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Canadian Rail 421 1991

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Canadian Rail 421 1991

Canadian Rail ¢:±
No. 421
MARCH -APRIL 1991
CANADIAN RAIL
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus
CO-EDITOR: Douglas N. W. Smith
PRODUCTION: A. Stephen Walbridge
CARTOGRAPHER: Wilham A. Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Fred F. Angus
For your membership In the CAHA, which includes a
subscriptioo 10 Canadian Rail. write 10:
CRHA, 120 Aue St-Pierre, $1. Constant. Oue. J5A 2G9
Rates:
PRINTING: Procel Printing
TABLE OF CONTENTS
THE AGASSIZ STATtON ……………… . ………………………………………. .
A LOOK BACK
••• CANADIAN NATIONAL Ts…… . ……. ….. .
RAILROADS OF MISSISaUOI COUNTY, QUEBEC. 1859 TO 1989 …… ..
TORONTO RAILWAY FENDERS OF 1908 ………………………………………….. .
JAMeS GOOD, AN UPDATE. ••••.•.•.•……..•……..••••…..
..•..•……•.•••••……•…..•….
CANADIAN NORTHERN PASSENGER CAR UPDATE ………….. .
ASBESTOS
& DANVILLE LOCOMOTIVE UPDATE ……………….. ..
THE SAGA OF MLW LOCOMOTIVE 53632 …………………………….•…………
BOOK AND PERIODICAL REVIEWS …………….•….. . …..•………….
CRHA COMMUNiCATI
ONS ………………………………………………………………… ..
in Canada:
outside Canada: $29 (including GST).
$25.
In U.S. funds.
ARNOLD McCOMBS …… .
CARL
GAy …•…
STEPHEN WALBRIDGE
FRED ANGUS ………………. ..
DANA ASHDOWN ……….. .
RAY
CORLEy ……. .
PAT WEBB ………………..•…
42
47
54
58
60
60

65
THE BUSINESS CAR …………………………………………………………………………………………….. . 68
Canadian Rail is continually In need 01 news. slories. historical dalB. photos. maps and other malerial Please send all contributions 10 the
edilor: Fred F. Angus. 3021 Trafalgar Ave. Montreal. P.O. H3Y lH3. No payment can be made 101 contribuTions. but Tile contribuTel WIll
be gwen credit lor malenal submitted Material win be reTurned to the contributor If requested. Remember Knowledge is 01 little value unless
It
is shared WIth others.
NATIONAL DIRECTORS
Frederick F. Angus Hugues W. Bonin J. ChrL$topher Kyle
R.C. Ballard Roberl Carlson William Le Surf
Jack A. Beatty Charles De Jean Bernard Marlin
Waller
J. Bedbrook Gerard Frechette Robert V.V. Nicholls
Alan C.
Blackburn David W. Johnson Andrew W. Panko
The CRHA has a number of local diVISions across the country. Many hold regular meettngs
and issue newsletters. Further information may be obtained by wnllng 10 lhe division.
NEW aRUNSWICK DIVISO<
PO So. 11152
Sa. Jam N B E2L 401
ST LAWJlEHC£ VIol.I£Y DMSION
I 0 Sol 22. S!Mion V
MonUNi P a H3B 3J5
RJDEAU VALLEY OIVlSION
PO Bo.1III2
SmllnFOnlK7115A5
KINGSTON DIVISION
PO 80.< 103. Smoon 11
~! TORONTO l YORK DIVISKlN
I O. Bo. 5S-&~. T …….. 11
TOfonJc>. On! M5W lP3
tMGARA DIVISION
PO eo.5e3
Sl. c.r-..w.. On L2R 8W1!
WlNOSOR·ESSEX OIVISION
300 cab.ma RC>ao;t EIISI
W
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KEYSTONE DlVISQN
I~ ReyooI$ a.~
~MwI. R3i(aM4
CALGARY & SOtJTli WESTERN OIVISION
eQ·6100 4t/I …… N-E.
~. AtbIrI T2A 5ZB
AOCI(y !.IOONT …. IN DIVISION
I O. eo. 6H)2. SIaIIon-C-
E<;ImorIIon, AtIerIa T58 ZNO
SEU PO B<»t 39
~sc VOE2S0
CROWSNEST KE111..E …un DMSJON
po 80 •• 00
Cr~robrook.. S.C VIC 41-19
NEl..SON ELECTRfC TRAMWAY SOCIETY
123
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pfUNCE GEORGE-N£CHAI«).fRASER ONISION
Po. Bo.2_
Prtoc. Geo<9I. S.C 1m 2S8
PAClFfC COAST DIVISKlN
1.0 60< 1006. StatIot1-....-
V rBCllC2f!1
Douglas N.w. Smith
Lawrence M. Unwin
Richard Vlberg
A. Stephen Walbridge
John C. Weir
FRO,
CO~ER: E.Qr/y;/I /908 II,~ Tormrln
Rai/uTI. (mIl/Hili I(>Slrd 1/1< lIul)OI! Atrlo,
/llIme Prlllle,. /908 Iypl! QII il.< TRC ~I /144 TIS c/OSlIj()l ,lrr IC< IIhrll
,h( photo IIU.I 1(11;(11. /144 J hrmlil II ……
… /1IJ,,1 (·tII a uujJ /IIIlh( Iroo/ (/ush. II IJ
Imill in ,h-t TRC, (> … UlillI. U/ hfl mlO
unlt( QII Fd)/J,ary 17. f9()..t II.wrl/(d /hr
7TC m/Hknl/:t/if 1<)21.1923 .wl({ rrm(,ill((/
Ide lIIi/ 19J6. III ,;,;( p/tm,). ,h .. Irlll..,
Iw-ill:!! IrS/(lllor ·,ig;/IO·-//lui Iws pass(t/ {h(
{(JI. hold;IIR r … o /IINI .hQlfl!rf/r,:ulIg.
As part of its aCTivities. the CRHA operates
the Canadian RaIlway Museum at Delson I
St. Constant. Que. which is about 14 ITUtes
(23 Km.) trom downtown Montreal. It is
open from ate May to early October (dairy
until La
bour Day). Members. and their im·
mediate tamirles. are admitted free of charge .
GOA!. Of THE ASSOCIATION Tl-IE COllECTION PRESERVATION AND OISSEMINATION OF ITEMS R8.AflNG TO THE HISTORY Of RA.U.WYS IN CA.NAOA
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 39
Tile Agassiz Statioll
By Arnold McCombs
Agassiz station and caboose at their present location. This now comprises the Agassiz Museum.
The Fraser Valley is located in the south west corner
of British Columbia. extending about 93 miles (150 kilometres)
easterly
from Vancouver. Prior to the 1858 gold rush on the Fraser
River, only a handful
of fur traders and explorers travelled the few
trails which penetrated the dense rain forests that covered most
of
the valley at that time.
The gold rush, however, provided the impetus for the
establishment
of New Westminster, located just south-east of what
is now Vancouver near the mouth of the Fraser River, as the seat
of the then government and to triple the population of British
Columbia almost over night.
By the l860s the settlement
of the Fraser Valley began in
earnest. The land was rich and fertile.
In addition to the trails, the
Fraser River provided the means for the sternwheelers to traverse
the full length
of the valley. Among the first permanent settlers at
the easterly end
of the valley was the Agassiz family.
Captain L.N. Agassiz was an ex-officer in the Royal Welsh
Fusiliers who had come to British Columbia seeking a new life for
himself and his young family. Between 1858 and 1862, while his
wife and four young children stayed in Eastern Canada, he
travelled throughout the gold fields and the Fraser Valley. After
being joined by his wife and children in 1862, a failed attempt
to
reach the Caribou resulted in a temporary stay at Hope and Yale at
the extreme eastern end
of the Fraser Valley. The decision was
made to back track, however, and the same year the family rafted
some forty kilometres back down the Fraser River.
They came
ashore at a point on the north bank
of the Fraser River near land that
Captain Agassiz had pre-empted a few years earlier.
[t was here
that the Agassiz Farm was established from which the town
of
Agassiz derives its name.
By the 1870s, the value
of the natural resources of British
Columbia was recognized and plans were developed for a trans­
continental railway to connect the west coast with the east.
The
route on the north side of the Fraser River through the Fraser
Valley was one
of the last segments of this massive undertaking to
be completed. Construction had commenced through the notorious
Fraser Canyon area to the east
of Hope in the early 1880s. By 1886,
however, the railway had been completed through Agassiz and
on
to Port Moody just east of Vancouver. A modest railway station
was constructed that year
to service the area. Charles Tnkman, a
former employee
of a railway company in Texas. became the first
agent for the CPR at Agassiz. Needless
to say, 1886 was a
milestone
in the history of the development of Agassiz and of the
Fraser Valley.
Page 40 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
The year
1886 was not only
Tourism may have
. been
one of the fi rst
major industries of the
area
due to the Saint
Alice Hotel, but
certainly as the land
was cleared and
developed, agriculture
became a major force.
Early in the century
before pasteurization,
dairies were located
close to the cities so
that milk could be
delivered fresh to the
market. Agassiz
became a major
collecting point for the
CPR milk run from
the
farms in the area to
the d a i ries near
Vancouver.
significant to the
Agassiz area for
completion of the
railway, but for a
number of other
reasons as wei J.
Harrison Lake is
located just eight
kilometres north of
Agassiz and at that
time, was a pristine
body
of water sixty
kilometres
in length
set at the foot of
massive snow capped
mountains. Tn 1886,
a trail
wascuttheeight
kilometres from
Agassiz to Harrison
HotSprings where the
Saint Alice Hotel was
built. Because
of the
The Agassiz station as it appeared in a photograph taken in August, 1899.
Until I 926 when the
Lougheed highway
was completed to
Agassiz, the only way
nearby health giving
natural hot springs as well as the beautiful setting, the hotel
became
world famous. Many a celebrity from the United States, Europe,
as well as Canada, arrived in Agassiz by train then travelled by
coach to the Saint Alice.
Agassiz became a significant town on the CPR in the
Fraser Valley for a
number of other reasons as well. Until the
conversion from wood to coal in the 1890s, the Agassiz station was
a
major wood stop. Up to 250 men were engaged in wood cutting
in the area during that time. Possibly being related to the fact that
it took time to load the wood, Agassiz also became a meal stop
until the trains started including dining cars. Donald McRae had
a house near the
CPR tracks in Agassiz and became one of the first
to contract to provide meals to train crews and passengers at 35
cents
per meal. The Bella Vista Hotel, built in 1891 and located
just a block from the station, was another meal contractor in the
area.
Around the
same time in 1886, the Government of Canada
enacted legislation to
create a number of experimental farms
across Canada.
For a number of pertinent reasons, a site just to the
north
of the CPR tracks across from Agassiz was one of the few
chosen sites. A
couple of years later the beginnings of an
experimental or research faml was established, This certainly
enhanced the reputation
of the Agassiz area as an agricultural
centre and increased farm production traffic for the CPR.
The exact cause is not known, but in 1893 the original CPR
station was completely destroyed by fire. Given the importance of
the Agassiz stop at that time. however, the station was immediately
replaced by a larger
wood frame building. While the original
station
saw much railroad history, so did the newer 1893 station. to travel
to or from
Agassiz was either by CPR or by ferry across the Fraser River.
The winter of 1934-1935 was one of the worst in history for
the Agassiz area. In January, drifts up to twelve feet high stopped
all rail traffic for ten day
s. HYdro power was lost for over a month
and telephone service was not fully restored for
more than two
months.
The Fraser River flood of 1948 cut the CPR rail lines near
Agassiz in several places and disrupted service for several weeks.
Aside from all these natural disasters, the structure
of the
rail traffic through Agassiz itself changed.
While Agassiz was
never a
major stop for freight except for the milk run, passenger
and mail service was an important aspect for the station agent. As
with
so many stations in the country. however, the passenger and
mail activity diminished to the point that the
CPR could no longer
keep an agent in Agassiz. The last ticket agent in Agassiz was Dick
De
lacherois and then was only working pan-time at the end.
Just prior to the station closing pelmanently in the mid
1960s,
it was the oldest operating wooden CPR station in British
Columbia. After its closing, the station sat dormant for several
years. In 1985, however, the Agassiz-Harrison Historical Society
under its then president, Helen Vaughan, sought and finally
concluded the purchase of the station (for one dollar).
In the meantime, the Agassiz-Harrison Historical Society,
under the guidance of a subsequent president: Joyce McRae,
negotiated the lease of a parcel of land from the Research Station
which is located just across the CPR tracks from the station. On
November 22, 1985, the station was moved to its new site. The
move required the CPR rail system at Agassiz to be shut down for
two hours as crews moved the station over the tracks.
MARCH -APRIL 1991
Once at its new location,
renovations and restoration costing
$80,000 and financed with a
number
of federal and provincial grants
commenced immediately, When the
station was officially opened in May,
1986, it became the
home for the
Museum and Archives
of the Agassiz­
Harrison Historical Society,
Since opening as a museum in
1986,
the station has welcomed over
10,000 visitors, Recently additional
storage and display space has been
added at
the rear of the building and
only last year in 1989,
the society
acquired a 1949 vintage
caboose, This
is now part of the museum and is also
open to the public.
The Agassiz Harrison
Historical Society and its current
president, Ella Pretty, extends a warm
welcome
to anyone interested in the
history of the Agassiz area or who
would like
to view what once was the
oldest operating wooden
CPR station
in British Columbia,
CANADIAN RAIL Page 41
A local milk train, hauled
by Pacific-type locomotive
2585, stops at Agassiz
station in the 1920s,
One
of the major parts of moving the station was crossing the main line c.p tracks,

Page 44 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
4036 enters Winnipeg off the former Canadian Northern line that snakes through nOllhern Minnesota from Fort William (now
Thunder Bay). January,
1951.
The last of the T-l s, T-1-c number 4044, at Truro, NOla Scotia in October, 1956.
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 45
The T-2-as spenl mosl of lheir career in Toranlo lransfer senice. This was Ihe firSI applicalion oj Vanderhill lenders 10 eN
power. The pholo was laken in TorOlllO ill March. 1954.
A T-4-a, number 4312. was olle oj Ihe 10col1lolives renumhered in 1959. II became 4712.
r
Page 46 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
Here is T-4-h number 4316 struggling on the long lIpgrade from the east. Winnipeg, August 1950.
The only 2-10-4 types on the CN and its affiliates were
the T-3-as of the Central Vermont. The 705 is pictured at St. Albans,
Vermont
in August of 1939.
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CAIlADIAII RAIL Page 47
Railroads of Missisquoi County Quebec
1859 to 1989
By Stephen Walbridge
Oliginally presented to a meeting of the Missisquoi Historical Society on January 17th, 1980 and later updated.
Let us turn the clock back to about 1810 to 1840 and imagine
ourselves living in Missisquoi County -a long sixty miles from the
nearest major centre
of population, MontreaL
A map compiled
in 1812 shows a road from Missisquoi Bay and
SI. Armand north towards
Lawrence in the Granby area. On a
map dated 1829, a
Post Road is shown. Swanton, Philipsburg,
Henryville, SI. Johns to LaPrairie.
An advertisement dated February, 1837 announced the SI. Johns
& Troy Stage,
operating along the valleys of the Pike and
Missisquoi
Rivers to Troy via the Grand Line, Stanbridge,
Frelighsburg, Richford -Sunday, Wednesday, Friday after breakfast.
Leaving
Troyan Monday, Thursday and Saturday mornings at 4
oclock to arrive at SI. Johns, in summer, in time to take the Rail
Road cars to Montreal.
In winter, passengers will take the St.
Johns to Montreal stage. More than forty years later things were
scarcely better, for the Stanstead Journal for
January 9, 1879
reports a monstrous storm:
The stage between Cowansville and
Frelighsburg, a distance
of 12 miles, was delayed two days.
Bear in mind that the first public railroad in Canada, the Champlain
& SI. Lawrence, opened in July, 1836 between LaPrairie and St.
Johns.
By 1850, a map shows a road from the Vermont border through
Frelighsburg to SI.
Johns, and one between Cowansville and
Chambly.
But two roads toward Montreal were hardly enough to
serve a growing population. Stage coaches were slow, and freight
was presumably hauled by horse or ox-drawn wagons.
A
map of the Eastern Townships dated 1870 shows a rai Iroad from
Iberville through the St. Alexandre, Stanbridge, St.
Armand areas
and a second
one through the northern tip of the county. The
Railroad Era had indeed arrived. Several railroads in the New
England states had already connected with Montreal; several more
were being promoted. Missisquoi County was prime territory for
such international railway lines which would,
of course, also serve
local needs.
Who were the promoters of these railroads, and how did they go
about organizing and financing a railway? The lists of Directors of
early railroads in the County include several Vermonters, local
residents -both French and English speaking, frequently an M.P.
and often a local doctor or lawyer.
Their method was to dream up
a railroad. I
have been unable to find any economic studies such as
would be prepared today.
Manyofthese railroads were development railroad
s for which economic studies would have been quite
meaningless.
A charter was then sought, initially under the Quebec Railway Act
of 1869, later under Federal Charter. The promoters would then
estimate
costs, hopefully, but not necessarily after a careful survey
of the proposed line. Frequently the railroad did not follow its
originally-planned route, as detours through towns that offered
grants were often made. Usually, a very minimal amount
of the
promoters funds were paid into tbe enterprise. The Federal,
Quebec and Township governments were canvassed for grants,
free land, guarantees
of interest on bonds and many other devices
for securing financing.
Door-to-door canvassing spread the story
of the glorious benefits of railroads, and tile financial rewards
available to subscribers. Construction was frequently
commenced
with only part of the financing of all costs arranged for. The
London, England money market was a favourite source of funds,
generally secured
by bonds. I have a deed of gift, in beautiful
handwriting, by which several Bedford-area farmers donated part
of their farms for a railway roadbed.
Suppliers
of all kinds of goods and services frequently had to
finance the
construction of the railroad, with or without the
permission
of the supplier, by the use of long credit terms. My
grandfather was one
of these suppliers. He took his suits for
payment to the
Supreme Court on, we believe, two occasions. He
lost one case (the other we havent traced) and
in the end he was
never paid.
Frequently, charters for railroads
changed names, destinations and
routes. Tracing these through books
of law to establish a continuity
with the actual railroad
is an interesting subject for research. When
construction was
commenced, it was assured only so long as the
funds lasted.
From an engineering point of view, Missisquoi County is without
much challenge. Elevations from
one end of the county to the
other, for the location
of local routes, vary by relatively few feet.
Crossings
of the Yamaska and Pike Rivers require few major
bridges. Roadbed material was scraped up from the sides
of the
right-of-way, leaving
drainage ditches in place.
Eight railroads were built
in various parts of the County during the
1858 to 1898 era. A
separate chart lists them in chronological
order. In 1989, only three
of the original eight are still in service.
Let us look briefly at the history of each.
Page 48 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
1. STANSTEAD, SHEFFORD AND CHAMBLY RY.
T
his railroad was incorporated in 1853 to connect St. Johns,
Canada East (by then served by the Champlain & St. Lawrence to
LaPrairie) with Farnham, Magog, Stanstead and American railroads.
The bLidge across the Richelieu River was built in 1858, and the
railroad continued
on to Farnham, opening for service on January
I, 1859. It continued to Granby which was reached by the end of
the same year. The Farnham
to Granby line was abandoned as of
December I,
1988. During 1859 and 1860 it was operated by the
Champlain
& SI. Lawrence RR. In 1862 the Vermont Central took
control
to forestall competition with its Montreal to Rouses Point
N.Y. line. The Iberville to Farnham section served until 1935,
when
the current owner, Canadian National Railways, obtained
rights to operate on Canadian Pacific tracks to Farnham, thence to
Granby by their own tracks. Some of you will recall the SS & C –
CN station in Farnham, directly north of the CP station.
2. MONTREAL
& VERMONT JUNCTION RY. CO.
This rail.road was incorporated in 1861 to build from near Iberville
to near Swanton, Vermont via SI. Alexandre, Des Rivieres and St.
Armand Station.
It was 22.77 miles long and was completed in
1864. The Travellers Official Railway Guide of 1868 shows trains
leaving St. Albans for
SI. Johns at 6: 10 A.M. and returning at
11:45 A.M., a one hour and 55 minute run, passenger cars only. It
left again at 6:50 P.M. and returned later as a mixed train, freight
and passenger cars. Stations mentioned do not include Stanbridge
Station:
this leads us to believe that it was established shortly
be
fore 1879 when the Champlain & SI. Lawrence Junction RaiJway
was built from Stanbridge Station to Farnham. [Stanbridge station
is in the Official Guide for June, 1877. Ed.]. For many years, early
in this century, the Central Vermonts train, the Washingtonian,
ran from Montreal on this line via New York to Washington
nightly until the wood-pile bridge across
the Richelieu at Iberville
could
no longer carry the heavy locomotives required to haul the
train through the Green Mountains.
At Des Rivieres, there was a
deep, stone-
lined well to supply water to the locomotives. The
former
Des Rivieres station is still standing ( 1989) at Notre Dame
de Stan bridge, but barely. From the mid-1940s, passenger service
was supplied by a diesel-electric powered car operating from SI.
Albans to Montreal in the morning. It spent the day in the hole on
Dorchester Street in pre-Place Ville Marie days, and returned to St.
Albans
in the evening. The line was dismantled in 1955.
3. LAKE CHAMPLAIN & ST. LAWRENCE JUNCTION RY.
This railroad was conceived in 1871, when a charter was granted
to the Philipsburg, Farnham and Yamaska Railway Co. to build a
railroad from the waters of Missisquoi Bay
to some point in the
parish of SI. Armand West and the Village of Philipsburg by way
of Bedford and Farnham in a northerly direction as far as Three
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 49
Monlreal & Allanlic Railway Co. locomotive 28, coupled to a combine car (express and baggage seclion with smoker passenger
seclion)
and a passenger car. each with open pla/forms. The train is probably at StclI1bridge Station, some time in the 1890s, awaiting
departure time for its 14-mile trip to Farnham, through Bec/ford, Mystic and St. Sabine. The locomotive was built by the Rhode Island
Locomotiv
e
works of Providence in 1883 for the SOItih Eastern Railway Co. No. 28, originally named St. Cesaire, became M & A
No.
28. then became CPR 7162 in July, 1914, while retaining its M & A idemilyfor legal reasons. It was scrapped in 1917. lIS driving
wheels measured 63 and its cylinders were 17 X 24. It was coal-fired.
and the headlight was lighted by kerosene. The numbers
of the M & A cars are not clear. The emulsion on the glass negative has eroded, accounting for the black border The negative is
the property
of the Missisquoi Historical Society, Stanbridge East, Que. and was found in a col/ection of glass negatives in an allic
in Bedford about 1980. The print was filed in the CRHA Archives about 1984.
Rivers. This quotation came from an amendment to the act (June,
1877) authorizing the Philipsburg Farnham and
Yamaska Railway
(In 1875 the
LC & StLJ succeeded the PF & Y). This reads, in part,
as follows:
If the munic. Corp of Stanbridge subscribes $15,000,
it may oblige the
Ry. to pass th.rough places called Bedford and
Stan bridge Station. Construction in Missisquoi County commenced
in that year. The Stanbridge to Farnham section was built to a
gauge of3 feet 6 inches, using very light (35 lb.) rail. It commenced
operations in October, 1879 using a wood-burning narrow-gauge
locomotive purchased from the
Toronto & Nipissing Railway.
Quoting the Annual Report for 1880:
The LC & SL has been
greatly improved.
The light iron is being replaced by steel rail, and
the road
bed has been widened to 4 8 1/2 and ballasted. The rails taken up are intended to be used in extending the road to Missisquoi
Bay on Lake
Champlain, as provided in the Charter. Rolling stock
consisted
of 3 locomotives, 4 passenger cars and 3 freight cars. In
1881, the railroad was leased to the South Eas
tem Railway. In
1913, a siding was installed
in Bedford for B.R. Stevens, who
operated a cattle feed business. In 1914. The Weiland Vale Mfg.
Co., a manufacturer
of wood tool handles, installed a siding in
Bedford. In 1928,
Shawinigan Chemicals opened a quarry with a
siding near Bedford.
Passenger service was discontinued in April
1952, but freight
service is still offered in 1989. An unusual event
occurred about 1928 or 1929 when a tornado and the morning train
arrived simultaneously
near Mystic -at right angles! Two wooden
passenger cars were
blown into the ditch, with the loss of one life.
Page 50 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991


SOUTH-EASTERI! RAILWAV.-Montreal & Boston Air-Line.
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A. B. CHAFFIlIl, Secretary and Tresurer. Newport, Vt. Montreal, ~
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5 II 905 II II i 63 II 8 …….. Knowlton…. … 881809 626
II po» 20 …. ChamblyCanton …. 84 819 817 1 jn8 16 …… Waterloo •….. 80 742
640 n 934 25 …… Marlcnllc …….. 791808 II B06 I, ; 816 36 …… Roxton Falls …… 60: 623
715 IO 09 II 39··· West Farnham • 0 65 7,,0 73§.!. i2 00 P.M: 238 II 42 …….. Acton· …….. 54 i 6 au ,100,1
760
II
102
7 46 ……. nngh,,! …… 01581712 n 710 n I 336 . 99 60 .•..• Drummondville ….. 36 ~ 506 n :055A.
807 n 104 n 152 I …… CowallsvI? …. 0 52 635 II 643 II 358 n I Q4I)) 64 ……. 51.Germain ……. 32: 154 n !I027 1
e~5)) 105 II 6t …. SlItlon]lInCllon …. 43
60
7)) 621 n .512 ,012 II 75 …. St.Culliaume
7
… 2I 11422 II 19081
e.5 n III 13 1>4 …….. Sulton.FIt:i …… 4 55
8
II 6;4 1 648 II 1032 n 82 …….. 5t David …….. 14 402 18.;,
918 II IIJ7A.~., 72 l ……. Rlchto~d …. 013
2
,53
2
!6A n I COg 1044 86 …….. Yama,ka …….. 10 ,349 . 8001
1000 12 •• so,Ni
86
1 …… Mnso~~·tlle …… 1.81419: 621 I J.O.9_!:.:.:.:.-I_~:?_~C.!. 96,arr ……. Sor:lI. ….. lve. 0 t320 r.M.ryooA.
1010 I .~o N qo , ……. Nort), lroy ….. 0 4 4 W 512 ——–. ~
10 ~o P.M.~l 5ISO 104 arr, … Newport 0 .1,,0. :~3 >SA. M .:+135 •. ,·1.11
MA~;:;T5 f51>~I–afT , Yr.vmout~:f,:e. –,if3S;.;Tfos-;;:-M.q K NOWL TON ACCOMMODATION.
42,A.M.,725….. ! …. Concord … i 9Z5 n I.0.15.M.:;Leavc Knowlton …….. +542A.M.iiLeavc Sutton Junc …. +840
611A.~I.: 80~.M. .. M~nchester .. ,852 n 1 C;37A.M.!! . nro~noCorncr. ···.55 II . BromeCorner ….. 861
~~_A_ .• _.II_e_1_v_p_._._ .. __ a_r_I_ .. _._._. iI_a_s_hl_~a . .-:.:~:: __ II_?_20 ~1:i_8_4_5___I.:: Annc Su.ton June …. 602A.M.I· Arve Knowlton …….. 900-1
QIOA.M. I ;arr … Worcester .. lve. .~091 .. M., 73
0A
.
M.:
STANnARD-lI[of-laltim~.
1 00 p…. .arr … Providence .. Ive. I .10 P.M. II
735~191O~ –:~-;;::-:-:-:-:-:-i..owell.-.. -.~ -Ii 50P,M. ~~! N. n.-Train, marked • run daily: + daily, except Sunday. 0 Teli
–·-.-1———–.—————. I, graph stat,ons.
~~ _____ .~r::..:.~~~lve.!:.:..:..:.:~ __ ~lp.M. 520A. ..
830,0.. M. 10 05}.M. ·arr ….. DOEton …. .Ive. 1
700
P.M. 830. M.d CO~NECTIO~S.-I With Grand 1 runk, and Que~ec, M~nlr~2I,Ott1
———.—.———.——–;: & OCCIdental R. Ws., and boat< on 51. L~wrence RIver. Yllh CeDD
~A.M. ______ .a::.:.;~ewYor~ __ , ____ .Q30p.M·i. .. dM-
6 00
–. S I fi Id I 1
110
I Vermonl R. R .• St. Lawrence, ChamplaIn & JunctIon R. W., an .
P.M. 6jO,.M. .arr … pr ng Ie .. ve. . }.M. I I P I d & B R Y (5 I … ) • W h C IV
717p.M 800A.M. I …. Hartford …. n SOA.1. ,rea, ortan oston … outlern DIvIsIon. It entra
817p.M.922A .. f, … NewHaven … n 10 31 … ·.M.! ·lmont R.R. With PassumPsic R.R. With Central Vermont R.
1030 p.M.I2 0SNON arr …. New York …. Ive. 805,0.. M. I: 6 With Grond Trunk R. W. 7 Yith SI. Lawrence, Champlain & Jun.lt
l
CENTRAL VERMONT RAILROAD
NORTHERN DIVISION.
Oclo~r 1-·I–.-I8::CS:-o-.-~M=P-as-. Pa.!l. Mix. Pa5.IPas.!ISOUTH AND EAST. pas:-pas.-pas~pas.
NORT:(ANO-wEST. -A.M.;::-M.!.;oNP:;:~M.1 STATIONS. A.M.P.M.—-
Lve.St. Albans 10+ … 0 0 545 l73S 2 IO 616 8 20j:Lve. Waterloo 14 …… 645 l!;~
East Swanton … 0 Q 605 753 125 6 33 640j Wesl 5heflord ….. 658 Z 3/
» HighgateSpgs+o 13 613 8co 105 6i2I850 Granby ………… 715 320
P..,vi.nce Line … 17…………… …. Angeline ………. 730 405 Sl.
Armand+ …. O 18 622 8.0 130 652 900. WestFarnham …. 74S 500
llooer~ ……. 21 … …… .. . .[. …. 1 St. Bri~de…….. 75S 520
St:IJbridge+ ….. O
I
25 637 823 200 705 914 Verselles ………. 80. 536
Des Rlvleres+ … 07 6 H 827 210 710 920 IArr .. St. Johns ll…… 8~ 610
St. Alexander+ 034 6S7j 840 242 725 936 A.M.P …. P.M.A.M.
Arr.;st.JOhnsl+cI43 71519»0 320 H2, 965Lve.St.Johns
il
…… 85 4161730 ?l5,
S.S.&C.R.R. A.)..i.M.P.M.P.M.P.M. St.Alpxander …… 8404337&07501
Lve.8t.JohnsI+ .. O,43 83°1 417 Des Rivieres ……. 85 446: 805 827
Vcrsdles+ ……… 150 ;, 12 i 3G , Stanbrid.:e …….. ~ 571 462 810 838
St. B,igicle+ …….. 53 923 147 • Mooer s ……………… I …. I
We~t Farnham + 0 iS7 9 5: ~ 00. • St. Arman~ …. .. 9 IO 505 823 9 IO
Angeline+ ……… IC410231 525 Province LIne ……. I …. I ……..
Gran~+ ……. 072 IIIr,1 545 • Highi!ale Springs. 918j 317 832 935 We. … elford +
… 18011451 602 East Swantons …. 926 526 840 955
Arr .. WC1terloOI·.+.oI861J2~5; 617 .. ,Arr .. St.Albans
lo
….. H515i5 90°11040
.
NO Ill Po M. I A •• . P. N. P. M •• .MI
Some nineteenth cellfury timetables, together with a map showing the railway cOllnections from the Missisquoi area to MOl1lreal,
Vermont and other pariS
of Canada and the United States. The timetable of the Stan stead, Shefford & Chambly is dated May, 1869,
while the map and all other timetables were printed in 1881.
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL
LAKE CHAMPL.AIN &. ST. LAWRENCE JUNCTION R. W.
P. S. GENlJRO~. President. I J. N. CULVER, Allditor. J
OHN FO,TEH, ~Ianar,cr. S. A. BEATTIE, SUPl. Telegraph.
J. R. FosTeR, SUJlerintendcnt. General Offices-5t Hyacinthe,Que.
Pas. jEX5:MIS: Nov(1Ilber :.! .:.8~~:.-:-.1fls, pasi!~:1 CON N ECTIONS.
P. M.,A.M. t.EAVI!] [ARIRIEj :P. M. P. M ..
246 640 ° …. Stanbrldge …. 62,160 752 I With Cel)tral
267, 6 48 2~, …….. Bedf~~d…. …. 59., 137
i
745
310 656j 5 · …….. !lly,.c …… , S7, 125. 737, Vermont R. R. I
360 12011. ! …. ,Filrnham~ .. .. 48 ,IqO: 710 I
415 74°120 i … L Angc-Gard,en … 142 12051647. 2WithCentralVer-1
4
630
L
s
800j 26 ; ….. AbSbOllps.ford … 1
36
1130; 6621
70
mont R R S With Ii
v-17 31 ……. t. IC •… s 3T 1100
1 • •
l
550 sd 4
0
! … St. Hya.clnthe …. 22 ,1020,615 Grand Trunk Ry. I
505 s SOi 4 ·1·Stc. RosalIe Junction .. 21 I 9 so, 535
625 910,4
8
….. 51. Slmon ……. I14 9
I
S 516 I( With SOllth-east-
6~5 925 53 ….. Sl. Hugues … 1 9 i S3
0
500 I:
72595o162i .. St.CUlllaume4 .. 0 74S!430 ernR.R.
P. M.A.M. !ARRIVE] [LEAVE A.M. r. M.
Page 51
1. I5TAliBTEAD, BHEFFORD &; CHADLY
RAILWAY.
Madi MLB. llay, 186g. MI.is. 1l..11.
–1.:)1·1-STATIONS.
—-
P .. x
00 0 .., Waterloo … 43 740
o ~Ol 1 .•• W 61~ ::;l1.trord ••. 87 720
–I 7 ..•.. Hollacd …… 36

036 U .•…. Granby …… ~~ 700
6 ~O, 22 ….. S~. George ….. ~l 045
715
1
~g … Well Farnham … H 630
7 2~ 83 …. St. Brjgida …. 10 620
735 30 ….. SoixaIlt.e ….. T C 10
760
1
is … St. Johnll … 0 660
J.. x. 1.kftrnj lUUVlC P. )L
,
1 ConuectB Wllh Muntr,,1 s.nd Champlaln RAilway.
Page 52 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
4. MONTREAL, PORTLAND AND BOSTON RY. CO.
The history
of this railroad was very ably written by Norma
Whitcomb Young
in the Missisquoi Historical Societys Volume
14 in 1976. The purpose of the rai Iroad was as described in its title,
that
is a connection between Montreal, Portland and Boston.
Construction
to Farnham was completed in l877 and extended to
Stan bridge East via Durocher, Stone and Riceburg; it went into
service
on November II, 1879. The line was continued to Frelighsburg
in 1882 via Hunters Mills, and was later extended to the Vermont
border at East Franklin. There is some doubt whether or not this
extension ever went into operation for the steel was removed from
the entire line back 10 Farnham in 1883. The land where the tracks
were was unused
for 13 years and was then (1896) sold at a sheriffs
sale. Soon after
this, the tracks were re-Iaid the entire 18.28 miles
to Frelighsburg and service was resumed on November lO, 1901.
A timetable of about this period shows a mixed train
leaving
Frelighsburg at 6:30 A.M. and arriving at Farnham at 7:30 A.M.
A
passenger train left Farnham at 11 :00 A.M., arriving at Stanbridge
East at 11:40 A.M. and Frelighsburg at 1:20 P.M. The engine was
turned
on a hand-operated turntable at Frel ighsburg, and left at
I: 10 P.M., ten minutes before its scheduled arrival!! By 1933, the
timetable lists Freight Service Only. The line was c
losed in
September 1938, but the station at Frelighsburg survived until
1964. The CRHA
has its nameboard; removed in 1939.
5. SOUTH EASTERN RAILWAY COMPANY
The
history of this railroad is somewhat complicated; there was a
s
uccession of Charters, name changes, leases operated etc. Suffice
it to say that this railroad, in the late 1870s and 1880s, was the
prime mover between Montreal and New England, and, starting in
1889, Montreal and Maine to Saint John, N.B. Poors Manual, the
annual summary of
railJOad operations in NonhAmerica,commenced
listing the SER in 1876-77 West Farnham to State Line, VI. 32
miles, and 4 miles of siding in operation, Gauge 4 8 1/2,56 lb /
yd rail. The manual of 1877-78 lists operation from St. Johns to
Richford Vt. No rolling stock was owned, so it was probably
leased. By 1883, the Manual stated that 103,558 passengers were
carried
and freight hauled totalled 190,795 tons; the earnings were
~ 116,469. Reference is made to the LC & St.L Division of the SER
which operateci63 miles of railway from Stanbricige toSt. Guillaume.
Steel rail
of 72 pounds per yard replaced 56 pound iron rail as it
fractured less in winter. The SER built shops in Farnham in which
they built railway cars, and cast wheels. The SER station
at
Farnham burned down in 1949, and the shops were demolished
about 1970. This line
is owned by CP Rail, and rail traffic in the
Farnham area
to Vermont, and to Stan bridge, is alive and well.
6. THE UNITED COUNTIES RAIL WAY COMPANY
This railroad
was chartered in 1883, and in 1888 was authorized to
build from Richelieu to the U.S. border. Ten years later (August 1,
1898) it commenced operations from Iberville south to Noyan
Junction, via Sabrevois and Henryville,
to Vermont. A series of
name changes included the East Richelieu Valley
Ry., Quebec
Montreal
& Southern Ry. and, in 1929, Canadian NationalRailways.
Financial problems plagued its entire existence.
It was idle for
some years,
and was then taken out of service in May, 1931.
7. PHILIPSBURG JUNCTION RAILWAY & QUARRY CO.
We read in the account of the Lake Champlain & St. Lawrence
Junction
Ry. Co. how its charter read in part From the Waters of
Missisquoi Bay to some point…(near) the village of Philipsburg.
No
effort was made toward building the line from Stan bridge to
Philipsburg (6.75miles) until 1888. The PJR & Q was incorporated,
but financing was slow until a s
urveyors map of the line, dated 9th
February 1893, came
to light. The line crossed flat farms until near
Philipsburg, where
it climbed the escarpment to the marble quarry.
Construction was completed
to the quarry, and to a station in
Philipsburg, about 1895. The Official Guide for I R96 lists two
passenger trains daily each way,
to connect at Stan bridge Station
with Canadian Pacific trains
to Farnham, and with Central Vermont
trains
to New York. Stunbridge Station was thus the Union Station
for three railways. The line
to the pier on Missisquoi Bay was
completed about
1898. Quantities of hay were required to feed the
horses which provided the wagon-power
on the streets of Boston
and New York. Carloads of hay were off-loaded at the pier ancl
placed on barges to be towed by steam tugs down Lake Champlain
to market. Passenger service continued until about J 920; the
branch
to the pier was abandoned about that time. During the
1920s, I recall seeing a CPR locomotive (number 29) hauling flat
cars carrying huge blocks of Italian marble
to the Quarry for
processing. Service on the PJR & Q was discontinued about 1939.
8. CANADA ATLANTIC RA1LWAY COMPANY
The Canada Atlantics predecesso
r, the Coteau & Province Line
Railway, was
incorporated in 1872. However, the history of the
railroad from Coteau
to Cantic (named for the first three and last
three letlers
of the name Canada Atlantic) has been difficult to
pinpoint. We understand that the line across the Richelieu River
east
of Can tic and south-eastward across Missisquoi County in the
direction
of St. Albans Vermont was built in 1897. This railroad,
in that era, was owned by the Booth lumber interests of the Ottawa
Valley;
it exported large quantities of lumber via this route to U.S.
market
s. In 1989 it remains in service as part of Canadian
Nationals connection with New England. Amtra
ks passenger
train, The Montrealer, also uses this line.
IN CONCLUSION
Of the eight railways built in Missisquoi County between 1859 and
190 I, only three remain in service in 1989. It is not possible to ride
a regular Canadian passenger train
in the county. In the fairly short
span
of 130 years, railways played an important part in the
development
of the County, then gradually subsided into the
background. Would anyone care
to speculate on the modes of
transportation which may be used in the County in the next 130
years?
FURTHER RESEARCH
The writer will
be pleased to hear from readers who can improve
and enlarge on the above accouot of the history
of railroads of
Missisquoi County. Pictures of railroad-related events will be
most welcome. The authors address is: 196 Lakeview Ave.,
Pointe Claire, Que. H9S 4C5.
,
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL

CENTRAL VERMONT RAILROAD. 25
J. Greiory Smith, President. J. M. Foss, Gen. Asst. Supt. and J. Burdett. su~t. Rutland Dlv.
Jas. R. Lan~don, Vlce-Prcsldent. Mastcr Mechanic. 1. B. Futv~e. ~t. Northern Dlv.
John W. Ho Jart, Gcn. Manager. E. A. Chlttendcn, su~t. Local Frt. L. Millis, en. I
lW Through
D. D. Ranlett, Treasurcr. C.A. Conycrse.Asst. urt. Lac. Frt. Frclght Dept, 260 ashlngton
E. G. Lucas, Auditor. S. W. Cummings, Gcn. Pass. Agt. street, Boston, Mass.
General Offices-St. Albans, Vcrmont. Montreal Ottlec-l!J6 St. James Street.
Boston Offiee-260 Washington Street. Ncw York Oltice-317 Broadway, cor. Chambers St.
I!) ~7 671 68t 18 t ~ Tke .J une 2, 1884. 50 54 10 66 62
Mxd Pas. Pas. Mxd ;::; fare Eastern time. Pas. Pas Mix Pas.
CONNECTIONS.

——————-
A.M. P. )1. Lvc. Arr A. ~[. A.M. P.M. P.M. At
St.Albanswlth Nol.
….. P. M. 830 880 P.M. A.M. ….. iIIOllTREALI40747 82;; 10 3 680 1050 P.M. . ….
Dlv. for St. Johns, Mon-
….. 12 10 930 928 630 650 0 ….. St. Johns .. 431,1 720 925 845 730 1005 …..
treal and Waterloo:alHo
….. 12 25 935 983 6 S5 7 15 2 ….. S. S. & C. Jun.+ H 15 920 385 725 10 ro ……
with Eas. Div.forSheld-
….. 100 9 47 947 648 745 9 ….. S. Alexander 800 ~7 ():; 908 315 713 947 …..
on, Enosburgh Falls.
….. 160 1000 1000 700 8~ 15 ….. DesTIlvleres.+ §6 53 855 250 700 985 ….. Hichford, et.c., and with
….. 235 10 0Ii 1005 705
85(1 18 ….. Stanbrldge .. 400 648 850 285 665 981 ….. Wctern Div. for O~-
….. ….. ….. ….. ….. ….. 22 …..
Mooer·s·······t
SS7
d()n~hlr~ and Intermc
…. S 15 10 Ii 10 15 720 9~ 25 ….. St. Armand … 685 208 645 920
diate pomls.
26 ….. Province Line. …..
AtSt.Johns with Grnd
….. 340 10 2.~ 1023 7 SO 940 30 ….. HIgh1;atc Spgs. ~6 25 8 26 145 685 912 ….. Trunk R. W .
….. 400 1032 10 80 788 955 3-l ….. East wanton+ ~6 17 818 1 SO 628 905 …..
At Waterloo) w·ith
….. 416 10 38 10 SO 748 10 10 37 ….. Swanton Junc .. &6 12 812 1 15 622 900 …..
Waterloo & MagogRD.il-
…. 445 1050110 45 765 10 35 43 ….. ST • .lLUA.NS .. W74
600 t800 1~60 t6 10 taw …..
way •
P. M. A.M.lp. M. P.M. A.M. Arr. Lve. A.M. A.M. non P.M. P.M.
I
Page 53
I
I
I
I
;
i
,
I
i
An 1884 timetable
showing Celltral
Vermollt senice
from Montreal to
St_ Albans Iia
St{lI1bridge
and SI.
Armand. Note the
po
pulatiolls
a
ccording to the
ce
nsus
of 1880 .
-. _.
1
;
li9t!l, * Pally. t Dally. except Sunday. ~ Dally, except Saturday. V Daily, except Monday § Sundal8 0 1
fopllo.tio». [cens1.t~ qf ~ll&Ql opposite stations. + Small statio!1(l, n ¥,
TABLE OF RAILROADS OF MISSISQUOI COUNTY, QUEBEC
NAME OF RAILROAD FROM TO IN SERVICE OUT OF SVCE.
1. Stanstead, Shefford & Chambly Railway St. Johns Farnham Jan. 1,1859 1935
Farnham
Granby Dec. 31, 1 859 Dec.
1, 1988
2. Montreal & Vermont Junction Railway Iberville St. Armand 1864 1955
3. Lake Champlain & St. Lawrence Junction Ry. Stanbridge Stn. Farnham Oct. 1879 In service
4. Montreal, Portland & Boston Railway Chambly Ctn. Farnham Sep. 22, 1877 Sep.
1, 1925
Farnham Stan bridge E.
Nov_ 11, 1879 Mar. 1, 1883
Stan bridge
E. U.S. Border Sep_ 9, 1882 Mar. 1, 1883
Farnham
Frelighsburg Nov. 10, 1901 Jan.
16, 1939
(Rails re-Iaid after being removed
in 1883)
5. South Eastern Railway W. Farnham Sutton Jct. Jun. 10, 1872
In service
6. United Counties Railway Iberville Noyan Jct. Aug. 1, 1898
May18,1931
7. Philipsburg Junction Ry. and Quarry Co. Stan bridge Stn. Philipsburg 1895 C. 1939
Philipsburg
Pier 1898 1920
8. Canada Atlantic Railway Can tic -Noyan St. Albans 1897
In service
Page 54 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
Toronto Railway Fenders of 1908
By Fred Angus
From the earliest clays of electric street railways, serious concern has been shown for the safety of pedestrians. In the days of horse cars,
the
lower speeds made accidents less likely, and less serious if they did happen. Starting about 1890, the electric cars appeared on the streets,
and
were the first mechanically-propelled vehicles to operate in street service. The question of pedestrian safery became an issue from the
earliest days, and there were several fatal encounters between tram and pedestrian within a few months of the start of service in most major
cities. The first response of city authorities was to limit the speed of electric cars. sometimes to as low as four miles per hour, but it was
soon obvious that such artificially low speeds negated one of the major advantages of electric power. Soon fenders of various designs
appeared and were placed on the cars; these were designed to scoop up unwary pedestrians before they could be run over. By 1895. fenders
were almost universal on most street car systems.
As time
went on, new improved fender designs appeared. A completely satisfactory fender was never developed for, if a fender protuded
far
enough in front of the car. it would be too prone to damage. Eventually the fenders were located under the front platform. and actuated
by a
protective feeler hung in front. This was not likely to be damaged in traffic. but the poor pedestrian suffered. The assllmption was
that by 1910
most people were used to mechanical vehicles and could avoid them: if not they were out of luck.
In 1908
there was still hope for a better fender design, and in that year the Toronto Railway Company. which operated the city cars in Toronto,
tested the
Watson Automatic Fender, 1908 Type. The fender was installed on car 1244, one of their latest trams, which had been placed
in service on February 17. 1908. (and which survived until 1936). A similar fender was also tried on open car 603 which was already almost
nine years old. having been put into service on May 25, 1899 (it was later converted to trailer 236, and was eventually sent to Haileybury
after the disasterous fire there in 1922).
These extremely detailed photos were taken. in 1908, during these tests. and were made available by Ken Moil and Norris Adams of
Vancouver B.C. We take great pleasure in printing them as a photo story of an interesting feature of street railway history.
The Watson Automatic Fender, 1908 Type. Showing Flexihility. Conforms to conditiol1 of road bed.
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 55
Fender Dropped and Locked; impossible jor any objec//o pass IInder.
: f?.f . .;..,. …. ;:.. :, ~~~::h:-:.,~.~. ~ ~:
-i~~~~::.; :-,
••. : jci.
A guard screen as applied /0 1899 open car No. 603
Page 56 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
A secTional view of The fender. NOTe the open car in the background, stored outdoors ill the winter witit the
canvas curtain rolled down.
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 57
The fender folded up as it would be when the car is in the barns. Note the clarity of the details.
Page 58 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
James Good, An Update
By Dana Ashdown
[ have a few comments regarding Fritz Lehmanns excellent article
on James Good (Canadian Rail
number 416) that may be of interest
based on my own researches:

The Canadian Journal of May, 1854, page 255, in describing a
new variant on the steam hammer,
mentioned that its inventor, Mr.
Sykes, was the superintendent
of the Toronto Locomotive Works.
Sykes Steam Hammer was said to have been patented although
there
is no record of a Canadian patent having been issued for it.
I am still trying to determine exactly
who Sykes was and whether
he may have been responsible for
some of Goods locomotive
designs –Sykes was not
listed in the 1856 Toronto directory.
Another employee
of Goods who may have had a hand in
locomotive design was Nicholas Hawkes, a civil and practical
engineer who advertised his services
in The Globe beginning on
December 13, 1855, having left the Torol1lo Locomotive Works.
Based upon various news
paper accounts from the period, it
would
seem that James Good may have built as many as 23
locomotives. [ have attached a list
of these, based on completion
dates, which varies somewhat from the listings compiled from
railway rosters. I have not yet been able to confirm that a third
engine was actually delivered to the Buffalo, Brantford & Goderich
Railway, which accounts for the question marks next to the
WELLAND entry. Entry number 17 represents another mystery
engine, assuming that the newsp
apers of the day were accurate.
-Ontario, Simcoe & Huron engines No
.9 HERCULES and No.
10 SAMSON were built as 4-6-05 and were described in the
Toronto Daily Leader (March 18, 1854) as being freight engines
with 6
drivers and 10 wheels. They were rebuilt as 4-4-0s in 1861
and 1862 respe
ctively.
-Ontario,
Simcoe & Huron engines No. 13 and No. 17 were built
as 0-6-0 crab engines, so called because they were backward­
pushing helper engines. They had to be rebuilt as
4-4-0s (by the
substitution
of a 4-wheeled truck in place of the forward pair of
drivers) in order to correct a dangerous problem with weight
distribution which caused severe
damage to the track. -Ontario,
Simcoe & Huron No.2 TORONTO had to be rebuilt
following a serious collision
in November 1855 in which the
engine was badly
damaged, so much so that she was not ready until
1858.
Messrs. Mason, Cook & Blakeney, machinists (made up of
Raymond Mason, A. Cook and William Blakeney) took over
Goods foundry in January 1856 according to an announcement
which stated that they have been and are extensively engaged in
the
same business in the States (The Globe, January 15, 1856 and
following).
Mason, Cook & Blakeney only employed around 60
hands, down significantly from Good who had as many as 200
working a year or so earlier.
-As Carfrae, Cross & Company,
Toronto boiler makers Thomas
Carfrae and James Cross also occupied space at the foundry
beginning in early 1856.
Brunei &
Company, made up of Alfred Brunei and William
James Anderson (and perhaps others) assumed control of the
Toronto Engine Works by October 1857 (The Globe, October 19,
1857).
-Another later
occupant contemporary with Brunei & Company
was L.D. Campbell who established the Toronto Water Pipe &
Chain
Pump Tubing Manufactory in part of the works in September
1857. He made water pipe out of wood.
– I wonder
if James Good only leased his foundry during the 1856
to 1858 period in order to keep creditors away, with the full
intention
of returning to the business when pressure lifted
during this time he styled
himself as a gentleman in the city
assessment rolls –perhaps even retaining a portion of the foundry
to build or complete the locomotives sold to the Grand Trunk
between 1856 and 1859.
I have
been trying to finish a manuscript on Torontos
locomotive and car builders for some time, but the danger always
seems to be that once one question is solved another always
appears!
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 59
JAMES GOOD, TORONTO LOCOMOTIVE WORKS. LOCOMOTIVE COMPLETION DATES
SEQ. NUM RAILWAY ROAD NUM. NAME COMPLETION DATE
OS & H 2 TORONTO APR 18, 1853
2
OS & H 6 SIMCOE JUN
27,1853
3 BB & G 5 BUFFALO AUG 15, 1853
4
BB & G 6 * HURON SEP 2$, 1853
5
C&P COBOURG DEC 14, 1853
6 OS & H 9 HERCULES MAR 16, 1854
7
C&P PETERBOROUGH APRIL, 1854
8
OS & H
10 SAMSON MAY, 1854
9
GTR 34 SHERBROOKE
JUL 15,1854
10 GTR 138 ISLAND POND AUG 25, 1854
11 GTR 135 NORTHUMBERLAND OCT 5,1854
12
BB & G
?
WELLAND? DECEMBER, 1854
13 OS & H 11
— — — – – – ———-
MARCH,1855
14 OS & H 12
—— – — — ———-
MAY, 1855
15 C&P ALMA JUN 1, 1855
16 OS & H
13 GEORGE BEATTY JULY, 1855
17 ? ? ? JUL
Y, 1855
18
OS & H
16 J.C. MORRISON JUL 23, 1855
19 OS & H 17 CUMBERLAND NOV
6,1855
20 GTR 141
——–_.————
NOVEMBER, 1856 **
21 GTR 143
———————-
DECEMBER, 1856 **
22 GTR 142
——— ————-
MARCH, 1858 **
23 GTR 186
—–.— ——- —-.-
NOVEMBER, 1859 **
*
BB & G number 6 (HURON) was later renumbered 9.
** Denotes date of receipt rather than date of completion.
Page 60 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
Canadian Northern Passenger Car Update
In the article about the Canadian Northern in the last issue, mention was made of 66 passenger cars ordered by Canadian Northern in
1914 for the transcontinental and Ottawa service. Mr. Ray Corley has supplied further data on these cars, including builders, car
numbers and date delivered. All cars were 72 feet 6 inches long, not including vestibules, as reported in the Canadian Railway and
Marine World for
August, 1914. This infornlation was from the Canadian Northern Encyclopedia of 1916.
BUILDER QUANTITY CAR TYPE WEIGHT CAR NUMBERS DATE DELIVERED
National Steel Car 15 Baggage-Express 131,700 3200 -3214 1915
5
First Class Coach 121,500 8218 -8222 1915
Crossen
7 Colonist 128,000 7055 –
7061 1915
Preston 5 Mail
? 4000 -4004 1915
Can -Car
11 12-1 Sleeper 154,000 9647 -9657 1915
2
Compt. Sleeper
? 9950 -9951 1916
7 Diner
? 9018 -9024 1915
7 Tourist Sleeper 128,000 9407 -9413 1915
7 Buffet-Observation
Sleeper (4-Cmpt.,
1 Drw.
Rm.)
* Only listing is for 8 Compartment Sleepers, Nos. 9900 -9907, delivered in 1916.
Asbestos & Danville Locomotive Update
Mr. Colin Churcher reports that he has a record, from the Merrilees notes, that A & D No.8, CLC 13 I 9, became Laprairie Company
No.8. Mr. Corley states that this is probably correct.
A & D Nos.
15 and 16 (MLW 54481 and 54482) were Dominion Dredging 2 and 3, not I and 2 as shown. Dominion Dredging I was
MLW 54480, unless the DD seriat numbers did not coincide with the road
numbers.
Plymouth 3130,
shown as A & D No. 31, built in March 1929, was returned to Plymouth and re-sold to Herzog Lime & Stone in Ohio
in August, 1929.
Mr.
George W. Horner writes:
A
small bit of additional information on engines 36, 37, 38 and 39. The following locomotives were observed in Mimico Yard in Toronto
in 1947:
April 8,1947. Missouri Pacific 9801 and 9802.
April
26, 1947. Detroit Telminal 23.
May
3,1947. Pittsburg & Ohio Valley 7.
All were destined to Danville, Que.
The note on the bottom of page 175 may be correct, but the above observations confirm that the
two locomotives were not lettered
Union Terminal. However, you will note you now have the number 7 to add to the roster.
I
I
I
I
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 61
The Saga of MLW Locomotive 53632
By Pat Webb
MLW builders number 53632, buill ill Monlreal in Seplember, 1913 Jar the Beaver Mines at Pincher
Creek, Alberta. This view was taken at Lethbridge
011 September 11, 1951.
Photo by WR. McGee, from the col/ecliol1 oj Pat Webb.
Montreal Locomotive Works No. 53632 was a homely little ten­
wheeler, but was the
epitome of design in September 1913. She
was ordered new for the Kootenay and Alberta Railway, an 18-
mile shortline
which ran between Kandary, a mile and a half west
of Pincher station on CPs Crowsnest Sub, and Beaver Mine, a
short
climb and a trestle away in the foothills. Here, a coal mine
briefly flourished, so briefly that Kandary ceased to exist as a
junction a year after it was first listed. Evidence of the mine
remains today, as does mllch of the roadbed, but the legendary
trestle at
Beaver Creek is only an awesome gap. Reportedly it was
a mile long, 300 feet high and required five million board feet of
local timber. The story persists that when the ten-wheelerapproached,
it would stop and let the fi reman off who then walked across the
trestle alone. The engineer then started the train and, with the crew,
got off, abandoning the train and the creaking trestle to the howling
Chinook wind and fate. When the train reached the other side, the
fireman boarded and stopped the train,
awaiting the rest of the crew
who plodded across.
The engine was sold a number of times, ending her revenue days
as
she appears here on her 38th birthday, a colliery switcher at
Lethbridge in 1951. Paradoxically, the 55-ton locomotive outlived
everyone of the companies for which she so faithfully laboured.
for many years the locomotive had no number, but was later
numbered
1, the number that it carries to this day. The story has a
happy ending for
she was purchased, in 1964, by the Mid Continent
Railway Museum at North Freedom, Wisconsin. Now restored,
and with a new pilot and headlight,
she is still in service, a
compliment to the locomotive builders art of 1913.
Page 62 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
Book and Periodical Reviews
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY STATIONS IN B.C
By Ian Baird
A 108-page illustrated history, Canadian Pacific
Railway Stations
in B.C will delight both railway enthusiasts and readers interested
in the architectural heritage of British Columbia.
When British
Columbia joined Confederation in 1871, the terms
of union promised a railway that was to be constructed within ten
years. It
wasnt until 1884 that British Columbia, which had
threatened to secede,
saw CPR steel finally cross the border from
the east, although construction from the west had been
progressing
in B.C since 1880. During the following boom years, when rail
lines
were laid at the rate of a mile or more a day, stations were
thrown up to match, and rapidly
became the core of many
communities.
The stations of the CPR were more than merely places where the
train stopped.
They were the centres of community and commercial
activity and a focal point for expanding urban
development. As
such, stations were a unique architectural form that often expressed,
in design and purpose, the nature of the community and the
character
of the people they served. With its diverse landscape and
population, British Columbia provided a rich and varied
backdrop
for railway stations. The CPR took full advantage of this diversity,
erecting stations that ranged from simple log structures to luxuriolls
re
sort centres.
In text and photographs, many never previollsly published, Ian
Baird explores the nature of these rapidly-disappearing buildings
from both an historical and aesthetic perspective. Canadian Pacific
Railway Stations In British Columbia
is his tribute to an architectural
form that
embodies an important yet fleeting era in the provinces
development.
Ian Baird, a native of Victoria and a professional librarian, has
written extensively on railways and local
history. His first book,
A Heritage
Guide to the E & N Railway, concentrated on railway
stations
of Vancouver Island.
Available from:
Orca
Book Publishers
P.O.
Box 5626, Station B
Victoria, B.C V8R 6S4
Price: $16.95 Postpaid.
TRACKS OF THE BLACK BEAR
By Dale Wilson and Gordon
D. Jomini
This is a very fine 64-page picture book and history
of the Algoma
Central Railway. It contains a good introductory history of the
ACR from its sta
rt in 1899, through many vicissitudes up to the
present time.
There is also a chapter of old-time stories, as well as
-~
~~TRACKS
~~ OF THE .~
q/1, BLACK BEA~—–
/1 .——-
L ~ _—–… -.
—–
.. —–
——–_.
a roster of present-day motive power and passenger equipment.
The great feature of the book is its photos, 102 of them, of wl1ich
no less than 65 are in colour.
The black-and-white pictures are
mostly historical ones,
some dating from the early days of the
century, while more recent
development is covered in fuJi colour.
The quality of reproduction of all photos is superb, even the early
colour views of the early 1950 period which are so often found in
a faded condition. Also illustrated are old maps and timetables
which clarify the story.
Available from:
Nickel Belt Ra
ils Publishing
Box 483, Station B
Sudbury, Ontario P3E 4P6
Price: $32.10 (Including GST and Post paid)
In the U.S.A.:
Nickel Belt Rails Publishing
P.O. Box 578
Houlton
ME 04730
Price: $30.00 U.S. (Post paid)
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 63
THE LONDON HURON & BRUCE RAILWAY
1870 -1990
Third Edition
By Calvin M. Patrick
We have previously reviewed this book and reportt::d that it was
printed in a very limited edition and was sold oul. We now have the
pleasure to report that
it is now in the third edition which has been
revised,
corrected and updated to include the recent purchase of the
line by a Texas corporation. It is still a fine history
of an Ontario
short line and we are glad it is available again.
Available from:
Calvin M. Patrick
#204 157 Green Ave. W.
Penticton, B.C.
V2A 3S9
Price: $16.50 (Post paid)
THE ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OFNEWFOUNDLAND LIGHT
AND POWER
By Melvin Parker, Robert D. Pitt, Janet Miller Pitt
This is not primarily a railway book but is, as the name suggests,
a history
of power development in Newfoundland and Labrador
from the pioneer days of the 1880s to the present time. However
there is very much material on the street railway system in Saint
John
s, together with a number of rare photographs, since both
power company and street railway were operated by the same
company for many years. There is also some mention of the
Newfoundland
Railway and its interaction with the power company.
Anyone interested in industrial development in what, in the early
days at least, was a remote region
of North America, will find this
a
very useful book, factual yet easy to follow. It is the kind that is
hard to put down until one has fini
shed reading it.
Available from: Creative Publishers
P.O.
Box 8660
St.
Johns, Newfoundland
Price: $29.95
Cl
LINES
Published by CN Lines Special I.nterest Group of the National
Model Railroaders Association.
We
have previously mentioned this excellent quarterly publication,
but
recent additions and improvements require us to mention it
again.
-WM.t.tMIII·qiM eN UNESS(G NEWSlEnER .!JI.I.I,18,,}.+
eN LINES
CANADIAN NATIONAL. GRAND TRUNK WESTERN. CENTRAL VERMONT
GRAND TRUNK
RAILWAY. DULUTH, WINNIPEG & PACIFIC
IN THIS ISSUE: DW&P N2as
(
. Wtl
.-;tt.I·I·~.I;-·I;
1111.1: _ ,.
1)\&1· … 11- lH~. :l,:<
I !:,~II~I,I~.~,~~_~·~:It:q I:
l
,

·.~ttI~lr
:-.sClI~.lIi(;I …. p.c;n··(j,·H~.
111~; … Mtl-IH)I;:; S,IO:<~ hll
I-rrt.:>n:-.t.ll …. ((1\1. Il(furn:
1. I~ loII.fI.,;
,.
,.
.,

A sampling of articles that have appeared in the last two issues
(October 1990 and January 1991) include: Duluth, Winnipeg &
Pacific N-2-a class Steam Locomotives, The CN 470000 Series
box cars,
Modelling eN Streamliners, Conversion of Rivarossi
1930
coaches to CNR and GTW Models, Grand Trunk Western
History,
CNs First ROC, Railfanning CN in the Maritimes, A
Brief History of Victoria Bridge, as well as numerous other very
useful articles, both large and small.
The publication is devoted to Canadian National and its subsidiaries
(Grand
Trunk Western, Central Vermont, Grand Trunk, Duluth
Winnipig & Pacific), both from a prototype point of view as well
as features of building (and converting) models of CN equipment.
As the sample above indicates, CN Lines includes Steam, Diesel,
Electric, Historical and Model Railroad articles.
Foranyone interested in CN, this publication is highly recommended.
Available from:
CN Lines Sig.
Membership Chairman, Arthur R. Thomas
RD I, Box 295
Alum Bank, PA, 15521-9658
U.S.A.
Price: Me
mbership for one year, including 4 issues of eN Lines.
Non NMRA Members in Canada: S18.00 Canadian
Non
NMRA Members in C.S.A.: $15.00 C.S.
Non
NMRA Members Overseas: $22.00 U.S.
NMRA Members in Canada: $15.00 Canadian
NMRA Members in U.S.A.: $12.00 U.S.
NMRA Members Overseas: $18.00 U.S.
Sustaining
Members in Canada: $25.00 Canadian
Sustaining
members in U.S.A.: $25.00 U.S.
Page 64 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
BULLETIN OFTHE AUSTRALIAN RAILWAY HISTORICAL
SOCIETY
DECEMBER 1990
Bulletin
Volume 41 t/o638
ISStl0005·0105
ntglsttr~d by Auslralla PO:;l
Publh:allofl-Nell (1.846
The ARHS produces two very high quality, publications, the
Railway Digest and
The Bulletin. Two recent issues of the Bulletin
contain articles which we felt
might be of considerable interest to
CRHA members. Bulletin 637 (November 1990) has a lengthy,
detailed article on the
design and construction of the sleeping cars
for the Southern Aurora, the stainless-steel, all sleeper, overnight
train between Sydney and Melbourne. These cars were, in many
ways, much like those on the Canadian and it is fascinating to
read the accounts, a
nd examine the detailed plans and photos
outlining the design and
construction of these fine cars. In Bulletin
638
(December 1990) is a history of Commonwealth Railways
Special
Car No. I, a magnificent, wood-bodied, official car, built
in 1920 and, after numerous ups and downs, fully refurbished and
still
in selvice.
Available from:
Australian Railway Historical
Society
P.O. Box E-129
St.
James, New South Wales 2000
Auslralia
NEW ZEALAND RAILWAY CALENDAR
The New Zealand Railway and Locomotive Society Inc. offers its
1991
Railway Calendar. This collection of 12 excellent coloured
photos
of steam, diesel and tram scenes very well worth the price
of $8.00 U.S., including postage by airmail.
Calendar available from:
New
Zealand Railway & Locomotive Society
P.O. Box 1297
Dunedin, 9000, N
ew Zealand.
The Society also offers memberships for two years at $45.00, New
Zealand Dollars (G.S.T. included; sound familiar?) This includes
their fine quarterly publ ication, the
New Zealand Rai Iway Observer.
Me
mberships available from:
New Zealand Railway & Locomotive Society
P.O. Box 5134
Wellington, New Zealand
NIGHTMARE ON THE GREAT WESTERN, 1857
By
Ian C. Johnson
Published
in the December 1990 -January 1991 issue of The
Beaver, the publication of the Hudsons Bay Company.
On March 12,1857 occurred one of the worst railway disasters in
Canadian history, when a passenger train fell through the bridge
over the Desjardins canal at Hamilton, Canada West, with a loss
of sixty lives. In this 6-page article, Ian C. Johnson tells the story
of this disaster, starting with an account of a gentleman in Toronto
hailing a cab and dashing to the Great Western station in an
attempt to catch the 4: I 0 PM train to Hamilton. When he arrived,
he found that he had just missed the train, but, as things turned out,
the gentleman was soon to consider this one of the most fortunate
events of his life
l
About one hundred people boarded the ill-fated train which
consisted of a baggage car and two first-class passenger cars
hauled by the Oxford, a 4-4-0 built by Schnectady in 1853. This
locomotive was just out of the shops after a six-week overhaul,
but, unfortunately, a hidden crack had seriously weakened the
front axle of the leading truck. For some time all seemed well but,
about 5:50 P.M., disaster struck. As the train passed over a switch
leading to the rather flimsy wooden bridge over the canal, the axle
broke, the train derailed and the impact
of the locomotive brought
down much of the bridge together with the entire train. The
unlucky passengers and crew faced death by three horrible means:
being crushed in the wreck itself, burning to death in the resulting
fire, or being drowned in the icy water. It is surprising that forty
people survived. The Oxford was recovered, but was damaged
beyond repair and was scrapped soon after.
The account of the tragedy is sllpurb, and we can feel the suspense
leading up to the accident, and then the horror of that terrible night
and following days. Even after more than 130 years
we can
sympathise and grieve for the victims and their families. We read
of the two sisters who boarded at Oakville for the short ride to
Hamilton, and perished in the accident. We also read of the off­
duty switchman who had jusl boarded the rear platform of the last
car, saw the locomotive break through the bridge, and jumped off
while shouting a warning that saved several lives. There are tales
of heroism such as the noble fellow who went into the icy water
in shirtsleeves and attemped to rescue trapped passengers. The
whole story is enhanced by a rare photograph and other contemporary
illustrations.
The aftermath of this accident was the establishmenl of a Royal
Commission, the production of the famous Keefer Report, and
more strict safety standards on Canadian railways. This article is
very highly
recommended.
I
I
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 65
CRHA Communications
KINGSTON DIVISION ACTIVITIES IN 1990
1990
was a very active year for the Kingston Division with our
sponsorship of the Kingston RAIL-O-RAMA as the major event in
April.
This was a
two-day show heLd on April 21 and 22 with a total
attendance
of 1809 adults and 177 children (paid). Nine model
layouts were
operating as well as seven displays on railroad and
marine subjects. Eighteen commercial outlets were selling models,
videos, books etc.
This show did a great deal to enhance the
reputation
ofCRHA and the Kingston Division. It will be repeated
on April 20 and
21 in 1991.
The Division met monthly with an average attendance of about
twenty.
January -Annual Meeting.
F
ebruary -Video Titfield Thunderbolt shown.
March -President Hugues Bonin reviewed a membership
questionnaire to be distributed. Video 6060 to Vancouver shown.
April -Brian
West reported on Rideau Valley Railway and CNs
offer of 3 miles of track at $10,000 per mile. A video on How to
Operate a
Steam Locomotive was shown.
May –
Brian West requested that the Kingston Division invest in
a
$1000 share in the Rideau Valley Heritage Railway. A slide
presentation on stations and railway structures
in Ontario was
given by Bill Thomson.
June -President H. Bonin presented a budget of ~5300 for 1990
including seed money for 1991 RAIL-O-RAMA. H. Bonin
wrote Rideau Valley
Railway requesting financial information.
The annual auction was held with a financial return of only $67.00.
Special Meeting,
June 19, L 990 re purchase of Rideau Valley
share. Messrs.
West, Coo and Strong made presentation. A future
vote would be taken.
July –
By a vote of 13 to I it was decided not to purchase a share
in the Rideau Valley Railroad Ltd.. CRHA Kingston Division
shirts
and caps were shown and put on sale. Railway slides and
movies were shown.
August -President
Hugues Bonin reported on our association with
the
Pumphouse Steam Museum, and our assistance in identifying
rolling stock
of the new 0 gauge layout given to them. The
programme was movies and slides.
September -Dr. Robert 1icholls gave a presentation on the CRHA
Iational Convention.
October –
Membership decided to make the annual membership
fee $15.00. Bill Sinclair presented a very interesting audio tape on
a
CN wreck in .fJew Brunswick. Hugues Bonin showed slides of a
western
C.S.A. trip.
November -Robert Gawley of UTDC gave an informative update
on their activities in the transit field.
December -Discussion re the future of CN steam locomotive 2534
on display in Belleville. Kingston Division formed a committee to investigate
our possible involvement. Walter Bedbrook reported
on our acquisition of the HO layout used on the TV program
Friendly Giant. Uses will be investigated. New membership
brochures were shown. A programme Electric RaiJways was
presented by Bill
Thomson.
There were two field trips in 1990. One in May was to CNs
Taschereau Yard in Montreal, and the second was in October to
CNs MacMillan Yard in Toronto. Only six members participated
in each trip.
CN were excellent hosts.
Our publication Kingston Rail was considerably improved in
1990 under the
guidance of Walter Bedbrook, and the bi-monthly
publication was we
ll received.
Division officers
for 1991 are:
Pres
ident -Hugues Bonin.
Vice
President -Stan Stamal·ski.
Secretary -Bill Thomson.
Treasurer -Robert Ruddell.
Editor Kingston Rail -Walter Bedbrook.
Curator / Archivist -Nancy Howel I.
Programme -George Dillon.
Publicity –
Stan Suley.
Director -Euan Callender.
Director -Eric Mitten.
Submitted by W. Thomson, Secretary.
CRHA CONVENTION
The Kingston Division will be hosting the 1991 convention
of the CRHA. The dates are Thursday, August I to
Monday, August
5. A comprehensive program of activities
is being planned. For information call Hughes Bonin at
(613)-545-0783. Reserve the dates now!
SELKIRK DIVISION, REVELSTOKE B.C.
On Saturday, November 24, 1990 the CRHA award for an article
in a CRHA publication was presented to David LI. Davies for the
ankle Embankment which appeared in Canadian Rail NoAI3,
November-December 1989. In this photo, Ernie OtteweJl (right),
t
he President of the Selkirk Division, presents the award to Mr.
Davies (left). Eight Division members were at the presentation
Page 66 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
which included a tour of the proposed museum site, an exhibition
of paintings of CPR locomotives, followed by a dinner.
The photo was taken at the Divisions meeting rooms and shows,
on the wall in the background, the drawings for the proposed
museum site.
CRANBROOK RAILWAY MUSEUM SEEKS ORIGINAL
PARLOUR CAR CHAIRS
The Cranbrook Railway Museum, which has now assembled a
complete consist of the luxurious 1929 CPR [rain Trans Canada
Limited. is now looking for some surviving pieces of furniture to
complete one of its cars.
The day parlour car 6751, which was designed for use on such
trains as the Trans Canada Limited, between Montreal and
Ottawa only, is now being restored at the Museum back to its
original splendour.
The inlaid Honduran mahogany panelled interior
has been
completely restored to a highly varnished finish, and all
brass racks etc
have been refurbished.
The car originally contained thilty plush revolving parlour chairs,
and so far the Museum has located five. It is hoped that the general
public and railway personnel (both retired and active) can help find
the
Museum twenty-five more by searching around. The illustration
shows the
exact style of chair, with high back ancl padded arms.
The underside of the chair would have a cast base with a swivel
point where the chair sat on another cast piece bolted to the floor.
Although these bases may have been removed, and other types
of
legs might have been added later on. the style of the chair is
distinct.
The chairs were probably reupholstered several times as
well
over the years.
The car, when completed, will be as it was when first built, but will
serve not only as a display piece. The car will also have an
important Museum function as a reception car for first-class group
tour arrivals. and will be a main facility for school group visits
where specially designed and hidden audio-visual equipment will
be used for a variety
of presentations. Special public evening
presentations
of railway films. silent movies etc. will also be a
further use.
Originally there would
have been at least 420 chairs made for the
fourteen
cars built (6750 -6763). and the Museum feels that there
is a high probability
of at Ieas[ 25 remaining. If you know of any
of these chairs. please contact the Cranbrook Railway Museum,
Box
400, Cranbrook, B.C.. VIC 4H9, phone (604)-489-3918. You
could have an important hand in piecing back together one of
Canadas railway heritage treasures. and one of the worlds most
important trains.
NELSON ELECTRIC TRAMWA Y SOCIETY
This Division is advancing well on their restoration of Nelson
street
car 23. as well as their plans to bring back street car operation
to Nelson. From
1899 to 1949, Nelson was home to the smallest,
and probably the steepest. street
car system in Canada, and it is the
Societys hope to have a portion of this running again before the
centennia.l
in 1999. They have produced a very attractive brochure
containing photos of Nelson. and of car 23. past and present. The
body of car 23 appears to be almost completely restored, and the
project is rapidly
moving into its next phases.
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND RAILWAY SOCIETY
* ~, ~, ~, ~, , : , ~, ~, ANN 0 U N C E MEN T – , * ;. ;. > * ,
The Prince Edward Island Railway Society chapter of the Maritime
Federation
of Model Railroaders will host RAIL FAIR 91 in the
University
of Prince Edward Island Arena, Charlottetown, P.E.!.
on the weekend
of June 8 -9, 199/. Featured will be vendors, flea
markets, operating model contests, clinics, layouts, railroad heritage
displays and more.
A special invitation
is extended to fellow New England, Quebec
and Ontario modellers and fans, and others who may be interested
or down this way at this time. P.E.I. comes alive in June, with
theatre, beaches, et ai, and a real Island
welcome awaits you.
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 67
Plan a fun-filled weekend.
For details, contact Bob Mepham, 61 Newland Crescent,
Charl.ottetown, P.E.I, CIA 4H6. Phone (902)-892-1530.
Bob Mepham also sent us news of the preservation and movement
of diesel locomotive 1762 to Kensington. This move involved
much hard work, including the re-laying
of rails where they had
been removed at road crossings. All the haid work an planning was
rewarded, however, on
November 16, 1990, when a group of 17
volunteers moved 1762 into its new home at Kensingtons heritage
railway station, which
is also being preserved. Volunteerism is a
vital expression
of the Canadian way of life, but it did not just
happen; it required strong leadership, good planning and the
supportive coordination
of individuals. On this November day, all
these elements were pre
sent, and the job got done. This preservation
will insure that the railway will not disappear
completely from
Prince
Edward Island. It is hoped to have more details in a later
issue.
RAILWAY SOCIETY OF NEWFOUNDLAND
From Newfoundland comes good news and bad news. The bad
news is that, on
November 17, 1990, the last rails of the main line
of the Newfoundland railway were taken up. This sad event
occurred at Bishops Falls, once a division point on the railway.
CN called for tenders, closing December 19, for the sale of
business car Terra Nova II, situated at St. Johns. Also offered
for sale were flatcars,
caboose and coach at Stephenville Crossing;
box cars, flat cars, hoppers, air dumps and
cabooses at Corner
Brook; box cars, flat cars, gondolas, air dumps, hoppers, Jordan
Spreader and cabooses at Bishops Falls; flat cars, hoppers and air
clumps
at Clarenville. Some large ballast cars were sold to the
White Pass
& Yukon where they will be re-gauged and go back into
service.
Locomotive 919 has been donated to the town of Bishops Falls,
while 931 has
gone to the Railway Society of Newfoundland in
Corner Brook. 914, 917, 923, 924, 930, 932, 934, 935, 937 were
still
on the property at year encl, but their fate is unknown. At least
one
of them is to be donated to the town of Port Aux Basques.
The
good news is that the Railway Society of Newfoundland now
has a
home. On the first Tuesday after Labour Day, the rails were
cut
on both ends of the Humbermouth site at Corner Brook, leaving
1500 feet
of main line, plus the two spurs, intact. Steam locomotive
593,
coupled to the cars of her express, was eased back out onto and
up the main line, coming to rest just short of the crossing next to
the old station stand.
The moment so many people had worked so
hard and so long for had finally come to pass. Well done!
The first
days of September saw the final coming together of the
Soci
etys rolling stock. The dining car 10 was returned and
coupled into the express with a ballast car for the work train also
being
acquired.
The most significant new addition was locomotive
931 which was used to actually assemble and position the cars in
their final resting spots. As mentioned earlier, the
express on the
main
line and the work train set back on the spur near the points.
The
Society would like to single out Mr. Bren J. Everard, CNs
Newfoundland Operations Manager and Mr. William Baggs (retired)
Roadmaster, Terra Transport for their steadfast SUppOlt. These
gentlemen were indispensable in the attainment of the Societys
goals during the past years. THANK YOU.
Last summer there was a fair volume of work accomplished at the
Mu
seum site. Engine 593 received a new exterior coat of paint. The
cab floor ancl roof were repainted and a new cab door was installed.
The engine gauge plate was also completed and installed courtesy
of Mr. Rhoadie Hickey. The dining car was completely repainted
to the express colours, and as well the
snow plough received a total
facelift.
The only projects remaining on these units are the
identification markings. A complete site clean-up was also undertaken
early in the season.
This venture was greatly helped by the
donation
of a brush cutter by the Historical Society of Newfoundland.
The Society also purchased a new lawn mower this season, so
relieving Mr. Philip
Greenacres trusty steed of the task.
Last
summer also saw the first season of on-site tour guides. Three
young ladies, Heidi Bonnell, Anne Gregory and Cathy Ann
Willett, hired under the
Canada Employment and Immigration
Challange
(S.E.E.D. Grant) program, were available from June 25
to August 17, 1990, seven
days a week from J 0:00 AM to 7:00 PM
to assist visitors. During that time they provided service to more
than 2000 tourists.
The Society was truly grateful for their efforts
and contributions
during the summer, and would also like to
mention Mr. Philip
Greenacres work in arranging these positions
to the Society.
The Society would like to thank all those who contributed of their
time, efforts, finances
or artifacts. Also again, to anyone who has
information, artifacts or time they wish to donate, tbey are
welcome to contact them.
The Society is committed to preserving
Newfoundlands Railway Heritage in tribute to the people whose
hard work and dedication ran
our railway for more than a century.
Anyone wishing to become a
member of.the Railway Society of
Newfoundland, please address your letters to:
Railway Society
of Newfoundland
P.O. Box 673
Corner Brook, Newfoundland
A2H
6GI
Dues are $2.00 per year.
CORRESPONDENT WANTED
Mr. P. Oldroyd, 211 Midland Road, Royston, Barnsley, S71 4DN
Englancl, wants to cOl1espond with a member about Railways in
Canada -steam era and
present-day railway practice. He will
exchange information on railways in the U.K. Quote: Please,
Please Reply.
INFORMATION WANTED
Rosemary Bennett, 4 Foxhil1 Road, Scarborough, Ontario MIT
IE7 writes:
[ am
seeking information regarding a railroad strike in the
Toronto, Ontario area (it could
have been more widely spread) in
approximately 1877 -1881
(I dont know the exact date). Can you
please direct
me where this information is available?.
Can any
member help her with her request?
Page 68 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
The Business Car
VIA RAIL LIKES ITS NUMBERS
Via Rail Canada Inc. says its revenue and passenger figures for
1990 were on track for
most of the year, and its on-time performance
was an impressive 88 to 90 percent, compared to 78 percent in
1989.
For 1991, VIA is predicting a modest growth in ridership of
between 3 and 4 percent over 1990 thanks to the improved
performance as well as the recession and Gulf war which have
caused air travellers to look for
other modes of travel.
VIA released figures
in mid-January to coincide with the first
anniversary
of the huge cuts of January 15, 1990. It finished 1990
with 3.6 million passengers and revenue of about $135 mi.llion,
compared to $244 million in 1989 when it was operating more than
double the runs. Although it had forecast 4 million passengers and
revenue
of$)44 million, it still believes it is on track because travel
and touri
sm in general was down about 7%.
Although detailed results will
not be released until April, VIA did
s
ay that its expenses in 1990 were just below $600 million
compared to $775.3 million in 1989. In effect this reduces the
overall efficiency since the subsidy per
passenger has increased.
The reason the costs did not drop more substantially was because
of expenses incurred in the cutbacks, including the reduction in the
number of employees from about 7000 to about 4000. VIA is less
affected by higher oil prices,
since the cost offuel is a much smaller
proportion of total cost than it is for the airlines.
Based
on an article in the Globe and Mail, January 11, 1991.
BANKS ON BOARD FOR HIGH SPEED TRAIN
Bombardier Inc. has stitched together a consortium of six powerful
banks to back its bid to build a $5.3 billion high-speed train linking
Montreal and Toronto. I guess you could say were putting our
money where our mouths and our intentions are said Pierre
MacDonald, Bombardiers Vice-president in charge of the TGV
(Train a Grand Vitesse) project. And thats not exactly what we
see from our competition. The consortium includes three of
Canadas big banks -The Royal Bank of Canada, The Bank of
Nova Scotia and The National Bank of Canada, Bombardiers
principal banker. They will be joined by three French banks –
Banque IndoSuez, Credit Lyonnais and Societe Generale.
Mr.
MacDonald said the banks have agreed to put up a maximum
of $12.5 million toward tile cost of a feasibility study. Bombardier,
its
Franco-British partner GEC Alsthom, and an unidentified
industrial partner, will put up another $12.5 million.
The remainder
of the $30 million to $50 million feasibility study must be paid by
the federal government, as
weJl as those of Quebec and Ontario.
Banque IndoSuez and Credit Lyonnais are no strangers to train
financing. Banque IndoSuez was the leading
bank of the equity
issue for the Eurotunnel and, with
Credit Lyonnais, also issued
debt for the tunnel project.
Mr.
MacDonald noted that Asea Brown Boveri Ltd., the Swiss and
Sweedish giant also vying to build a high-speed train in Canada,
is
counting on governments to fund all but $3 million of the
feasibility study. However, ABBs more
modest $3 billion Sprintor
train technology would require almost no public funding to build.
Bombardier has said that $1.6 billion of its $5.3 billion project
would have to
be paid by governments. A Quebec and Ontario
government committee, set up to study high-speed trains in the
Quebec City to Windsor corridor, is expected to recommend that
a detailed feasibility
study go ahead. Its final report is due at the
e
nd of February. Mr. MacDonald said that if the feasibility study
gets under way this year, the first trains could be running between
Montreal and
Toronto by late 1996, and in the rest of the corridor
within two years after that.
Bombardier is also awaiting worcl on a bid to build a TGV in Texas.
The Texas High-Speed Rail Commission is expected to choose
between the TGV technology and a rival German group in May.
Were very confident on the Texas project, Mr. MacDonald said.
Source:
Globe and Mail, February IS, 1991.
ALBERTA SHORT LINE WlNS COURT CASE
On December 21, 1990 the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the
Central Western
Railway, a privately-owned grain hauler based in
Stettler, Alberta,
does not fall under federal jurisdiction and does
not have to honour the union· contract it inherited from Canadian
National four years ago. In an 8 to 1
judgement, the high court said
that the railway,
which operates entirely within Alberta, cannot be
characterized under the Constitution as a federal work orundertaking
and
is therefore not subject to the federal labour code.
Central
Western was formed in 1986 when it bought a 175-
kilometre stret
ch of track from Ferlow Junction to Dinosaur
Alberta from eN. The larger railway had been trying for years t~
abandon the track, known as the Stettler Branch. The sale marked
the first step in a federally-sponsored program to preserve such
lines by selling
them off to private firms. Central Western, with
three locomotives and 12 to
18 employees, hauls grain from nine
elevators
in cars owned by federal and provincial governments. It
also owns palt of a tourist excursion service, but grain represents
99 percent
of its business.
Four national rail unions won a ruling from the Canada Labour
Relations Board that Central came under federal jurisdiction and
had to
honour the previous CN contracts. However, Tom Payne,
the railway·
owner and a fonner CP Rail engineer, said he couldnt
afford to operate if his work force was unionized and had had to
follow union
job rules. Its bittersweet, Mr. Payne said following
his
Supreme Court victory. Thats one little chapter closed.
Were a provincial railway then. 1 think its tragic in a sense that
the brotherhoods,
when we started the railway, didnt sit down ancl
work with us instead of against us.
Ron Bennett, legislative
director for the United Transportation
Union, had argued that since Central Western hauls grain thai is
moved across provincial borders for export, the federal
labour
code should apply [even if the result was the shutting down of the
railway,
and loss of all jobs! Ed.]. We see this as a total erosion
of the hard-fought-for rights and benefits the unions have gained
over the years. Mr. Bennet said.
Source:
Globe and Mail, December 21, 1990.
MARCH -APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 69
ALBERNI VALLEY
MUSEUM STEAM TRAIN
TheAlberni Valley Museum
in Port AI.berni B.C. operates
the Alberni Pacific
Railwaywhich runs asteam
train hauled by a Shay
locomotive. This 42-lon
engine, number 2, known as
the
Two Spot, was built
in 1912 by Lima Locomotive
Works and spent its entire
working I ife, from 1912 until
1953, serving the forest
industry of western
Vancouver Island. It had been
converted to
an oil burner in
1923, but was otherwise little
altered
in its 41 years of
service. In 1954 the
locomotive was donated to
the city by MacMillan
Bloedel, and saton exhibition
as astaticdisplayfor a quarter
century, During that time
the weather and vandalism had left it a sorry sight until, in 1979,
the city placed
it in the care of the Alberni Valley Museum.
Restoration began
in 1980 and, on August 1 I, 1984 the Two Spot
was recommissioned to active service. Regular passenger service
began in 1985, and has continued until the
present time.
The coach used on the train is former
CPR lightweight coach 2238
built
in 1949 in CPs Angus Shops in Montreal. It served CP for
many years, and was later used on
BC Rails Royal Hudson steam
train where it carried the
name Pemberton. It was acquired by the
Alberni Valley Industrial Heritage Society in 1984.
The restoration is only the first step in a larger plan for heritage
development
in the community. The Alberni Valley Museum and
the Industrial Heritage Society have planned a national calibre
Forest Industry Interpretation Centre to be situated in the
citys
industrial waterfront area. The centre will relate the historic
mechanical technology
of the forest industry to the surrounding
1990s computerized mill complexes.
The TwoSpot and passenger
car will provide a shuttle tour service.
Most of the required
collections have been acquired including
an entire 1925 steam
driven line shaft sawmill, 160 by
60 ft., with equipment and
business archives. The Museums collections have virtually
quadrupled
in one year.
LAST
SECTION OF NEWFOU NDLAND RAILWAY REMOVED
Bishops Falls -November 17 -18 1990 was a historic weekend,
but
one many people would rather forget as the last section of rail
in Newfoundland was taken up. The head of Canadian National in
Newfoundland, Bren Everard, was in
Bishops Falls when work
crews
hauled up the last section of rail from the abandoned
Newfoundland Railway.
/
Mr. Everard described the occasion as a sad day which one would
rathernotsee,especially for the workers involved in track maintenance.
He said these workers
spent their time repairing track, and to have
to take it up must have been particularly disappointing.
Jim Pardy
of Badger was a member of the work crew. He said that
the rail workers were a dedicated
group but, like a lot of things, it
was the politicians
who decided what their future would be, and
unfortunately these
same people who make the decisions dont
really understand or seem to care about the impact of their actions.
Source: SI.
Johns Evening Telegram, November 19, 1990.
CONDITION OF RAILWAY LINE CONCERN FOR SOME
GROUPS
Concern has been expressed by some municipal councils and
recreational
groups in central Newfoundland that Canadian National
isnt doing a good job in cleaning up the abandoned rail line, and
they say the railway ties that have been left pose a safety hazard for
snowmobilers and the like.
However, the
General Manager for CN in the province, Bren
Everard, issued a reminder to all people that the railway line is still
federal property.
He pointed out that some municipalities want CN
to clean up the property so snowmobilers and other recreational
vehicles can use it, but he stated these people must understand they
are not presently allowed to be on the property.
Meanwhile
Mr. Everard says the status of the numerous bridges
and culverts
along the rail line is unresolved at this point and CN
is waiting to hear from the provincial government on what course
of action they would like to see taken in this regard.
Source: SI.
Johns Evening Telegram, November 24, 1990.
Page 70 RAIL CANADIEN MARS -AVRIL 1991
WINDSOR AND ANNAPOLIS LOCOMOTIVE OF 1868
A very rare, photograph has
just come to light showing one of the
original locomotives
of the Windsor & Annapolis Railway (Later
the Dominion Atlantic) in
as built condition.
Six
of these broad (5 foot -6 inch) gauge locomotives were built,
in 1868, by Fox Walker of Bristol England for the Windsor and
Annapolis. They served the W & A until 1875
when, upon the
conversion
of the railway to standard gauge, they were traded in
to the Intercolonial Railway
(whose standard-gauging had forced
the W
& A to follow suit) for a like number of standard gauge
engines.
In 1876, at least four
of the Fox Walker locomotives (the four
definitely known had been named Evangeline, Gabriel,
Hiawatha, Blomidon on the W & A) were converted to standard
gauge, lettered Canadian Pacific and sent to Fort William for u
se
on the government-built section of the Canadian Pacific Railway.
A photo
of one of these, taken in 1876, appears on pages 48 and 49
of Canadian Rail No. 349 (February, 1981). The rebuilding greatly
altered their appearance since the narrower gauge required the
boiler to be raised, giving the
locomotives a rather ungainly look.
In 1883 these four were bought by the CPR Company and
numbered 152 to 155. All, with various rebuildings, survived as
CPR locomotives into the early twentieth century.
Although these engines acquired
such North American features as
pilots and headlights when they arrived
in Nova Scotia in 1869,
they still retained a very
British appearance until their 1876
rebuilding.
However when built they looked even more British, as
this photo shows. There is, however, one strange thing about this
photo. A close look at the builder
s plate shows that it reads
Peckett and Sons. This has been faked by retouching the photo
at a later date! The Fox Walker works were later owned By Peckett
and Sons who evidently altered the photo to
make it seem as if they
had built these locomotives.
However, the engines were definitely
built by
Fox Walker, and the altered photo points out once again
that
things are seldom what they seem in railway history, and one
should be always wary
of such pitfalls.
DRIVERLESS 95-CAR TRAIN JOYRIDE
Early Sunday morning, September 23, 1990, a
driverless, engineless 95-car
CP Rail freight
train barrelJed across a good
piece of southern
Manitoba, travelling almost 50
kilometres before
it lost momentum. There were
no injuries when
the cars, without engines or
caboose, rolled
away from 24 other cars at the head of the train.
The unlit, late-night express negotiated a
series of sharp curves, ploughed through level
crossings and raced down a
series of inclines
between Minnedosa and Gladstone Manitoba,
about 150 kilometres west
of Winnipeg.
The RCMP said that at 3:53 A.M. they received
a dispatch that there were 95
runaway railway
cars that had
somehow been disconnected from
an engine at M innedos
a. The cars were travelling
at a very high rate
of speed on their own
momentum; one officer said that at one of the
crossings they were
just a blur. It took CP Rail
officials nearly an hour to catch up to the
runaway cars as they
began to
slow near Gladstone, Two engines, dispatched from
Minnedosa, sped after the train of empty grain cars.
Although the cars activated the road crossing signals,
it was still
potentially quite dangerous for the cars were unlit,
so motorists
would think nothing was coming and try to cross. Fortunately no
accident happened. Mr. Ov ide Pelletier
of Neepawa, who lives less
than
50 metres from the tracks, noticed that when the train went
through it did not blow its whistle.
The racket woke him up around
4:30 A.M. and he did not see any lights but he said Im so damn
used to those trains going through I never thought anything of it.
Police estimated that the 95 cars zoomed past Mr.
Pelletiers home
at around 90 kilometres per hour (55 MPH).
Lome Perrett, a CP Rail foreman in Gladstone, said he understood
the cars were being switched from one track to
another when they
took off.
They just got away from a switch, how he did not know
but officials were investigating. Investigators are examining the
recording
device in the engine to see what it might reveal.
Most
of the terrain in Manitoba is relatively flat, but the southern
stretch
is dotted with river valleys with fairly steep grades.
Source:
Globe and Mail, September 25, 1990. David Roberts.
TRAIN HITS AIRPLANE
Loon Lake, Ontario: On September II, 1990 Kevin Wolff had a
bad day. First, the Edmonton man was forced to
make an emergency
landing on railway tracks after running low on fuel while flying his
family
over Loon Lake, about 80 kilometres east of Thunder Bay.
Then, just after he had ushered his wife and two-year-old son out
of the Cessna 172, an eastbound freight train rounded a curve and
ploughed into the plane.
No one was injured. Thunder Bay police
constable John Brink said the train caused extensive (and expensive)
damage to the planes right wing, tail and windshield. Police said
that the family plans to take the first available
commercial flight
to
Edmonton.
Source: Montreal Gazette, September 13, 1990.
MARCH – APRIL 1991 CANADIAN RAIL Page 71
NEW FORMAT VIA TICKETS AND TIMETABLES
VIA Rail has introduced Ii lleW (onnal ticket which rcpta(c~ Ihe
:lIrlllle-~t)lc [omlS previously in use. The new Ild:Ch :Ire in (,:ard
fonll. in which two coupons, the receIpt and cover (rcpla!;ing the
fonner envelope) are all on !I single pi~ce of cardboord. The 1lCW
Joml i~ much neater ami more allr.lctjve. and ~houlu ~,le comidernble aOlOUnI of pllper. much of ,hid] was db(,Mded when
the tickets were h~ued. Although the new jbm1 h;)<; only twO
COUIJOfl~ (cOnlPlred 10 fOUf in the old ones) VIA states thallhe gre:1
majority or trips involve only IwO !nuns. More c:Hensic nip-: wilt
require more thun one Ud:d. bill Ihey are cro~s-rt:fercllccd.
Wilh Lhe DeccmtKr 9. 1990 limetable. VIA also mln){Jurcd a
shgtuly different fonn:!! which is more compact Ilnd ~ome\hllt
eusier to follow. One surprise IS the dimimilion of nlCtric dislancc..~.
For years now. lhe disl((ll~es havl bct.n ~hown In miles and
kilometre>..
but \lIh this timct:.ble. mile~ only art u..cd. Eidenlty
Ihi~ is to eonfonn 10 the aetual milepost.s used 011 the raihays
which have never becn eOllvtrted to Ihe metric system.
VIA TO TAKE OVER ONE CN LINE
Early ill February 1991. thc National Tmllspon:lticm Agcoc)
:Iuthorized CN 10 abandon Ihe 21 mile line from Richmond. just
we.
,t OfOUaw!!. to Smiths Falls. Since VIA u~e.~ IhKt line for its
Ouawa -Toronlo train~. it has agreed to Ilike OW! the line.
LAST GASP FOR GASPE.
In the 3.me decision as abovc. thc NT A Jlu.hori/Cd CN to abandOIl
Ihe
56 mile line be,ween Chandler und Gaspe. Quebec. VIA has
~Iatcd Ihal il cannot afford to I;lke over Iha. line ond, if another
opcmlor cannot
be found to tnke il over. it may have loeut its Ga~pe
M:rvicc rnltk.. nli~ could mcan the discontinuance of the elllire run
from Matapedia to GllSpt. although the line to Chandler \ill
COl1tmuc for freigln SClvke. The pcnnission to :lb-,.tnc.lon dot~ not
come into effect until February.
1m. w the G:J:;pe tl1llll (Ih ….
ctk1Icur) should run through 1991. Belter ride It Ihi, year. it is
lI) scenic and it b endangered.
THREE U
NE5 TO STAY
ll-.eNT A h:J.S ruled [h.1tthrce lines between Owen Sound. Palmc~[on.
L,:;tov.el. Wingham and Stratford. all in OntliriO and [utalling 136
m
iles. mU.~1 continue [0 be opcrotcd by CN for a1lOlhcr year.
Although I
hl: 11I1~~:HC prr~nlly uncconomic. the NTA fcd~ thai
Ih<:) could gencrnle up to 20.000 carloads of freight in 11)<) I.
JUDGE ALLOWS SELUKG D & II TO CP
Selling Delaware &:. J lud~(ln Railway Co. makes bcncr 1>Cnse than
liquida!lIlg
it. a federal U.S. judge has nlled in denying an appeal
by crediton.. The ruhng upheld a bankruptcy caun de(i~ion and
cie:lred the way (or till: :.alt!. on Janullry 16. IWI. of D & H 10
CanadIan P;ltifie Lil1litt-d. An earlier di~pulc , itlt Conrail 300ut
running righls.
which onc~ Ihrcatened to i>Cullle the whole scheme.
had already
becn r~ollcd.
U.S. District Judge Joseph Lon~obllrdi said Ih:1I crcdilon. h:l(llx:cn
<,Ccklng bener-lhan-adequ:1lc protecllon \ hen il come tf.) repa) nlent
oflheir ~ccured lo~n~. The three crcdil Industrie~ Inc .. Mellon Bank NA and Xtra Corp. ,ought tn block
the ~Ie of D & H OIl Ihe ground~ Ihal it ~ould not rni~c rnough
mooey
10 pay their combined Ceurcd debt or SIN million U.S
111ey had argued th:.ll D & Hs b;mkruptey [ru~t~e ~as wrong in
approving a sale IOCP for $25 million when Ihe milwayeould h:tvt
been liquid.1[oo for bet\.ccn $67 million and $&0 million.
Sale
of tl)e D & H will give Cl ih long-~)ught-for In[I) into [he
major U.S.
porl~ of Philadelphia and Baltimore. and ma} ,,cU
change thc c.hllro.lcter of r:lilwlffic from ccllInll Canad:1 to the cast
coost. II will also ensure the cOlltinutd txistcnce of [he mih:Jy
which. with ib prcdC(.b$Orcanal. has been ~Iing Nonh Am<:ri<.:a
sinct 1823.
PLENTY OF DESIRE FOR BELGIAN STREET CARS
At least .hree m:ljlf European cilies want to buy some Belgian
~trc.:t c:Us thm have been around for 25 to 30 years. TIll: prospcel
is prublemmK: for Belgilill foreign-tl1ldc official:;. because Ihe
Sireel cars
:Ire practically indestructible ~nd henec the threc cilic~
fhat wantlhean. Buchar~l. The Hague and lo·larwille. will be Iost
mnrkel.~·· for lIew Bclgi:m ~Ircct carl>.
11ll Sociele owns the cars. once ~Id .)Gille of ils old IranlS 10 C:mo w1m:h laler
sold Ihem
to Copenhagen. SonIC 40year-old Belgian troileys ~
still runOlng in Asunc.ion. Partlguay. 11le company said th,lt il had
o
ffers from the threc European cilies for92 old c:lrs.lInd would like
to:.ell at let.st 50 for $50.000 U.S. each. Thh will make 1lI0~ room
i
ll the depots which will ~00fI be fillec.llly 48 ~w tram~ on order.
from Belgian firms of cour..e.
The company
say~ Ih rc-u~c the old car..,
Mar$CiIle i) lllllinl) imere)ted In Ihe truck, which lhe 00C$ on il:. own ca~. \ohilc TIl{ Hague wants them ror ~pa.rc
p:ln~. 11le coltlpllny g;l-e up the idlll ofmodemizmg lilt old l·an..
I it would h:lv,, CO~I more Ih:111 the new ont$
BACK COVER: III the mid-1980.I. CP {ICtluir,1 two P(IS.ltlIger cars/rom Amtrak. Thtu III/its hml belll ((l/Ilertrd 10 $In, as Tr(l(
£m/iU/liol1 ((Irs. Tile tlO ((/IS lItft piwtoglopIJ,>d aI Smiths Full.l· OntariO ill July. 1990. Car ~CI-I>4~ I. !qllipfrd ,;111 trark !Hlilfllfinl/
equi/1mi1II (111.1 illcor,JOmlt:s I/lratrl stylt: s;>atilU: 10 n/fir ofJicwfs (J cI,m del of IIII rail ilifmslm~·tllre. Built by PullmaN Stalldard lor lilt
Flori!lll East COllst (FEC) ill /954 us {/ 54,slll (QUch n(lll/rli Holi)I()Q(/~. (iJt ftlr SfX1U mall) .<· ljWl/ers ,/{ Ih, SCoboard Air LIIIl. S .. aboard ClJ{1S/ Lim! Will Amlrat
Cal CP-65 .Hn·Cs (IS () .luff accommodation (ar. The !Judd Company tlil/led ollllh,· 52-.fim lowh ill lC).J9 for III< FEe. Tilt (ur M(/.f
dcquired tf) ope!(I/e 011 the Detroit -Florida /1lIin IIJI Royal Pallll~. jointly oplr{/{l!d by iiII 1111 Yur/.; Celilmi. SOllllwm alld 11t( FEe. Tht
cur (111 IhrQl/gh Ihe Utili .. (il(l(lgtS (If {>III/(nhil (IS ~Cf-54~.
PItO/IJ bl [)Qllg/{/X N_IV. Smilh.
Canadian Rail
120, rue St-Pierre, St. Constant, Quebec
Canada J5A 2G9
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