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Canadian Rail 422 1991

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Canadian Rail 422 1991

Canadian Rail
No. 422
MAY -JUNE 1991
Ottawa Electric Railway -1891 – 1991
CANADIAN RAIL
~ru;;HEi;Br-MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: Douglas N. W. Smith
PRODUCTION: A. Stephen Walbridge
CART
OGRAPHER: William A. Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Fred
F. Angus
For your membership In the CRHA, whICh Includes a
subscripllon to Canadian Rail, wnte to:
CAHA, 120 Rue St-Pierre. 51. Constant, Oue. J5A 2G9
Rates: in Canada: $29 (including GST).
outside Canada: $25. In U.S. funds.
PAINTING: Procel Printing
,.———TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE OTTAWA ELECTRIC RA.ILWAY CENTENNIAL, 1891 ·1991 …………………………… FRED ANGUS…. 75
.. TAKETHEC-TRAIN ………………………………………………………………………………………….. NlIKE WESTAEN 77
THE MONTREAL STREET RAILWAY BOO-SEAlES STREET CARS ………………………… FAED ANGUS…. 81
THE FUNERAL TRAIN OF SIR JOHN A. MACDONALD, JUNE 10, 1
891 ……………………………………………. . 104
CRHA COMMUNiCATIONS ………………………………………..•………………..•…………………..•.•…..••…••…•….•…••…. 107
Canadian Rallis continuaKy in need of news, stories. historical data, photos. maps and other material. Please send all contributions the
editor Fred F. Angus. 3021 Trafalgar Ave. Montreal, P,Q H3Y 1 H3 No payment can be made for contribuboos, but the contrlbuler WIll
be given Cledlt forrnateriaJ submitted, Matena) will be retumed to theconlributor if requested. Remember Knowiedge ISo( little yalue unless
[, is shared WIth others
NATIONAL DIRECTORS
Frederick F. Angus Hugues W. Bonin J. Christopher Kyle
R.C. Ballard Robert Carlson
William La Surf
Jack A. Beatty Charles De Jean Bernard Martin
Walter J.
Bedbrook Gerard Frechette Robert V.V. Nicholls
Alan
C. Blackburn David W. Johnson Andrew W. Panko
The CRHA has B number 01 local divISions across the COtJntry. Many hold regular meelJngs
and issue newsJet1ers. Further Information may be obtained by wnting to the division
ItEVSTONE 0tV1S1ON
NEW~DMSIOH
po eo. 1162
s-. JolIn N B E2I. ~7
ST Lf,WRENCE V …… LEY OIVISION
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RIDEAU VA!.l.EY 0tV1SION
PO 110><962
Smim.F~io.OnI K7!M
KINGSTON OMSION
PO 60.0 10:3. 5tIlIOtIA
KII1g!IIon On! K7M 6P9
TORONTO & YORK 0I1I1S1ClN
PO eo.5114!l T_A­
TortWlIQ, On!. MSW,P3
NIAGIIRA DIVISION
PO 60.593
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Windsor On! fI9G,A2
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Witnpoog. MaIn R3K (MI
CALGARY , ~ WESTERN OlVlSION
110·6100 ~ …. NE
CMriwf ……… T2A $Z8
RCX:II:Y ~AIN OMSION
P 0 80~ at o:z. S2tIon C
EOInOl1!OtI. AN1Il TSB:2NO
SELKIRK OMSIQN
po, BOIl»
Rt~ e c VIlE 2SO
CROWSNEST .. KETT1..E VAU£Y DIVISION
P.O 8ox400
Ctiri«l<>k. 6.C VIC 4H9
NElSON ~TAIC TRAMWAY SOCEn
123V-SU,
NeiGon.B.C IIIL2Y6
AAw.lCE GEORGE~EOAKO-FRASER ONISION
PO fkt< 2-08
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P.CIAC COAST ONISION
PO BOIl 1005. Slat., …..
II. PI
Douglas NW. Smith
Lawrence M. Unwin
Richard Viberg
A. Stephen Walbridge
John C. Weir
FRONTCOIER 0111111115, 18~)f.,,1 II.IItm
diJ~ ufl~f II CIIIIk and llis do~ ~ur/rtr~d a …. / as (I flat
njWfJ (lheOml1 Eltnf,,· Rai/lIen(I1 ph,,·
I/))lral,hrll taf l/1t PUfllumtlrl 8mfdillU (he
dd~ ami hIS master 11- IJrt t)nl.v lHfel 11111
mmff/ dun,,/( Ih~ /nnl: ~.ptlUlU! T/u Hlr.I, u·
splemlrnt In silimOIl a,/ l~m(m.I~II, lI~r~
ab(lill /() lurf.l lif urhumtnl /() lI.Iil Ih~ Gm~rnm<11 £~r~
11/(11/1>1 Flm Thtl/wlo, t>,~A.c. PmfN.I,,>jOr·
111110, J/rI1>sfic of l/r finr Ot.R CUT!!, huill in
1891 bl P(l/IrlSlln C(.It/)ill (>/SI. Car/,u,-ill..
Cili/tclilm fll-orrrll r 50,,.
As pan 01 its aC/VItles. the CRHA operates
the Canadian Railway Museum al Dalson (
SI, Constant. Que.
whICh is about 14 miles
(23
Km.) 110m downlown Montreal. It is
open Irom laiB May to early October (daily
until Labour Day). Members, and their 1m·
mediate
families, are admitted freeol charge.
00Al Of THE JSSOClAnoN THE COllECTION. PRESERVTlON AND OISS£IoIINATION OF ITEMS RELATING TO THE HISTORY Of RA1.WYS lH CAN.o.D
MAY-JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 75
The Ottawa Electric Railway Centennial
1891 -1991
One of the earliest open electric cars of the Ol/awa Electric Railway which began operation on June 29, 1891, just JOO years ago.
Natio
l1al Archives of Canada, Merrilees Collectiol1. photo PA-J36692
June 29, 1891. A day of great importance in the history of electric
traction in Canada. At 2:00 P.M. on that day the Ottawa Electric
Railwa
y, the real pioneer of city-wide electric railways in Eastern
Canada, began operation. It had been little more than eight months
since Thomas Franklin Ahearn and Warren Y. Soper had been
awarded
the contract to build an electric railway in the city of
Ottawa. during w
hich time the first lines had been built, the rolling
srock acquir
ed and the hundreds of linle details attended (0 in order
(0 make the system a success. It had not been easy. There had been
a previous offer to build
(he lines, but this had fallen through.
Ahearn and Soper h
ad submitted their bid, together with a cheque
for $5000. on October 20, 1890, and the acceptance of their offer
had been approved that night by City council on a split vote of 12
to 10. There then followed a s(ruggle (0 obtain a charter, for there
was
some opposition to the new company. The old Ottawa Street
Railway, which
ran the horse car system, opposed the speed of the
new cars, especially where they crossed the tracks of the old
company. The
federal government objected to tracks being laid on
Wellington Street in front of the Parliament buildings, and there
were numerous co
mplaints about the terms of the contract. the
overhead wires
and such considerations as the problem of clearing snow. T
he problems had, however, been surmounted and the
charter, dated February
13, was finally received on February 25,
189
1. Under this charter, Thomas Ahearn, Warren Soper and
others were
incorporated as the Ottawa Electric Railway Company.
The work of construc
tion went speedily forward, the cars arrived
from Patterson & Corbin of SI. Catharines and, by June 29, all was
read
y. The Ottawa Journal of June 30, 1891, in describing the
festivities. quoted the last three verses of the poem The Broomstick
Train
by Oliver Wendell Holmes (see next page). This poem was
new, h
aving been inspired by Bostons new electric cars.
The Ottawa Electric Railway served Ottawa for more than half a
century u
ntil it was taken over by the city in 1948. Street car service
ended
in 1959 with a ceremonial parade. Although Ahearn and
Soper.
as well as the Ottawa Electric Railway. are gone, the
industry they pioneerecl still exists as can be seen in such cities as
Toronto (which never gave up street cars). Calgary and Edmonton.
It is very fitting that the centennial of the Ottawa Electric Railway
be observed at
this time. For more inFormation ancl photos of the
Ottawa
Electric Railway, the reader is referred to Canadian Rail
number 3
77, November-December 1983.
HAIL vAIlAUIt:II IVIAI -JUIN 1 ~~1
Ol/awa Elec/ric Railway car 65, buil/ by Ol/awa Car Company in 1897, is shown as i/ appeared new in/he year of Queen Vie/arias
Diamolld Jubilee. The insClip/ion Royal Mai/ refers /0 /hefac//lf(l//he company had a cOl1lmc//o carry lhemail.ByI897 a paint
scheme
ofgreen wi/h gold le//erillg was in use. Sisler car 66, Imer col/ler/ed /(l a work car and renumbered 6, is /he aides/ surliJing
Ol/awa elee/ric car, and is preserled
a/ /he Canadian Railway Museum. 11 is hoped elJel1lually /0 res/ore i/ /0 this appearance.
Nmiollal Archiles of Canada. Merrilees Col/ec/ion. ph% PA-/36697
An early iew of a group of eigh/ cars of /he Ol/awa Elec/ric Rai/way laking a large
crowd of Passengers /0 a Chris/ Church Sunday School picnic. BOIh open and
closed cars,
of /he earties/ types, appear ill /his ph%. The numerous /rolley poles
do indeed resemble /he brooms/icks of Oliler Wendell Holmes poem.
Na/iollal Archives
of Canada. pholO PA-27305.
They came, of course, at their masters call.
The witches, the broomsticks. the cats. and all;
He l
ed the hags to a railway train
The h
orses were trying to drag in vain.
Now. then, says he. youve had your fun,
A
nd here are the cars youve got to run.
The driver may
just unhitch his team.
We dont
want horses, we dont want steam
You
may keep yuur old black cats to hug,
But
the loaded train you ve got to lug.
Since then on many a car youll see
A broomstick plain as plain can be;
On every stick theres a witch astnde.­
The string you see to her leg is tied.
She will do a mischief if she can,
But
the string is held by a careful man.
A
nd whenever the evil-minded witch
Would c
ut some caper. he gives a twitch.
As for
the hag, you cant see her,
But hark! you
can hear the black eats pun.
And now and then, as the car goes by,
You may catch a gleam from her wicked eye.
Often youve looked on a rushing train.
B
ut Just what moved It was 110t so plain.
[t could l1t be those wires above.
F
or they could neither pull nor shove;
Whe
re was the motor that made it go
You could nt gu
ess, blllllow you know.
Remember my rhymes when you ride again
0)1 the rattling rail by the Broomstick train
l
From The Broomstick Train
by
Oliver Wendell Holmes. 1890.
MAY-JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 77
Take The C-Train
By Mike Westren
A tiny piece of contemporary railway
history was in the making, and the
Calgary & Southwestern Division
of the CRHA was somehow mixed
up
in the centre of the action.
Calgary Transit opened the first leg
of its highly successful Light Rail
Transit (LRT) system as long ago
as 1981. Incredibly, right up until
CRHA CONFERENCE 90, no one
had taken up the option of renting a
C-train unit, although the
offer has
b
een available all along. Thus to its
amazement, the C & S W Division
found
it was able to make some sort
of an historic claim on August 26,
1990 with the Calgary Transit
LRT
Conference Charter, the very first
for the system.
The
cooperation received from CT
for this rail tour was outstanding. A
Sunday
morning was chosen so that
the special could be readily
inserted
between service trains operating
on a 15 minute headway. Thus,
nei ther the ex tra nor the regular
trains interfered with
one another
in any way. The tour covered the
entire
28.3 route kilometres, or the
whole three legs of the system. An
Anderson Road LRT Repair Shop is quiet on a Sunday morning, as Calgary C-train
units requiring attention await the return
of the work force on Monday.
All photos hy author, diagrams courtesy
of Calgary Transit.
extra kilometre in the northwest, the extension to Brentwood
Station, would not be energized for another week. Leaving Anderson
Road in the south, the train travelled Route 20 I to 10th Street S.W.,
the west end of downtown, east on route 202 to Whitehorn, back
through
downtown and northwest to University, returning the
length
of Route 201 to Anderson. All this totalled 60.6 km., ancl
took 2 hours 10 minutes of virtually non-stop running.
First
of all, the party was treated to a first-class tour of the
Anderson Road facilities, where the C-train cars were assembled
originally. Phil Rickard, of the electro-mechanical department,
was an extremely enthusiastic guide and ambassador for Calgary
Transit. He described the constl1lction of these Siemens-Duwag
cars and subsequent maintenance and repair routines. CT now
operates 83 of these double-ended articulated Type U2 vehicles.
They run in multiples of one, two or three units, the limiting factor
being
the length
of downtown city blocks, where the trains run on
the s
urface. All 83 cars were assembled, in batches, in the
Anderson Road Shops between 1980 and 1985, giving a 50%
Canadian content component. Power is 600 volts D.C., overhead
pick-Up, and the track is standard gauge, wheel profile and clearances to street railway criteria.
Two additional test cars are on
the system this year, fitted with trial A.C. traction motors.
However,
they have not so far
appeared in revenue service.
Unit No.
200 I, the first of the series, was requested and provided
for the charter.
The driver for this occasion was Michael Dupras,
transit supervi
sor and relief driver. He also provided excellent tour
and operating
commentary; the Conference could not have asked
for better. Leaving the Anderson Car Barn at 10:41 A.M., the
special arrived
at 10th Street S.W. at II: 10, Whitehorn at 11:30,
University at
12:02, and parked at Anderson once again at 12:50.
The cars are smooth and quiet running, and have airy, spacious
interiors.
Some excellent views of the City of Calgary are afforded
by the LRT routes, particularly as they climb up out of the Bow
River valley.
Contrary to a
popular concept, history did not end at some specific
time,
50 or 100 years ago. History is an ongoing, continuous
process. It was therefore entirely appropriate that it should have
been the Canadian Railroad Historical Association that took this
first all-system charter on the
Calgary LRT, the C-train.
I-age Itl RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
•••
I~~··——————————–~~~–~~~——————————~~~·I
~Bi-FOld Doors/
Measurements in mm
-1.. Service
7 Avenue
Free Fare Zone
..:
:2
3:-
c.?
ct
co
~Bi-FOld Doors /
7 Avenue
Free Fare Zone
Whitehorn
Rundle
Marlborough
MAY -JUNE 1991 CANADIAIJ RAIL Page 79
A gleaming Car No. 2001 stands at the doorway of Ihe
Anderson
Road Shops while the Conference 90 party climbs
aboard Jor Calgary Transits very first LRT charter
RIGHT: Girder rails set in
dowlll
OlVn street, 8th Avenue
SOllth is a reserl
ed transit
thoroughlare. Single ullit, car
No. 2046, is seen leaving 8th
Street
S. W. Station, destination
Anderson. Sing
le IIllit operation
is
Ilormal service. Transition trackage
between Bow River Bridge and street
level rails
in dOwl1lown Calgary. View is from weslbollnd
train coming in to the core area
off the Northeast Line.
.. :–~ -I
Page 80 RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
The driver of Ihe Conference 90 exIra was Michael
Dupras, shown operaling from Ihe 8 elld conlrol cab of
No. 2001
Crossover
Imckwork al Ihe soulh end of Whilehom Slalion,
Ihe terminus of Ihe NOllheasl Line The Co
nference 90 parly hasjusl disembarkedfrom car No. 200J
in
Ihe Anderson Road car shops upon complelion of Ihe syslem­
w
ide lour.
Experimenral Car No.
3002. filled wilh A.C Imelion
mOlars,
was seen skulking in Ihe back of Ihe Anderson
Ro
ad s/Omge barns.
MAY -JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 81
The MSR 600-Series Street Cars
The Transition From Single To Double Truck In Montreal
By Fred Angus
Nllmber 600. photographed in 1897jusr afier it was complered in the MSR shop5. Of special inraesr is the early rype offrol1l lestibllle,
scarcely more than a windshield. Also I/otable is the early fender design. The photo was taken by Canada Switch & Spring Campa II.
to depict rheir nell desigll of truck. Epidel1lly 600 was one of the first cars to lise rhis type of rrllck.
All pharos. unless otherwise credired. are from CRHA Archiles. Binns Collection.
I INTRODLCTION
Back at the turn of the century, street car systems were in the period
of transition
from the early electric era. using primarily single­
truck car
s, to the more modern systems with larger. faster double­
truck trams. In most major cities this period is well represented by
the numerous car types that were developed in the five years
be
tween 1897 and 1902. It was a time of rapid teclmological
change,
to the point where street cars only a few years old became
outdated. So it was that many turn-of-the-century cars were rebuilt
and otherwise modified
in later years to keep up with new
developments and yet protect the capital investment that had been
made
in the older cars. A good example is the Montreal Street
Railw
ay which was, by 1900, becoming one of the leaders in street
railway development in North America. In the early years of the
century a MontreaJer could ride open cars in the summer, closed
cars
of various types in all seasons. double-truckers on the busy main routes
and single truckers on branch Jines. A few years later
it was possible to ride Pay As You Enter trams. convertibles and
double-enders. One could
also ride the rural and semi-rural
suburban
lines sometimes aboard city-type cars especially equipped
for suburban us
e. The tram was a part of all walks of life: and even
somet
imes of death, for one could make his last ride to the
cemetery
on a special funeral car. All interesting fact is that. 011 the
Montreal system, all
these activities could be done on cars
numbered in
the 600s, a most versatile number series of exactly
one hundr
ed cars whose dates of building spanned the important
years
from J 897 to J 901. Though of different types, they had two
things
in common; all were wooden and all were built by the MSR
in its own shops. Montreals 600s were truly a representative cross
sec
tion of the turn-of-the-century street car in North America. This
article will consider each of the Montreal street cars numbered
from 600
to 699 and look at all the different types, sub-types,
conversions a
nd rebuilds encountered in this group.
Page 82 RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
By the start of the year 1897 the depression of the early 90s had
ended at last and prosperous times had begun. The outlook was for
unprecedented
expansion of the cities of Canada in which the street
railways would
playa most important part. The electrification of
Montreals street car system had begun more than four years
before and had been completed for more than two years. The
pioneer times were over and the system was poised for major
advancement. From 1892 to 1895 the MSR was so busy with the
problems of electrifying Canadas largest street railway that they
did not build any cars. Consequently the early electric cars were
purchased
new from a wide variety of builders, both in Canada and
the United States. In 1896, however, the
company began to build
its
own street cars in its shops at Hochelaga and, by the end of 1896,
had already
completed 25 closed and 30 open cars of its own
manufacture.
The outlook for 1897 was so good that the directors
of the MSR ordered 50 closed and 25 open trams to be built in its
s
hops. The fifty closed cars comprised the largest lot yet built by
or for the company. They were numbered 504 to 602 even
numbers, and so the last two, numbers 600 and 602 placed in
service about November 1897, were the first to be numbered in the
600 series.
Before proceeding it is in order to give a brief explanation of the
numbering system used by the Montreal Street Railway, and
numerous other companies at that time. While at first it might
appear to be complex, a little consideration shows that it is quite
reasonable and straightforward.
The most basic fact is that even
numbers were used for closed cars and odd numbers for open cars.
This is a throw-back to the days when one set of trucks was used
for both types
of tram, and were used with open car bodies in the
summer and with closed car bodies at other times of the year. Thus
a particular truck might, for example, be used with
car body 187
(open)
in summer and with 188 (closed) at other times. This
changing of trucks was becoming obsolete by the turn of the
century, but the even-odd numbering persisted for years thereafter,
even after open cars were no longer built.
The other policy followed during the single-truck era was that of
re-using vacant numbers. The earliest electric cars simply continued
on
where the horse cars had left off, about number 184 in the even
(closed) seri
es and 123 in the odd (open) series. As time wen I on,
lower
numbers were used by new electric cars; these were numbers
vacated by horse cars that had been retired as the electrification
progressed. Since the quantity
of new cars acquired was greater
than the quantity retired the numbers did progress, but not nearly
as fast as if lower numbers had not been re-used. As a point
of
interest, Montreals first electric car, the Rocket, received as high
a
number as 350 because it was owned by the Royal Electric
Company, not the MSR, and was only purchased by the MSR in
1894 by which time the even numbers had reached 348. After the
wholesale retirement of old horse cars during the period of
electrification (1892-1894) many of more recent vintage were
retained for u
se as trailers until about 1899-1900 when they were
scrapped and the numbers re-used.
Some new cars were destroyed
in a
car barn fire in 1896 and promptly replaced (e.g. 310 and 340)
while far more were lost in the disastrous fire at
Hochelaga barn
on S
eptember 16, 1898. In the latter case 62 passenger cars
destroyed were replaced in 1899 with a like number of new cars
bearing the
same numbers. Since the last horse car trailers seem to have been retired
in 1900, we have the strange case of some of the
latest single-truck cars
of 1900 bearing two digit numbers. Ir is
sometimes said that the policy of re-using old numbers ended
about 1900,
however this is not rhe case; the policy continued as
long as single-truck
cars ran, it was simply not applied to the
double-truck trams.
This is adequately shown by two groups of
single-truckers, acquired from the suburban companies in 1901
and 1907 respectively, being
given vacant low numbers (some of
the latter actually received single-digit numbers
l
). Even as late as
1923, rhe Birney cars
were numbered in the even-numbered 200s
(by this time there were plenty of vacant low numbers to use)
showing that the
numbering policy for single-truck cars was still
alive and well
in the 1920s. As it turned out, no 600-series number
was used more than once, nor were there any gaps in the series, thus
they
comprised exactly 100 cars, so simplifying the compiling of
a roster.
The classification of the MSRs passenger rolling stock also
differed between single and double-truck cars. In the single truck
era (except for
the Birneys) classification was by lot number, a
consecutive number starting at 1 for both open and closed. For
example, numbers 504 to 602 even numbers comprised lot 16
closed, while 613 to
649 odd numbers were part of lot I I open. The
double-truckers were classified by the number of the first unit in
the series (e.g. 640-class), although one exception is the 638-type
which usually
seem to have been referred to as Scotch Cars and
will be so referred to here.
Since the 600s included examples of
both types of classification, this is an important point to bear in
mind.
It should be noted that several of the classes which contained cars
numbered
in the 600s were not confined entirely to that hundred
but contained other similar cars numbered below 600 or above 699.
In depicting the types we have attempted to
show cars actually
numbered in the
600s. This is not always possible since the only
known photos
of some of the types are of examples bearing
numbers outside the
600 limit; in these cases we have shown the
available photos since the
cars are identical.
One further note
concerns dates of construction. The oldest .known
accurate lists of Montreal street cars are those prepared by David
Blair starting
in 1903. All cars then on the roster were included,
together with as
much information as could then be compilecl. In
the
case of earlier electrics there are a number of questions, even
including years
of building, but for those built by the company
from 1896 on the information is more complete. There is no
mention of trams already retired or destroyed prior to 1903
although such information
can sometimes be deduced from other
sou
rces including the progressive re-use of lower numbers. By
1903, all the
600s were in service, so the lists of these cars are of
considerable accuracy even if not completely first-hand. We may
rely on the
year of construction as shown, but there is some doubt
as to
the month. For example it is highly unlikely that all the 640-
class went into service
in August 1900 as shown, although the year
is undoubtedly correct.
Perhaps the date of ordering was used, or
the completion of the order, or even a combination of both. From
1903 on, the data are fuJly accurate, and we may also consider the
1897-1902 dates to be
accurate to within two or three months.
Having explained the
rules of the game and the potential pitfalls,
we can
consider each type of car.
MAY-JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 83
The fasllype of sing fe-I ruck cfosed car as seen fore and afr. This type, buifl in 1900, was nol col/vened 10 Pay-As-You-Enler in
laler years. The lap view of 620 was rakel/ on January 10, 1905. whife Ihe rear-end view of 610 dales jiom Seplemher 26, 1913.
These cars are very simifar 10 600 excepl Ihey hale shorler frOI1l pfarjorms as weff as fuff veslibufes.
Page 84 RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
II THE 600S AS BUILT
By the end of 1897 the numbers of open cars had only reached 357,
while those of closed cars had reached 602. Thus the first 600s
were in service, and so these 1897 closed street cars are the first to
be considered.
They were known as lot 16 and, as we have seen,
comprised 50 cars. They were almost identical to the MSRs first
home-built cars, constructed the previous year, the
only significant
difference being a slightly lower clerestory roof which gave better
proportions and a more pleasing roofline.
The body was 21 feet
long with
seven arched windows per side, ancl the total overall
length was 28 feet.
Although built of wood, all these cars had
internal trusses which did not show.
They were vestibulecl from the
sta
rt, but the original front vestibule was merely a permanently­
attached windshield which left the platform sides open. This was
soon fully enclosed, so photographs showing these trams in as
built condition are rare. Fortunately a good broadside view of
number 600 itself exists showing clearly this early vestibule. The
lot 16 closed cars were very handsome and distinctive. The
characteristic Montreal Roof, introduced in 1896, became a
feature
of almost all of Montreals closed cars built from then until
1913. Lot 16 had a long life as single-truckers went, many were
later rebuilt for Pay As You
Enter (PA YE) ancl some survived into
the
1920s.
The 1890s were the years of the great bicycle craze as many
people began to go by bicycle for business and pleasure. Summer
revenues
of street railways began to suffer; a foretaste of what
would happen, thirty years later, with automobile competition. It
was necessary for the street railway to offer more attractive
service, especially
in summer, to entice riders off their bicycles
and back on to the trams. Open cars had already proved very
popular, the trouble was that the
MSR did not have enough of them.
Consequently, the MSRs entire car building program for 1898
was devoted to open cars. Sixty were built for Montreal (plus five
for Saint John N.B.). When 1898 ended the open car numbers had
reached 477 while the highest closed car
number was still 602.
Therefore no 600s were added to the roster in 1898. The car barn
fire
of September 16 had a very serious effect on the fleet, so a
replacement program was begun at once, new cars being delivered
in 1899.
Forty-two closed cars were built in 1899, essentially identical to
those
of 1897. Thirty two of these were given numbers to replace
those burned in the September fire, while ten received the numbers
of fonner horse cars which had been recently retired from trailer
service. None received a number higher than 602. It was quite a
different story with the open cars. One hundred opens, of a new
design designated lot 10, were constructed
during the winter and
spring of 1899. Thirty replaced those destroyed, while three (31,
39, 121) replaced retired horse car trailers. The remaining sixty­
seven continued the odd number series starting at 479 and reaching
611.
Therefore the last six of the 100 were numbered in the 600s.
Lot 10 were similar to the early opens except they had wooden side
panels on the left-hand side. Since all were
single-enders, there
was no need to
get on or off by the left side so the panel was a great
safety feature. Individual roller curtains were also a feature of lot
10.
The Montreal Herald of April 17, 1899 gave a good description
of the new rolling stock, including a charming drawing of one of
the cars (obviously copied from the official photo). This article,
and
drawing, is reprinted in full as it gives some insight into the disadvantages
of conventional open-car travel; disadvantages that
tend to be forgotten
in moments of nostalgia:
liTHE STREET RAILWAYS NEW SUMMER CARli
——;.i.:::-c——–~~—
If the citizens of Montreal are not smisjied with the service
supplied hy
fhe Sfreet Railway this summer it will not be the fault
of the company. The company will have 250 open cars running this
season,
of which 100 will be brand new, and all oj them will be in
operation by the J 5th of June. This is an increase oj 100 cars [sic]
over last season, so that the largest crowd can be handled with ease
and comfort.
Furthermore the cars are
of an entirely new type and possess some
unique features that will
add considerable to the comfort of
passengers. They are being built with a special view to the
exigencies
of Montreal climate. The hOliest days in Montreal are
not infrequel1lly followed
by chilly evenings, when to timel in fhe
old-fashioned cars that are open on all sides is eXfremely
uncomfortable. To meet this variafion all the cars are to be filled
with lemheroid curtains that
fit snugly into grooves, and when
drawn down practically make the ca
ra closed one. The advantage
of this will be instantly recognized by the unfortunate citizen who
has been caught in
fhe old-style cal by a sudden thunderstorm. In
the new structure the disagreeable dripp ing from the roof will also
be done away with, as each car is filled with an eave trough and
waferspout.
Another complaint against the old type was the dust and dirt that
is invariably whirled
in as they pass one another. To dispense with
fhis disagreeable feature the devil strip side
of the car is similar
to the side
of an ordinary closed car, except that it is windowless
[i.e. the openings above the belt rail were not glazed. Ed.]. The
introduction
of this style, which, bv the way, is as yet limited to
Montreal, will render travelling
in the fall considerably more
comfortable than it has been
in the past, and will do away with the
necessity and bother
of continually changing Fom open to shut
cars according as the weather dictates.
The new type of street car soon showed its usefulness, for the
summer of 1899 was one of the wettest ever recorded in Montreal.
An example
is given by a story in the Montreal Daily Star for July
21, 1899. On that day a terrific
thunderstorm hit the CiLY, and a bolt
of lightning burned out the fuse in an open car. The passengers in
the marooned tram were completely drenched by the rain; evidently
it was not
one of the new cars!
MAY-JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 85
The official photos of the new design of open car. These pictures were taken at the new Hochelaga car bam in tlte spring of 1899. The
features mel1liOlled in the Heralds article are clearly seen. Although the cars depicted are not numbered
ill the 600s, they are identical
to 601 –
649, odd numbers, as built.
Page 86 RAIL CAIJADIEIJ IVIAI -JUIN 1991
This lot of 100 cars was destined to be the largest group of single­
truck street
cars ever built in one year for a Canadian street railway.
Forty-five more joined the fleet the following year, and they were
used throughout the system. For years they were the mainstay of
Montreals open car fleet and they served well until automobile
traffic compelled the retirement of open cars. A significant number
of photos of early 20th century Montreal street scenes show 1899
open cars, and at least one appears in an oil painting of the period.
Many were later rebuilt as convertibles to increase their usage to
winter months as well, and it was the mid-1920s before the last
one disappeared from the roster. By the turn
of the century many systems were building double­
truck
cars and starting to shift the older type to more lightly
travelled routes. Montreal
quickly joined the trend and, in July
1900, turned out
number 638 from its shops. This was a Jarge
double-truck
car with a centre entrance. the design being copied
from a type used
in Glasgow Scotland. We will soon be discussing
this type further, but first we
must consider the 640 type. These
were an eJongated version of lots 16 and 17, having nine windows
per side instead
of seven, and were mounted on double trucks. Due
to the technology
of the times, the trucks had large wheels and, to
allow them room to swivel on curves, the body was set considerably
Montreals first double-truck city car, number 638, photographed at Hochelaga car barn brand new in.luly, 1900. 1tlVas also the
first Scotch Car, although no additional cars like it would he
builtformore {han a year. Notice the safety net infrom of the wheels.
This device
had to be removed later, due to snow conditions. thus making this type of car more dangerous to pedestrians.
The year 1900 marked the transition to the construction of double­
truck street cars for the Montreal Street Railway.
In the early part
of the year, the designs of 1899 were continued for the new
equipment, as 60 closed and 45 open cars joined the fleet. By now
mosl of the former horse car trailers had been retired, so 43 of the
new
closed cars were given vacant numbers as usual. The remaining
seventeen were numbered 604 to 636 even, and all sixty were
designated lot
17. They were very similar to the earlier group but
not exactly the
same for the bocty was one fOOL longer (22 feet) and
the front platform one foot shorter, making the overall length the
same.
Because of this shorter front platform, none of Jot 17 was
converted to PA YE in later years, although some survived until the
1920s. The forty-five open cars were called lot II and were
identical to those of 1899. Twenty-six of them received the
customary vacant low numbers while the other nineteen were
numbered 613 to 649 odd. They were the last single-truck passenger
cars built new for the Montreal Street Railway. higher from the ground.
This, combined with their narrow width,
gave them a rather ungainly look which, in later years, made them
look more old-fashioned than they really were.
One delightful
story, unsubstantiated
although one would dearly like to believe it,
is that the
640s were nicknamed the Klondike cars due to their
large size (compared to the previous ones).
The implication was
that the
company would find them a goldmine as the crew costs
wouJd be no different than for
smaller cars. The analogy was apt
since the Klondike gold rush
of 1898 was a recent memory. The
MSR annual report for 1900 (submitted at the 40th Annual
Meeting on November 7, 1900) reported as folJows: There are at
present under construction
il1 the Companys shops 6 eXira long
closed motor cars,
moumed on double trucks. making in all 25 cars
of this new type, which will be available for service during the
coming willler
The 6405 served long and well, all were later
converted to PA YE, some became double-enders, and one (number
664) was the last of the 600s to be scrapped.
MAY -JUNE 1991
-~ –~~~~ ~
Two winter views oj 640-
class cars as they looked
whenlheywere built in 1900.
Above.
662 poses aU/side
SI. Henry car bam on the
cold
morning of January
10, 1905. The lower view
shows 644 011 Victoria
Alenue, WestmOllnl, all
February
9, 1904, about to
start its return trip east.
Cwiollsly.the roofsign says
To
Greene Ave. in the
backgro
und is the site of
CPRs Westmolll11 station,
before that stmion e .
.. isted
(it was built in 1907).
-~~::,..s.. … ~~ ~
CANADIAN RAIL Page 87
/
~ .
Page 88 RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
Early 1901 saw yet another group of open cars join the MSR fleet.
This
lot of 2S was known as the 6S I-class. The series is notable as
being the first double-truck open cars owned by the MSR (note that
this do
es not include the suburban companies) as well as being the
last open cars acquired new
by the company. They were numbered
6S I to 699 odd numbers and were of similar design to the single­
truck lots
10 and II except they were longer (3S feet 6 inches
overall) a
nd were mounted on double trucks. Like the 640s, they
were also somew
hat higher off the ground to al.low room for the
trucks
to swivel. These cars were used on the busier lines and were
also
in demand for charters and special occasions. In 1912 they
were rebuilt as closed cars and lasted well into the 1920s. some
seeing further serv
ice in Quebec City. By 1901 the open cars on the
MSR actually outnumbered the closed cars. This did
not sit well
with
an efficiency-minded management that disliked having more
than half
its fleet tied up for 70 percent of the year, not to mention
the
extra storage space needed for all that unused rolling stock.
With
the coming of larger, more expensive. cars this hurt financially.
It is no wonder that other solutions to the seasonal problem were
soug
ht, and eventually found, and no more open cars were built
after
190 I.
As we have seen. one car, number 638. was outs hopped in July
1900. This was
copied from a type of tram placed in service in
i
Glasgow Scotland in 1898 (curiously the Glasgow cars were also
numbe
red in the 600s; one of them has been preserved). In
Glasgow the type was known as the Room and Kitchen or But
and Ben type. The big innovation was a centre entrance which was
reached by climbing a flight of four steps. then turning either right
or left. through a bulkhead door, into one of two passenger
compartments each
of which had three very wide arched windows
per s
ide. There were. of course, differences from the Glasgow
prototype.
Most notably the Montreal cars were single-ended. and.
ofcollrse, they had the Montreal Roof. Evidently 638 was considered
a success for twenty-five additional trams of this type were ordered
in 1901. They were almost identical. but not quite identical. to 638,
a
nd they were given even numbers from 690 to 738. Those of them
that we
re numbered in the 600s are reported as having gone illto
se
rvice in October, 190 I. Although called the 638-class, they are
usua
lly referred to in official records as the Scotch Cars because
of the Glasgow origin of the design.
The delivery of number 698 about October 1901 completed the
entire
100 units numbered 600 to 699. All had been built within a
four-year period
but showed great changes in design. A II 100
would remain in service ullti I the first gaps occurreci in 1917,
although
there would be much altering and rebuilding in tile
meantime.
L
–i.
Scotch Car 696 photographed about 1904. It is almost identical to 638 except the end bumpers are a few inches lower in
order to match those 011 smaller cars. The extra trolley pole belongs to another car on an adjacent track.
MAY -JUNE 1991
Two views of 65J-c/ass double­
trllck open cars in special excursion
senice. A.bove is a piloto of691 on
the occasion
of the opelling of the
lille on Sherbrooke Street west to
MOl1lreal West
ill 1908. To the
right we see a row
of ten of these
large open cars. headed by 695,
gilil1g
hundreds of Montreal
children a /reI ride aroulld the
city. about 1910.
CANADIAN RAIL Page 89
Page 90 RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
~ONTR.E.AL STREET R.AILW.A..Y Co.
______ 0 __ 5TANDARD _——
DOUBLE-TRUCK,12 BENCH,OPENCAR.
·1
~
I
—————–1
——————————I.
—-.. _————————————-3J.,
ABOVE: Probably fhejinesf original drawing of an early Canadian slreef carlo survive is Ihis vel) detailed elevalion
vi
ew of Monlreal Slreel Railway car number 69 J. The original drawing. 10 a scale of J J /2 inches 10 Ihe fool (one­
eighlh
aClJlal size) is almosl five feel long. The drawing was compleled on Seplember 2 J . 1901, and was of Ihe design
which was inlended
10 be Ihe Slandard J 2-bench open car. As illumed oul, only one group of Ihese cars were buill
(651
10 699 odd numbers) before Ihe company decided not to build any more open cars, but to adopt other designs
sllch as semi-col1vertables.
The drawing has been reduced to fit Ihe page, but we hme reproduced
it as large as possible in an attempt to bring
out the details visible
in the original.

I
I
,.
MAY-JUNE 1991
-iCO/(L tI inch – / fool.
IJ __ . _________________ ~0_._ . .:::::~,….::::O:O_::
CANADIAN RAIL Page 91
——-,. –~–. ——-
() f;
fr
f.OOnltU — —– —————————–__________ —
NOTE: The drawings on pages 94, 95, 98, 99 are official dimensioned diagrams produced by the Montreal
Tramways Company about
1913. While they are not to scale, they do show the basic dimensions and clearances
as well as
the configurations of the various types of cars, particularly those which were rebuilt or otherwise
modified between 1904 and 1912.
.i
Page 92
Two a/the 1899 design of open
cars as they
appeared after
the) were reiJllilt into
cOI1enables ill the upgrading
program of 1904 to 1906. Car
63 I. ar right. is jirted up for
Slimmer senice. while 39.
belm-. has its sides iI/sial/ed,
alld seats
tllmed longitl/dil/allv.
39 is all ideJ/lical ((Ir to 631, it
has a low I/IIl1/her which
replaced a former horse car
tmila The lieH of 631 was
taken in OctoiJer,
19/J, while
that 0/ 39 was takell 011
Decemha 16. 1907
RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
.. >—
l: ;—
MAY -JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 93
640, soon afier being rebuilt as a double-ender, appears in this view on Westmount Boulevard on October 1,1912. This was during
track construction near the comer of Cote des Neiges, and 640 is running on a temporary track laid on top of the reglliar track
during the construction. Double-enders
of this type were regulars 011 Cote des Neiges above the Boulevard ul/til (he Bimeys arrived
in 1924.
III REBUILDING AND ALTERATION
Following the completion of the 600s, late in 1901, there wcre no
major alterations to them for about three years. However the
development of street car design proceeded at an ever faster rate
during the years 1902 to 1908, with major new developments
coming every year. In 1903 the first trams equipped with air brakes
appeared, the following year the semi-convertible design was
introduced and confirmed that no more open cars would be built.
Then in 1905 the revolutionary Pay-As-You-Enter system was
developed, followed a year later by the building of much larger
cars. In 1907 the first steel trams went into service and a year later
the bui Iding of new wooden cars ceased. With this rapid development
it can be seen that even recent cars would soon become old­
fashion
ed, and it is not surprising that some of the new features
were retro fitted to the older cars in order to get more efficient use
out of them. Between 1904 and 1915 no less than 76 (and perhaps
77 if we include 636 being equipped for suburban service) of the
100
cars numbered in the 600s underwent major rebuilds and
conversions to give them a new lease on life.
Foll
owing the successful introduction of a semi-convertible design
in 1904, the
company decided to rebuild 75 of the 1899 and 1900
open cars (lots 10 and II) as convertibles. This involved making
removable panels for the right-hand side, building vestibules,
gl
azing the left-hand openings and modifying the seats to allow for
a centre aisle. This work was done between 1904 and early 1906
and included 18 of the 600s (601, 607, 611, 613, 617, 619, 621,
623, 625, 627, 631, 633, 635, 637,
639, 643, 645, 649). The
remaining seven continued as open cars. The result was not all that
good from an aesthetic point
of view, but the convertibles did serve
well on smaller routes, and in rush hours, untiJ the end of the single­
truck era about 1918.
By 1908, the
PA YE system had proved itself and it was decided to
conv
ert many of the older cars. This involved lengthening the rear
platform and installing
double doors (one for entrance, one for
exit)
in the rear bulkhead. The majority of the 1897 and 1899
single-truck closed cars
(including 600 and 602) were converted,
but those built
in 1900 (lot 17) were not converted due to the extra
cost
of lengthening the front platform. About this time, car 636, the
last-built
of the single-truckers, was transferred to the Park &
Island lines for use on such routes as the run to Montreal West
where it s
aw service as an extra. Whether it was altered for this new
use we
clo not know, but it is likely that some transformation was
clone.
Also rebuilt to PA YE were all 25 cars of the 640-class, but
not (at that time) the
Scotch cars due to the extra work involved.
By 1910 there was a need for lar
ger double-ended cars. This may
have been due to the
retirement of early single-truck doubJe­
enders, the construction
of new stub-end lines, or both. Whatever
the reason, eight of the 640-class were rebuilt as double-enders,
644,652,658 in
1910,664 in 1911 and 640, 642, 678, 680 in 1912.
Page 94 RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
SCATIN6(APACITY ZS.
WEIGHT
!Vt/MBER I;VSERV/CE 34 .
.iJATES. ~E.PT.189G-r£~. /fJOo.
22~ 0
S/IVGLE TRVCf( CL O.JE£J P/I. YE. C/1/?
eSE/I TI;1Ie; C/lP/lCiTY. Z-f.
WE/61fT 17,!:JOOl1fr
/Vt/M.BER I/VJE.RYIC£ 35.
LJ/I TES 5£PT 189G-FEB/300.
MCtlh ouey P(ar~~ 6~3j­
UJ(dt~ (JOeY 13elt Rad :81
!<.Jtdt;, oua5dt :ai
£x:(-y~m<, GlJ~drh 8:0
t<:J,dr; oLl~1Eaues. :/0
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MAY -JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL
CLASS-SI/YCL£ T/?(/CK CO/YV£RTIBLE-OP£/V-
SE,-/ .cl,Vv CAP~C I ry -10,
W£/(.HT I,fO5tJlh
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.f]ATEu A?KIL.lB:J~-Ju/YE. /300,
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030:0

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We/il; /7690·TO /88$O~
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Page 95
Page 96 RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
The Scotch Cars posed more of a
problem.
The fairly narrow centre
entrance
diel not lend itself to the PA YE
co
ncept which had, by now been applied
to all other large closed city cars. Some
Scotch Car
s were assigned to suburban
lines and equipped esp
ecially for this
service with such amenities as large
wooden pilots. Car 716 wa, so
ld to
the Park & Island Company (by then
controlled
by the MSR) in 1908 for use
on the newly-opened line through Notre
Dame de Grace
to Montreal West. It is
very likely that 698 wa~ also used
regularly on this line,
as was 5ingle­
trucker 636. An account of the early
days
of Lower Canada College, opened
in N.D.G. in 1909, tells of the sllldents
riciing to and from school on the Park &
Island cars. One time, early in 1912,
the 698 was marooned
in the snow on
what is now SherbrookeStreet requiring
the students
to overnight at the school
(a far cry from today when the schools
seem toshut after the first few snowflakes
fall!). A very serious problem with the
Scotch Cars was caused by the
unprotected high wheels so close
to the
centre entrance, especially
on curves.
AboUI 1909, cor 698 makes a SlOp in /llral surroundings as 1110 youllg passengers prepare
10 disembark. Note Ihe dangerollsly unprolecled /10111 wheels.
National Archives
o/Callada, Me}/ilees Colleclioll, phoro PA-166512.
Heading
up McGill Sireet all November 20,1912, Scolch Car 694 spons the big red
number panel which shows that
it has been converted /0 PAYE. The ghostly image 0/
a southbollnd tram shows the length oj the exposure.
Anyone boarciing a moving car ran a risk of
being run over in spite
of the safety screens. A
further danger was when
the car was backing up,
since the rear platform was minimal and the
conductors position was
in the centre. On at
least one occasion trageciy struck as we see from
the All Our Yesterdays column in the Gazette
of September 1, 1956, quot
ing the memories of
Mr. E.C. Gannon: AI thaI tillle the Papilleau
cars were
of the high-wheeled lOriet) and 0111
el1leled by the Celllre. They ral/north 0111.1 as/ar
as MOIlI1I Royal Avenue, where Ihey Y ed back..
1 recalllHo
ofmv lilllejiiends heing killed (their
lIames were Lillner and
(v/cDoi/ald) Oil a Good
Friday lIight hy
olle 0/ the Papineau cars while
i/ backed IIpal MOllnt Royal A )lel/ue and Papilleau.
The comer was hadly lighted alld there were
appar
el/lly 110 eye witnesses 10 Ihe accidellt.
Theil bodies were /ollnd mangled a
ll the street
and the /ragfdy happened
IIl1kllOIl1I to fhe
1II0/0rmall orcolldllctOI Events like that proveci
the car design to be unsuitable formociern operation
and.
in 191 I and 1912, all Scotch Cars were
rebuilt for
PA YEo This involveci closing the
centre entrance and builciing a
long rear platform.
For some reason, probably
to provide structural
strength,
the bulkheads acijacent to the former
centre entrance were left intact.
In this rebuilt
configuration these cars served well, until the
late 1920s.
MAY -JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 97
Rebuilding 651-class double-truck open cars into closed PAVE trams in 1912. Car 673 il1 the foreground is about to be
started, while 687 in the background is almost complete, and already has its PAVE number panel. This photo was taken in
YOl/ville Shops soon after they were opened, and it shows much detail as well as some cars of older and newer types.
655. as rehuilt, appears
in this excellent broadside photo taken 011 May 21. 1914.
The last major rebuilding to any of the 600s was to the 651-
class dOllble-truck open cars. By 1912 it was clear that the open car
era
was almost over and it was a waste lO maintain these 25 large
cars in this form. Accordingly they were all rebllilt as closed PA YE
cms in 1912 by closing in the sides, arranging the seats longitlldinally
to make a centre aisle. and bllilding a long rear platform. They then
saw more than a decade of f
Ul1her service. One interesting facl is
that this
was the first major job undertaken by the new Youville
Shops of
the Montreal Tramways. The shops were opened in 1912,
and some of the photos taken of the new facility show 651 s being
rebllilt.
Page 98
0EA TlNG CAPACITY. 3+
WE/CIIT. 35JfeJO 1M
!1It/UBeR /N ,sERV/Ce. ZS.
LJAT£S. Atlcr:-/900.
RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
f+—-/l~o—–~
}4———–~9: z· … ———-~
CLASS. 051 . ./JOt/BLE TRVC/( CAR
SEA TlNG CAPACITY 3..,…
W£/GIIT 3(1-50//J.s.
NUMBER /NSERV/CE :Z4.
lJA TES /VA Y-O/. JU.JYE-01.
E;dr t(j,dIA OU~y aJ~a.TA~r :$/)-1. . 7:(O~ .
to/Qth ;!a(/ /*.1 At-$/1. ~34::
MAY -JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 99
II D1DI[]I [~~ ODD DO
F-: ________ ————1-.~. -~~~t-tt—————-~~\_—BaD
~/o:-/o =—l–+o–t—–z~: 8 – ——–i—-yo…..f-­
~-f~-f~
~————————~s-/O ——————–.-. –~~
Anotherconversion occurred
in 1915 when car 651, the
first of the group,
was rebuilt
as a funeral car. It replaced
an earlier funeral car which
had been rebuilt from
an
J 896 suburban tram. The
new funeral
car had its
greatest period
of use during
the influenza epidemic
of
19 J 8 when it made many
trips, sometimes
by night,
carrying the remains of
flu
victims to their final resting
place at Hawthorndale
cemetery in east-end
Montreal. The service
was
actually more of a freight
operation, since the
mourners did not ride
in the
same car
as was done in
some other cities. 65 I served
as a funeral car until the
prov
is ion of better roads
allowed
it to be retired in
1927.
l
Thefonner 651, converted (0 afuneral car in 1915, s(i shows a few signs, such as (lie larger side
windows af each elld.
of irs origin as an open car ill 1901. The door in (he cen(re of the side isfor loading
fhe coffin info (he car.
Page 100 RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
Sold down Ihe river 681,659,679 were three of len idel1lical cars sold to Quebec City. Here, they are loaded aboard 1101 cars 011
August 20, 1922 ready to leave for Quebec. Despile Iheir age, they appear to be il1 excellem condition.

111 its lIew home, Quebec Railway Light and Power street car number 689 seen, in its new red and cream paint scheme, at Quebec
City about
1923. This was one of ten former Montreal 651-class tl{{ms sold 10 Quebec the !JIeliolis year This was not Montrea!
689 since thai car was nol sold: Quebec 689s Monlrealnl.ll11ber is unknown, It lVas scrapped in 1930,
Nalional
Archives of Canada, Menilees collection, photo PA-I64715,
MAY -JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 101
IV THE DECLINE OF THE 600S
At the start of the year 1917, all the 600s were stiH in existence.
None had yet reached the age of twenty years, but all were outdated
and
some were obsolete. Hundreds of new large steel cars had been
placed
in service in the preceding six years and this had just about
wiped out the single-truck fleet
except for rush-hour service. Most
of the earlier ones had been scrapped, and others were held for
possible use
in extra service due to the increased traffic caused by
World
War I. The delivery of more new two-car trains in 1917
V EPILOGUE
It is now almost sixty years since the last of the MSR 600-series
street
cars was scrapped. What, if anything, survives of this group
of trams? Very little, if anything, but perhaps something does, in
fact, survive. Unfortunately this group is in the middle of the era,
approximately 1894 to 1905, that is not represented by any
preserved city street cars in Canada. [Editors note: Ottawa car 66,
built
in 1897, and MP & 1 1046, built in 1902, date from this time,
but 66 represents an earlier era while 1046 has been very
extensively
spelled the end for more single-truckers.
In that year, eight closed and two open
600s were scrapped; these were ones
that had not been rebuilt in any of the
conversion programs. Included was 636
which had been returned to city use
after its stint on
the suburban lines. The
remaining 92 cars survived the war
years although most of the single­
truckers were out of service. Many
were stored at the St. Henry car barn
and were destroyed there in a major car
barn fire on May 21, 1920. While
serious, this fire was not as much of a
disaster as that of 1898 since the
destroyed cars were old and would
have been scrapped soon anyway.
Included in this destruction were eleven
of the 600s, being 5 closed, 3 open and
3 convertible.
The first disposal of double truck 600s
was in 1922 when ten of the 65 I-class
were sold to Quebec City. In Quebec
A drawing, made by Omer Lavallee/rom memOly in 1949, showing 664 ol/the Park Extension
line. Mr. Lavallee well remem
iJered having, as a child, seen tltis car regularly in service on
that line more than twenty years be/ore.
they were renumbered 680 to 689 but it is not likely that any
retained their Montreal
numbers (although 681 and 687 could
have). All the remaining single-truck
600s were scrapped between
1922 and 1925 and then, following the delivery
of more new two­
car train sets, a start was
made on retiring the double-truck 600s.
The last of the 651 s was gone by early 1927 and, by 1928, only 18
of the 600s were left in Montreal. This included the eight 640-
class cars which had been
converted to double-enders since there
was still need for them on certain lines
despite the acquisition of
the Birneys in 1924. However, the arrival of six new large double­
enders in 1929 spelled the end for
most of the remaining members
of the 640-class. By 1929 there were only four 600s in Montreal
and ten
in Quebec; three of those in Montreal were scrapped in
1929, three
in Quebec went in 1930 and the remaining seven in
Quebec were cut up in 1931.
The series was very near the end of the line. At the end of 193 I only
one
600 was left; this was number 664, the one that had been
converted to a double-ender in 1911. In later years it had been used
exclusively on the Park Extension route 76 which then traversed an
area that was still quite rural.
Despite the use of Birneys on the
nearby
Model City route 97, old 664 continued its anachronismistic
run on route 76, a
SOil of double-truck Toonerville Trolley. It is
sa
id that the crew of 664 knew many of the local people by name;
they
were regular riders. The line was abandoned about 1930, 664
was
placed in storage and was scrapped in 1932. So ended the
career
of what must have been one of the most interesting group of
street cars ever to polish the rails of any Canadian city. rebuilt.
Quebec interurban car 40 I dates from 1902, but is not a city
car.]
The cars of this era were retired long before the days of
railway preservation. A few older cars, notably in Montreal and
Toronto, were saved as pioneers at an early date, and some
survived into more recent times as work cars. Some cars from 1905
on actually
remained in passenger service until the preservation
movement began. Those from the turn of the century were in
between, not old enough to have been saved as pioneers, and not
new
enough to have lasted until railway museums began. So they
were scrapped at an early date leaving no trace.
A
number of good photographs do survive of the various types that
made up the 600s. A good selection of them, mostly from the
collection
of Richard M. Binns, accompanies this article. There are
a few stories
known, and we have tried to tell some here, but these
too are facling into the past. The authorS father used to tell of riding
to
and from work on a double-ended 640-class car on the long­
abandoned (since 1927) line on lower Guy street. There are some
sto
ries of 664 on the Park Extension line, but noknown photographs.
The Montrea.1 Tramways Company did make use of some equipment
from scrapped cars. A few trucks from early double-truck cars
were used as shop trucks, and perhaps one or two of these may have
come from 600s. One complete double truck was made into a shop
locomotive used at You ville shops. This locomotive, and several
of the shop trucks, have been preserved at the Canadian Railway
Museum. These, and perhaps a few misceJlaneous parts rescued
from
Youville Shops, could be actual relics of these cars, the last
slllviving tangible remnants
of the MSR 600s.
Page 102 RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
MONTREAL STREET RAILWAY CARS IN 600 SERIES
CAR LOT DATE IN ALTER-OUT OF SVCE.
& DISPOSITION CAR LOT DATE
IN AL TER-OUT OF SVCE,
NUM NLM SERVICE ATIONS
600
602
604
606
608
610
612
614
616
618
620
622
624
626
628
630
632
634
636
638
640
642
644
646
648
650
652
654
656
658
660
662
664
666
668
670
672
674
676
678
680
682
684
686
688
690
692
694
696
698
16 Nov 1897 P 1908 1924 S
16 Nov 1897 P 1908 1924 S
17 Feb 1900 1920 B
17 Feb 1900 1923 S
17 Feb 1900 1917 S
17 Feb 1900 1923 S
17 Feb 1900 1920 B
17 Feb 1900 1924 S
17 Feb 1900 1920 B
17 Feb 1900 1917 S
17 Feb 1900 1920 B
17 Feb 1900 1923 S
17 Feb 1900 1917 S
17 Feb 1900 1917 S
17 Feb 1900 1920 B
17 Feb 1900 1923 S
17 Feb 1900 1917 S
17 Feb 1900 1924 S
17 Feb 1900 1917 S
SC lui 1900 P 1911-12 1928 S
640
Aug 1900 P 08 0 12 1928 S
640 Aug 1900 P 08 0 12 1929 S
640 Aug 1900 P 08 0 10 1929 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1925 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1925 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1925 S
640 Aug 1900 P 08 0 10 1929 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1928 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1928 S
640 Aug 1900 P 08 0 10 1928 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1928 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1927 S
640 Aug 1900 P 08 0 II 1932 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1925 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1925 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1927 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1928 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1927 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1928 S
640 Aug 1900 P 08 0 12 1928 S
640 Aug 1900 P 08 0 12 1928 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1927 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1927 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1927 S
640 Aug 1900 P 1908 1927 S
SC
Oct 1901 P 191 I -12 1928 S
SC O
ct 1901 p 19lJ -12 1928 S
SC Oct
1901 P 1911-12 1925 S
SC Oct 1901 P 1911-12 1928 S
SC Oct 1901 P 1911-12 1928 S
B Burned
in fire at St. Henri car barn, May 21, 1920.
C Rebuilt as
convertable cars 1904 -1905.
o Converted to double-enders.
F Converted to funeral
car in 1915.
NUM NLM SERVICE ATIONS & DISPOSITION
601
603
605
607
609
611
613
615
617
619
621
623
625
627
629
631
633
635
637
639
641
643
645
647
649
651
653
655
657
659
661
663
665
667
669
671
673
675
677
679
681
683
685
687
689
691
693
695
697
699
NOTES
JO lun 1899 C 1904-05
10
lun 1899
10
lun 1899
10
lun 1899 C 1904-05
10
lun 1899
10
lun 1899 C 1904-05
I I lun 1900 C 1904-05
II lun 1900
II lun 1900 C 1904-05
II lun 1900 C 1904-05
I I lun 1900 C 1904-05
II lun 1900 C 1904-05
II lun 1900 C 1904-05
11 lun 1900 C 1904-05
11 lun 1900
II lUll 1900 C 1904-05
II lun 1900 C 1904-05
II lun 1900 C 1904-05
II lun 1900 C 1904-05
II lun 1900 C 1904-05
II lun 1900
II lun 1900 C 1904-05
II Jun 1900 C 1904-05
II Jun 1900
II lun 1900 C 1904-05
651 May
1901 P12 F15
651 May 1901 P 1912
651 May
1901 P 1912
651
May 1901 P 1912
651
May 1901 P 1912
651
May 1901 P 1912
651 May
1901 P 1912
651 May 19
01 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651 Jun 1901 P 1912
651 lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912
651
lun 1901 P 1912 19
22
1917
1
920
1922
1925
1925
1920
1917
1925
1920
1925
1925
1922
1922
1920
1925
1925
1922
19
25
1925
1920
1920
1922
1924
1922
1927
1926
1926
1926
1922
1926
1926
1922
1926
1926
1926
1922
1922
19
26
1922
1922
1926
1926
19
22
1926
1926
1926
1922
1922
19
22
P Converted to Pay-As-You-Enter operation.
Q
Sold to Quebec City in 1922. Scrapped 1930-3 J.
S Scrapped by Montreal Tramways Co.
Note:
Date in service month may be approximate.
S
S
B
S
S
S
B
S
S
B
S
S
S
S
B
S
S
S
S
S
B
B
S
S
S
S
S
S
S
Q
S
S
Q
S
S
S
Q
Q
S
Q
Q
S
S
Q
S
S
S
Q
Q
Q
MAY -JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 103
YEARLY SUMMARY OF THE 600S.1897 TO 1932
YEAR CHANGE DURING
END THE PAST YEAR
1897 2 closed cars built
1898 No changes
1899 6 open cars built
1900 43 clsd., 19 open bIt.
1901 5 clsd., 25 open bit.
1903 No changes
1905 18 open made cnvtbJ.
1907 No changes
1908 27 rblt. to P.A.Y.E.
1910 No changes
1912 31 rblt. to P.A.Y.E.
1914 No changes
1915 Car 651 to funeral car
1916 No changes
1917 8 cars scrapped
1919 No changes
1920 11 cars bumed
1921 No changes
1922 7 scrpd., 10 to Quebec
1923 4 cars scrapped
1924 5 cars scrapped
1925 15 cars scrapped
1926 14 cars scrapped
1927 8 cars scrapped
1928 14 cars scrapped
1929 3 cars scrapped
1930 3 Que. cars scrapped
1931 7 Que. cars scrapped
1932 Car 664 scrapped
SINGLE TRUCK DOUBLE TRUCK
CLSD. PA YE OPEN CONY. CLSD. PA YE OPEN SPEC. QUE.
2
2
2
19
19
19
19
19
17
17
17
17
17
17
11
11
6
6
6
2
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
6
25
25
25
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
7
5
5
2
2
2
2
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
18
IS
15
8
8
8
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o o
o
o
26
31
31
31
31
6
6
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
25
25
56
56
55
55
55
55
55
55
45
45
45
39
25
18
4
o
o
o
o
o
25
25
25
25
25
25
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
7
o
o
TOTAL
CARS
2
2
8
70
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
100
92
92
81
81
74
70
65
50
36
28
14
11
8
o
NOTE: As built, all even-numbered cars were closed while odd-numbered ones were open (on the right-hand side). When 651 to 699
(odd nos.) were rebuilt into c
losed P.A.Y.E. cars they were not renumbered, thus the even-odd convention was no longer strictly applied.
Lot
numbers 16 (closed), 17 (closed), 10 (open), 11 (open) also included cars numbered below 600.
Lot SC (Scotch Cars)
also included 20 cars numbered above 699.
The classification by consecutive lot numbers applied only
to single-truck cars. The double truckers usually took their classification
from
tlle llumber of the first unit in the class. However the 638-class were usually referred to as Scotch Cars.
The 1 0 cars sold to Quebec in I 922 were renumbered 680 to 689. So far there is no record as to which car became which in Quebec.
It is
just possible that 681 and 687 could have kept their former numbers, but this can not be determined. Quebec cars 681, 686, 689
were scrapped
in 1930, while 680, 682, 683, 684, 685, 687, 688 went in 1931.
Page 104 RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
The Funeral Train of Sir John A. Macdonald
June 10, 1891
The funeral (rain as i( appeared at Ol/awa. CPR locomotive 283 was built by Hinkley in Bostol1 and placed in service in August,
1883.
It was retired in October, 1897 after a short career. Note the reinforcing !Jars on the conl1ecting rod.
One hundred years ago, on June 6. 1891, occurred the death, at the
age
of 76, of Sir John A. Macdonald. the first Prime Minister of
Canada. Sir John had been Prime Minister ever since Confederation
except for the five-year period from 1873 to 1878.
The Pacific
Scandal
of 1873 had been his only major defeat and had resulted
in the five-year premiership of Alexander Mackenzie. After his
relllrn to office
in 1878 Sir John had been greatly involved in the
politi
cs surrounding the building of the Canadian Pacific Railway,
and he had travelled the whole length
of the CPR main line on a trip
to British
Columbia in 1886. soon after the transcontinental
service began. In March
1891, only three months before his death,
Macdonald and
his government had been re-elected for a fourth
consecutive term of office, making a total of six elections he had
won.
His last appearance
in Parliament was on Friday. May 22, for on
the following day he was taken ill with what proved to be his last
illness. A week later
he suffered a major stroke and soon it was
common knowledge that Sir John was dying. It is said that the bells
were removed from the horse
cars that passed his house so as not
to annoy the dying Premier.
The end came at 10: IS P.M. in the
evening of Saturday. June 6, 1891.
The funeral of Sir John A. Macdonald was one of the largest that
had been
seen in Canada up to that time, and few have been as
impressive in the 100 years since.
So much of his career had
involved
railways, for campaigning. general travelling and, of
course, the CPR construction, that it was only fitting that there be
a special funeral train to carry his remains from Ottawa to Kingston
where he was buried.
One car was fitted up as a mortuary chapel
with a dias on which the coffin was placed. Motive power for the
train was
supplied by CPR locomotive 283, which had been built
by
Hinkley in Boston in 1883, and which survived only until 1897
when
it was scrapped, perhaps as the result of a wreck. The train
was, as usual on such
occasions in those days. draped for its entire
length with black cloth and other decorations as a sign of mourning.
It is interesting that the surviving photo of the train shows that the
right-hand connecting rod of 283 had been strengthened by having
steel members strapped to top and bottom. This was quite often
done as a temporary repair in those days, and it is interesting that
an engine with such a repair was
chosen to haul such an imporiant
train. In any case, no mechanical problems developed en route.
The Dominion Illustrated magazine covered the events of
Wednesday, June 10 1891 in detail including several illustrations
MAY -JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 105
A Fiew of Ihe hearse leaFing Ihe Cily Hall al KingslOIl. The passenger cars in Ihe background are from Ihe Grand Trunk. The one il7
Ihe cenlre was old in 1891, wilh Ihe finllype of clerestory roof, illikely dales from the early 1860s. The ol7e to {he righl of il is not
much newer Mosl of the alher cars were probably quile new when Ihe photo was /{{ken.
which were of remarkable quality considering the developmenl of
half-tone printing technology
in 1891. The following account, as
well
as the photographs, is taken from their issue of June 20. 189 I:
The procession … .proceeded out 10 the Canadian Pacific Railway
Slalion
by way of Rideau alld Welling 1011 streels. Soon ajier
lea
Fing Ihe church a Iremendous storm of wind and min came 011.
dispersing Ihe crowd of speClators in all direClions for shelter; and
so heavy was Ihe downpour llial almost all {hose in the procession
itself had 10 fly for refuge. thus leming the corlege 10 consist solely
of those in carriages. The mililia suffered much from the rain,
being entirely wilhout sheller,
and Ihe men were drenched from
head 10 fOOl. AI lasllhe SImian was reached. and amid {he {ears of
many, and a sad silence, all Ihm was mOrlal of Sir John A.
Macdonald
fore Fer lefr Ihe city in which he had spenl so many
year
s. As {he lrain was leaFing an old man. slanding bareheaded
on the platform. called oul. Good-bye, Sir John, Good-bye The
kindly lips
of Ihe sl({/esman were forever silent, bUI ill the hearlS
of all that mournful company re-echoed Ihe farewell.
InlO a car,
draped heavily wilh massive folds of crepe. was borne
Ihe caskel. Manyfloral {ribUleS of rare beauty lay abOUI il. and Ihe
air was h
eavy wilh the rich pelfume they exhaled. The doors were
kept
open during Ihe IIIn; and Ihe groups ofwalchers who slOod 011
the cross roads, Ihe hillsides. and Ihe slation platforms, as the lrain went by, could catch a
fleeting glimpse of Ihe flower-shrouded
coffin.
SlOPS were made at Carle Ion Place and al Smilhs Falls,
where crowds o.fpeople pressed around Ihefuneral car wilh a sad
but eager reFerence;
({/ the laller tOlvn afurlherfloral offering was
made
by Ihe Liberal-Conservalive Association. AI Perlh no SlOp
was made, bUI (he Ira in passed through Ihe station very slOWly. Ihe
l
oad band was in waiting, and played Ihe Dead March as Ihe cars
went
by; minule guns and the loiling of bells could be heard al
inlavals Ihrough the strains of music.
Kingslon was reached aboul half-past len o
clock Ihcll nighl. The
station.
and the large squares immediately opposite was densely
crowded wilh cilizens, e
ager to see Ihe lasl home-coming of Iheir
illuSlrious represel1lalive. The casket was taken
from Ihe funeral
car and carried over 10 its place of honour in Ihe Cit) Hall 011 the
sho
ulders of eighl policemen of Ihe civic forces, under commalld
of Chief Horsey ….. AI Iwo 0 clock Ion June I J I Ihl special
parliamel1lary Irain arrived from Ol/awa, and preparalions were
immediately
madefor the laslmarch 10 Ihe cemetery at Cararaqlli.
Ihree
miles dislal1l.
In this time of uncertainty about the future of the country which Sir
John
A. Macdonald did so much to create, it is very appropriate to
commemorate his death a century ago anel to remember that what
he s
aid in 1867 applies still: Let us be English or let LIS be French,
bllt let us always be loyal and above all let LIS be Canadians.
Page 106 RAIL CANADIEN MAl -JUIN 1991
MAY -JUNE 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 107
CRHA Communications
TO OUR READERS -OUR APOLOGIES IlAlLW.y MAIL SEn VICE EXHIBITIO~
Your EdiIOf$, and our Production M a.nagcr, ~hare ) nllr cOII,tdernblc
disap!X)intlllcnt at the ,cry
POOR QUALITY of
reproducllon of ~ever:ll
photo~ In the March-Apnl
i~~u~ of Canadian Ra.il.
TIlCrcjsrJOlhingtobegamed
by pointing fingcTl :u the
offenders:
but ) our edilor
loot: his u~ual long ntk by
Metro 10 in:opecr the plJtcs
before printing
+ and the)
appeared to be 0[ ver)
atteptable{IUaIiIY. The bo.-st
Itlid pl:Us sometime go
astr-J}: und }OU sa the
fe,ulb.
To shnw you lhallhcoriginal
photos were
of reproducIble
qualilY …… 0: are R:printing
1.10 orlhe hoIO~ from the
March-April
l!>sue (those
on pages 49 and 61): ilnd
you be the Judge …. hen yOll
comp3re them.,., ilh thc
priots In i~uc No. 421. As
10 the future. Ie are
inve~lIgaing ~uc:h new
proce~:.c~ as c()mpulcr
:LIming. as well asch:mges
In l~ half-tone ncg,IIi1e~
and pl;uc~.
MORE ,P()LOliY
The C.R.n.I. KinJ,:Slon Oil isian \ 111 hOSI COF[RE~CE ,)J
from Augusl1 InAuguslS. 1991. Regislratiol1 forlhecQufcrenc:e
ill I)e Thursda~ evening III Ihe I)Qnald (;onlon Centr!! of
Queens Lnhersil) frOIll \hieh all the aclilities will originate.
Actililies are pl:llOed 10 iudude a lisillO lfrm.:. trips ro rhc
Ridcllu Valle) UhisionS Smiths Falls Railwa,l MuseulI1, and
to the Hrvcklille Railway Tunnel.
A
banquet ill be IH~ld Saturday elcllingallhl! Centre lind will
rctllure a lie,l illite ~Ilcaker. Sel11inars will bl. held in Ihe lecture
thea
tre,
I-ccommodation for those from out of town wil/ be arrilngcd at
the
I)onald Gordun Cenllcor IIboard the Icehreaker ··Ah.·_xandcr
Henlf·
Cost for Ih~ c(lnrerence has bl~n sel :11 $95.00, IIhich ineJuuts
alilranspollat ion, mid-day meals 3 nd bam/Ut:I,,crolllmO!.lal i(Ul
will cost appIO~illl:lle/.I $-40.1)(1 pcr night.
Y
our early Iegistration will he appreCial(d u~ the Cunfclence
Committee.
Ile:1SC Cllllt:llr:
eR!I. Kingston I)i i,jon
P.O. 8u, 103, St;,Ii1l
Kil1),(.;;lun. (Jnl;;
71 r.I >tJ
i~jrillg the national CJpual thl~
ummershould plan to Ijev.
the special
c:o:.hiblt r~:lIurilig
the Railway Mall Service
at
the Can;Kilan Iuseum
of Civililation. Mount~
b) the National Po … t;11
Mu~eum. rhe cxhibl
document.> the more th.111
100 yeal> when the mail
mo .. ed by raIl. A pka…mg
bl~nd of photos.. :lf1ifncll..
l1lodcl~ and film foolage i~
u..cd 10 e~plain lhe role Ihe
railay l)lared In the
natJOn~ mail .. enice,
Special alt~ntion i~ p..1id 10
the dUlies of the raIlway
mail clerks. l1Je postsl
mlJ~eum carried out
inlervicw~ wilh 65 fomler
rail,ny mail clerks.
Rounding out the c,hibit is
uspecinll·hildrcn·
… attivily
room.
The Canudi:ln
)1usc:um of Ci,ihz.uioo j,
in Hult. II is open Tuesday
Ihroogh Sunday.
While an
admission fCC: i, chnrged
mo~t da), of the \eck.
admiS!;;on on ThIJNlay~ IS
free. The e:(hlbllion cl():,C.~
on Scptember 2. 1991.
For the laiC i~suing oi
Charitable Receipt:. for donations r«eived in 1990. We hope thar
OUi Canadian donoT did nllt mi,~ the deadline for filing Ineomc Illx
ICturns hile :awaiting the amval ofa ta; nXClpt frol11the CRHA:
but if you did, they arc as v.ekome by Revellue Cllnlldu for 1991
as
t~y Ief: fOf 1990. IN
MEMORAM
!Ile:lllwhile. We are lImlllging I method whereby our computer
volu
nteer. Jim Bouchard, IlJl halc hl~ computer do most of the
or; 10 prepanng rhe laX receipts for J f)I) I. and beyund. The
Trra.>urer:. sign:uure will. however,
continue m hi: hand rlllcli. Our
member. Norman John Cardv.ell died on February II. 1991.
:1 vicllm of murdlT in the Ton>flto subway yMem.
lIis acquaintencl!s in the railway hobby (.Irc~s thcir CQndolcncc~
hi~ f:amil).
CANAOIAN RAILWAY MUSEUI!
Members ure remllld£d trul the Canadian Railw!lY r-.·Iu~ulll :l.t
Oclson -St. Constant P.Q. Will.>OO1l be open for tnc 1991 ~ea~QIl.
Remember. all members and their immediatc families arc adnlliled
frec of
charge.
BACK COliER. nu:sday. N()1tm/J(I 18, 191 J sa, c(/r 658 of he MOlllre(li Tmlllhtfys CUlJlfHJII) IIlIIlIing (lI1 Nom Dame SfrN E(w IIlur
II. ((}TII~· of h A I·~ml!·. 658 fwd /Jtrll Imil ill 19(X) lind h{U (OII1lrtlll /(I (lli()!lhiCluilr in 1910. II ,(If ()/It {)[I~ [ell dOI//)/~-~l1dtrs 011
II SH/CIII ,I/m rrlied 11/11105/ (1/111((1 011 slIJgk-rlUlnJ oprrlJliufI.
CRHA A/,{/uIIJ. BInns Cfll/rcl;OIl.
Canadian Rail
120, rue St-Pierre, St. Constant, Quebec
Canada J5A 2G9
Postmaster: if undelivered within
10 days return to sender, postage guaranteed,
PLEASE DO NOT FOLD
MAIL~POSTE
~—.-… -,
__ fIeoo!_
LtI.rmaii Post.lttlre
PERMIS 148
5T CONSTANT, QUE.. J5A 2G2
NE PLiEZ PAS S.V.P.

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