Carbonear branches on September 20, 1984.
5
In every respect there was, from the weight of rail used in
their construction (35 pounds per lineal yard) to the actual motive
power and rolling stock which ran on them, the branch line
railways were secondary to the mail line -with the
exception of
unprofitability and operating difficulty.6
For the criticism delivered upon the main line as being a
mountain railway with its excessive grades and curvature,
substandard roadbed, and lightly-constructed bridgework and
abutments, all of which made it less a first class passenger and
freight railway than a secondary development line, the branch
lines
were of an even poorer standard. Despite their undeniably
substandard nature, however, the branch lines of the Newfoundland
Railway did have a definite impact on the economic fortunes and
social advancement of the island
7
While many feel that this is not
true, I believe that the major impact of the branch railways on
Newfoundlands economic development was an indirect one, a
byproduct
of the draining of revenues from the core of railway
operations, the main line.
This research paper will examine the branch lines and the
questionable motives behind their construction along with the
personalities involved.
The viability of the branch lines and their
impact on the sociocultural, and especially theeconomic
development
of the island will be discussed. J intend to outline the role which
the branch railways have played in theretardation of Newfoundland s
growth through theirdraining of general revenues from therai Iways
operations. It is my belief that the Newfoundland Railway as a
transportation
system could have met with economic success had
not its capital and resources been needlessly diverted at a time
when they were most urgently
needed for structural upgrading,
gauge expansion, and stock renewal.
I. The Harbour Grace and Palcentia Branches and the 1909
Branch Line Contract
On April 2. 1880, a joint committee of the House of
Assembly and the Legislative Council that had been convened at
the request
of the Newfoundland Prime Minister, William V.
Whiteway, to study proposals for the construction of a railway in
Newfoundland released its report. A recommendation was made
by the joint committee that a second class narrow gauge railway be
build for
some 340 miles from St. Johns to Halls Bay, an inlet
from Notre
Dame Bay on which the present-day town of Springdale
is located. The proposed railway was to follow a route which
would connect with the larger communities in Conception Bay and
Notre
Dame Bay, servicing the northeast coast of the island in
general. With the
completion of a survey by the firm Kinipple and
Morris
of London, England, in December, 1880, the government
called tenders for the initial construction of a 57 mile railway from
S1. Johns to Whitbourne, with a 27 mile branch line from
Whitbourne to Harbour Grace.s
Construction
of the railway began under the supervision of
the A.L. Blackman Syndicate of New York, New York on 16
August, 1881
9
With the coming of the ground freeze in the late
fall
of 1881, the railway had reached Topsail Pond in Conception
Bay.lo
The line laid by the Blackman Syndicate had been built
quickly thus far, but was
composed of rail with a weight of 35
pounds per lineal yard instead
of the 50 that had been recommended.
In addition, excessive grades of over 2.5% and curves of 12 -14
degrees were to be
found-flaunting the engineering study completed
by Kinipple and Morris. With the precedent set for substandard
construction by the
Blackman Syndicate, whose Newfoundland
Railway Company went bankrupt in April 1884, the railway
reached the site
of the Harbour Grace Junction, now Whitbourne,
in micl-1884. Under the supervision of a Canadian Pacific Railway
section foreman,
Thomas P. Connors, the Harbour Grace branch
was
completed with the last spike being driven on II October,
1884.
12
Page 40 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
A mixed lrain aboulia leave SI. Johns ill October, 1954.
CRHA Archives. Toohey Collection 54-109.
The operation of the 27 mile branch to
Harbour Grace and the main line to St. Johns,
the Halls Bay Railroad, relied on a daily
schedule forthenexttwoyears with the Whiteway
government unwilling to finish the road to
Halls Bay. Sir Richard Thornburns victOlY
over the Whiteway government in 1885 as a
result of the failure to complete the Halls Bay
Railroad and a riot between Protestants and
Roman Catholics at Harbour Grace led to the
construction of a 27 mile branch line from
Whitbourne to Placentia. Thornburns
administration defended the Placentia branch
line,
completed in 1888, on the basis that it
gave work to unemployed labourers and allowed
a faster ship
connection between Placentia and
Halifax then from the port of St. John ·S.11
Accusations were made by the
opposition, notwithstanding, that the building
of the Placentia branch was a ploy to increase
Thornburns majority in theHoLlseof Assembly.
A mixed train en roule 10 Argentia on August 23. 1982. The second unit. number
805. is now
atllie Canadian Railway Museum.
Photo by Fred Angu
s.
MARCH -APRIL 1992
The Evening Telegram, which opposed Thornburns
Reform Party, editorialized on October 26, 1886, that:
CANADIAN RAIL Page 41
A feint of constructing the Placentia Branch
has been made by the Government to secure
their Receiver
Generals election for the district.
But it is positively asserted by the discontented
ones within the
camp that construction will go
no farther than the levelling off of some miles
of earth: and that it will be many a year yet
before the road will see a rail. The object is to
gull the Placentia
Bay electors, and the latter
have been SlUffed to
such an extent by strong
declarations -and
have innocently accepted
these declarations -that the
branch will be
duly built and put in
running order. that the
nefarious object is likely to
succeed and the
electors to be thrown off their guard. To use an
americanism. it will be
a good enough branch
till after the election.14
Memorial 10 Sir Robert Reid on Ihe former Nell/oundlond Railway
Slat ion al
SI. Johns.
Upon opening on October 2, 1888, the Placentia
branch had cost almost
$24,000 a mile to build for a total
Pholo by Fred Angus.
cost of some $648,000 -$216,000 more that the original estimated
cost
of $16,000 a mile or $432,000 in total. 15 Bearing in mind that
the line from St.
Johns to Harbour Grace was operated by A.L.
Blackmans bankruptcy receiver and the Placentia branch by the
Newfoundland government, the latter
was now saddled with the
operation
of a branch line built without an eye towards profitabil ity.
In
The Two Roads, an editorial which appeared in The Evening
Telegram October 9, 1886, supporting the construction of a public
road
in lieu of the proposed railway, it was noted that:
Thus, there is a contrast, and a marked contrast, between
the common road and the railroad in new and as yet
unpopulated countries like
Terra Nova. The first is an
earning fund to the
colony from its birth, and increases
its earnings to the
public funds as time rolls on. The
second, the railway, is a constant sinking-fund … a never­
ceasing drain upon the
public revenues and every tax­
payer in the colony to the
end of time. For the sake of the
temporary advantage
of a little labour to the immediate
neighbourhood, the whole colony is saddled with an
enormous public burden, the
worst feature of which is
that there is no end to il.16
The Evening Telegram also went on to refute the necessity
for a
public work in the Placentia district. The Two Roads made
note of the fact that. There is no destitution in the district to be
relieved, for by a singular (and for it, inopportune) coincidence,
that part
of the island has been blessed with an exceptionally good
fishery.17
Further branch line development in Newfoundland would
have to
wait until after the completion of the main line by the
Scottish-Canadian contractor
RG. Reid (later SiJ) in 1898. Reid
was able to interest a fellow
Scotsman, Lewis Miller, in the white
pine
along the Exploits River and around Red Indian Lake. Miller
decided to build a sawmill on the lake, and obtained
Reids
s
ervices in building an 18 mile branch line to his mill site,
subsequently named Millertown.
Construction of the Millertown
branch
began in May 1900, with completion by early fall. Timber
from Millertown was carried to the main line and then to Lewisporte
on a small branch line built by Reid for the government in 1897.
Miller
suffered a number of setbacks, however, and this resulted
in Reids takeover of the sawmill and the Millertown Railway in
1903.18
R.G.
Reid and his sons, W.D. and H.D. Reid, occupied
themselves with their transportation interests and the development
of their significant land holdings from the construction of the main
line until after the election of 1909, won by the Peoples Party of
Sir Edmund P. Monis. The Reids had invested heavily in Morriss
campaign for Prime Minister in the J 908 election which ended in
a tie with the
Liberals of Sir Robert Bond. By increasing their
support for Morris, The Reids won a campaign promise to construct
branch railways in the 1909 runoff.19 This promise became a
reality
when the Branch Line Contract of December 9, 1909,
gave the Reids responsibility for constructing six branch lines
totalling some 375 miles of track.
Branch lines were to be build from the mainline to Trepassey
(104 miles -completed 1913), HeartsContent(42miles -completed
1914), Bonavista (88 miles -complete 1911), Bay de Verde from
Carbonear (48 miles -completed 1915), Fortune bay (58 miles -of
which 43 were completed before removal in 1922) and Bonne Bay
(35 miles -of which only the grading was ever begun). The Reids
were to receive
4000 acres of land for the operation of each mile
of each branch line of railway … in blocks of one mile frontage and
ten miles rearage, 156 miles of land 011 one side of the branch line
of railway, or five-eights of one side of the track … If the Reids
so chose, the Newfoundland government further agreed to pay to
the
Company a money subsidy at the rate of 28 cents per acre for
any
or all of the said lands to which the company is entitled.20
The Bay de Verde branch line, completed in 1915, was the
last
of the branch lines built in Newfoundland. As was mentioned,
the Fortune Bay branch was never completed, nor was the line to
Bonne Bay. Construction began on the Fortune Bay branch in
I 915, and
progressed in fits and starts until the 43 miles of track
Page 42 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
laid were removed in 1922.21 Branch
line construction had cost 7.5 million
dollars
by this time, well above the
governments original estimate of only
4 million dollars.22
Construction costs
aside, however, the
branch lines main
drain on the island economy came in
the fOlm of operating costs to both the
Reid
Newfoundland Railway and, after
I July, 1923, the Newfoundland
government.
II. Branch Lines Impact on the
Newfoundland Railways General
Revenues and Island Development
R.G. Reids construction of the
Newfoundland Railway main line
b~ween 1893 and 1898 had been a
sllccess both for the Reid Ne
wfound land
Railway and the government.
Construction had been completed on
schedule to
government specifications,
and Reid had not only
managed to stay
within his budget but had
actually made
a profit of over half a million dollars
2)
Although R.G. Reid died on July 1,
1908,
in Montreal and had no role in the
Reid Ne …. joundland locomoli)le No. 112, a 4-6-0 of Baldwin design, buill in 1911.
decision to accept the 1909 Branch Lines Contract, it is perhaps
unreasonable to blame his son and successor W.O. Reid for
entering into it.
24
With their previous success to boost their
confidence, the Reid interests felt it justifiable to build and operate
an additional 375 miles
of track without any reliable forecast of the
branch lines earning abilities -an
error in judgement whose
consequences would be
appreciated decades later
25
As mentioned,engineering difficulties in building the
branch lines, as well as
work stoppages and rising fuel costs from
$5.10 per net ton for coal in
1904 to $16.10 per net ton by 1921 had
made the construction of the branch lines almost twice as expensive
as projected
in the 1909 contract. Despite this, the real money hole
would be found
in 1912 after the Bonavista branch had opened, the
fir
st of the four completed out of the 1909 agreement. Variable
costs for goods and services needed to operate the branch lines, and
which the Reid
Newfoundland Railway and government could not
control, served to magnify
construction losses. For the year 1920-
21, for example, the cost of general repairs to the physical
structures and locomotives on the four branch lines exceeded
ev
ery other expense -$222,184 a year. By comparison, the entire
yearly wages for the section men, train crews,
shop workers, and
agents and operators for the branch lines was only $221,400 for
1920-21. Fuel costs
came to some $96,000 for the same period –
generaUy
the greatest annual expenditure for contemporary rai Iways.26
Snow-fighting costs on the branch lines proved to be the
largest headache
of all, however. Direct costs attributable to snow
removal were estimated at
$46,997 for 1920-21, ignoring the fact
that a large pari
of annual repair expenclitures was put towards
repairing the
damage caused in carrying out snow removal on the
H
earts Content, Trepassey, Bay de Verde, and Bonavista branches
27
The Report of the Government Members of the Rai Iway Commission,
15 June, 1921, stated that:
… the
Trepassey and Bay de Verde branches should
only be run until the snow prevents progress by pilot
plow. This closure might begin about the middle of
January and might continue into the second week of
April. After the first blocking no further attempt should
be make to keep them open. The people of the Southern
Shore could be served during this period by one of the
Government fleet of boats from St. Johns about once a
week, and points
on the Bay de Verde branch might also
be reached in the same way.28
R.C.
Morgans Report on Reid Newfoundland Company of January
2, 1922, sUPPOJted this conclusion:
The present plan of closing down (the branch lines)
during winter sea
son is undoubtedly wise. and should be
continued as a fixed policy for the future.
The expenditure
for
snow fighting during the past few years has been out
of all proportion to the earnings from traffic handled,
and is really money thrown away … 29
The real measure of the effect which the expense of branch
line
operations had on general railway revenues can best be seen
by comparing statistical information for the railways operations
prior to 1909 with the years that followed. Between 1904 and 1909
-the year the Branch
Lines Contract was signed -the Reid
Newfoundland Railway suffered an increase in average annual net
loss of ~29,358. An anomaly occulTed in 1909-1910 when the Reid
Newfoundland Railways statements showed a decrease in the
companys annual net loss from $70,649 in 1909 to $19,162 in
MARCH -APRIL 1992
1910 -a prod uct of
increased revenues
resulting from branch
line construction
payments. Therailways
annual net loss of
$33,830 recorded in
1911 was over a 75%
increase from the 1910
figure, a reversal
of the
1909-
1910 situation –
and a portent of the
future
JO
CANADIAN RAIL Page 43
On November
8, 1911, the 88 mile
Bonavista branch line
opened, followed by
Hearts Content and
Trepassey in 1915 and
Bay
de Verde in 1915.
It is no
small coincidence
that in the Bonavista
branchs first year of
operation in 1912, the
railways annual net loss
increased to
$133,437
from $33,830 the year
previous.
The increase
in average annual net
loss between 1911 and
1914, before th
erailway
experienced the effects
of wartime inflation (the
The most spectacularfeature of the BOllavista lille was the Trinity Loop where the track made a complete loop
over itse/fto gain altitude. This view, taken on August 25,1982, shows locomotive 800 hauling the once-a-week
mixed traill. Happily this loop has been. preserved. Photo
by Fred Angus.
percentage increase in the price of material per unit for the railway
rose from,
4,9% in 1914 to 24.2% in 1915), was $57,453. During
the same period, inflation only accounted for an average annual
incr
ease of 0.46% in the price of material per unit for the railway,
while
wages for employees remained constant.
31
What conclusion
can be drawn from these figures? Clearly, having outlined the
unjustifiable
expenses of operating the four newly-constructed
branches, and the precipitous increase
in the railways average
annual net loss between the
opening of the Bonavista branch and
the beginning of wartime inflation, the verdict is obviollS. As each
of the branch railways opened, they saddled the Reid Newfoundland
Railway and later the Newfoundland Government railways with
unprojected
expenses from which there was no remuneration.
The decline of wartime inflation in 1918 had no effect in
reducing the increase in annual net losses. From $346,439 in 1918,
the Reid Newfoundland
Railways annual losses had increased to
$1,650,000 in 1921, for an average annual increases of $434,520
-while the price
of material per unit declined by an average of3.2%
per year, and the price of fuel per ton by 15.3% annualJy32 From
these figures, it can be seen that the branch railways had a
disastrous
effect on the main line operations of the railway,
draining
away capital that was urgently needed to upgrade the
main line with deeper
ClltS, better ballasting, heavier rail and
bridgework with curvature not
exceeding 10 degrees, and new
instead of second hand rolling stock and motive power.
3J
Unable to
overcome their financial incapacitation, the Reids sold the
railway to the government on I July, 1923. The sheer futility of the
branch lines
became apparent when the uncompleted Fortune Bay
branch was taken up in 1922, to be followed by the Trepassey,
Hearts Content, and Bay de Verde branches in early 1930s.
While the Newfoundland railway attracted some modest
growth with the beginning of paper mills at Corner Brook and
Grand Falls after 1923, and
allowed some limited development of
the interior through mining at Buchans, its inability to improve
the physical infrastructure and rolling stock vital for its future as
an avenue for further development proved to be its doom Faced
with competition from its own fleet of coastal steamers, which
provided cheaper transportation to the same centres served by the
branch railways and therefore drained passenger and freight
revenues from the main line, the Newfoundland government bore
the brunt of ever more grievous losses. Convinced of their
necessity despite their minimal usage, and afraid of the political
repercussions which would result from their closing, the Placentia,
Bonavista, and
HarbourGrace branches were maintained as expensive
appendages
of the main line for 60 years after their takeover by
public tr
easury.34 The unprofitability and operating difficulties of
the main line took on a character of their own as time progressed,
but their foundation and furtherance lie in the abandoned railbeds
that skirt
Newfoundlands northeast coast.
Page 44 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
An official cal of/he NeH10uIldiand Railway dating back /0 the days of Sir Robert Reid, the jell([ Nova was built ill 1892, and is here
seen
at St. Johns in 1954. This centenarian caris I/OW preselled at the National Museum of Science and Technology in Ottawa.
CRJ-IA Archiles, Toohey Collection 54-136.
LIST OF WORKS CITED
Martin, Frank. More Blood, Sweat, and Money: The Development
of the Branch Railways in Newfoundland. St. Johns: Memorial
University Centre for
Newfoundland Studies, 1982.
McGrath, J.W. ·R.G. Reid and the Newfoundland Railway.
Newfoundland Historical Society. St. Johns: Newfoundland
Historical Society, 1971.
McGrath, 1.W. The 1898 Railway Contract. Newfoundland
Historical Society. Sl. Johns: Newfoundland Historical Society,
1973.
Penney, A.R. A History of the Newfoundland Railway Volume 1
(188 I -I 923). St. John s: Harry Cuff Publications, 1988.
Penney, A.R. Centennial Newfoundland Railway 1881-1981. S1.
]ohns Creative Printers, 1981.
Rolton, ChriS. Carbonear Station. The Newfoundland Quarterly.
Summer, 1987.
The Placentia Branch. The Evening Telegram. St. Johns:
October 29, 1886.
The Premiers Answers to OurQuestions.The EveningTelegram.
St. Johns: December 10, 1909.
The Two Roads. The Evening Telegram. St. ]ohns: October 9,
1886.
Reid Newfoundland Company Papers (RNCP). File No. 321. Reid
Newfoundland Railway Statements 1902-1919. Provincial Archives
of Newfoundland and Labrador (PANL)
Reid Newfoundland Company Papers (RNCP). File no. 311 Branch
Line Receipts 1920-2l. Provincial Archives of Newfoundland and
Labrador (PANL)
Reid Newfoundland Company Papers (RNCP). File No. 324.
Newfoundland Railway Situation, 1921. Provincial Archives of
Newfoundland and Labrador (PANL)
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CAIJADIAN RAIL Page 45
NOTES
Proposed Reduction in Train Service June 28, 1921 Reid Newfoundland Company Papers (RNCP), File No. 324, Newfoundland
Railway Situation, 1921, Provincial Archives
of Newfoundland and Labrador (PANL). Footnote references to the Reid Newfoundland and
Labrador (RNCP) and the Provincial Archives
of Newfoundland and Labrador (PANL) will be made hereafter using these acronyms.
J.W. McGrath, R.G. Reid and the Newfoundland Railway, Newfoundland Historical Society (St. Johns: Newfoundland Historical
Society, 197 I), pp. 24-25.
A.R. Penny, A History
of the Newfoundland Railway Volume I (1881-1923), (St. Johns: Harry Cuff Publications, 1988) pp. 95-96.
Ibid.,
p. 32.
Chris Rolton,
Carbonear Station, The Newfoundland Quarterly (Summer 1987), p. 32
Report on Mr. R.C. Morgan on Reid Newfoundland Company, January 2, 1922, RNCP, File No. 324, Newfoundland Railway
Situation, 1921, PANL, pp. 17-17.
10
II
12
I)
14
Ibid., p. 29.
Penney, pp. 6-7.
Penney,
p. 8.
Penney, p. 9.
Penney, p. 27.
Penney, pp. 31-32.
A.R. Penney, Centennial Newfoundland Railway 1881-1981 (St.
Johns: Creative Printers, 1981) p. 55.
The Placentia Branch, The Evening Telegram, SI. Johns: October 29, 1886.
15 J.W. McGrath, The 1898 Railway Contract, Newfoundland Historical Society (St. Johns: Newfoundland Historical Society,
1973), p. 2.
16
17
18
19
20
21
The Two Roads, The Evening Telegram, St. Johns: October 9, 1886.
Ibid.
Penney,
p. 93.
The Premiers Answers to Our Questions The Evening Telegram, St. Johns: December 10, 1909.
Ibid.
Penney,
p. 96
22 Frank Martin, More Blood, Sweat and Money: The Development of the Branch Railways in Newfoundland (St. Johns: Memorial
University Centre for Newfoundland Studies, 1982) p. 33.
23
24
25
McGrath, R.G. Reid and the Newfoundland Railway, p. 13.
Ibid., p. 23.
Report of Mr. R.C. Morgan on Reid Newfoundland Company, January 2, 1922. p. 16.
26 Estimated Operating Expenses of Various Branches for Year Ending June 30th, 1921, RNCP, File No. 311, Branch Line Receipts
1920-21, PANL.
27
Ibid.
28 Report of the Government Members of the Railway Commission, St. Johns, Newfoundland, 15th June, 1921, RNCP, File No. 324,
Newfoundland Railway Situation, 1921,
PANL, p. 19.
29
Report of Mr. R.C. Morgan on Reid Newfoundland Company, January 2, 1922. pp. 17-18.
30 Abstract of Statistics from June 30, 1903 to June 20, 1921, RNCP, File No. 321, Reid Newfoundland Railway Statements 1902-
1919, PANL.
3 I
Ibid.
32
Ibid.
33
Penney, p. 99.
34
Rotton, p. 32.
Page 46 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
A Trip to Japan in 1893
By Fred Angus
The Canadian Pacific Railway began its trans­
Pacific
Empress steamship service in 1891,
just lOa years ago last year. The original three
ships were the
Empress of Japan, the Empress
of China and the Empress orIndia. Two years
later, in
1893, a traveller, whose name we have
not
been able to determine, set out from England
bound for Japan. Leav
ing England early in April,
he sailed on the
White Star liner Majestic for
New York.
Travelling tluough the United States
to Chicago. he visited the
Worlds Columbian
exhibition. Then on to Minneapolis, north to
Winnipeg and west on the C
PR to Vancouver
from which he
sailed on April 25 aboard the
Empress of Japan; destination Yokohama.
Eleven days later
the ship docked in Yokohama
and our visitor began his stay in Japan. Departing
in July on the Empress of India, he returned to
Vancouve
r, thence back tluough the U.S.A. to
New York, not forgetting to stop
at that perennial
tourist attraction, Niagara Falls.
Sailing from
N
ew york on the Majestic, our traveller arrived
safe
ly back in England on Wednesday, August
23. 1893.
This trip. one of thousands made in that era,
would have been long forgotten if it were not for
the fact that this
unknown person made an album
about the trip, and this
album has survived to
give a fascinating glimpse
of travel a century
ago. Not only does
it include photographs, but
also map
s, logs, menus and other ephemera of
the trip. Some of the photos are remarkably clear
and are undoubtedlyprofessional views purchased
en route. Others are less clear and are most likely
taken by the traveller himself using one of the
early Kodak cameras
(whkh had been on the
market for only five years).
From the other
material
wecan follow the course of the Empress
across the Pacific, see what food was selved, and
how much it cost, and
even hear what songs were
sung by the passengers in the
conceJ1s aboard
ship during the
long voyage across the Pacific. It
takes only a 1 ittle imag
ination to hear the passengers
singing such old favourites as There is a Tavern in the Town and
Knocked em in the Old Kent Road during a concert held the
evening
of May 6, 1893, the last night of the crossing, as the ship
neared the Japanese coast.
As a commemoration
of the centennial of the start of CP passenger
service across
the Pacific, we present some excerpts from this
album which offers a glimp
se of a way of travel, and indeed of a
way
of life. which has vanished.
On these two pages we see a breakfast and a dinner menu from
the
RMS Majestic of the White Star line, as well as two views
taken
in New York, our travel/ers point of arrival in North
America. Ahove
is an impressive view of the structure of the
New York elevated railway, while opposite is a street scene with
several types
of horsecars in service.
Photographers unknown.
MARCH -APRIL 1992
,.
R.M. S:MAJESTIC
FRIDAY APRIL 7TH ,893
PORRIDGE. HOMINY.
FRiED WHITING, ANCHOVY Bu~nll
K,PPERED HERRINCS
tJlUTTOK KIDNEYS, • BAc~N
DRY HASH
~ALVE9 LIVER, BACON
CR.ALlNE CAKES
OROIi..E:I BEEFoTC:A<. MJ3H100~S
MUTTON CHOP8
D,5LEY FA~Y1 SAWSAO=:, MA3HEi) POTATO[
BROILlD HAM … BACON
Ecoe To ORDER
SCO:~ES. CD~N BREAD
BOil: 0, FRIED POTATOES
COLD ….
O BOARS HEAD WITH ASPIC
HAM
CANADIAN RAIL Page 47
~
din
W R.M.S:MAJESTIC
MEUU
A LA Tornuf, CO:–:f:,ld~ MOHlf CIILO
CAVIAR£. nDIStl~~
!=,WErl[J FnlE:r OF HI E. MAOllRA SAUC:t
SPRNQ lAMO. MINT SAUCE
YOUNO P10, APPLE SAUCl
CORN~D tirE F, VEOtTABLl8
~(tPARACU8. P.l,it~IP8 IJ G:tA,T:U
MAfI;Etl, &. CO:L£O POTArO~1J
SPRIHQ CCJ((II Sr. SAlAn
P.A.l[ DE F..Jll G=-.t.a TAUFH A LA C;l£(
PLUM PUnOINO, JnAN:lf, HARD SAuce
PfACH(9 A LA. CONOI
W.ttf Jf.ltY. VI(NHA OEUElT
lItCti f;tA,wo:;:unt Ica: C.u ….
Page 48 RAIL CANADIEN MARS-AVRIL 1992
ABOVE. Chicagos State Street in 1893, the year of the Worlds Columbian Exposition. Cable cars (some in three-car trains)
and a
few horse cars provide the public transit for the huge crowds of people.
J.w. Taylor, Chicago 111.
OPPOSITE, TOP: Main Slreet in Winnipeg. This view must have been taken before 1893, since the tracks for the electric
cars
had not yet been laid.
W.M. Notman
& Son, MOnlreal.
OPPOSITE,
BOITOM: In the outskirts of Winnipeg, a solitary horse car waits before beginning its return journey
downtowl1.
W.M. Notman
& Son, Montreal.
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CANADIAN RAIL Page 49
Page 50 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
MARCH -APRIL 1992
r-~~-~
rSanadian ];fadfio RaiZway.
HOTELS AND DINING CARS.
Englisl) BreakJast Tea. Oolong Tea. Coffee.
Cl)ocolat
e.
Dry Toast. Buttered Toast. Creafll Toast.
Tea Biscuit. Browl) Bread Toast. Plail) Bread.
Cold Roast Beef. Cold Hafll. Cold Toqgue.
Bostor)
Baked Beans.
AJdZttL
Sirloin and Tenderloin Steaks.
Plain Witt) Must)rooflls
and TOfllalo Sauce
Broiled Hafll. Lafllb Cl)ops. Extra Bacon·
E
ggs and Ollelets.
Fruits.
MEALS. 75 CENTS.
N. O.·-Gu~sls are requesled 10 itiform lhe Ceneral
Sllper-ill/mdelll of allY inallelllio1l or irregltlanly.
CANADIAN RAIL Page 51
OPPOSITE, TOP: A view a/Calgary not long afier the arrival a/the
CPR tracks
from the east.
Wm. Notman
& Son, Montreal.
OPPOSITE, BOTTOM:
Looking down the lower Kicking Horse
canyon.
True
l1lan and Caple, Vancollver B.C.
ABOVE: Approaching Rogers Pass. Note the sign reading Rogers
Pass one mil
e. Water.
Neelands Bros
.. Nelson B.C.
LEFT: The menu of the Glacier House Hotel of the CPR as it was
in the summer
0/1893.
Page 52 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
LEFT· A tunnel in the canyon of
the Kicking Horse riper
Loome & May, Calgary N.W.T
BELOW:
Thefomous loops 01/ the
original CPR mainline (abandoned
in 1916) near Rogers Pass. Four
tracks are visible
in this photo.
Neelands Bros., Nelson B.C.
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CANADIAN RAIL Page 53
ABOVE: This ornate cover of the passenger list of the Empress
is typical of the beautiful graphic designs of the late nineteenth
century. BELOW: The breakfast mellu on the Empress
of Japan for
Saturday, May
6, 1893. This was the last full day of the
voyage, as the Empress docked in Yokohama the next day.
.. R·M·S ~EMPRESSoJAPAN
Mny lith
.: BREAKFA ST :.
I. -Porri,lge Illld CrCllm.
~.-Broiled Salmon.
:1.-Kilpecn Htlrlillgs.
4. -·Sidoin StllIk nnd OniUIIl!.
.-(Jrilltlcl nOll6/io
Ii. ·-I.!vtl Lilt1 Rill! BIlI!OIl,
i.-Ihwilltln Ham .
… ~. J rill Sttw
!I.-nlonrv Omtll·t .
. 111 … Ilntt .. r,·d I:, 1 I. -lloih·,1 1·:l;gs.
1 ~ -1111,1 1111 Hi,·.
I.{. _. eld Ox TI)IIgn~.
14.-BlIlkwlrtIIt Cakcs.
llrrnb.
Wid,.. ,,:11. ll BIIR.
i 0;1 ~ t . ~.: •
J 1,,1,,1 .. I r 1,1
1 … ,.. (·,,11·,· … (·I(lal .
.tr it.
• .J.,
I
Page 54 RAIL CANADIEN
MARS-AVRIL 1992
Map and log of the Empress of Japan, April and May. 1893. Note that there is no May I because of the ship hm·eng crossed the
Il1Iell1ational Date Line going west. Also the actual course is somewhat to the north of that printed 011 the map.
MARCH –APRIL 1992 CANADIAN RAIL
I :
;n(t-+-+-+-H-~-+-+-+–+-+-+-.Li—-+-H I4ncouvttr w Yokohama —-
Yokohama Xohi ________________ 350
tj~.t:~~~~~f~j=:tt/(ohi Naga$aki ————380
Woosung _____________ 450
~~~~~~~~~~~–~~~~-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Woosung (diroct) ___ /060
Hongkong ______ 840
Hongkong(direct/ /600
miles
:;:-bH-t-,:t—–;-+-i-++-+–l,.c,:+-+-i–+–I—l–l-,,,!-,,lb+-+l-+–H-+-+-+–t—l-f-+–l-l—l–I–l-I-f–+-f Vancouv~;–:: —M;ntrea/____ 2906
Page 55
Page 56 RAIL CANADIEN
CANADIAN •. _~~CIFIC RAILWAY CO.
R M.S: .. EMPRESS oFJAPAN
CONCERT.
SATURDAY 6TH. MAY 1893.
—f-
PART I.
I. :-;,,;; …. nllll1 Ch:t11ntJl … Mr . .I. II V Loh!!·.
., … ·OlJtOIl t11p.dl<:l? ... ~1r , ,. ~,!lii11;;
. ( … , {KI,eke]l!,ir.IIl~·f II I
, ~clIlIl<; :;on; o!d Kent. Itl)l,I I 1 1, e;it, I
t IltJ;lIli .. ; …… SuI8Llld ….. Si,· W.Il. Ilow,]ll
u. Iart ::;o,I,; … ·liltJ,·t: is:1 ta ,; f)fI:lg … _ …. ..• ),1011:· ……. , _ .. }r r. T ~I Hnyd
-:-. CI!II it; :-3l);1,~ OI)NI WC:lt thl:! C.qJtli II ~11 :1 ;Ilj):l)
,.;. ;-;;! …………………………… ~1r. l I [ ~r(:;:l
. 1.II·t ~ .. :r .• ; Dc ,,:c 11jll S .• :u by :If ,. T :1. i;.,.,·d
PAR r II.
Ill. li:lIl11fllilc SO~IJ …………………… I r. 10 i 11, :·,r.
II. ~ollg ……………………….. jl,·. I. l! ~Ic:;;
l~. ; I),dlllh.r r/., YO:I Ie lIIe :Ill. J H L .. i:L··
·1 ;;. (lIlie i Till: II wj,,, broke t},(. I
~IIII;; I iJ:1 II!.: :lL 111011 Lt C:I rill f
I·L ~)11~ ……… ; 1 Ii ,I :11111 [.
.. h. H.,,I
h. . OIl,·.Jl;;;S CII:111 IrLlIl( tn-dy .1,. ;11111)
]/; ![un()rt)tl.~ SIl:lg …… The·!ollg·:llld til( ~1J()I·t.·
;11. IV .. . :1 odin:.;
·
17. Iart :O-;I)ug ….. ~~11{.11:101l Ll!Y
ABOVE
: The program of an entertainment given on board the Empress of Japan
on Saturday night, May
6, 1893. At this time the ship was rapidly approaching the
coast
of Japan, and would dock in Yokohama the next day. Judging by the contents
of the program, a good time must have been enjoyed by all, a suitable finale to this
long voyage across the Pacific.
MARS -AVRIL 1992
OPPOSITE: This bealltiful hand-drawn
il/ustration
of the Empress of IlIdia is
from a dance program dated
July 22,1893,
dllring the retum voyage from Japan.
BELOW: These hand-drawn fla
gs are from
the cover of the same dance program.
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CANADIAN RAIL Page 57
:.: .I~. ..
. !
Page 58 RAIL CANADIEN
RMS:EMPRESSo,lNDIA
July AntiJlJJc~ Jy, 18:)3,
,:LUNCHEON:·
HORS DOEUVRES
Anchoy ringer~ 2 Olivcs
souP
FISH
i Fresh Lobster:! 5 SalJincl
HOT
6 Mutton Chops 1
.CUllicd R:lhLit (dry)
COLD
8 Roast Deef 9 Corneu Beet 10 Mutton
11 Ram 12 Ox Tongue 13 13rallll
14 Bologna Sausnge 15 ~lelton ~rowbr3y Pic
16 Tapioca Pudding 11 Marmalade Tllrtlets
18 Prunes and Rice
19 Cucumbers 20 Lettuce 21 Tomatoes
22 Chicken Salad
23 CheeRe
240raligea
2;> Pillms
26 Tea 21 Coffee 28 Chocolate
MARS -AVRIL 1992
RM·S !EMPRESSor INDIA
Jilly 1nti»),lo., ,1:,:: t~:I:l,
.:MENU:·
Hons DOEUVRES
I Cn.iure on To-t 2 Olics
sou …..
~ Ox rail
FISH
4 Boiled Cod and Oy, ENTREE
5 Pigeon a In Clopaudine G Croll;ta.lo : I:t T 1I,I: JOINTS
7 Roast Beef nnd Potato Crllqlleue;
8
C:lIO; )[co,l and Bacon Brain S:tn 9 Roast Cupon nnd J3reau $:111
10 Ox Tongllo nnd Y r,;elllul VEGETABLE
II Cabbago I~ Ve;;etnblo ~ll
row
CURRY
13 Lllb,ters
PASTY
14 Blackc.ap Pudding 15 Chce,c C:lke, I Ii PL:ltJ Tare
17 Chnrlotte Russe IS Pancake
DESSERT
19 PlumB 20 Prunes 21 Barcelonn nul$ 2~ Orange3
23 Almonds and Raisins
24 Tea 25 Coffee 26 Chocoln.Le
The return trip is not as
well documented;
however
it is represented by these
two menus jiom the
Empress of India, as well
as
Ihe rnap and log of the
retum to England on Ihl!
Majeslic, We t!USI that
0111 traveller a}/ived sqfely
ill Lngland aboul July 23,
1893,
and we musl {hank
him, 01 her, for this
illteresling look
(1/ navel
almost 100 years ago,
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CANADIAN RAIL Page 59
Toronto Railway Company Tales
(Also Civic Railways and Toronto
& York)
By Ivor Samuel
My dad, George Samuel, arrived in Toronto from Cardiff, Wales
in early September of 1904. By the 24th of that month he had
secured a job as a
conductor on the Toronto Railway Company.
One of Dads early runs was known as a swing, this consisting
of a single trip in the afternoon rush hour from Roncesvalles
along Queen
Street to Yonge, looping south on Yonge, west on
Richmond, up
Bay, and west on Queen back to Roncesvalles.
There was always a big
crowd of shoppers waiting at the south­
west
corner of Queen and Yonge, and one day Dads motorman
and he decided to avoid the inconvenience
of picking them up by
short turning the car. A certain sharp-eyed
TRC inspector was
puzzled by the fact that through Run 23 followed 22 going east
on Queen, but
preceded2icoming back. He decided to investigate,
and waited
on the aforesaid corner of Queen and Yonge the next
night.
He watched 22 load up and turn down Yonge Street. He
then looked west and saw 23 at Bay Street, whereupon it
suddenly turned down Bay, apparently to go west on Richmond
to York, and up York to Queen.
Aha, he cried, as he sprinted
across the street to
catch a westbound car. As the car crossed Bay
Street he saw
Dads car turn from York west on to Queen. Just
as the latter
car got to the foot of University Avenue (it ended at
Queen at that time), it hit a break
in the rail and the little single­
trucker ran
off the track. Have you got gloves? the motorman
yelled at Dad.
Grab the switch iron and let it touch the frame of
the car and the track, and we U back up. They thus got the car
rerailed and were pulling away as the inspector, riding on the front
step
of the following car, jumped off and ran after them, but they
were well away.
He reboarded the car on which he had been riding,
while Dad a
nd his motorman in their empty car went back to the
barn
s. They put their car away for the night and were heading for
the office
to check out when they saw the inspector coming
toward them.
Well, George, said Dads motorman, its been
nice knowing you. I gu
ess this is it. As the inspector came up, he
said
You know, I ought to fire you for what you did, but that was
such a neat trick
of rerailing that Ill let you get away with it, but
dont you pull that trick again, or youre through.
The TRC would put stoves in its cars about October I, but it would
be into November before the cars would be stocked with coa
l. At
times
in October the nights became very cold. On one such night,
around the middle
of October, Dad was on a night run on King
Street when word
got around that two street cars had collided at
Yonge and Front. As it was in the middle of the night, the following
cars shunted those which had been
in collision east on Front and
into the wye at Scott
Street to stay until the insurance adjustors
could inspect them in the morning. That night every King car and
Yonge
car had a fire in its stove! The King car diverted down
Yonge or Church and along Front, then stopped while the crew tore
some wood from the bodies of the damaged cars. Crews on the
Conducfor George Samuel (Ivors Dad), badge No. 275, 011 left,
and MOforman Pat Dooley, badge No. 1270, posed in /ronf of a
TRC car of the 612 -650 class. These cars were built in 1899, and
had maximum-fracfion trucks.
Yonge cars did the same, and when the adjustors came the next
morning there was not much left of the two cars.
Another night, when Dad was on the King route, it was raining and
the
car was empty. When they stopped at Church Street, two men
got on, a big husky one and a little scrawny one. Fares please,
sa
id Dad as he held out the farebox. Im not paying no fare; try and
make me the big guy said. Yeah, try and make me, squeaked the
scrawny one. Dad put down the farebox and said come on out to
the back platform.
The big guy lurched out after him. Now the
back platform was open with only a waist-high
dasher at the rear.
Dad leaned against the dasher, raised up on his rubber heels and
grasped the wet trolley rop
e. He was prepared for the resulting
shock, but
the big guy was not. He grabbed Dad by the shoulder,
let
out a YEEOWW, spun around and fell into the street. As the
car rolled merrily on, Dad went inside rubbing his hands. Fares
please, he said as he picked up the farebox;
Yes sir, the
pipsqueak said.
Another rainy day a conductor friend of Dads had the trolley pole
come off the wire. While he was trying to put it back on the wire,
the rope
came away from the pole, so he had to climb on the roof
to put the pole back on the wire. As he pulled the pole
down, its side
touched the tro
lley wire; the resulting shock knocked him off the
roof of the car. Fortunately a truckload of coal was passing at the
time, and he landed on a pile
of the black stuff.
Page 60 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
TRC 390 and trailer 141 at the corner of Queen and Roncesvalles in 1894. National Archives of Canada, photo PA-54556.
When I was small. my father was conductor on the Harbord run.
The west or up end was at Lappin and Lansdowne Avenues.
where the cars were
wyed by turning north on Lansdowne, backing
south across
Lappin. and then turning east for the down trip. The
Harbord line went along Lappin to Dufferin, made a short jog on
Dufferin to Hallam, then to Ossington. turned south and across
Bloor to Harbord Street. The line then proceeded east on Harbord
across Bathurst to Spadina. At
Spadina it turned south, around the
Crescent, across College,
Dundas and Queen and, turned east on
Adelaide. The route crossed York. Bay and Yonge to Victoria and
then looped north on Victoria.
east on Richmond, south on Church,
and west on Adelaide for the return trip. On Sunday, Dad would
leave his lunch at home, so I had the fun
of taking his lunch box up
to Lappin Avenue
where I waited on the sidewalk until his car came
along. I always got a free ride downtown and back. I got to know
every stop on the Harbord route, which
came in handy when I ran
my
own street car at home with chairs set up in two rows facing
each other. Por passengers, 1 had my young sister, her dolls, t
eddy
bear, Mr. Broom and Mrs. Mop; with Dads old conductors cap,
old transfers and a toy farebox: I collected fares.
One day, a slightly inebriated man got on Dads car with a live
goose under his ann. Hey! You cant take that into the car. Dad
said.
Wotll r do? I won it in a raffle and Im taking it home, the man said.
Lets tie it by the leg to the hand brake on the back
platform, said Dad, fishing out a piece of string from his pocket.
Great, the man said; Make sure 1 get off at Crawford Street. He
sat down by the stove and promptly fell asleep. Upon the car
reaching Crawford Street, Dad went to wake the man up.
He
jumped up and headed for the front exit. Dont forget your goose
out back, Dad said. You keep it, I dont want it, said the man
as he
jumped off the front step. r dont know how many times the
goose went up and down the Harbord route, but the passengers
were
somewhat startled on boarding the car to see a live goose tied
up
on the back platform. When Dad and his motorman finished for
the day, they took the
car down Lansdowne to the barns. After
stabling the car, Dad took the goose under his arm and headed for
the
Lost and Found office. Hey; you cant put that thing in here,
said the clerk as Dad was stuffing the goose through the wicket.
·
Well. it was left on the car, and Im turning it in. said Dad.
Weve no place to keep it here; could you possibly keep it at your
place? asked the clerk, knowing that we lived only a couple of
blocks away. I guess I could make a place under the back porch,
said Dael. Fine, said the clerk;
You keep it. feed it anel look after
it, and if its not claimed
in 30 days its yours. So Dad got laths
and
made a cage under the porch. Every day I had to go to the feed
store for maize or Indian
corn to feed the beast. Needless to say,
we had goose for dinner that Christmas.
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CAIJADIAN RAIL Page 61
Car 328 at the corner oj DanJorth alld Broadview ill 1896. National Archives of Canada, photo No. PA-54433.
Another time, a drunk gal on Dads car and started throwing money
all over the inside; he then sat down and went to sleep. Dad
carefully galhered up all
of the bills and stuffed them into his own
pocket. When the
drunk left the car, Dad was busy collecting fares
and did not
see him get off. However, lWO or three days later the
man got on the
car looking very woebegone. Whats up, pal? said
Dad, recognizing him;
You look as if you dloSl your best friend.
Worse, said the man; the other clay I gal drunk at a party and I
had
over $300 on me to pay an important bill. Ive lost it
somewhere.
Is this it? -Count it, said Dad, pulling a roll of bills
from his pocket.
Where did you find it? asked the man. Dad told
him what had happened, but instead
of conveying his thanks after
counting it, the man tull1ed on Dad and said
Wheres the 67 cents
change I had?
Youve stolen it!. Needless to say, Dad was very
aIUloyed, retorting
Youre lucky to get anything back.
In those days the
Toronto Railway Company owned its own power
company, The Toronto Electric Light Co., and sometimes when
the
Toronto Hydro supply failed, one would see the street lights out
and
some houses in darkness while others would be lighted. In the
centre
of each intersection where car lines crossed there was a
cluster
of five lights in series drawing their power from the 550
volts of the street car system. One time on a Bathurst night car, as it was approaching King
Street, where a meet would be made with a King car, Dad sa
id to
his
motorman Want to see some fun?. Directly under the
intersection I ights ran a wire diagonally across the intersection,
casting a thin shadow on the roadway.
The passengers jumped
from Dads car to run to the waiting King car, and as they
approached the shadow Dad let his switch iron fa
ll to the road with
a clang and shouted Look out!.
The lead passenger, seeing what
he thought was something lying on the road,
jumped over the
shadow, and everyone following did the
same thing.
Another time, as a Bathurst night car was approaching the Bloor
Street intersection, a man
in workmans clothing ran up to the car
and shouted
My mate is down in dle sewer, overcome by sewer
gas; we were working down there. Between Dad, his motorman
and the other man they got the fellow up. He was semi-conscious,
and wanted to lie down and sleep. Dad and his motorman poked
and slapped him and walked him up and down until
he was
breathing normally again.
Yet another Badlurst Street story concerns· a time when Dad was
on day shift.
He and his motorman would pick up their car at the
barns on Lansdowne, proceed along
Bloor to Bathurst and north on
Bathurst to Dupont, where they wyed to start the downtown trip.
Page 62 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
About halfway up to Dupont,
Dad would run up the steps of
the home of a regular
passenger, bang madly on the
cioor, and run
back to the car.
When the
car came back on
its downtown trip, the man
would be waiting on the
sidewalk, lunch box in hand,
ready to
go to work.
In pre-TIC days, the Toronto
Railway Co. wyed at Royce
(now Dupont) and Lansdowne,
thus
passengers proceeding
further north had to cross the
CPR tracks and board a double­
end
Toronto Civic Railways
car to take them up to Sl.
Clair, where they would
transfer to a Civic Railways
St. Clair car.
The fares on the
Civic lines
were 2 cents for
adults and I
cent for children!
An interesting
feature of this
Lansdowne stub line was the
very steep
hi II just north of
TRC open cal 361 (built ill J 893) as it appeared at the end of its career in } 921.
National Archives of Canoe/a, photo PA-SS03}.
Davenport Road. To ameliorate the southbound descent, the road
took (and still takes) a
sharp reverse curve to the left. An added
hazard was the single-track Toronto Suburban Railway Davenport
route that ran east-west at the foot of the hill. Motormen on the two
lines could not see each other until they were right on the
intersection. The big danger was a runaway coming down the hill,
thus a
permanently open derail switch was placed halfway down
the hill. A small hut containing a big hand lever was located on the
sidewalk; this
lever closed the derail switch to let the car proceed
through. A semaphore, normally in the stop position, was
situated above the hut. This was connected electrically to two
semaphores on Davenport, one east and one west of Lansdowne,
with these normally being in the proceed position. To operate
this feature, a southbound car had to stop above the derail switch
while the conductor jumped off the car, ran into the hut, and pulled
the big lever.
This would close the derail and change the semaphore
to proceed, signalling the motorman to pass through the switch.
The conductor could then release the lever and run after the car. At
the same time as the semaphore changed to proceed, the two
semaphores on Davenport Road would change to stop, in case
the Lansdowne car could not stop at Davenport because of black
rail condition, brake failure
or other cause. There must have been
the occasional
derailment at the derail switch, as there were ruts in
the
pavement where cars had run off the track.
One day after we had moved to Fairbank, but when I was still going
to Scouts at West Toronto, I had just transferred from the Carleton
car at Royce (it was all one fare by this time) and was sitting just
inside the car chatting to the conductor while holding on to my
Scout staff with its patrol pennant at the top. A drunk got on and,
weaving in front of me, grabbed my staff. Holding it like a Morse
signalling flag, he started to wave it back and forth. The poles too
long, he said as he handed
it back and sat down beside me.
Umpty, lddy, Umpty, he said quite loudly. I wondered what kind
of a nut this was until I remembered that signalmen in World War
I referred to dots as leidy and dashes as Umpry in the Morse
code.
Another time, as I was coming home the car crossed Davenport anel
started to climb the hill when the wheels began to slip. The
motorman applied sand but to no avail, and the car slid slowly back
down to the bottom and into the middle of the Davenport intersection.
It seems that a truck carrying 40-gallon drums of condensed milk
had
come east on Davenport to make a left tum up Lansdowne. As
the
driver made the turn, two drums rolled off and burst. Between
the milk and the sand put
down by the street cars, there had been
created an unholy mess, and the
wheels of progress ground to a
stop.
The passengers had to walk the rest of the way up to SI. Clair.
I heard that they had to call the
Fire Department to hose down the
road.
What a meal for the cats!
When I was six or seven, I liked to go over to watch the rush hour
cars returning to the Lansdowne barns. There was a man with a
switch iron
who would send some cars inside while others would
be directed to the more northerly track that
went on to the yard
outside.
O.K., he would say as he switched the cars bound for the
yard,
and I figured that was his code word for outside. One day
as I stood there a crowded car passed, going on up Lansdowne. It
had an
open back platform, and some of the passengers were
standing on the beam prOjecting at the rear
of the car and hanging
on to the railings. One man was even hanging piggyback to another
man! Just then the
conductor pushed through and stllck his farebox
under the
piggybackers nose. Fares please said the conductor.
How the (expletive deleted) can I pay my fare! said the man. If
I let go to pay 111) bloody fare you wont get it anyway!. The
conductor gave a grunt and turned away.
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CANADIAN RAIL Page 63
A large number of old TRC cars, retired by the TTC, awaiting scrapping in 1922. Those in the foreground are 1899 maximum­
traction cars similar to that sho
wn all page 59. National Archives of Canada, photo PA-54229.
Another incident that I remember was on a Sunday School picnic
to Bond Lake, about 15 miles north
of the city. In those days
churches or Sunday Schools would charter one or more street cars
and would pick up the group at the nearest point on the car line to
the church. My Sunday School had chartered two big cars
of the
Lake Simcoe line (Metropolitan Divisio
n). This single-track line
with passing sidings ran nearly 50 miles
up to Lake Simcoe. As we
were returning in the evening, we had passed through the siding
north
of Lansing (Yonge and Sheppard) and were at the brow of
Hoggs Hollow. We kids were at the back of the car, singing
Sunday School songs, when suddenly we saw a big headlight
coming up the hill and two cars stopped nose
to nose. The two
motormen got
out and into a big argument as to whom should back
up to the last passing track (there was another siding at York Mills
in the Hollow). The language used was hardly for kids to hear and
our teachers had quite a time distracting us with other amusements.
Our motorman lost the argument, and our two cars had
to back up
through the passing track and then proceed south through it again.
One time during Dad
s early days on the street cars, his car was
leaving the terminus at High Park (he was operating an open car)
when a young lad climbed aboard. He had a number
of garter
snakes in his pocket and showed them
to Dad. Soon Dad had them
crawling up his arm and around
his neck. At this point several
ladies in the car screamed and threatened
to have Dad fired, so he
had to ask the lad to get off the car with his scaly friends. On another occasio
n, while collecting fares on a crowded car and
as Dad was pushing past a lady wearing one
of those big hats of the
period, she turned and the point
of a hatpin caused a long scratch
from the bridge
of his nose, under his right eye, and around to his
right
ear. That night there was an article in the paper saying
Another victim
of womens hatpins. While collecting fares on a
crowded street car, conductor George Samuel was severely gored
across the face by a long hatpin sticking through the hat
of a lady
passenger. I remember seeing the clipping in a small scrapbook
of Dads.
At intervals on the trolley
I ines there are insulated bars separating
one feeder section from the next, with a sign hanging from the
support wire
TROLLEY BREAK, MotOImen must pass under
with controller OFF. I
dont know if Dad or his motorman found
out that if they passed under with the controller full on, it would trip
the circuit-breaker at the power house, controlling the section they
had
just left. This became a stunt to pull at rush hour when the
sections were heavily loaded, bringing all the cars
in that section
to a stop until the breaker could be re-sel.
Another memory I have
is of old Scarborough Beach. In late
evening.
extra cars would be wailing to take the crowds home, and
2 or 3 extra conductors with coffee pots (i.e. fareboxes) would
board the cars to help
the regular conductor collect fares. They
would Iide as far as Queen East barns, then
jump on the next car
going east.
Page 64 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
Engineer Murphy and the Dead Cow
(From Yarn, a magazine for railway enthusiasts, Auckland, New Zealand)
Submitted by Jack Beatty
Memo to Superintendent: Hit cow. Mileage 123. Engine OK. Cow dead.
Engineer Murphy.
Memo
to Engineer Murphy: Your report as to the demise of a bovine creature is to hand. Yciu are hereby advised that a further
report
is to be submitted as per the example on Circular B S/15/16789. Please forward promptly.
Superintendent.
Memo to Superintendent: No more to say. Engine still OK.
Cow still dead.
Engineer Murphy.
Memo to Engineer Murphy: Your unsatisfactory report
is to hand. Your attention is again drawn to Circular B S/l 5/16789 which
sets out the following questionnaire: What was the boiler pressure at time
of incident? Was sand gear working? Was throttle
fuJly open?
What was position of cut-off lever? Was brake applied? What was nature of weather and direction of wind? What
was the name
of fireman and brakeman? What was the nature of injury to the creature? Give description of creature: age, sex,
type, markings etc.
What is your assessment of damages claimable by this office? Advise immediately of these particulars.
Superintendent.
Memo
to Superintendent: No steam. Yes. No. None. Yes. Cow not killed by weather, wind, fireman or brakeman. Not enough
left
of cow to find out the rest.
Engineer Murphy.
Memo
to Engineer Murphy: Your further unsatisfactory memo is at this office. You are forthwith to explain why your
locomotive was not under steam at time
of incident and also why it is not equipped with the standard steam cut-off lever. For
prompt and full report.
Superintendent.
Memo to Superintendent: Driving diesel engine. Needs no steam. Has no cut-off lever.
Engineer Murphy.
Memo
to Engineer Murphy: This office still awaits your full report as to how creature was killed by your locomotive. For urgent
and immediate return to this office.
Superintendent.
Memo to Superintendent:
Saw cow walking over line. Engine swerved to left to miss cow. Cow kept walking. Engine hit cow.
Engineer Murphy.
Memo to Engineer Murphy: You are hereby fined $3.00 for insolence. Please advise the nature of the injury to the creature
without further delay.
Superintendent.
Memo to Superintendent: Went
to where cow killed. Cow is definitely dead. This cost me $3.00 expenses.
Engineer Murphy.
Memo to Engineer Murphy: Herewith find special payroll No. L80/247 to be signed in duplicate for $3.00 expenses as claimed.
This correspondence
is now closed.
Superintendent.
Per R.B.P.
Chkd. M.D.M.
Int. H.R.R. Appved. L.A.R. Filed H.H.G.
Cert. C.A.F.
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CANADIAN RAIL Page 65
Photographs by R. Wyatt Webb
A CRHA 60th Anniversary Feature
At this sixtieth anniversary of the founding of the Canadian
Railroacl Historical Association, it is very appropriate to remember
R. Wyatt Webb who did so much for the CRHA, especially the
Canadian Railway Museum during the critical twelve years which
included tile construction period of the Museum. Most active
CRHA members will remember Wyatt Webb. From late-1962
until his untimely death in January 1975, he supervised and
directed many
phases of the museum construction and operation.
Drawing on his practical experience in the Engineering department
of the Canadian Pacific Railway, he made an untrained group of
volunteers into a creditable track gang who laid most of the track
at the present
Canadian Railway Museum.
Thirty years before the days of the Museum, and long before his
connection with the CRHA, Wyatt Webb had taken a number of
photographs of locomotives, equipment and buildings, mostly
those of the CPR for which he worked. Although not an avid
photographer,
he did sometimes take pictures which are now a
valuable record.
Through the courtesy of his son, Ian Webb. we are
privileged to print
some of his photos, taken mostly in the area
around
Sutton. Quebec. All of the present group were taken in
1932, the year the CRHA was founded exactly 60 years ago, and
some were taken in March, 1932, the actual month of the founding
of our Association. We hope you will enjoy them.
~
-.. –
. ,-
. –

~ .
. .:.
..
E3a class 4-6-0 No. 2013, built at Angus shops, May 1913, scmpped in February 1943. Photo at Sulton P.Q., May, 1932.
Page 66 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
—————————
G1 t 4-6-2 No. 2227, buill at Angus shops, August 1911, scrapped OClober 1957. Pholo 01 StIlIOIl, P.Q., March 1932.
03d 4-6-2 No. 2334, buill by MLW, September 1926, scrapped March 1961. Photo at Farnham, P.Q., 1932.
M4d 2-8-0 No. 3440, buill by Schenectady, Oerober 1904, scrapped NOFember 1960. Pholo at SUllon, P.Q., 1932.
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CAIlADIAN RAIL Page 67
G1p 4-6-2 No. 2202, buill 01 Angus shops, May 1906, scrapped OClober 1957. Pholo 01 Sutton, P.Q., May 1932.
G2u
4-6-2 No. 2623, buill al Angus shops, May 1912, scrapped December 1957. Pholo al SuI/on, P.Q., 1932.
Page 68 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
DJOg 4-6-0 No. 876, built at Angus shops, September 1910, scrapped July 1957. Photo at Sutton, P.Q., March 1932.
D6a 4-6-0 No. 519, built by Schenectady, Novemher
1902, scrapped October 1948. Photo at Farnham, P.Q., May 1932.
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CANADIAN RAIL Page 69
The oldest locomotive in this group, J3d 2-6-0 No. 3049, built at CPR New shops, June 1888, scrapped June J937. Photo at Farnham,
P.Q.,
ill May 1932. 111 the background is the old South Eastern Railway station which burned in 1949.
D/Ok 4-6-0 No. 1083 (huill hy MLW, October 1912, scrapped Augusl 1960), alld M4g 2-8-0 No. 3519 (buill by Baldwin, June 1907,
scrapped Seplember 1959). PholO ar SUI/on P.Q., March 1932.
Page 70 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1992
DIOe 4-6-0 No. 842, built by MLW. October 1909, scrapped December 1964. Photo at SUI/on P.Q., June 1932.
GIs 4-6-2 No. 2211, built at Angus shops, November 1907, scrapped September 1956. Photo at Sutton P.Q., March 1932.
MARCH -APRIL 1992 CANADIAN RAIL Page 71
£J(I ./-6-0 No. 2017.1111111 at An,~lIj shop.1. May /9/3. SerapINd February 19·0. Photo at Sullun P.Q .. May 1932.
AIIOI E: The on!y /lim·CPR !ocomolhl ill this series of photos is /)lIaware and HI/liM, No. ()()4, SUII Iren: on Jill IlIrlUablt· m Ihl
G/ell Yard ill 1932. IlIIerestinK/I, Ihe D&II is IIOwQlllled by CP,
BACK COVER: Conmmelll Street. ()okill.~ north/rom Fort Srrrtl. ill Iicloria B.C. (lIJtJUI 1893. NOll Ihe eor/y ellClric ~Ir((/ ((II hiell
was 01U of rllf. Ii r.H 10 oplr(JI1 011 Cluwdag lltSI UXIS/. This photo is /10111 WI al/Jljlll motie by a ,i.filOr from £II.~/(Illd lOho {r(!lIflN/to
Japtl/l i/l 1893.
Canadian Rail
120, rue St-Pierre, St. Constant, Quebec
Canada J5A 2G9
Postmaster: if undelivered within
10 days return to sender, postage guaranteed.
PLEASE DO NOT FOLD
MAIL~POSTE
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Let1.l1IIIil PosI.ltttni
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