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Canadian Rail 409 1989

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Canadian Rail 409 1989

Canadian Rail
No. 409
MARCH-APRIL
1989
38
CANADIAN
————————ISSN 0008·.815 —-_
PUBLISHED BI-MONTHlY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus For your membership in the CAHA which includes a
CO-EDITOR: Douglas N. W. Smith subscription to Canadian Rail write to:
PRODUCTION: M. Peler
Murphy CAHA, P.O. Box 148, St. Constant, Quebec J5A 2G2
CARTOGRAPHER: William A. Germaniuk Rates: in Canada……… ……………. $27.
LAYOUT: fred F. Angus outside Canada: ……… $23. in U.S. FUNDS.
TYPESETTING: Belvedere Phola-Graphique Inc.
PRINTING: Procel Printi
ng
r—————–~TABLEOFCONTENTS——————_.
A REVIEW OF THE ONTARIO AND QUEBEC RAILWAY ..
THE MODERN MIDLAND ……………………. .
FAREWELL TO THE OTTAWA-TORONTO OVERNIGHT TRAIN
NAPIEAVILlE JUNCTION VAN 34 ………………. .
THE NUMBERS AND NAMES OF THE A-4S …… .
RAil CANADA DECISIONS ……. . …… .
SOOK REVIEWS
……… .
C
RHA COMMUNICATIONS
BUSINESS
CAR
……. ROBERT G. BURNET 39
GERHERD WETZEL 46
DOUGLAS N.W. SMITH 51
………. KEN CARROLL 54
.
….. IAN MORAIS 55
DOUGLAS
N.W. SMITH 58
64
66
69
Caoadian Rail 1$ commually 10 need 01 n(l~. stories. historical data. photos. maps and other rBproductible m8terl81. Please send all
tontlbuhons to the editor: Fred F.Angus. 3021 Trafalgar Ave. Momreal. P.O. H3Y 1 H3. No payment Clln be made forcontnbutloos, but
the contributor will be given credit lor material submitted. Material will be returned 10 the comrlbulor il rcqueslad. Remember, Knowledge ,s
of Ii e value unless it IS shared with others .
Fr~derick F. Angus
R. C. B Jack A. Be Walter J. Bedbrook
Alan C. Blackburn
• NATIONAL DIRECTORS·
Charles De Jean
Gerilrd FrechcHp.
David W. Johnson
J. ChflS!Clphcr Kyle
Wilham le Surf
Bernard Mmlin
M. Peter Murphy
Robert V. V. Nicholls
Andrew W. Panko
DOllrl1as N. W. Smith
De
ryk Sparks
David w. Suong
laurence M. Unwin
Richard Viberg
A. Slephen Walbridge
John C. Weir
The CRHA has II number 01 local divisions atfOSS Ihe country. Many hold regular
meetmgs .. nd issue newsletters. FUrlher ,nformatlon may be obtained by writing 10 the
diVISion.
FRONT COVER:
eN P/lCihc 5069 Is shown hUdillg up the Orrewe-
81s 8Y ITlm which cOilnecled Arnprior end
Renf,~/o /hene/ions cepite/. n rhis erfy 1950s
view. 5
069 is Irli/tld by e sletll m{tll Ger which
cons/,s/s SlrofIfJ/Y wilh Ihe woode IfIJ!$ rod
COKhes behInd it. On IfIg Itlff is , wooden
combme und on the mh:ed fI/J iHtlWtltln 8Mrfs
8t1y d Whll~. rhe 5069 W/JS buik IrH til. Gnd
Tronk in 1913 by rhe Monlt .. Locomotivtl Wotks
tlnd wllS relired In 1955.
• NEW BRUNSWICK DIVlSION
PD. 80_ t162
SainI John.
N.-.¥8l1f1$wock E2l.G7
• ST
LAWA(NCE VAlLEY DMSION
PO. 80. 22 SIll 8
MonU .. !. 0….. H3B 3J6
• RIDEAU VAlUV DIVISION
P.O. Boo 962
Sm.tt., filit. On.1<>O K7A 5A5
• KINGSTON DIVISION
80. I ~. 0 A,,
KngstOn,O,.O K7K 655
• TORONTO 110 YORK OMSION
PO. Boo SS.9. Termnli A.
TOfonlO, Ontario MSW IP]
• NIAGARA DIVISION P.O.
80. 593
51. Clln.nn .. , Onllno l2R 6WB
• MNDSOIHSSfX DMSICN
30() Clblnl !In, E~.
Wnds …. Qfwoo N9t.i IAl
• KEYSTONE DIVISION
14 RfNnoIlIs Bly
W,nn,,,,,,. Mlniloi>o RJK ~4
• CAlGARY & SOUTH W£STERN DIVISION
50 -tltOO .• !h A.,.. NE
CltollY, Albano T2- 5Z8
• ROCKY MOUNTAIN OIViSION
P.O.
800 61D2. SII C.
EdmoniOll. Alberti T68 2ND
• S
ELKIRK DMSION PO
80_39
Rove loJ •. B.C. VO( 250
• CROWSNEST II. KETTU_VALUY OIVlSION
P.O.
80. 400
Cr,nbroo~. 8,1 Columb1~ VIC 4H9
• PA.CIFIC COAST DIVISION
PO Bo< 1006. SII!Jon A.
v .. ncOVY …. B, .. II Columbo. v6C 2Pl
ifIoltl Crtldit: PiJ/tlrson-GMJrgtl Colltlctio
As part of liS activities, lhe CRHA operates
the Canadlln Railway Museum at Oelson/51.
ConSlant. Oue
bet which is 14 miles (23 Km.1
Irom downtown MonlleBI. II
IS open dally
rom late May 10 early October. Members and
their Immed.ate famihes are admined free 01
charge.
GOAl 01 fHf ASSOOA nON; THE COlLECTlON. PRESERVATION AND DISSEMINATION Of ITEMS RELATING TO THE HISTORY 01 RAILWAYS IN CANAOA
39
A Review of the Ontario
and Quebec Railway –
The Scottish
Line
By Robert G. Burnet
While investigating old family pictures, this railway station
at Bathurst was discovered -Photo 1. After searching many
maps, all that came to light was Bathurst, New Brunswick. I
then asked
Mr. Fred Angus and he located Bathurst west of
Perth, Ontario, on the CPR. Within a few months of further
genealogical investigations, it became clear that on
my maternal
side
139 years of Canadian railway history existed.
The railway beginning was meager.
At Finch, Ontario, my
great grandparents and grandparents were born. As a child and
young teenager my grandfather worked around the Ontario and
Quebec Railway
(0 & Q), carrying spikes and light supplies to
the track crews. My great grandfather
ofUEL/Scottish descent,
cut and sold trees off his farm to the
0 & Q as railway ties. Later,
through a traditionally arranged Scottish wedding, my grand­
father married my grandmother. Some time later, they moved
along the
0 & Q line with a great uncle to the settlement of
Bathurst, Ontario.
The Ontario and Quebec Railway was chartered by the
Canadian Government
in 1871. This railways initial route was
to be from Toronto to Peterborough and Madoc to Ottawa.
It
was primarily to link up with the railways of Quebec. The 0 & Q
was seen
as a means to open up and develop the back woods of
Ontario and to provide a means of communication for national
defence. Ten years later, in 1881 , the same
0 & Q charter was
amended from five to twelve pages. One
of the new provisions
was the right to amalgamate with other railways
of Ontario, and
this was vitally essential to the new Canadian Pacific Railways
route to the Pacific.
The
0 & Q had to overcome two major problems. The first
was a terminus
in Toronto. The Grand Trunk Railway (GTR)
had a monopoly as-it-were, on the Lakeshore and the City of
Toronto in the 1880s. To circumvent the GTR, the Ontario and
Quebec laid their single track from Perth through Peterborough
into and through
North Toronto and York Borough to meet with
the Credit Valley Railway (CVR) at West Toronto Junction.
The
CVR, also chartered in 1871, built their tracks through
western Ontario up into Orangeville along with other branch
lines.
The CVR had the vital entrance into Toronto Union
Station which the
0 & Q desired.
The second major problem for the
0 & Q was also GTR
related. Smiths Falls -apostrophe officially dropped in 1968-
provided the CPR with a major rail junction and divisional point.
Smiths Falls
is strategically located between Montreal, Ottawa
and Toronto
as well as being situated on the Rideau River Canal
System, once essential to the economy before the railway came to the area. When the
CPR finally acquired this centre the GTR,
further south on the Lakeshore began to fear the presence and
growth
of the Canadian Pacific. The Grand Trunk then began a
series
of defensive manoeuvers to hinder further CPR progress.
The CPR countered by acquiring the South Eastern Railway in
Quebec, then it re-awakened the 1881 Charter of the Ontario
and Quebec Railway, invoking the right to amalgamate with
other railways. The Canadian Pacifics primary objective was to
build and secure an all-Canadian transcontinental railway to the
Pacific coast.
The CPR carefully scrutinized the significance in
eastern Ontario of the government sponsored Canada Central
Railway
(CCR). In the 1870s, the CCR ran from Ottawa to
Callander through Carleton Junction
in north eastern Ontario,
with a terminus at Sand Point and a branch line between Perth
and Smiths Falls. Therefore, on June
9th, 1881, the CPR
exercised its charter rights once more, and acquired the 254
miles
of the CCR.
With the
CCR acquisition, a mainline from Montreal via
Ottawa through Smiths Falls into Toronto was conceived. In
order to complete this route, however, the
CPR needed
several other railways. Therefore, the Canadian Pacific leased
each
of the following railways for 999 years: the Toronto, Grey
and Bruce on July 26th, 1883; the London Junction on
November 19th, 1883; the Credit Valley on November 30th
1883 and, the
0 & Q on January 4th, 1884. It is significant to
note therefore, that eight months later on August
11 th, 1884, the
mainline from Montreal
to Toronto via Ottawa and Smiths
Falls-Perth, was officially opened for freight and passenger
traffic. Their railway tenacles now spread into the Orangeville­
Guelph-Mount Forest areas and, through northern Ontario to
Callender (Figure 1 -map). As well, many changes in financial
planning and management
in the CPR were needed, and in 1885
when Turnbull and Baron de Reinach retired from the
0 & Q
Board, E.B. Osler, Sandford Fleming and
G.R. Harris (from
Boston,
Mass.) were added to the 0 & Q/CPR directorships.
In
short, the CPR now had affiliations with six railways while
gaining a Toronto Terminus, rail connections into southwestern
Ontario and a major railway junction at Smiths Falls
in eastern
Ontario for its transcontinental line.
The Ontario and Quebec Railway, now CPR, maintained a
different philosophy
to the Grand Trunk Railway. Because the
CPR and GTR basically served the same areas, the CPR gained
an advantage by pushing their line west from Perth -at least they
believed so at the time. The G
TR had the prime route on the
Lakeshore.
CPRs rational was first political with secondary
40
Figure 1 -C.P.R. Map -October 17,1892
On this map Bathurst and Finch are not listed -respectively Jound west oj Perth beJore Sharbot Lake/east oj Perth between
Chesterville and Apple Hill. The
G. T.R. line along the Lakeshore is just aJaint unmarked line, however, the line from North Bay
10 Toronto is labelled GD. TR.. (F. Angus Collection)
believed so at the time. The GTR had the prime route on the
Lakeshore.
CPRs rational was first political with secondary
goals to develop the lines
of communication, in order to provide
a route
for national defence all under an all-Canadian railway.
The
GTR was managed from England yet subsidized with
Canadian taxpayer dollars.
The Grand Trunk though, was its
own worst enemy because
of its connections with the United
States midwest and the US Atlantic coastal ports while using
Canada
as a means to ship freight cheaper from Chicago to
Portland at a time when
Canada felt that the United States was
trying to take over. When Canadian Pacific leased the
0 & Q, it
provided a more secure route with emphasis on Canadian
markets, terminal facilities, rolling stock factories, lake ports,
major rail junctions and various other physical features such as
buildings, agricultural land and minerals. The Grand Truck,
however, had a poor reputation
for horrendous track maintenance
of their rights-of-way, poor rolling stock and facilities. It also
had incredible debts and could rarely make dividend
or interest
payments on loans, not to mention wages to its employees.
The Grand
Trunks fear of the CPR intensified. Competition
took a new and bitter swing
for both railroads. Freight traffic for
the
CPR gained quickly as a result of trunk line competition. In
fact, the competition for freight was so intense that double
tracking
of the CPR line from Montreal, Ottawa to Glen Tay­
four miles west of Perth -commenced in the early 1900s and
was completed
in 1914. The G TR also believed that Canadian
Pacific was invading their areas
of competition in western
Ontario
as well as in the north. Incredibly, the GTR recognized
CPRs right to haul freight and passenger traffic in the northeast
of the province; the CPR agreed to leave the GTR in possession
of its districts. Interestingly enough, the CPRs far-sighted
wisdom had already gained the
CVR, CCR, O&Q, LJ, CCR
and NS Railway. The Grand Trunk tried to sway public opinion
by discrediting the
CPR as having tremendous debts, verging on
bankrupcy and complete failure.
It appears now, the GTR was
u
s
ing their own misfortunes against the CPR and it later caught
up with them.
It is interesting to note therefore, that had the CPR
stopped at Callander, it would have then become a mere feeder
line for the
Grand Trunk at North Bay, progressing no
further.
Perth to Tweed Stations
BATHURST:
This station (Photo 1 / Figure 2 -1892 Timetable) and
settlement was built
in conjunction with the O&Q Railway and
was named in honour
of Henry, the second Earl of Bathurst
(1762-1834). Bathurst was the Secretary
of War and the
Colonies and was instrumental in organizing the emigration
of
settlers from the British Isles to Canada after the War of 1812.
Most early settlers were United Empire Loyalists
and/or
Scottish. It is interesting to note that the Ontario and Quebec
Railway was known
as the Scottish Line because of its
ancestors. In 1971 the population at Bathurst was 30; by the
1980s, it was abandoned and in 1987 deleted from the records
as
uninhabitated. The 1988/9 Ontario Road Map has returned
Bathurst to its original name
ofWemyss. Today, it is only a map
reference.
41
Bathurst, Ontario eight miles west of Perth on CPRs (nee 0 & Q) mainline in the mid-J880s. My grandparents are seated on the
platform and great Uncle stands beside a signal winch. Note the Dominion Express
and Canadian Pacific Telegraphs signs, a
weight scale, station house signal, }ire buckets, platform pedestal and especially the switch standard
and tracks.
For reasons unknown, my grandparents moved to Gananoque
leaving
my great uncle here. My grandfather became Station
Master at Mallory town (uncle born in station) on the Grand
Trunk line
in the late 1880s. Later, he was Station Master at
GTR/CNR Darlington (mother born in station) and Port
Union, while my uncle worked as a call boy and telegraph
operator at
CNR Danforth and in time, Chief Dispatcher for
CNs Great Lake Region out of Mimico Yard in Toronto.
Reflecting on station life, my mother makes these comments:
it was the focal point of the community. Social gatherings, music
nights and family meetings were held
in the station. Families
came to the station on the pretext
of meeting a passenger but
more-often-than-not, it became a social event.
No cards or
alcohol were permitted in my grandfathers stations as
he was a
leader
in the Temperance Society and Freemasons. Railway
rules were
his second Bible. Local and national news events
flashed along the telegraph lines reporting births, deaths, late
night gossip, telegrams and, notifying the next station
of all
trains that passed. Station jobs included writing times on the callboard, helping to load and unload livestock, dairy and
lumber goods,
sort mail, send and deliver train orders, and
operate
the key. The second floor provided living quarters for
the family.
At all our stations, a large garden and bee hives were
maintained.
SHARBOT LAKE:
Industries: mining iron, apatite, mica and feldspar which
began
in the 1830s. Lumber goods and an increase in dairy
cattle and sheep developed
as a result of the O&Q line.
This area is now a Provincial Park.
No station exists.
MOUNTAIN GROVE:
Industries: potash, maple sugar and lumber. Shipping centre
on the
O&Q for dairy goods especially cheese -this persists
today.
The railway station was dismantled in 1967.
42
U{ Montreal. W1D.d.orB ….. ….. Ar ~.:..:..:..::.:. ~ ~ ~I
. iii Mil. mod ………………………… ·• , .• pro …………………. ••••• t 8.10 ILIIl
6 QU.b.O .. l ……………………. ;.I~e.l.aml ………. l ………. I … ; …. I. pm
Figure 2 -C.P.R. Timetable -October 17,1892
This 1892 timetable lists all station stops along the Ontario and Quebec Railway. Also listed are junction points for the U. S.A.
and Maritimes. Note the express times between Montreal and Toronto compared to today.
(F. Angus Collection)
ARDEN (ARDENDALE):
Industries: blacksmiths, sawmill, grist mill, planing mill,
sash and door factory. Later, lumber, logs and agricultural
goods went via the
O&Q to other centres.
the last train went through Arden in April 1967. The station
was dismantled in the summer
of the same year. This writer
purchased land north
of Arden in 1984, only to learn recently
that
my ancestors were a part of this CPR main line.
KALADAR:
Industries: lumber
HUNGERFORD:
Industries: woodworking, carving, casket making and a gold
mine nearby.
It was once an important Mississauga Indian
hunting ground.
SULPHIDE:
Industries: town opened around 1900. Sulphide was produced
here until in the 1960s.
TWEED:
Industries: saw mill, grist mill, cheese factory, woollen
factory, large
egg farm, grain elevator.
In 1884, the
O&Q junctioned with the Bay of Quinte
Railway.
Note: A photograph of the Tweed Station can be found in Canadian Rail, No.
405, July-August 1988 Issue, Page 131.
o AND Q DEMISE
The Grand Trunk Railway provided the CPR with yet
another advantage. The
CPR knew that a lakeshore route would
take time to negotiate and develop. In the short run The
O&Q
route would serve its purpose. However, in 1888, the GTR
more-or-Iess gave the CPR a mainline from North Bay to
Toronto. In the meantime, the
CPR planned a Lakeshore route
out
of the Smiths Falls area as well as double tracking their
present line from Montreal
to Glen Tay, which began in the
early 1900s.
A few other less significant events occurred. In May 1885,
wages to railway employees were long overdue. Men could only
afford one meal a day, they could not save their meager
$1.00 a
day which was paid for back-breaking track work, could not
TIME TABLE No. 48. OCTOBER 29. 1967
WESTWARD
TRAINS-INFERIOR
DIRECTION
KeOND
CLASS
91
FIRST CLASS
389
1
387
1
385
1
383
1
381
O~lIy
E E ~ ~
HAVELOCK
SUBDIVISION
STATIONS
ii
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—I
—~~~I–I
1–1–
TIME
TABLE No. 48. OCTOBER 29. 1967
HAVELOCK
SUBDIVISION
EASTWARD
TRA1NS

SUPERIOR
DIRECTION
—-1
~~
I
i.
~~
5~
STATIONS
3801386 P~HD
nr
I
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Rule
933
npplle8.
Rules
41
~nd
44
(pply
between
Hav
elock
And
Gleo
Tay.
HAVELOCK SUBDIVISION
FOOTNOTES
Toronto
Terminals
Di
vision extends
ca,tward
to
milC3.gc
178.6
Trains
betv.-een
mileage 178.6and Kennedy will
be
gove
rn
ed by
Toronto
Terminals
Division time
mb
le
and
footnotes. p .. ges 30 1036.
Eastward
trains
to
the Belleville Subdivision
may
l
eave
Glen
Tay
withoutclcarancC. We
stward
trains
may
leavc Glen
Tay
witho
ut
clearance,
All
trains
must
obtain
a clearance before leaving H:lVelock mileage
Q3.
7.
Trains
may
leave Dranocl
without
registering.
Trains
may
leave
Tapscott
witho
ut
reg
is
tcring,
Tra
ins rn(y l
eave
Tapscott
without
clearance.
Trains
may
retister
at
Peter
boro by
re~i$
ter
licket.
Jet.
with Belleville Sub.
at
Glen
Tay

eTC.
Jet.
with Belleville Sub.
at
Kennedy-
CTC.
Swing Bridge
mi1ea~e
11
7.1-lnlerlocking.
Rule
60511.
does not
apply.
Railway crosslnlZat
grad
e with C.N,
R.
at
mile:lgc 118.2 -Interloc:k.ing
Automatic.
Rule 605A does not
apply.
Eas
tw
ard
dwarf
signalll82B
governs lrnin movem
ents
througll
t\:a~~t~r;~~i~~~r~m~~~~r~~di:;~
::m~
~i~~ht~;ll;~u;h~n~nt~~~ki~~
from the siding or Kellys
Spur.
Crews
must
as..
..
ure themselves
that
Ihese
spur
tra
ck switches
arc
properlr
lined
fo
r their
movements
before
accepting
the proceed indicatIon.
Railway crossing
at
grade
with
C.N
.R
.
at
mileage 80.4 non. i
nt
erlocked.
Rule 105/ docs n
Ot
apply
at
Blainon,
Havelock, Norwood,
Peterboro
,
and
Ourketon.
Rule
I1(L
) docs not
appl
y within the limi
ts
of the
City
of Peterboro (mileilj::e 116
.6
6
to
mileage I HI,46).
The
ringiug of
en~ille
~lit!sc
.~~~~t~
rh~1hti~~t;~ef~lr~Wi~ec;~~~f~~
~~e~:~
_fi
v~i:;~~
~~~~~
reaching crossings.
Cor.linuai
pat
e 9
Figure 3 –
C.P.R.
Timetable –
October
29,
1967 -two pages
62.5
s ..
….
IWEEI>

.zl
F E

66.
..BulLk
..

H
:~::
I:::
….
:::
:
:~~:M:~
:::.·.·.
·.·

……
~I
·
~
..
~·I–*-
I~~~~I—
,
—,—
89.1

PM
93.7
,.)
.
BLAIRTON
..
..
,
jet~~~~l>·b
….
,

KZ
S
ilO
1:05
..
J
:451
:
••

30
.··
b.
… NORWOOD
..
…..
…..
N D
Sl
……

·.·
1
F12
·
53··
F 8·
34
.

1
108.2!..
.
..mDIANRIVER
.
……
…..
…..
54
AM
F12
·
43
PM
F
8.
25
PM
118
0
……..
P~JORO
KZ
90–
ll.iOl
5
12
·20

25
S8.lO
—a.iO-

-.

99.8
I~:~~
I:
:::::::::::
1·20,
..
121.6
..
KEJDky
..
(2
11
·03
12·07

23
7.57
7
.57.·
12.15
, .

.
….
CAt:1r.1…
.
51
11
·00
F
I
~02
F
5
.09
F
7.52
F
7·52·

DRII.
~O~L
….


RYZ
..
Nil
10
.
55
Fll
.
55
F 5.
03
F 7.
45
F 7.
45.
Jet.
Bol
X:::Uceon
Sub.
127.0 132.A
1
2.10
, ..
12·01
•..
135.2
..
…………
Io1AlI.%b.s.
Nil
F10.52
Fll.51
F
4
·5
9
F
7.41
F 7·
41.
AM
1)-=.
,-1-=.

..
c:..
-••
– ..
P0=NTYPOOc,)
·9
L…
41

-0–8
—-
.4-6
–4-.5-5
–7-.3-6
-,
-7-
.36




-5
-.

148.0

.
….
BUR~N
..
43
1
10.
39
F
II.
36
F
4·46
F
7.26
F
7·2
6.·
11
·30
··
151
.3

MY~:hE..
MU
(5
FIO.31
111.27
F 4.
37
F
7.17
F 7·
17.
11.
15
….

.
-,,:c
,-::.
,-I—
–,o=-
A=-=dik
-.
,-

-0
-.2
-7
—-
.2

-,-.
-.3


-7
-.
,-,

7-
.

-.

-,-,
-0-5 -..

166
.2
……..
OI.AR.tJOr..T
..
R M
)1
F
IO
·22
Fil·l5
F 4·
25
F 7·
05
F
7
·0S

10
.5
5 .. .
11).7
…..
.
LOOU~~:HILL
..
_
,,
_
fIO·
IS
fll·07
~~Z
r
6.57_
. __
~0.4~_
.
__
11B.9
……
..
T~~)1I1.1~~·~
~…!.!..£2~~
6
.5
0_
.
__
~_
.
__
I e2.4
eTC
…….
KENNEDY
..
£~:g
…..
X
……
Nil
1 &
.06
_
g_.5_6
_,_._
.0_6
__
~_-4_6
_p_~_-4_6
___
·····PM
···
Rule
93:.1
a
ppll
ce.
.~~~n.
1
S
lift.
onl1
I
C~.~~rL
O.
ll1y
I
S~L
011
11
u.
S3L
D.lIlr
~1Id
Sun.
Rules
41
a
nd
44
npp
ly
b
etween
Havelock
an
d
Glen
Tay
.
380
1
386
1
382
3841388
90
HAVELOCK
SUBOIVISION
fOOTNOTES-
Colltir.lled
MAXIMUM
SP
EEDS UNLESS OTHERWISE RESTRICTED
Miles per
Hour
Passenger
Trains
(cagt of
Ha
vel
ock)
.
,0
Pcrma nen t Sl
o,,
Or
ders Permissible Speed Miles ocr
Hour
P3.SS(:nger
Frt.
and
Mil
eal!c
Lor:ltion Train$ Mix
rd
Trains
O.ut062.53
On
C
~

3-U-

0

63.55 On
Curve
…….
..
30
116.G6
to 119.4(l
City
Limits,
Peter
boro
10 10
130.7
10
131.7 On
Curv
es..
60
131.7 to 133.7 On
Curves…
50 50

33.7
to
166.2 On
Curv
es.. 60
West
…..
ard
trains a
nd
engioes
stopping
at
Kal
adar
statiOn m
ust
not
exceed ten miles per hour
until
crO$!ling
of
Highway
No. 41. milc..,ge 46.57 has been reached.
This
also applies to movemen
t
leaving siding.
An
movements
over No.7 High(ay crossing of
Ontario
Rock Com
pany
spur
kad
ing (r
om
mik must
not
exceed seven milcs per hour.
m:y
~C:d~~:ln~0~~~~i~t~d~c;~~~hS~I~t~n~~~:~do~I~/~~1;tdel~1t~~
station
nea~
the
operators
wifldow and
at
the crossing.
Ex
cept
when
w~
ther
or
other
condilions prevent
proper
running inspection,
Sflcci:11
Instruction
C
is amended
to
read 75 miles on this subdi
vi
sion.
Trai
ns
must
:c;tor
before passing
ruh
li
c
(ros~
jl1~
grade, pro­
tected
by :1utomal;c
sign.11s.
at
1I1i1ca
gc
10
.
GO
,
2!J.
15, 39.42,
4G
.12.
62.5-3,
70.
33,71.48
and
ifJ.99 to
en
sure crossing protection op
erating
g;~~r~~~
~fo!~~~~~~~~:l(j
r~l
~~;l~r~;~g~u~~o~~:le~e~~
member
of
Regular passenger service bel
ween
Glen Tay
and
Ha
ve
lock ended
in
the early 1960s. Note the stations are still listed but without
times. Most other stations are now ./lagged. Rules
41
and 44 still applied at this time, however, the last known train was a
freight in April 196
7.
.a;. eN
a
WESTWARD
TRAINS
INFERIOR
DIRECTION
TIME TABLE No. 43. APRIL 28th. 1974
EASTWARD
TRAINS
SUPERIOR
DIRECTION
SECOND
CLASS
IUlST
eu..ss
HAVELOCK
SUBDIVISION
RR.ST
eLASS
..,.,…,.
CL.US
91 .Ip,
Dilly
ILSal
383 ,.

Senl
Sun.
only
381 !nSlnler
Dill,
ILSUn.
I
~~
I
i
STATIONS
~i
~~
…. 0
Uv>
380
I
382
I
90
–I-~I-



a_
R_
I—+––I—–j
I-~I–I–
I–
I–

62.S
…..
IWEEO
.•…••
66.4
…••.
Bulik
……..
.
..Z,.
Nil
5.
:~::
.:::::;:M:~:
..
~.·.·.·.·.·.·
..
~I=f-+.-I····
·······1··········1·
··········1········
····
9.)
99.7
…•••.•
…..
BLAIRTON
..
.0
1900
1745
0610
93.7
·.··jtt~~~;:fu·b·.
.

Kzl
S
6.1
191
5
F1755
F062Q
99.9
…•.
.NORWOOO
..
8.
18
=I
………..
1940
FI807
F0632
,.rc.:08::
.:.2F
, ..
.:.
..
,-,
·
, ..
,
.. _
..
=nm~1AN~
RIVER..
·
..
·1
……
~4
1-
9.8

1959
91820
80645
118
.0
..
~ORO
………
KZ
B 0
20
2014
F1833
F0658
127.0
.CAVAN
……
.
5.

2023
fl842
F0707
1)2.~
….
ORANOEJ..
………
RyZ,.
Jet.
BobC::lYIi:c:on
Sob.
2.8
2OOO12359i
0130
F1950
F2347
0120
:~:~~
:~~~~
~~~~
I::::::::::::
F1906
F2309
DOlO
lil859
12300
0001
1
1=1
.;~~;.
~::~:
~~:!
:::::
…..
:~~~
8.
-~I
11854
1
12254
1=1=
..
I
39
Fl848
F2248
2345
……….
..
2054
F1906
F0731
148.0
BURKETON
..
.J
)5
~~~~
:~:~:
~~!!
::~:~
….
·:·.·::JZ·~.
..
..
l~
5
.2
]7 Nil
2211.
F1932 F0757
166
.2
……..
OI..AR!!:MONT
..
7.5
]0
2235
1950
0815
118.
..
____
……
T~.
.. ..
–Va;;
I.
110.)
..
_
..
__

TORONTOYARD..
Y
II.
Yard
1.2
FI836
I
F2236
2330
Fi824
12224
L_~_~.~,
__
_
Fl819
IF2
219
flBII
F2211
FISO
I
F2201
1753
2153
2305
2255
2245 2235
2225
F
1942
F0807
11].
7
.••..•..
LOaoST
BILL
~
Nil
111.5
0
……..
B~Y
…….
_.
Y:u-d
…..
…….
. 1·
…..

….
.
51955
80820
111.6
t-
..

..
AOIN
COORT

..
R G N
1
51748 52148
1957
0822
112
.~
0
……
.
~by.
……
1746
2146
……….
.

—–
0.
u..~l
91
SaLonI)
DIU,
…..
~
383
I
381
Rulo
93a
applies.
Rules
41
and
44
app
ly
between
Havelock
and
Tweed.
e~~IJIl.
I
$1I1I.onl
I
e~~J~l
380
I
382
I
90
HAVELOCK
SUBDIVISION
FOOTNOTES
ON
PAGE
29
Figure 4 –
C.P.R.
Timetable -April 28, 1974
Thejlagged station stops are cut by about two-thirds now. Note the
Tweed Blairton station are listed but Glen Tay and Tweed are gone
-Rules
41
and
44
apply now between Havelock and Tweed.
TIME TABLE No.
49.
JUNE 8th.
1980
WESTWARD
TRAINS
INFERIOR
OI
.REenON
HAVELOCK
SUBDIVISION
EASTWARD
TRAINS
SUPERIOR
DIRECTION
FOURTH
CLASS
91 freight
~r

So<.
FIRST
CLASS

189
I
191
1­~.onIy
..
s..OIIIJ
187
1
i
P…,per
J
00,
~
Us.l
.
~
s.AAy
i ~
STATIONS
…….
RTH
CLASS
FIRST
CLASS
.!
~-I
i
ol
cJ
]~
f
188
I
190
I
90
i .:l§o Jl
-1-1-
~
b_
_
.b
.b
62.5
.J
….. ……
TWEED
…………….
z
f-ol;;,90~0+1;;,74::5+::0::7~1.::0+.::0.::6~1.;;0+:.:3–1.
1
16:gl.
…………..
HAJ~lOCK
……….
KYZI
s
153001
93 43
2000
2359
0130
0120
84.11 Jc:l.N
….
phtonSub.
6.1
.
1950
fl766
F0720 F0620
~9.8
1
….
..
………….
NOR~poD.
……
122301
37
F1950
I
F2347
F1807 F0732
F0632
10
8.2
………
.

.
lNDIANR:..:rv.;;ER..:;
..
..:;
..
==+=+-l—-I-=:::O::-t==:-t~:::::-1
2020
S
l820
50745
S0646
118.0
~~:~)
…….
PETErgORO

0040
2035
Fl833
F0768
F06S8
121.0
~
….
..
……..
..
CAVAN.
0010
2044
fl842
F0807
F0707
132.4
~1.6
……………..
OR1r.tOEL…
.. ..
RYZ
Nil Y2.9
JO
l.BObcl.§conSub.
PI848
FOS13
F0713
135.2
.1….

MANVERS..
Nil
F1854
F2254
FI859
I
2300
0001
2058
F1854
FOSl9
F0719
139.1
.M
..

……….
.

POr-.rA~OOL….
Nil
FI848
F2248
2345
2115
F190S
F0831 F0731
148.0
j….
.. ..
BUR~JroN
…..
Nil
F1836
F2236
2330
2130
FlelS
F0843
f0743
151.3
.1..
..
…………..
MY~=-h.E

.
..
….
1960 32
F1824
F2224
2315
2140
F1924
F0849
F0749
161.0
.I
……………..
..
oAdJAR
…..
Nil
Fl819
F2219
2305
I
5.2
~~~~
:~::~ :~:~~ :~~~~
:~~:~
~~:::
.

::::::::::.~~W~:.
.
..
1860
~:
I
:~:~~
:~~~
~~::
1.
5.2
=::;;===
F=J
=
+
::
-I-~~J-;~~~~~
2235
1950
0916
0816
118.9
1
….
TA~50TI
…………
RZ
.
YII.rd
1753
2153
2236
180.3 . .

TORONTQYARD
.CKW
Y A
….
Yo.rd
,
l
0..1,
So,
91
181.5
,1.5
(J
……….
BRl~~EY
S1955
I
S0920
I
S0820
1
8
1.6
……
)-
……..
AOlNa: ……
..
.1957
0922
0822
182.4
.
~
….
(J
………
KENNEDY
So.nonly
1
s.
l.
only
189
I
191
0,.1,
h~l
..os… 187
Rule
9J:l
3.pplit$.
Rul~
41:1nd
44
apply
be
«n
H.I
elock
Ind
TWttd.
Y.
HAVELOCK
SUBDIVISION
FOOTNOTES
ON
PAGE
27
Figure 5 –
C.P.R
. Timetable –
JUDe
8,
1980
S1748
1
S2148
1746
2146
D
illy
1
Str.I
on
ly
~b
.
188
I
190
Flag stops still existed as they continue today. Note that Tweed­
Blairton are now gone/rom the table. however, this
was
not
abandoned until December
27, 1987.
Also o/interest, Rules
41
and
44
is
applied between Havelock and Tweed.

~So, 90
~ ~
afford to pay rents or raise a family. In Perth, a group of
mechanics met and decided on a work slowdown or a strike
unless they were paid. When Van
Home stopped in Perth and
met the construction gangs,
he simply rep I ied he would close the
whole works down. A major railway strike was averted, but it
was clear the
CPR had to do something.
The
CPR also owed interest payments to the government.
Because
of the strike threat, the government became concerned
about their own interests. The
CPR had to find money not only
for salaries but also interest payments on the bonds held by the
O&Q. The CPR knew that if the money was not found, their
railway company might fail. Finally,
by May 1st and July 1st
1886, the
CPR agreed to pay the Government a debt of
$19,150,700.00. When the debt was paid, the government,
along with other deals, agreed to return $ 300,000.00
of
debenture stock to the O&Q which had been deposited as
security
for a government loan. The railway crews also got a
stipend.
It is interesting to note that the CPR did not own all
outstanding shares
of the O&Q Railway. Approximately
11,500 shares are believed still held by the Company with
another 8500 shares owned
by some 108 individuals.
The Grand Trunks earlier philosophy started to change.
The
GTR maintained rail routes in Quebec, Ontario, the USA
and finally,
in 1903, they entered into a transcontinental railway
forming the Grand Trunk Pacific Company. This railway was to
develop the Canadian territories north
of the CPR and provide,
eventually, a more northerly Pacific port. With years
of poor
financing, debts and bad management, however, the
GTR and
GTPR goal was never realized. By 1923, the government had
taken over the
GTR. Its bitter history was now a historians
matter.
DOWNGRADED TO DEGRADED
On November 11 th, 1911, the double track from Montreal to
Glen
Tay was completed. Officially opened on December 13th,
1914, the
CPR tracks now ran along the Lakeshore, taking some
150 miles off the original main line to Toronto -the
O&Q was
now downgraded to secondary status.
By 1962, Canadian Pacific had almost closed the
O&Q
railway; in April 1967 (Figure 3 -1967 Timetable) this once
historic main line saw its last train. During July
of 1971, the
Ontario and Quebec took another insult and the line was
abandoned between Perth and Tweed encompassing the stations
mentioned above and
in the timetables. Rails that lay quiet and
rusting, were tom
from their sleepers and sold for scrap in the
same month
as the decision was reached (Figure 4 -1974
Timetable). Yet another
blow came on December 27th, 1987,
when the line was further abandoned
from Tweed to Blairton.
These rails were quickly pulled and sold
for scrap and relics
dismantled.
IfI could buy a dream, it would be to ride the long-gone rails
of
my great grandfather, grandfather and great uncle. It is painful
to examine the past when little remains. Finding information and
photographs
is like an archeologist sweeping layer after layer of
dust off a hidden bone. And now, the right-of-way is only a
landscape scar
in a few places. In the communities that still
45
exist, the Bell Telephone has posted signs warning against
trespassing and
No Vehicles along the right-of-way -the
only testament to a once significant part
of Canadas historical
railway development. All that may be done now
is to imagine
what it once was like.
Where
my earliest ancestors once lived, grew garden
vegetables and kept bees, no visible signs
of this railway station
remain. The soil they once tilled
is now overgrown with weeds
and debris. Our family
of stations are now just some names on a
map or old timetable
… names no one wonders about any
longer.
Had this photograph not turned up, my knowledge of what
my early family did on the O&Q, GTR and CNR for some 139
years, and the history behind their lives, would have been lost.
It
is sad and insulting to our past that such railway barbarism
persists. More and more our rail lines are disappearing -more
and more our past
is dying and being covered up. The degrading
has to stop.
SIGNIFICANT 0 & Q DATES
1835 Oct. 10 -James McCalpin born (greatgrandfather) D:
Nov. 14, 1904
1865 May
13 -Robert H. McCalpin born (grandfather) D:
Apr. 23, 1931
1871 -Ontario and Quebec Railway Charter
1872 May 7 –
CPR Bill introduced to complete a trans­
continental railway to the Pacific from Lake Nipissing within 10
years
1881 -original 0 & Q Charter amended to permit railway
amalgamations
June 9 –
CPR acquires Canada Central Railway and branch
line between Perth and Smiths Falls
1883 Jul. 26 -Toronto, Grey and Bruce leased for 999 years
Nov.
19 -London Junction leased for 999 years
Nov. 30 -Credit Valley leased for 999 years
1884 Jan. 4 –
0 & Q leased for 999 years
Aug.
11 -0 & Q opens mainline from Montreal to Toronto
via Smiths Falls and Peterborough
1886 May /July -strike threat at
Perth averted and payment
of debts made
1900 (early) -double tracking Montreal to Glen Tay begins
1907 Mar.
18 -Railroad Commission orders CPR and GTR
to reduce passenger fares to 3 cents a mile
1911 Nov. 14-CPR opens double tracking Montreal to Glen
Tay (officially opened
Dec. 13)
1914 Jan. 29 -shortline from Glen Tay to Agincourt opens
Dec.
13 -CPR lakeshore route commences with Express
Trains
#19, #20, #21 and #22 to Toronto
1932 -Highway 7 completed paralleling the
O&Q from
Tweed to Perth
1962 –
0 & Q line all but closed
1967
April-last train between Tweed and Smiths Falls
1971 July -0 & Q between Tweed and Perth officially
abandoned
1987 Dec. 27 -Tweed to Blairton abandoned (Figure 5 -1980
Timetable) .
46
The Modern Midland
By Gerhard Wetzel
Mention the Midland to most railfans and images of
Pacific hauled locals sweeping across central Ontario come to
mind. Phil Stroh, retired
CN agent/operator, remembers his
years from 1951 to 1955 as operator at Waubaushene when four
daily passenger train (2 to Toronto and 2 to Lindsay), a way
freight from Lindsay, and two manifest freights from Lindsay
dusted the small station with cinders. Add in 4 to 8 grain extras
and the Midland was a busy line. Those days are long gone but
the modem Midland Subdivision
of CN Rail still supports a
surprising amount
of traffic for a branchline. During the summer
of 1985, I decided to examine the current operations on the
Midland Subdivision.
The Midland Sub extends from Orillia to Midland, Ontario,
a distance
of 3 3.2 miles. Interestingly enough, mile posts are still
measured from Lindsay though the rail connection has been
severed for years. Train 544, a
five day a week wayfreight,
travels the length
of the line. The crew of 544 goes on duty at
7:30 a.m. at Orillia where their unit and van
is parked. On the
August day when I rode train 544, or technically
Extra 2580
West, I had a double treat: not only the ability to ride the train
but the unit assigned was the first unit
ofthe last order ofMLWs
HR 416 s. And since Bombardier had just previously announced
that it was leaving the locomotive business unit
2580 took on
historic proportions.
No matter how much we railfans love MLW power and are
willing to chase allover
North America to hear, photograph and
smell
MLW and Alco power, I have never met a railroader who
speaks well
of the ALCOs. Nor have I ever heard them
referred to as anything other
than ALCOs as though it were
an epithet for all
that was evil in locomotivedom. Today was no
exception.
At 7:50, train 544 swayed out of Orillia on 10 mph track
pulling its van.
As luck would have it, the crew had no switching
at Longford, approximately halfway between Orillia and
Washago on the Newmarket Subdivision where Domtar
maintains a large chemical plant.
My ride today was to be
devoted solely to the Midland Sub.
The lift for Midland was standing in the siding at Uhtholf.
Twelve covered hoppers and four boxcars were rearranged with
the boxcars put next to the van
for easier spotting at Midland.
The cars for Midland are brought from Torontos MacMillan
yard by Train
461, a turn which often runs seven days a week to
serve the huge limestone quarry at Uhtholf. Train 461
the
stone train runs in the late afternoon and lifts 544s cars from
Midland at Uhtholf before returning to MacMillan yard. The
stone train ties the operation
of 544 into the wider operation of
CN. The importance of train 461 is further emphasized in that
welded rail has been installed from the Orillia yard limit to about
—–
—-
——
T
Extra 9463 North, train 461, powered by Jour oJ eNs distinctive wide-nose GP-40-2 s is leaving the Newmarket Subdivision at
Orillia
to run west on the Midland Subdivision to Uhthoff.
All photos
by the author. This one taken July, 1983. All others, August 8, 1985.
Georgion Boy,
c.p.
M aeTier

.,
,, Loire Ontario

t
-N-
– C N Midland Subdivision
trockage rights on
Midland Subdivision
Other C N S C P lines
o 10 20
miles
GW-86 w 1S-88
47
48
a mile west of Uhthoff to support the heavy stone trains. On
most days, at least 55 loaded stone cars are lifted in addition to
the Midland cars resulting in 12,000 hp often being assigned.
Four or five GP-40 WLs or three M630s are common; even
the new SD
50Fs have been assigned to this train. Heavy duty
railroading for a branchJine operation.
Extra 2580 West, train 544, makes its lift at UhthoffofTiffin and
Midland cars. 544 had left Orillia as a van hop.
.< side trip to the Uhthoff quarries is recommended during a
week-day since the Limestone Quarries uses an
ex-CP S 3 No.
6534 as their switcher. The S-3 has a cut down cab to clear the
limestone loaders and pulls around a couple
of ancient side
dump cars for added braking. Neither
CN nor CP spot the
hopper cars under the loaders. Rather, holding yards are used to
hold empties and loads with the
CN and CP trains only operating
into these yards. S-3 No.
3-6908 spots the hoppers for loading
and returns them to the holding yards.
Fifteen
minutes are spent re-arranging our train.
As the sun
rises and the day gets hotter, the brakeman gives a new meaning
to the term comfort cab. Stripping off his overalls,
he changed to
shorts under his overalls. And while the uniform
of railroaders
has not changed drastically from stearn days, their cooking
utensils have. Gone are the metal dishes, replaced
by Tupper­
ware which for the brakeman contained cereal and fresh
strawberries. West
of Uhthoff, the countryside alternates between farms
and bush. Across the open farmland, two
CP Rail 1800s
pushed a van toward Uhthoffjust east
of the CP Rail crossing at
Medonte. The Uhthoff quarries are also served
by CP Rail from
their
Port McNicoll SUb.
Speed on this
part of the line reached the subdivision limit of
30 mph and a clear signal allowed us to cross CP Rails Mactier
SUbdivision.
The crossing is controlled by the CP Rail operator
at the Medonte station via a small interlocking plant. These,
incidentially, are the only signals on the line. The dispatching
function is carried out
of MacMillan yard in north Toronto by
YX train dispatcher. The line is operated by Manual Block
System (MBS) with running rights conferred
to a specific train in
a specific block. This
is particularly important since CP Rail has
trackage rights on the Midland Sub. MBS clearances are issued
via the operator at Orillia
or over the radio by Y X dispatcher via
local repeaters.
Coldwater was passed at 8:
50 and as we passed the
Fessertan
Flats, the traffic on adjacent Highway 12 paid little
attention to our
short freight. It was here in the early fifties that
Phil Stroh used to pace the Mikado-hauled grain extras
ostensibly to show his sons how an engine valve gear
worked.
Train 544 lifts 2 empty hoppers at TijJin for the Indusmin sand
plant
in Midland. In the background is the massive TijJin grain
elevator. No loads
were picked up today but winter time often
generates
40-50 loads.
By the time Victoria Harbour is reached, the track passes
many cottages, often dividing the summer houses from the
waters
of Georgian Bay and the hom is in constant use. In
contrast to urban areas, the children here still wave to the train
crew rather than stoning the train.
The crew is extraordinarily
vigilant along this
part of the line; a deaf boy was run over a
month back subsequently dying
in hospital.
By 9: 17, train 544 passes the stone piers of CPRs Hog Bay
trestle and MacMillan which
is the junction switch with CP
Rails Port McNicoll Sub. From here as far as Coldwater, CP
Rail has a trackage rights agreement with CN Rail. On the
outskirts
of Midland at Tiffin, yard limits are reached. Located
here
is a two track interchange track with CP Rail and the huge
Tiffin elevator.
Four tracks serve the elevator although activity
49
The weed grown tracks oj Midland yard as seen from the cab oj train 544. At the left is the eN Midland station which is now used
by
MW crews.
is limited on this summer day. During the winter months its not
unusual for 544 to lift
35 or more grain hoppers. Obviously with
trains
of this size, two units are assigned during the winter
months.
The yard at Tiffin is used to re-arrange the train putting
the van next to the unit and then the sand hoppers including two
lifted off the
CP interchange track for Indusmin and the flour
boxcars
for Oglivie. With the train rearranged, everyone
retreated back to the van
for a coffee break. The coffee had been
warmed on the engine hot plate. A section
man joined the crew
and exchanged moose hunting stories.
In addition to the grain traffic from Tiffin, Midland provides
two other sources
of traffic for train 544. Indusmin makes fine
silica sand for the glass industry and our empties were spotted
and four loads pulled for the
CPR interchange. Since Indusmin
is owned by CP, much of the traffic goes to CP Rail. With the
van next to the unit, the crew
is already building the train for the
return trip to OriJlia. The 2580
is run around the train at end of
track and coupled onto the four empty boxcars for flour loading
at Oglivie Mills. Eight loads are lifted at Oglivie and by
11: 35,
train
544 is ready to return to Orillia. The conductor is on the
radio to the train dispatcher copying his MBS clearance which
gives him the railroad from Tiffin
to Orillia. At Tiffin, the CP
Rail interchange is set out and the train begins its journey back to
Orillia.
Since there are no turning facilities
at Midland, 2580 is
operated long hood forward. This puts the engineer on the wrong
side and limits operating speed
to 25 mph which has no
consequences for the 30 mph trackage.
At Uhthoff, the cars are
set off for train
461 and engine and van are back in Orillia by
1: 30.
The unit is parked between derails on one of the wye tracks
and
~hut down during the warm summer months. IncidentialIy, the unit
for 544 is handled by 461 for its monthly inspection at
MacMillan yard. Sometimes when 461 s power fails, it steals
544s unit and the crew has to go to Washago to get a
replacement set
out during the night by a Bala Subdivision
freight.
Unit 2580 spotting box cars Jor flour loading at Oglivie Mills in
Midland. III the backgroulld is the Indusmin plant, source oj
covered hopper loads oj salld.
Railfanning the Midland Subdivision
Since 544 runs Monday to Friday, one ofthose days
is best to
see the train out on the line. The 7: 30 starting at Orillia is
adhered too and only local switching or work at Longford will
delay departure from Orillia.
An operator is still present during
the week at Orillia who can give out line-ups and also
movements of
CP Rail on CN track.
50
The addition of 4 more boxcars of flour will complete train 544 for its run back to Orillia. In front of the van are four covered
hoppers loaded
with sand for interchange with the CP at Tiffin.
The CP Rail roadswitcher usually gets out of Port McNicoll
some time between 7:30 and 9:
00 a.m. CP Rail stafTare usually
available at
Port McNicoll. Also the CP Rail operator at
Medonte can give the whereabouts
of the CP roadswitcher and
also knows when 544 crosses the interlocking plant. Finding the
CP Rail Medonte station can be difficult but not impossible if
one takes the Coldwater cut-off from Highway
12 and instead of
going into town follow the road leading to the CP Rail repeater
tower at Medonte.
Train 461 usually gets out
of MacMillan yard at 2:00 p.m.
and doesnt reach Orillia and the Midland Subdivision until 5:00
-6:00 p.m. Take West Street out ofOrillia to reach UhtholTbut I
would recommend topographic maps to find the concession
roads necessary
to reach the UhthofT sidings and the set ofT
tracks. There is no open station at the west end of the Midland
Subdivision and at times it can
be difficult to determine the exact
location
of train 544 or the CP Rail roadswitcher. The use of a
scanner
is recommended to determine the location ofthe various
trains on the Midland Subdivision. Frequencies used are:
CN Rail
Channell
Channel 3
CP Rail 161.415 –
160.935 –
161.475 –
160.175 -Used by train crews.
Used by train dispatcher
to issue MBS clearances to
both
CN and CP trains
using trackage rights.
Used by trains crews.
Maintenance
of Way;
also used to broadcast
track line ups.
CP 1808, a rebuilt MLW RS-18, has just completed its run over
the Midland Subdivision
of CN. A t Coldwater, ils proceeding to
Medonte to set off its cars for Mactier Subdivision trains.
I wish to thank Jim Stratton and Bill Staples of CN Rail and
the crew
of train 544 for help in the preparation of this
article.
51
Farewell to the Ottawa-Toronto
Overnight Train
by Douglas N. W. Smith
On January 17, 1989, the overnight train service between
Ottawa and Toronto made its last departure ending more than
one hundred years of such service. VIA
FPA-4 6780 which
headed the final train to leave Ottawa was trailed by 72 seat
coach 5646 and the 4 section-8 roomette-4 bedroom sleeper
Elgin. On board were 31 passengers.
Overnight passenger train service
of a sort began in 1870.
That year, the St. Lawrence & Ottawa Railway (StL&O)
inaugurated a new train between Ottawa and Prescott which
connected with the Grand Trunks Montreal-Toronto overnight
trains. While the new service must have been appreciated
as it
saved a
full business day, the only accommodation was coach
seats. The service rapidly proved
its popularity. On March 8,
1871 , the StL&O started to run sofa cars on these overnight
trains
for the comfort of its patrons. An additional charge of fifty
cents was made
for the use of these cars between Ottawa and
Prescott. Regretably, no details of the interior accommodations
of these cars has yet come to light.
Through service was not a possibility as the track on the
StL&O was laid to a gauge of 4 feet 8]..1 inches, while the space
between the
GTR rails was 5 feet 6 inches. In October 1873, the
G
TR narrowed the width of its Montreal-Toronto line to
standard gauge. With tracks of a uniform gauge between Ottawa
and Toronto, the
GTR and StL&O began on October 23, 1873
to run sleeping cars between the two cities three times per week.
As the primary source of sleeping car patronage was politicians
and businessmen seeking favours, the sleepers initially operated
only when Parliament was
in session. During those periods
when the sleeper did not operate, the
StL&O ran its sofa cars
between Ottawa and Prescott Junction. While today the
assignment of specific sleeping car space
is taken for granted,
such was not the case
in the early 1870 s. The January 28, 1875
issue of the Ottawa
Citizen announced that effective
February
1st sleeping car space would be sold by berth number.
Effective November 29, 1880, the frequency of the Ottawa­
Toronto sleeper increased to daily except Sunday. The three
additional round trips were not operated over the
StL&O, but
over the Canada Central Railway
(CCR). While the CCR had
completed its rail line from Brockville to Ottawa via Carleton
PLace
in 1870 [see related article in Rail Canada News section
concerning the abandonment
of this line between Carleton Place
and Ottawa
1, it could not afford to convert its line from broad to
standard gauge until 1880.
In
June 1881, CP assumed control of the StL&O and the
CCR. The two railways had been keen competitors for Ottawa­
Toronto traffic.
CP pared the passenger schedules offered by the
two companies to euminate duplication. In January 1882, the
night train over the former
StL&O trackage was discontinued. Sleeping cars began to operate six nights per week over the
former
CCR.
In 1884, the Ontario & Quebec Railway (O&Q) completed
its line from Smiths Falls, on the former CCR line, to Toronto
via Peterborough. The
O&Q was controlled by financiers
associated with
CP. On August 11, 1884, CP inaugurated the
Night
Express which ran between Montreal and Toronto via
Ottawa and Carleton Place. With the opening
of its own line, the
Toronto-Brockville-Ottawa sleeper operated jointly
by CP and
GTR was terminated.
The Montreal-Toronto overnight train began to by-pass
Ottawa following the completion
of a direct rail line between
Montreal and Smiths Falls
in 1887. Ottawa-Toronto cars were
switched
in and out the Montreal-Toronto train at Smiths Fal.ls
during the next two decades. On November
25, 1907, CP
inaugurated a separate Ottawa-Toronto train. Effective October
31, 1915,
CP the through Ottawa-Toronto trains began to
operate via Kemptville rather than via Carleton Place.
For thirty years, CP had a monopoly on Ottawa-Toronto
traffic
as it possessed the only through line between the two
cities. While the
GTR pondered constructing a line to Ottawa,
the challenger to
CPs supremacy was the Canadian Northern
(CNo). Having started out as a feeder line to CP in Manitoba in
the 1890s, the CNo decided to become a transcontinental
system. In line with these plans, the
CNo constructed a main
line between Montreal and Toronto via Napanee and Ottawa.
On October 19, 1914, shortly after the portion
of the line
between Toronto and Ottawa was completed, the
CNo
inaugurated an overnight service between these points.
During the difficult years
of World War I, the CNo found it
could not meet its financial obligations.
It was taken over by the
government and served
as the core for the Canadian National
Railways. During the
1920s, under the direction of its
President, Sir Henry Thornton,
CN aggressively challenged
CPs dominance of the passenger business. The Ottawa­
Toronto route, which was used by important politicians and
business men, came
in for special attention. CN deployed its
newest sleeping cars on the route, inaugurated a through sleeper
between Ottawa and Hamilton, and generally gave
CP a run for
its money. By the end of the decade, the two companies were
handling approximately the same level
of patronage.
The onslaught
of the economic depression in 1930 drastically
reduced travel. Whereas
in 1929 the two railways fielded a total
of 8 sleeping cars between Ottawa and Toronto, four such cars
were adequate during most
of the 1930s. Based upon the
recommendations
of a special government commission, CN and
CP agreed to pool duplicative passenger services. Those
between Ottawa and Toronto were merged on April
2, 1933. At
52
that time, CN discontinued its day and night trains between
these points. While the Ottawa-Toronto day trains operated
over
CP track between Ottawa and Brockville and over CN
track between Brockville and Toronto, the overnight trains
operated over
CPs direct line via Peterborough.
In order to maintain their corporate presence,
CN and CP
equipment were used on the Pool trains. The typical consist for
the Ottawa-Toronto overnight train during the 1930s was one
CP express car (except Saturdays and Sundays), one CN
express car (except Sundays), one CP mail car (except
Sundays), one
CP coach, one CN 6 section-l drawing room-4
chambrette (single bedroom) sleeper, one
CP 8 section-4
bedroom sleeper, one CP
12 section -1 drawing room sleeper,
and one
CP 3 compartment-l drawing room-buffet-lounge
open platform observation car.
Business picked
up considerably in the late 1940s. Thus CP
inaugurated a second Ottawa-Toronto overnight train in April
1947. Rather than
follow the route of the existing train through
Peterborough, the new train operated over
CPs Lakeshore line
through Belleville which
CP had opened in 1914. These two
trains handled a total
of 8 sleeping cars. Slightly more than ten
years later, following the discontinuance
of the second train in
October 1958, the number of sleeping cars moving between the
two cities had shrunk to six.
Amongst the last passenger equipment purchased
by CP
were four stainless steel streamlined sleeper-buffet-lounge cars
which were acquired second hand from the New York Central
in
January 1959. CP renamed these cars into the View series.
They replaced the heavyweight sleeper-buffet-solarium lounge
cars assigned to the Ottawa-Toronto and Montreal-Toronto
overnight trains. These cars had been built
by the Budd
Company
in 1949 and were used on some of the most famous
New York Central trains including the Twentieth Century
Limited .
As a result
of divergent policies towards rail passenger traffic
during the early 1960s,
CN and CP agreed to terminate the
Pool Agreement effective October
30,1965. While CN and CP
became competitors on the Montreal-Quebec and Montreal­
Toronto lines,
CP became the sole providor of service between
Toronto and Ottawa. As
CN had downgraded the old CNo
Napanee-Ottawa line to branch line status, it had no high speed
line between the two points.
As part
of its restructuring of the Ottawa-Toronto schedules,
CP terminated the overnight train.
At the time of its dis­
continuance, the overnight train generally carried three sleepers.
Concentrating on the daytime travel market,
CP scheduled two
daily round trips out of Ottawa. As these trains consisted solely
of spartan
RDC s and one involved a transfer between trains at
Smiths Falls, cries of outrage were soon forthcoming from the
public and politicians alike.
Faced with a barage of public criticism, the Board
of Railway
Transport Commissioners hastily convened special meeting
between the two railways. According to newspaper accounts,
the Board asked CP to reinstate the overnight trains. This
CP
refused to do as such a service would lose over $1 million per
year.
CN, however, was ready to institute such a service
provided it would
be given sole responsibility for operating
A CP storage mail car trails observation car Mountain View as
the overnight train from Toronto approaches Ottawa during 1965.
The View cars operated for less than nine years
in CP service.
A
II four cars were subsequently sold and still exist.
Phots Credit:
D.E. Stoltz
Montreal-Toronto and Ottawa-Toronto service. CP exi ted
these markets on January 23, 1966.
CN began to operate the
day trains, which included dining and parlour cars on the
afternoon runs, the next day. The start
up of the overnight trains
(initiaIJy numbers
201 and 202, later 48 and 49) did not occur
until February 14, 1966.
The day trains operated on a hybrid route involving
CN and
CP trackage in order to serve Brockville and Kingston, which
are major cities between the two terminal points. Even though
the overnight trains operated over the all
CN line following the
CNo, thirty minutes were shaved off the eastbound and one hour
and
15 minutes off the former running times of the overnight
trains over the
CP line. Patronage, however, never did return to
former levels as many travellers had found other alternatives
during the three and a half month lapse
in the operation of the
service. During the 1960s, most
of the cars on the trains were
for handling head end traffic. The typical consist in November
1969 was a Toronto and Belleville storage mail car, a Toronto­
Smiths Falls storage mail car, a Toronto-Ottawa storage mail
car, a Toronto-Ottawa railway post office-baggage car, a
coach, a sleeper, and a sleeper-buffet-lounge car. Between
Belleville and Ottawa, the consist was supplemented by three
express cars from Toronto.
The
1970s witnessed continual cost cutting changes. In
November 1970,
CN ceased to operate trains 48 and 49
between Toronto and Belleville. The Ottawa-Toronto cars were
handled
by the Montreal-Toronto overnight trains between
these points. Due to the level of patronage,
CN withdrew the
sleeper-lounge
in November 1970. The express and mail traffic
had disappeared by 1974. Due to declining freight volumes
between Toronto and Ottawa,
CN decided to close the
Napanee-Smiths Falls line
in 1978. The overnight train was
rerouted to make
its connections with the Montreal-Toronto
trains at Brockville effective October 28, 1978. On that date,
checked baggage service was discontinued permitting the
removal of the baggage car.
53
October 25, 1965 was the final day the CN-CP Pool Agreement governing passenger service between Ottawa and Toronto was in
effect. RS-JO #8572 heads up the consist of the final overnight train. On the left hand side of the photo is the consist of the last
day train
to arrive from Toronto. The next day CP assumedfull responsibility for Ottawa-Toronto service and terminated the night
trains.
Photo Credit:
D.E. Stoltz
Thus when VIA took over responsibility for the service on
April 1, 1979 the train consisted
of two cars. VIA made its
attempt to discontinue the overnight train in 1984 when it sought
authority to replace the overnight train with a
RDC equipped
train operating on a daytime schedule between Ottawa and
Kingston. This train was to be scheduled to connect with the
Montreal-Toronto trains. As the VIA network was under
review by the Rail Passenger Action Force, the application to
discontinue the overnight train was withdrawn.
In 1984, VIA finished a
$ 38 million rehabilitation of the
track between Ottawa and Brockville which upgraded the line
from 30 to
95 mile per hour capabilities. Coupled with the new
LRC equipment and the inauguration
of through Ottawa­
Toronto schedules, Ottawa-Toronto journey times decreased
from six to four hours. In order to capitalize upon these
improvements, VIA increased the frequency of its daytime
trains from two to three
in 1985. In the summer
of 1988, VIA once more sought permission to
terminate its overnight train and replace it with a fourth daytime
train. VIA inaugurated the fourth daytime time on October
20,
1988 even though the National Transportation Agency (the
Agency) had not ruled on the application.
On December 19, 1988, the Agency ruled that the train could
be discontinued. While individuals had opposed the change, the
provincial government and all the cities along the line supported
VIAs proposal. In its decision, the Members of the Agency
suggested that
VIAs proposal would serve changing market
conditions.
At the hearings, VIA showed that the day trains
averaged 150 passengers per trip while the night trains carried
22. Between 1970 and 1988, ridership on the night trains had
fallen from 28,000 to under 14,000. With the passing
of the
overnight train, an era has ended.
By the middle of the 1970s, the Otlawa-Toronto train had shrunk to three cars. In this view, the consist is being backed from the
coach yard into the station
to be ready for boarding by sleeping car passengers at 2230.
Photo Credit: Douglas
N. W. Smith
54
Napierville Junction Van 34
By Ken Carroll
It is not the first time the N.J. 34 has gone to the shop for
repairs. But we, at the Canadian Railway Museum, hope it will
be a long time before she
is back in our shop.
It took eighteen months of on and offwork to get the N.J. Van
back
in shape.
Napierville Junction 34 came to the museum
in 1968, soon
after her fifty-
five years of service. Built around 1912 for the
Delaware
& Hudson Company, she was later sold to the N. J. R.
line
in 1957. After ten years of service for the N.J .R. she was
then retired to the museum. After sitting outside
for another
eighteen years or so, it came time for a new lease
on life.
In the fall
of 1986 we looked her over and it was decided that a
full restoration was to be done instead of just the end beams and
floor boards. (Seventy-five percent
of the wood on the outside
had to be replaced). The roof had to be recanvased as well. The
interior had only small repairs needed, but
all the sixteen
windows and frames had to be remade.
Six volunteers took part
in the 1986-1987 winter (on almost
all the Saturdays during that time).
For most of that winter, Odilon Penault, our restoration
chief, and myself, worked on all the carpentry (sometimes six
days a week). Odi1on Penault
is a retired Canadian National
carpenter with thirty-nine years behind him. This made the
job
a lot easier. No one could say they had built or rebuilt a Van
before.
Our volunteers, having there own work to do, left the
work to us (after the winter was over). But with their help, the
mqjor work was done.
Now after the painting and finishing outside, Odilon mostly
by himself
is doing the finishing touches inside the van.
By opening day,
May 1 , 1988, due the N. J . 34 was in place
as one of the main displays.
We hope that the thousands
of people who pass through will
appreciate the time and money that has gone into the
preservation
of the N. J. 34.
The volunteers and management agree it
was worth it all to
preserve one piece of Canadian Railway history.
55
The N untbers and Names of The A -4 s
By Ian Morris
Following the publication of the articles on locomotive Dominion of Canada in the July-August 1988 issue of Canadian Rail,
there were several inquiries as to whether it would
be pGSsible to publish a complete list of all 35 locomotives of the A -4 class showing
names and renumberings. The author
ofthe ftrst article, Mr. Ian Morris, has kindly provided the data, which we now publish in the
form of a list, in order of date built, of all the A-410comotives. This list shows numbers and names as well as the names and dates of
the locomotive sheds to which each were assigned. The list does not show the short lived LNER numbers of 1946, but these are
exactly 60,000 less than the ftnaLBritish Railways numbers.
A-4 Locomotives
Orig. B.R. Name Date Date Assignments and Starting
Number Number Built Retired Dates ror each
2509 60014 Silver Link Sep. 1935 Dec. 1962
KX Sep. 1935, GRA Aug. 1944,
KX May 1948, GRA Jun. 1948,
KX May 1950.
2510
60015 Quicksilver Sep.
1935 Apr. 1963 KX Sep. 1935, GHD Dec. 1936,
KX Jan. 1937, GRA Aug. 1944,
KX Sep. 1951.
2511 60016 Silver King Nov. 1935 Mar. 1965 KX Nov. 1935, GHD Nov. 1935,
HTN Nov. 1939, GHD Mar. 1943,
HTN May 1943, GHD Jan. 1945,
STM Oct. 1963, ABD Nov. 1963.
2512 60017 Silver Fox Dec.
1935 Oct. 1963 KX Dec. 1935, NWE Jun. 1963.
4482
60023 Golden Eagle Dec. 1936 Oct. 1964
KX Dec. 1936, HAY Feb. 1938,
HTN Aug. 1941, GHD Jan. 1942,
STM Oct. 1963, ABD May 1964.
4483
60024 Kingftsher Dec. 1936 Sep. 1966
HAY 1936, KX Jul. 1937,
DON Apr. 1939, HAY May 1939,
DRD Sep. 1963, STM Dec. 1963,
ABD Apr. 1966.
4484
60025 Falcon Feb. 1937 Oct. 1963
HAY Feb. 1937, KX Mar. 1939,
GRA Apr. 1948, KX Mar. 1950,
GRA Apr. 1950, KX May 1950,
NWE Jun. 1963.
4485
60026 Kestrel Feb. 1937 Dec. 1965 HAY Feb. 1937,
GHD Sep. 1937,
Miles Beevor
HAY Jan. 1938, KX Mar. 1939,
(Nov. 1947)
DON Oct. 1947, KX Nov. 1947,
GRA Apr. 1948, KX Sep. 1951,
NWE Jun. 1963, STM Oct. 1963,
ABD Apr. 1964.
4486
60027 Merlin Mar.
1937 Sep. 1965 HAY Mar. 1937, STR May 1962,
Note: A STM Sep. 1964.
4487
60028 Sea Eagle Apr.
1937 Dec. 1962 GHD Apr. 1937, HAY Feb. 1938,
Walter K. Whigham
DON Mar. 1939, HAY Apr. 1939,
(Oct. 1947)
KX May 1939, GRA Oct. 1945,
KX May 1948.
4489
60010 Woodcock May 1937 May 1965
KX May 1937, GRA Apr. 1957,
Dominion of Canada
KX Sep. 1957, NWE Jun. 1963,
(Jun. 1937) ABD Oct. 1963.
Note: B Preserved at Canadian Railway
Museum at Delson Que.
56
4488 60009 Union of South Africa Jun. 1937 Jun. 1966 HAY Jun. 1937, ABD May 1962.
Preserved privately
in Scotland and
used on special trains
from time to time.
4490
60011 Empire
of India Jun. 1937 May 1964 KX Jun. 1937, HAY Mar. 1938,
Note: C ABD Jun. 1962.
4491
60012 Commonwealth of Australia Jun. 1937 Aug. 1964 HAY Jun. 1937,
DRD Sep. 1963,
ABD Jan. 1964.
4492
60013 Dominion of New Zealand Jun. 1937 Apr. 1963
KX Jun. 1937, HAY Jul. 1937,
KX Mar. 1938, GRA May 1948,
KX Jun. 1950.
4493
60029 Woodcock Jul. 1937 Oct. 1963
GHD Jul. 1937, DON Jan. 1938,
KX Feb. 1938, GHD Aug. 1943,
KX Oct. 1943, NWE Jun. 1963.
4494 60003 Osprey Aug. 1937 Dec. 1962
HTN Aug. 1937, DON Jan. 1938,
Andrew K. McCosh
GRA Apr. 1938, DON Mar. 1939,
(Oct. 1942)
KX May 1939, GRA Jan. 1941,
KX Feb. 1941, GRA Apr. 1957,
KX Sep. 1957.
4495 60030 Great Snipe Aug. 1937 Dec. 1962
DON Aug. 1937, KX Sep. 1937,
Golden Fleece
GRA Dec. 1939, KX Jul. 1942,
(Sep. 1937)
GRA Oct. 1942, KX Jun. 1950,
GRA Apr. 1957, KX Sep. 1957.
4496 60008 Golden Shuttle Sep. 1937 Jul. 1963
DON Sep. 1937, KX Sep. 1937,
Dwight D. Eisenhower
GRA Dec. 1939, KX Jun. 1950,
(Sep. 1945)
GRA Apr. 1957, KX Sep. 1957,
NWE Jun. 1963.
Preserved at Green Bay
Wisconsin
U.S.A.
4497 60031 Golden Plover Oct. 1937 Oct. 1965 HAY Oct. 1937, STR Feb. 1962.
4498 60007 Sir Nigel Gresley Nov. 1937 Feb. 1966
KX Nov. 1937, GRA Apr. 1944,
Note: D
KX Jun. 1950, NWE Jun. 1963,
STM Oct. 1963, ABD Jul. 1964.
Preserved
in England by the A-4
Locomotive Society and used
frequently
on special trains.
4462 60004 Great Snipe Nov. 1937 Jul. 1966
KX Nov. 1937, GHD Feb. 1938,
William Whitelaw
HTN Jun. 1940, HAY Jul. 1941,
(Jul. 1941) ABD Jun. 1962, HAY Sep. 1962,
ABD Jun. 1963.
4463
60018 Sparrow Hawk Dec.
1937 Jun. 1963 GHD Dec. 1937, HTN Oct. 1940,
GHD Mar. 1943, HTN May 1943,
GHD Nov. 1945.
4464 60019 Bittern Dec. 1937 Sep. 1966
HTN Dec. 1937, GHD Mar. 1943,
STM Oct. 1963, ABD Nov. 1963.
Preserved privately
in England as a
static exhibit recently painted
in silver
grey, side skirting replaced over the
wheels and given the number 2509 and
name Silver Link.
4465
60020 Guillemot Dec. 1937 Mar. 1964
GHD Dec. 1937, HTN Nov. 1944,
GHD Oct. 1945.
4466
60006 Herring Gull Jan. 1938 Sep. 1965
KX Jan. 1938, GRA Apr. 1938,
Sir Ralph Wedgwood
NWE Jun. 1963, STM Oct. 1963,
(Jan. 1944) ABD Jui. 1964.
4467
60021 Wild Swan Feb. 1938 Oct. 1963
KX Feb. 1938, DON May 1939,
KX Aug. 1941, GRA Oct. 1943,
KX Aug. 1944, GRA Mar. 1948,
KX Jun. 1950, NWE Jun. 1963.
4468 60022 Mallard Mar. 1938 Apr. 1963 DON Mar. 1938, GRA Oct. 1943,
KX Apr. 1948.
Preserved
in the National collection
at York England. Recently returned
to steam after overhaul
and used on
many special trains to celebrate the
50th anniversary
of the world speed
record, July 3, 1938.
4469
Gadwall Mar. 1938 Jun. 1942
GHD Mar. 1938.
Sir Ralph Wedgwood (Scrapped due to bomb damage).
(Mar. 1939) Note: E
4499 60002 Pochard Apr. 1938 May 1964
GHD Apr. 1938, KX Aug. 1943,
Sir Murrough Wilson
GHD Oct. 1943.
(Apr. 1939)
4500 60001 Garganey Apr. 1938 Oct. 1964
GHD Apr. 1938.
Sir Ronald Matthews
(Mar. 1939)
4900 60032 Gannet May 1938 Oct. 1963
DON May 1938, GRA Sep. 1938,
KX Sep. 1938, DON May 1939,
GRA Oct. 1943, KX Jun. 1950,
NWE Jun. 1963.-
4901 60005 Capercaillie Jun. 1938 Mar. 1964 GHD Jun. 1938, STM Oct. 1963,
Charles
H. Newton ABD Nov. 1963.
(Sep. 1942)
Sir Charles Newton
(Jun. 1943)
4902
60033 Seagull Jun. 1938 Dec. 1962
KX Jun. 1938, GRA Apr. 1944,
KX Mar. 1948.
4903 60034 Peregrine Jul. 1938 Aug. 1966
DON Jui. 1938, KX Jui. 1942,
Lord F aringdon
GRA Oct. 1942, KX Apr. 1948,
(Mar. 1948)
NWE Jun. 1963, STM Oct. 1963,
ABD May 1964.
NAMES OF SHEDS TO WHICH A-4s WERE ASSIGNED
KX
HAY
GHD
HTN
DON
GRA
Kings Cross (London)
Haymarket
Gateshead
Heaton
Doncaster
Grantham ABD
STM
DRD
NWE
STR
NOTES Aberdeen
St. Margarets (Edinburgh)
DaIry Road
New England
St. Rollox (Glasgow)
A. 4486. On August 10 1944, at the height of the war, an extraordinary renumbering and renaming was carried outin the works yard at Doncaster. 4486 -MERLIN,
then in black livery, was photographed three times bearing the foUowing:
1928 –
BRIGID
1931 -DAVINA
1934 -BRYAN
Names and numbers were fixed to the left-hand side only. Research has revealed that the names belonged to the children ofFitzherbert Wright, a newly-appointed
director
of the LNER. The numbers were the years of their birth. Needless to say, MERLIN re-entered service as nonnal; the director had been using his position to
act
in an eccentric fashion for family photographs.
B.
4489. Original BUZZARD nameplates removed, and WOODCOCK substituted, prior to leaving the works when new.
C. 4490. EMPIRE OF INDIA fitted with nameplates DOMINION OF INDIA during a works visit. They were removed before the engine left Doncaster, the
original title having been replaced.
D.
4498. The name SIR NIGEL GRESLEY was given to this locomotive when built, to commemorate the designer of the A-4 class and previous classes of
locomotives. It was also the 100th Gresley-designed 4-6-2 to leave the works at Doncaster.
E. 4469. Although 4469 -SI R RA LPH WEDG WOOD was scrapped following damage suffered in an air raid at York in 1942, the tender was saved, refurbished and
used on
A2/1 4-6-260507 HIGHLAND CHIEFTAIN.
57
58
by Douglas N. W. Smith
GUELPH & GODERICH GOODBYE
On December 1,1988, the National Transportation Agency
granted
CPs request to abandon its line between Guelph and
Goderich, a distance
of 77 miles.
The origins of this line lie in the monopolistic policies
adopted
by the Grand Trunk Railway (GTR) and their effects
upon the City of Guelph . Prior to 1882, Guelph had been served
by the GTR and the Great Western Railway. In 1882, the GTR
took over the Great Western thereby eliminating railway
competition
for traffic in many communities in South Western
Ontario. Freight rates to communities served only
by the GTR
experienced dramatic increases. The Guelph Mercury noted
that freight rates
from Montreal to Guelph were 22 cents per
hundred pounds while the rate to
Galt which still had two
competing railways was only
16 cents. This became a matter of
concern to the city fathers as high freight rates would encourage
manufacturers to locate
in other cities.
In 1884, a federal charter was secured for the Guelph
Junction Railway
(GJR) by Guelph businessmen. The line was
to run from Guelph to some point between Campbellville and
Galt where ajunction would be effected with the main line of the
CPR.
Those backing the GJR were unsuccessful in their attempt to
raise the estimated $200,000 needed to build the line. In
February 1886,
it was decided that ownership and the cost of
building the GJR would rest with the City of Guelph.
Amendments were made to the original charter during 1886 to
permit this change
as well as to authorize the extension of the
line westward to Lake Huron.
Guelph entered into negotiations with
CP in 1887 to have
them lease and operate the G
JR. In May 1887, CP agreed to
lease and operate the line provided the junction between the
GJR and itselfwould be changed from Schaw Station to a point
near Campbellville known today
as Guelph Junction. This
change substantially increased the cost
of the GJR as it
lengthened the railway
by six miles. Before the City agreed to
this term, it extracted a promise from CP to build a line from
Guelph westward to Lake Huron. The connection to Lake
Huron was viewed most seriously
by the business community.
During this period, large volumes
of westbound merchandise
traffic moved
to points on Lake Huron for forwarding to Port
Arthur and
Fort William by lake boats due to the lower rates on the rail-water shipments. Grain shipments filled boxcars and
vessels
in the eastbound direction. The city completed its part of
the arrangement when the GJR opened on September 8,
1888.
The City of Guelph was to wait for more than fifteen years
before
CP completed the promised line to Lake Huron. During
the
1890s, a major recession severely limited the amount of
funding CP had available for the construction of new lines. After
the tum
of the century, business conditions improved. In 1903,
CP surveyed the line. The following year contracts were let
build the railway
as a CP subsidiary which was aptly named the
Guelph & Goderich Railway
(G&G).
In order to speed progress, construction was started from at a
number
of points where the new line intersected the GTR. The
November 18, 1904 issue of the Guelph Daily Herald
reported that Contractor Campbells 7 ton steam shovel was
being taken to Pipes Mills where it would start operation. From
the Guelph CP station to Upper Wyndham Street, rails were
laid along city streets three lengths ahead of the machine. The
street railway tracks were used from Upper Wyndham Street.
To insure against damage, a contract was signed between CP
and the street railway whereby CP agreed to make good any
damage to their track. Progress at the Goderich end was
hampered
by landslides and by an injunction brought by the
GTR to prohibit CP from crossing its line in Goderich. Had the
GTR been successful, this would have cut CP off from access to
the harbour
in Goderich.
On August
4, 1905, the Goderich Star reported that 12
stations were to be built along the G&G which would have a
total value
of $150,000. The stations at Elmira, Blyth and
Malverton were to be
of brick and cost $8,000 a piece.
Smaller stations costing
$6,000 a piece were to be built at
Weissenburg, WaJliston, Monkton, Linwood, Millbank,
Walton and Aubon. As a last step,
CP proposed to spend
$40,000 for a new station in Guelph. As events turned out, the
new Guelph station would not
be built for another two decades.
The first rail of the G&G was laid in Guelph on Sempember
1, 1905 near the point where the street railway crossed Elora
Road. By October 13th, the rails extended five miles from
Guelph and a total of thirty miles of rails had been laid on
various portions of the completed right of way . Crews were busy
installing interlocking and signals at the crossing
of the G &G
andGTR line to Elora. On November 3rd, the Goderich Star
59
a.UCftClj N,t~ DE CART(S tT PLAN3
;;
C)
t!,
~
!l:
4!
84
<
T
I
.–.——..
;.e,,w ••• ,~.,.
)5 r-• ==:::*12 C
This map shows the harbourfront trackage and facilities built by the CPR at Goderich. The compact placement of the roundhouse,
turntable, coal shed, water tank station and freight sheds make this an ideal terminal for the model railroader
10 replicate. Due to
the reduction which occurred in printing this diagram, the stated scale of 1 inch equals fifty feet has been changed. Reference to the
ruler
on the right hand side of the plan will indicate the proper scale for those interested. Should allY readers have photos of this
terminal,
we would be pleased to run them in an issue of Canadian Rail.
Photo Credit: National Map Collection/National A
rchives/NMC-94SJ-8/ 17
reported that the south abutment of the Maitland River bridge
was complete and the structure was ready to receive steel.
By May
9,1906, the track was laid the 16 miles from Guelph
into Elmira. Regular service commenced between these two
points on June 30th. By the end
of August, regular service was
extended an additional
15 miles to Millbank and the construction
train had reached Milverton.
The rails were laid into Manchester
the week
of October 15th. Regular service was extended from
Guelph to Milverton, a distance
of35 miles, on November 15th.
While considerable progress from the eastern end was made
during 1906, there was less progress in Goderich. On June 8th,
the abutments for the bridge over the
GTR line in Goderich were
completed clearing the way for the erection
of the bridges at
Goderich. The first span
of the Maitland River bridge arrived in
Goderich on July 20th. Three flat cars were necessary to
accommodate its 110 foot length. The cars had to be returned to
Stratford, however, in order to have the span pointing the
correct way for installation.
On October 12th, Emanuel
Maddaford was killed when the gantry
car fell off the Maitland
bridge. The coroners hearing failed to determine what caused
the accident.
On March 15, 1907, the Goderich Star reported that the
new CP roundhouse and freight shed were roofed in while the
station roof was ready for shingles.
The track was completed between
Guelph and Auburn, a distance of70 miles. A special
train carrying
CP General Superintendent Oborne and other
officials made an inspection tour
of the new line as far as Blyth
on April 26th.
The completion of the line was delayed as CP had to cut away
the hillside
of Harbourbank Park in order to pass on the south
side
of the existing grain elevators in Goderich to access its
harbourfront tenninal facilities. This necessitated shoring up the
bank with a solid wall
of concrete. CP President Shaughnessy
and other high ranking officials travelled by inspection train to a
point
just opposite Goderich on August 2nd. They crossed into
Goderich in carriages to inspect the facilities there.
The final rail of the G &G was laid in front of the Goderich
station on August 21st. The next day, the first ballast train
crossed the Maitland River bridge in Goderich and commenced
to ballast the line to the harbour front.
On August 29th, at 0700
the first passenger train left Goderich. Several hundred people
gathered at the newly completed station to watch the
departure
of the first train which consisted of a locomotive, a baggage car
and three coaches. Some 40 passengers rode on the first train.
The official opening was delayed until September 12th. On
that date, the citizens from Guelph and other on-line
communities gathered to celebrate the opening of the long
awaited line. The Guelph Musical Society sponsored the
60
, I
1

A long freight train before the CP station at Elmira, Ontario. The water tank at the end of the station is completely enclosed to help
insultate
it against winters cold. The ball on the top of the tank is about as high as it can go indicating that the tank is full of
water.
Photo Credit: CP
Rail Corporate Archives
operation of three excursion trains which carried over 2,700
people. The first excursion train, consisting of eleven coaches,
operated non-stop between Guelph and Goderich. The second
and third trains made local stops.
At the Guelph station Mayor
Newstead declared the line officially opened as he smashed a
bottle
of champagne against the 80 pound main line rail.
In 1908,
CP completed a branch line from Linwood to
Listowel. This line, however, was a casualty
of the depression
and was abandoned in 1939.
One
of the main reasons for CPs interest in building the
G&G had been to more efficiently handle western grain
shipments.
OnAugust II, 1906, the Toronto Globe asserted
that one
of the reasons for the construction of this line was to
secure a direct route with low level grades for the economic
movement
of burgeoning grain traffic from Western Canada.
CPs existing line from Owen Sound to Toronto had heavy
grades which hampered the efficient movement
of grain. After
CP announced the construction of the G&G, new grain
elevators were built at Goderich.
The shipment
of grain by water transport from the head of
Lake Superior to the St. Lawrence was restricted by the
inadequacies
of the old Weiland Canal which could not
accommodate large grain vessels and which was severely
congested. From the
1880s through to the end of the 1920s,
grain moved by water to ports on Lake Huron and Georgian
Bay. From these ports, the grain moved
by rail to Montreal and
other ports accessible to ocean-going vessels. The opening
of
the new Weiland Canal which could accommodate larger
vessels
in 1930 signalled the end of major movements of grain by
rail from the Lake Huron ports, such as Goderich, to Montreal.
With the passing
of the grain trade, CP relied upon local
shippers to
fill its freight cars.
By the 1980s, the level of traffic had declined to levels which
made the branch uneconomic. Between 1984 and 1987, the
number
of carloads shipped over the line varied between 1,981
and 1,579. Shippers in Goderich accounted for more than
90%
of the shipments. Most of this business was accounted for by the
Domtar Sifto Salt mines, Champion Road Equipment and
Goderich Elevators. Losses averaged slightly less than $1
million per year. The Agency deemed the retention
of the CP
line unnecessary as CN is able to serve all the shippers in
Goderich from its own trackage. Indeed, CN had already begun
serving
CPs customers early in 1988.
ALGOMA
CENTRAL MUST STAY WHOLE
On January 20, 1989, the Agency ruled that the Algoma
Central Railway
(ACR) could not transfer its Rail Division to a
new corporate body to be known as the Algoma Central Railway
Inc
(ACRI). The Agency ruled that such a step would not be in
the public interest
as the ACRI would probably not be a viable
entity.
The ACR was incorporated in 1899 to serve as a tool for
regional development. Primary products carried by the railway
were iron ore and forest products. Over the years, the
ACR
became a diversified company. In 1988, the ACR owned the
following subsidiary companies:
1 . Algoma Steamships Limited which operated a fleet
of 18 dry­
bulk cargo freighters on the
Great Lakes and St. Lawrence
Seaway;
2.
Herb Fraser and Associates Limited which performs ship
repair and maintenance;
3. Algowest Shipping Limited which negotiaties with shippers
for grain movements;
4. Algocen Realty Holdings Limited which owns a shopping
centre, hotel, office tower and apartment building in Sault
Ste Marie and a shopping centre-office tower-hotel complex
in Elliot Lake; and
5.
ACR Delaware, Inc which serves as a holding company for
real estate ventures
in the United States.
During 1987, the
ACR sold ofT its trucking division and
condominium developments
in Florida.
The major commodity handled by the ACR is iron ore which
moves over the
ACR between the mines at Wawa and steel mills
at Sault Ste Marie. The long term prospect for this traffic
is
clouded as lower cost ores from open pit mines in the United
States could replace that mined at Wawa. While the tourist
traffic handled by the
ACR Tour Train and the regular Sault
Ste Marie-Hearst train
is a vital part of the economy of the
region, the rolling stock for these trains is approaching the end of
its life-span. The
Tour Train is one of the few in North
America operated by a Class I railway which covers
its
operating costs from passenger fares. The surplus is not
sufficient, however, to fund the purchase
of new equipment.
The Agency found the traffic picture not entirely bleak. The
new National Transportation
Act contains provisions to
increase railway competition for traffic from resource-based
shippers who are captive to a single line
of railway. Under these
provisions. shippers will have greater ability to route traffic over
other lines. The
ACR route for many such shippers in northern
Ontario to points
in the American mid-west is several hundred
miles shorter than other routes.
As part of the proposed corporate reorganization, the
ACR
proposed to retain approximately 850,000 acres of land which
were granted to it
for the construction, development and
operation
of the railway. The Agency found that the loss of the
lands would significantly weaken the
ACR!. It would earn no
revenues
from the lands as future developments occur and would
not have a sufficient asset base to raise capital which will
be
required to replace depreciating assets.
A FINAL RAIL LINE ABANDONMENT
IN NEWFOUNDLAND
In June 1988, the federal and Newfoundland government
announced plans to abandon the
CN lines in the province in
exchange for funding to upgrade the Trans-Canada Highway.
61
Pursuant to the terms of the agreement, CN abandoned its
service across the island in September 1988. However, for
reasons understood only
by lawyers, the Stephenville Sub­
division which extends 7 miles between
Whites Road and
Stephenville was not officially abandoned under the inter­
governmental agreement. This line has a rather unusual history
as it was built by the American Air Force.
Following the entry
of the United States into World War II in
December 1941, the American government built a number of
military bases
in Newfoundland. Ernest Harmon Air Force
Base was located at Stephenville. As part of the base
installations, a rail line was built
to the main line of the
Newfoundland Railway
in 1942. Following the closure of the
base
in 1965, the land occupied by the base and the railway were
transferred to the Newfoundland government.
In tum, the
Newfoundland government transferred these assets to the
Harmon Corporation. On August
5, 1971, the Harmon
Corporation sold the rail line
to Her Majesty the Queen in Right
of Canada. The line was turned over to Canadian National for
operation.
Up to 1985, traffic averaged mor~ than 600 carloads per
year. With the introduction of containers. traffic over the branch
fell to 355 cars in 1986 and 161 cars in 1987. Up to July 1,
1987,
CN operated a road switcher from Comer Brook to
Stephenville on
an as required basis with a maximum of two
trips per week. After that date,
all traffic rail car traffic over the
branch ceased and all goods moved
in containers. CN applied to
the predecessor
of the Agency, the Canadian Transport
Commission, for permission to abandon the line on November
13, 1987. On January
23, 1989, the Agency issued its decision
permitting the abandonment
of this line.
I wish to thank Douglas Stoltz for sharing the results
of his
research into the history
of the construction and evolution of this
obscure line.
A tum of the century view of the station at Carleton Junction [later CP replaced the name with that of the existing communitys
name
via: Carleton Place]. At the junction, the rail line from Ottawa joined the line from Brockville to western Canada. For more
than
80 years this was a busy place where passengers from points up the Ottawa would transfer to trains proceeding to Toronto.
Photo Credit: CP Rail Corporate Archives
62
CP Pacific 2627 and 2628 head up the consist oj an Ottawa-Brockville passenger train at Carleton Place .. This is mo~t likely the
afternoon pool train from Ol/alVa which includes
in its consist through cars destined to Toronto. Both engznes lVere built by CP at
the Angus Shops in
May 1912.
Photo Credit: CP
Rail Corporate Archives
THE CANADIAN TO BE REROUTED?
On December 29, 1988, the Agency approved CPs
application to abandon the rail line between Nepean and
Carleton Place, Ontario, a distance
of 19 miles. Since 1987, the
only train service using the line has been VIA Rails trans­
continental train, the
Canadian. This short piece of track
links Ottawa to the main freight line which by-passes the capital.
In September 1870, the Canada Central Railway
(CCR)
completed the line from Carleton Place to Ottawa. The terminus
in Ottawa was located
at Chaudiere where major lumber saw
mills were located.
The CCR had acquired control of the
Brockville
& Ottawa (B&O) in 1861 after this line had entered
bankruptcy. The B
&0 originated in Brockville and was
destined
to Pembroke. The B&O was completed only as far as
Arnprior when funding ran out. The CCR underwrote the
extension of the line to Sand Point, the nearest community
to
Arnprior which was on the Ottawa River. In order to supplement
revenue earning capability, the management
of the CCR
decided to build a branch to Ottawa to serve the booming lumber
mills in that city.
CP took over the CCR system in 1881 and
incorporated it into its transcontinental main line. In 1882, it
purchased Western Division
of the Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa
& Occidental Railway from the Quebec government. This line
which extended from Ottawa to Montreal, brought the trans­
continental line into Montreal.
Initially,
all CP traffic from Montreal to points west passed
over the former
QMO&O and CCR lines. CPs development of
a system offeeder lines in eastern Canada during the 1880s
soon required a more direct route. In 1884, the Ontario &
Quebec Railway, a company controlled by the financiers behind
CP, completed a line between Toronto and Smiths Falls where it
joined up with the old
B&O line. Shipments between Montreal
and Toronto had to travel the circuitous line through Carleton
Place and Ottawa. In order to shorten the distance, the Ontario
& Quebec completed a
new line between Montreal and Smiths
Falls
in 1887. This line reduced the distance Montreal-Toronto
trains had to travel 47 miles. As a side benefit, the new line also
reduced the distance between Montreal and Carleton Place
by 8
miles. More importantly, the new line was engineered to very
high standards which permitted longer trains and avoided
congestion
in the Ottawa terminals. Thus it was that CP began to
route westbound transcontinental freight traffic via Smiths Falls
rather the Ottawa.
The line remained a very important passenger line for many
years. The Ottawa-Toronto, Ottawa-Chalk River and
Montreal-Vancouver passenger trains operated over this line.
By the 1980
s, the limited requirements of Ottawa area freight
shippers could adequated
by met by other CP lines.
The Agency fixed the abandonment date for this line one year
from the date
of the Order. This is to allow VIA Rail time to
decide whether
it will acquire the line. Should it not take over the
line, it
is possible that the Canadian will take to CN rails as
far as Pembroke or even North Bay.
MILITARY SAVES THE DAY
On November 20,1988, the Agency turned down a request
by CN to abandon the 34 mile portion of the St. Raymond Sub­
division from Hedley to Jacksons, Quebec. A forerunner
of the
line was the Quebec & Gosford Railway
(Q&G). Built with
wooden rails, this was the first railway to reach Quebec City
63
The Canada Central undenvrote the costs of extending the Brockville & Ottawa Railways from Arnprior to Sand Point, Ontario.
This extension placed the
B& 0 on the Ottawa River where it could tap the large timber market which hitherto had been floated
down the river
to Ottawa. When the Carleton Place-Ottawa line was completed, the Canada Central operated a special train from
Ottawa
to Sand Point where a banquet marking the event was held.
Photo Credit: CP
Rail Corporate Archives {probably a Heckman photo]
proper. While the line was completed in November 1870, Arnprior & Renfrew and Ottawa and Parry Sound Railways in
service only began the following summer. This set a precedent 1891. The OA&PS served as the western extension for Booths
as the Q&G shut down each winter. The roadbed deteriorated Canada Atlantic Railway. In the September-October 1988
rapidly under the pounding
of steam locomotives. F ailing to find issue of Canadian Rail , this column presented a short history
operations profitable, the lessee
of the line gave up operations of the Booth rail lines.
before the 1873 season began.
The on-line lumber mills used In 1892, construction commenced at Ottawa. By February
horse power to move shipments through 1874 when it appears all 1893, ·the line was completed from Ottawa to Arnprior. By the
use
of the line ceased. end of the year, passenger trains were operating between Ottawa
The name of the company was changed to the Quebec and and Eganville, some 22 miles beyond Renfrew.
The OA&PS
Lake Saint John Railway (Q&LStJ) in December 1870. The was completed to Depot Harbour on Georgian Bay in December
Q &LStJ rebuilt the line I argely upon a new alignement. The 1896.
section from LorretteviUe Junction to St. Raymond was opened Booth sold his railway to the Grand Trunk
in 1904. CN.
in 1881. The lower section of the line was realigned and was acquired the line along with the other Grand Trunk assets in
extended into Quebec City in 1890. The company was taken 1923. The through route from Ottawa to Depot Harbour was
overby the Canadian Northern
in the early years ofthis century. broken in 1933 due to the weakening of a major trestle. CN
In denying the petition, the Agency noted that the military progressively abandoned the trackage as lumber activity in
base at Valcartier uses the line to transport vehicles. Movement Algonquin Park declined. The past major segment to be
of large numbers of vehicles to military exercises occur every abandoned was the portion of the line from Whitney to Renfrew
few years and generate a sufficient level of profit to cover losses in 1983.
during the intervening years. The
Nepean to Renfrew section handled approximately 100
LAST REMANENT OF THE OTTAWA, ARNPRIOR
& PARRY SOUND TO BE ABANDONED
On December 30, 1988, the Agency announced that CN
could abandon its rail line between Nepean and Renfrew, a
distance
of 44 miles. This is the final remaining portion of the
rail line built by Ottawa lumber baron
J. R. Booth during the
1890s to link Ottawa and Georgian Bay. Booth had originally
chartered the portion of the line between Ottawa and Renfrew
as
the Ottawa, Arnprior & Renfrew Railway in 1888. The
OA&PS was created when Booth amalgamated the Ottawa, carloads per year between 1984 and 1987. More than
90% of
the carloads were destined to BASF Fibres at Arnprior. As the
line lost over
$ 300,000 in 1986, the Agency authorized its
abandonment.
Due to the nature of the chemicals being shipped
from Texas to Arnprior, the Agency required
CN to keep the
line open for one year
from the date of the order. This is to permit
BASF to complete studies assessing whether it will be more
economical to build a new connecting track to the nearby
CP
main line, to acquire existing CN trackage [which includes a
major bridge over the Madawaska River
1 to the junction
between the
CN and CP lines in Arnprior, or to use intermodal
rail-truck service.
64
SHORT TURNS
On February 13, 1989, the Agency ruled that CN could
abandon the Coronado Subdivision from Elk Point
to Lindbergh,
Alberta, a distance
of 11.6 miles. The abandonment application
was uncontested.
CN opened this line as part of an extension
from Elk Point to Heinsbury
in December 1928. The Canadian
Transport Commission approved
CNs application to abandon
the outer most 8 miles
of this subdivision from Lindbergh to
Heinsburg on October
14, 1981.
On December 1, 1989, the Agency ruled that
CP could
abandon the
10 mile section of the Champlain Spur from mile
18.1 to St. Andrews, New Brunswick. This line, which was built
by the New Brunswick & Canada Railway, was the first steam
powered railway
in Maritime provinces. A full length article on
the history
of this company will appear in a future issue of
Canadian Rail .
On February 13, 1989, the Agency ruled that CN could not
abandon the 29 mile long line between Listowel and Kincardine,
Ontario. The line handled only
116 carloads in 1986 which
resulted
in a loss of $ 231 ,000. The major shipper on the line
which makes wooden doors demonstrated that the level
of rail
shipments could increase to a level sufficient to make the line
economic. The Agency
will review this decision in 18 months.
This line was built
by the Wellington, Grey & Bruce Railway
(WG&B) in the 1870s. The history of the WG&B was
covered
in the September-October 1988 Rail Canada News
column.
On December 30,1988, the Agency authorized the Quebec
North Shore & Labrador Railway to remove the centralized
traffic control system from the
131 miles of line between Ross
Bay Junction and Knob Lake Junction upon the implementation
of a Manual Block System. Since the closing of the iron ore
mines at Schefferville, Quebec, this section
ofthe QNS&L runs
fewer than one train per day.
McCullochs Wonder
The Story
of the
Kettle Valley Railway
By Barrie Sanford
This superbly researched history of the railways of southern
British Columbia, by Barrie Sanford, will delight serious readers
of railway history. First published in 1978 in hardcover, it has
recently been reissued
in paperback.
Not long after the completion of the Canadian Pacific tracks
through the mountains of British Columbia, the discovery
of
gold near Nelson, in the south-central part of the province drew
the attention
of Americans and Canadians to need for better
communications
in the area. Fierce rivalry between William
Van
Home, builder of the Canadian Pacific, and J. J. Hill,
builder
of the Great Northern, and former Van Home associate,
flared a new into a battle
for dominence in the developing market
for transportation along the
B. C., U. S. border. The reader feels
the tensions grow
as the rivals spar for position in obtaining
charters for favourable positioning of rail lines. Political
pressures are applied by both parties at the Federal and
Provincial levels; and sharp practices, and even first fights
between rival gangs of railway construction workers keep up the
tension. Frequent reference
to the maps supplied are essential to
follow the manoeuverings
ofthe two sides. By 1893, Canadian
subsidiaries of American railways had been built to bleed traffic
from developing Canadian mines
to the U. S. In the interests of
conserving the ties of Southern British Columbia with Canada,
an east-west railway route from the Prairies to Vancouver,
probably via the Coquihalla Pass was deemed to be a necessity.
As the sparring continued, so did construction
of railways in
very difficult territory.
.SPENCES
.BRIDGE
<..,,~
~ …
;..,
NCOLA
( … ;;,. …….. ~::l,.J
CO:?MERRITT
/, ….. ,_ …. ,.
I,,·
j •..• , …..
KETTLE VALLEY RAILWAY
-MAINLINE
•• -. BRANCH LINES
• STATIONS
L 10
MILes
In 1889, Andrew McCulloch entered the scene. The son ofa
Scottish fanner who had immigrated to Ontario; Andrew was
trained as an accountant. But Western Canada attracted him.
He worked
as an axe man on a survey crew, railwaylabourer,
surveyor, engineer.
He detennined the location of many lines in
eastern Canada; then worked on engineering the Spiral through
Tunnels. In 1910, he became Chief Engineer
of the Kettle
Valley Railway –
one of the most rugged regions on the face of
the earth. He was a do-er, a man who made it happen.
Barrie Sanfords style of writing brings the work
of Andrew
McCulloch to life, through his years
of not only completing the
building
of the railway through the Coquihalla Pass; but also
operating the railway successfully through very trying periods. I
leave it to the reader to experience through words the strength
of
Andrew McCulloch. This reviewers sole trip through the
Coquihala Pass was spent standing in the front
ofCP Dayliner
9198, at night, watching the revolving headlight reach out into
the pitch black; then suddenly shine on a sheer rock face when
the Dayliner took a sharp right
tum, then a sharp left over a short
bridge, a short tunnel, more sharp rights and lefts through the
Quinette tunnels and bridges
in the Pass – a 1958 experience still
vivid
in my mind.
Two black and white picture sections, and lengthy notes on
each Chapter help to enhance the readers appreciation
of the
scene. What better source
of facts that using McCullochs
diaries, meticulously written daily despite his demanding duties.
Recommended reading.
Stephen Walbridge
March 1989.
McCULLOCHs WONDER
Paperback, 6 x 9 260 pages.
Whitecap Books Limited,
1086 West 3rd. Street,
North Vancouver,
B.C. V7P 3J6
Canadian readers may order directly from the publisher,
enclosing a cheque for
$12.95, plus $2.00 for postage. U.S.
readers should make their cheque for U. S. $12.95, postage
included.
CANE TRAIN
The Sugar-Cane Railways of Fiji
By Peter Dyer and Peter Hodge
65
Published in December 1988 by the New Zealand Railway and
Locomotive Society Incorporated, P.O. Box 5134, Wellington,
New Zealand
ISBN
0-908573-50-2
184 pp., 240 x 180 mm, illustrated, case bound with full-colour
dust jacket. Recommended retail price
in New Zealand, $50
including GST (approx. $37.00 Canadian).
IN 1961 the New Zealand Railway and Locomotive Society
published
BALLOON STACKS AND SUGAR CANE, a
book that proved
to be immensely popular with narrow-gauge
railway enthusiasts.
It told the story ofthe 2-ft gauge sugar-cane
railways
of Fiji as they were in the 1950s.
NOW, CANE TRAIN brings the story into the 1980s, with
much additional historical infonnation added to the completely
rewritten text. This
is more than a sequel, and more than a
revised edition.
It is a combination of both. CANE TRAIN
describes the development of Fijis sugar industry from the
various small enterprises
of the 19th century, with their small
mills and tramways, to the mammoth industry
of today with
hundreds
of miles of track, scores of locomotives, and thousands
of wagons.
CANE TRAIN is illustrated with 128 photographs (many
not previously published), 20 maps, and about 30 drawings to
scale
of locomotives and rolling stock. This new case-bound
book, with its colourful dust jacket,
is being published just 27
years after the appearance of BALLOON
STACKS AND
SUGARCANE. Narrow gauge in the South Seas sounds like a
railway enthusiasts dream, but this book describes real
railways which are busy, well maintained, and likely to survive
as long as the industry they serve. All narrow-gauge railway
enthusiasts will want a copy.
66
CRHA CODlmunications
REMINDER
All members are reminded that the Annual General meeting
of the Association will be held at Vanier College, 821 Ste-Croix
Blvd. St. Laurent
Que. (Montreal Metro station Du College) on
Wednesday April 26 1989, starting at 7:30
P.M. All members
are urged to attend.
The CRHA annual conference will be held in Toronto from
May 19 to May 21, 1989. Full details from the Toronto
and York Division, Box 5849, station A, Toronto
Ontario M5W IP3
CONGRATULATIONS TO OMER
Members of the CRHA will be glad to learn of the appoint­
ment
of Mr. Omer Lavallee, former Corporate Archivist and
Historian
of Canadian Pacific Limited, to the Order of Canada.
This well-deserved honour
is in recognition of his long-time
devotion
to the study of Canadian railway history. Omer was a
very active member
ofthe CRHA from 1945 to 1967 and played
an extremely important
part in the founding of the Canadian
Railway Museum, not
to mention his career as editor of the
News Report (now
Canadian Rail), and a period as President of
the Association. Omer has recently re-joined the CRHA under
his original membership number, 89, and we look forward to this
renewed relationship with one who has done so much for our
Association in the past.
STANLEY F. DINGLE
Members will be sorry to hear of the death, on March 12
1989, of Stanley F. Dingle, former system Vice-President of
Canadian National Railways. Mr. Dingle was 87 years old, and
had been retired since 1966. Born
in Winnipeg, Mr. Dingle
joined the old
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in 1920, three
months before the company became part
of the C. N. system.
Starting
as a railway clerk, he rose through the ranks to one of
the top railway jobs in Canada.
When the Canadian Railway Museum was first under
consideration, it was
Mr. Dingle who arranged the terms under
which the
CRHA obtained custody of the Canadian National
steam locomotives now in the collection. Without this arrange­
ment
it would have been impossible to have acquired these
locomotives, and so it
is that Stanley Dingle was a great friend to
the
CRHA at a very important time.
A TRIBUTE TO DON E. GA W
1923 -1989
To dispel the thought of Don s passing on Jan. 9, 1989 was
not an easy matter, as
he and I had enjoyed one anothers
friendship over the years, and more particularly
so, since his
retirement, when he had so willingly agreed with me, to
volonteer his services on alternate runs
of the many 1201 steam
assignments.
Earned through long experience, his knowledge and approach
to passenger work were thorough, and his conduct on all
occasions singled him as one
of the old breed of railroaders. I
like to recall,
in passing, how often our telephone lines became
busily engaged pursuant
to one anothers run, simply to
exchange views about what may have transpired
on the days
trip up the line.
Upon considering his dedication to his family, his keen
interest
in golf activities, as well as his deep involvement in so
many other organizations, one might be
led to wonder if perhaps
he overlooked to care for himself too, if only too late,
however.
Be it as
it may, Don deserved a well earned eternal rest when
summoned
by the Grand Conductor to the great beyond.
To his widow, Aileen, to the family, and to his brother J . C.
(Sam) also a BRS number, deepest condolences in their sorrow.
Rolland O. Lafleur
(2091 )
MEMBERS DAY AT THE MUSEUM
The annual members day at the Canadian Railway Museum
in Dels
on/St. Constant Que. will be on Saturday, June 24
1989. There will
be numerous special activities as well as a
chance to photograph several pieces
of equipment which are
normally
inside, but which will be moved outside especially for
the occasion.
Further information can be obtained by telephoning the
Museum during working hours at (514)
632-2410. There is a
bus service from downtown Montreal, and information on this is
available from Monette Transport a (514) 632-2020.
All members are urged to attend this interesting and
enjoyable occasion.
WOOD CARVINGS
HERITAGE !RACKS -MILTON
BY WOOD CARVER KIM MURRAY
A UNIQUE AND SPECIAL GIFT
FOR BUSINESS OPENINGS
AND EXPANSIONS
PROMOTIONS
RETIREMENTS
MA
JOR CLIENTS
CHRISTMAS
AND MORE!
OR Bey ONE FOR YOUR OWN HOME OR OFFICE.
LfMITED EDITION FRAMED REPRODUCTIONS $245.00 each
y
~ ~lIL TON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,
~ DELACOURTS, HARROPS
, ,> ST. CLAIR PAINT & WALLPAPER.
~
A PROJECT OF THE
~ CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
P.O. SOXS2. MILTON, ONTAFlIOL9T2Y3 (416)878·0581
We have received notice from the Chamber of Commerce of
Milton, Ontario that they are offering reproductions of a carving
depicting the old station at Milton with a steam locomotive
passing by. Any enquiries regarding these should be sent
directly to the Milton Chamber
of Commerce at the address
given.
67
Former CP 80-foot baggage car, now the property of Salem and
Hillsborough
R-R. in the process of being repaired (new roof) and converted
to an open tourist car.
Photo by R.D. Thoma
s, June 21, 1988.
A rare photo of olle of the exhibits at the Canadian Railway
Museum as it appeared
in service. CPRs first diesel, No. 7000,
was photographed by our member Gerard Frechette at Mile End
near Van horne Avenue in Montreal. The date was August 1942.
ASSISTANCE WANTED
The Florida Gulf Coast Railroad Museum owns former
Canadian National Railways buffet-lounge-sleeper car
CAPE
TORMENTINE, and is starting on an extensive restoration
plan to bring the car up to
full operating standards. They would
appreciate if anyone could provide photos, history,
or other
information about this car.
It is said that, on May 16 1955, Mrs.
Eleanor Roosevelt, widow
of former U.S. President Franklin
D. Roosevelt, was a passenger on this car on an overnight trip
from Montreal to Toronto.
Anyone having information about the
CAPE TORMEN-
TINE, especially about the Roosevelt trip, please contact:
Mr. Jackson McQuigg
Florida
Gulf Coast Railroad Museum
1000 W. Horatio
# 125
Tampa, Florida 33606
U.S.A.
68
RESTORATION IN CALGARY
During 1988 the Locomotive and Railway Historical Society
of Western Canada completed restoration of former CPR
diesel-electric locomotive 7019 and van 437358. These fine
photos
of the restored equipment were very kindly provided by
James E. Lanigan, the President of the society. The amount of
work involved in the very high order of restoration is very great
indeed. Both
7019 and 437358 are displayed in Heritage Park in
Calgary, not far from 2-10-4 steam locomotive 5934 (nee
5931). It is interesting to note that 7019, built by ALCO in
September
1944, is more than four years OLDER than the
steam locomotive.
CAN ADIAN RAIL
QUESTIONN AIRE
Response to the questionnaire, sent with the 1989 dues
invoice, has been extremely good, as about
70% of the members
who renewed returned the questionnaire.
We are presently
arranging to tabulate the results and will,
in due course, publish
a
summary in Canadian Rail. The answers you gave will be of
great help in deciding what kind of articles to publish.
The editorial committee of Canadian Rail wishes to thank
those members who took the time to fill in the form and return it
to us.
69
Susiness ca~P: WHITE PASS & YUKON TRAINS RETURN
TO CANADA
Skagway, Alaska -The White Pass & Yukon Route narrow
gauge railroad, built to supply the 1898 Klondike gold fields,
will extend its passenger operations into Canada in 1989. White
Pass trains stopped running in October, 1982 when plunging
world metal prices closed the major mines
in the Yukon, which
were the railroads principal source
of revenue. A limited
excursion service operated in Alaska last summer, but May 23
will mark the first time
WP& YR passenger trains have crossed
the border
in 6Y2 years. The train becomes the only regularly
scheduled international rail service between the United States
and Canada west
of Chicago.
Daily
through scheduled passenger trains will operate
May 23 through September
22,1989 from Skagway to Fraser,
British Columbia, at Mile 28 on the railroad. Here, the trains
can connect with motorcoaches on the Klondike Highway, and
passengers will be able to board a bus for the journey on north to
Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. Southbound travelers can board
a highway bus in Whitehorse, ride to
Fraser, and transfer to
their connecting narrow gauge train on to Skagway. One-way
adult fare, Skagway to Whitehorse,
is $89.00.
The inauguration of his rail/bus service once again makes the
WP& YR a major passenger transportation carrier into the
Interior. Most
of the large tour operators going through the
Yukon will utilize the railroad on the Skagway to
Fraser portion
of their trip, connecting with their own motorcoaches to and
from Whitehorse.
Daily Skagway to White Pass Summit three hour round-trip
excursion trains have proved very popular, especially for
cruiseship passengers, and will be continued in 1989. Adult fare
is $67.00.
In addition, the White Pass will operate a limited passenger
service with a small train or track motorcar from Lake Bennett,
B.C. for hikers using the famous Chilkoot Trail.
The rail service will pick up hikers at Lake Bennett early in
the morning, and run south to Fraser where passengers can
continue aboard the scheduled train on to Skagway. One-way
adult fare, Bennett to Skagway,
is $67.00.
This new service effectively re-opens the Chilkoot Trail to
regular overland transportation
for the first time since 1982,
when the
WP& YR suspended railroad operations with the
closure
ofthe Yukons major mines and resultant loss of traffic.
Renewed accessibility will bring more hikers to the popular
wilderness adventure trail.
The 33 mile trail had almost 3,000
hikers in 1982, but only half that number in 1988. This was
largely due to the additional miles required to hike back out from
Lake Bennett without the railroad operating.
The Chilkoot was the route used by the majority of the
Klondike stampeders to cross the
Coast Range during the great
gold rush
of 1897-98. Today, it is a 33 mile long open air
museum lined with artifacts discarded by the thousands
of men
and women trying to get to the Yukon.
The trail is part of the
Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park
in the U.S., and
of the Chilkoot Trail National Park in Canada.
The WP& YR was the first railroad in Alaska (1898), and it
is one of only two remaining railroads operating in the state
today. Along its route travelers view the original
Trail of98,
Dead Horse Gulch, Bridal Veil Falls, and Inspiration Point
from the windows
of their vintage narrow gauge parlor cars .
Over 36,000 passengers rode the
Scenic Railway of the
World in 1988. White Pass expects traffic to double in 1989.
For schedules, fares, information, and reservations contact
The
WP&YR at P.O. Box 435, Skagway, Alaska 99840.
Phone 1-800-343-7373 or (907) 983-2217.
DARJEELING RAILWAY CLOSED
On the other side of the world, another scenic narrow-gauge
rai Iway in the mountains has not been so fortunate. According to
a letter in the Model Engineer magazine, the world-famous
Darjeeling Railway
in the shadow of the Himalayas has been
closed due to a combination
of political unrest, the weather and
lack
of determination on the part of the management to
overcome difficulties. Already the track has been broken
in
places by landslides, and the chances of the line reopening
70
appear slim. The Darj, as it was fondly called, was built to
2-foot gauge and opened
in 1880. In the 1950s it was featured
in a Cinerama wide-screen movie. An effort is being made to
bring two
of the Hunslet-built steam locomotives back to
England
for preservation.
CN SELLS DISCARDED NEWFOUNDLAND
EQUIPMENT
Canadian National Railways has sold a large proportion of
its discarded Newfoundland railway equipment to a railway
operating
in Chile and Bolivia.
CN subsidiary Canac International Inc. has sold 10
locomotives, 200 flat cars, 3,000 tonnes of rail, track and
workshop equipment,
as well as parts for the freight cars, to the
Antofagasta (Chile) and Bolivia Railway.
The total sale was worth
$1.9 million. A CN official said in
an interview it is a bargain for the purchaser, but the equipment
has limited value because the Newfoundland railway
is narrow
gauge, meaning the tracks are closer together than the world
standard.
The Antofagasta and Bolivia Railway serves salt and copper
mines
in northern Chile and acts as a corridor to land-locked
Bolivia.
CN said it was losing$40 million ayearon its Newfoundland
railway.
It got government permission to shut it down in
September 1988.
Proceeds from the sale will be used to offset the cost
of
discontinuing the Newfoundland rail operations. It still has 23
locomotives, 200
fl at cars, 75 ballast cars and other track
maintenance equipment, and 70,000 tonnes of rail for sale.
Source: Canadian Press Gazette
11/25/88
B.C. RAIL TO PURCHASE 22 LOCOMOTIVES
FROM GE
British Columbia Railway says it will purchase 22 diesel­
electric locomotives
from General Electric Co. of Fairfield,
Conn.
A spokesman for B.C. Rail would not say
how much the
railway, which
is owned by the B.C. government, expects to pay
for the 4,000-horsepower, Dash 8-40C model freight-hauling
locomotives, but a rail industry source said the order
is likely
worth about $44-million.
Delivery
is expected to begin later this year, said B.C. Rail
spokesman Noel Van Sandwyk, and will continue
in batches of
five locomotives through 1990, 1991 and 1992.
Mr. Van Sandwyk said
B. C. Rail invited three tenders for the
locomotive order and received two –
from GE and from
General Motors Corp.
The successful bid
by GEs Transportation Systems
operation means the B.C. Rail locomotives will be made at
GE s transport equipment plant in Erie, Pa., instead of at GMs
locomotive manufacturing operation in London, Ont.
The order and the phaseout over the next several years of a
slightly higher number of aging locomotives
now in service in
British Columbia will leave B. C. Rail with a fleet of about 110
locomotives.
Source: The Globe and Mail, Friday Feb. 10, 1989.
Its HEPpening to Stainless Steel
The 157 stainless-steel cars being refurbished constitute 30
per cent of
VIAs total fleet -and 94 per cent of its stainless­
steel fleet.
At present, 10 stainless-steel cars are not slated for
the
HEP project.
The first to enter the shops was baggage car
604. Project
manager
Larry Elliot says some cars are in worse shape than
others and,
in selecting cars for the shops, the worst will be sent
first.
One of the big problems (in assigning cars for HEP) was
that the cars are
all in service right now. Its a question of
synchronization, and weve been working with Transportation,
Marketing and Maintenance on this.
It doesnt just affect cars that are taken out of service; it
affects the whole fleet, and its critical that schedules
be met.
Equipment
Maintenance, Transportation, and Marketing have
joined forces to ensure that the
flow of cars in and out of the
program will disrupt service as little
as possible.
Were so stormproof that even if we slip, we wont fall ,
says Larry. Its all done on a computer model …
You cant just do something like this with a pencil.
FIRST DRAFT
For those of you who fancy numbers, heres a list of the
stainless-steel cars slated for the
HEP program. Please note
that they are listed
in numerical order -not the order in which
they will enter the shops.
Coach: 100-113,
115-127, 129
Skyline:
500-507, 509-512, 514-521
Baggage:
600-602, 604-610, 612, 613, 615, 616, 618
Chateau: 14201-14229
Manor: 14301-14342
Park: 15501-15504, 15506-15509, 15514, 15516, 15517,
15519
Diner: 16501, 16502, 16504, 16506-16509, 16513-16515,
16517
Sources: Vialogue October 1988
QUEBEC TO GIVE $1.4 MILLION FOR STEAM
TRAIN REVIVAL
Hull, Que. – A popular steam train
in the National Capital
region could be chugging down the tracks again this
fall following
an announcement that the Quebec government will inject $1.4-
million into the project. We can say the little train from
Wakefield, Que.,
will roll again, and roll for good this time,
said John Trent, president
of the Hull-La Peche Tourist
Development Council. Saturdays announcement ended months
of speculation on whether Quebec would provide the money
needed to revive a
27 -kilometre stretch of defunct rail line
between Wakefield and Ottawa, which
CP Rail closed in 1986.
Source: Globe and Mail, Monday
Feb. 13, 1989.
AMTRAK TO ADOPT AIRLINE-STYLE
FARE SYSTEM
Amtrak, the U. S. pas~enger rail ~ervice, will begin using the
same kind
of computerized (are.seuing system as airlines some
lime next year, which
will mean new, possibly lower fares and
constantly varying numbers of seaLS at different fares.
The shift to the
yield management system may take place
nexi fall, according
10 Timothy GlIrdner, Amtraks vice­
president
of passenger marketing.
With the system, computers usc past ridership on routes and
current
reservations patterns to determine for each train how
many se
aLS should be sold at various prices.
There
will be no advance purchase requirement fordiscountoo
t
ickets, but for trips expected to be popular and thus haing
fewer cheaper sealS. those sealS would be sold out more quickly.
If demand for higher-priced seaLS is lower than expected, a
discounted fare that was not so
ld out one day may be available
the next. Converse
ly, if demand is higher, the computer may
reduce the n
umber of cheaper seats.
Sources: The Globe and Mail, Saturday
,December 10,1988
MOVE CLEARS WAY FOR SPAIN TO ROLL INTO EC
ON
SMALLER RAILWAY TRACKS
Spain recently adopted Europes standard width for railway
tracks, a
step that will allow trains 10 roll directly into the rcst of
Western Europe for Ihe fir.>tlime since track was laid 133 years
ago.
The move clears the way for completion of high-speed train
links with the rest of Europe by 1992, when Spain hosts the
Summer Olympics and celebrates the SOOth anniversary of
Christopher Columbuss discovery of the New World.
The Spanish government
is e.l:pectt:d to award a major
contraellO build Spain
s first high-speed train system. French,
West
German and Japanese companies are bidding for the deal.
By the turnofthecenwry, the 1.65-metre-wide Spanish and
Portuguese tracks
will be replaced with 1.37-metre-wiJc track
used in
JO other European Community nations.
Transport Minister Jose BaTTionuevo said the France-to­
Seville line should
be ready by the opening of Sevilles World
Expo
in spring 1992 to commemorate the Columbus anniversary
and the 1992 Ba
rcelOna Summer Olympics.
Sources: The Globe and Mail, Dec. 10, 1988.
71
T!!efirst o/CP Rails new SD- track. ot GMDDs plant at London. Ontado on OClo/H.r 20 1988.
Photo by Gord Toylor.
100 YEARS AGO
It was a sistlt to make one stand and stare: cars with actuaJ
wheels runni
ng ge~terday on the Notre Dame street route. The
track is still heavy, and four horses are necessary (0 furnish
motive power.
Theother lines are being rapidly opened up, and
if the weather conlinue~ ravourable a rapld extension of traffic is
looked for.
Montre
al Gazelle, March 281889.
Traffic on Craig street will probably be open for the street
cars this evening, although there is only part
of one side cleared,
and efforts
aTe also being made to open the St. Catherine street
line, which will mOSt likely he clear by the end of the week.
Montreal Gazette, April} 1889.
e.!iwr, OOI.e: In 11M: <1..,.. of the borH c..-s in Montreal. lbe Illeet5 ... ·ere not pawed
in win~. and the passelliCT smoice …. as provided by llei. The above news
~etni refer 10 the rcswnplion cI ,!tee! can runni, on the ,ajll. Thil: oecurnd cach
lpilll as he snow mel!fd, onoe In«< CXpol;n, the Lraco.
BACK COVER:
fu w()rlc u/must (ompilud. /ruin 544 seu 01 jlsflour loads at Uhlhoff/or lroin 461 10 lift laur in the afternoon. Unit 1580 will
lyt hop bock (0 OnWa.
August 8, 1985 photo By Gerhard W,tzel
Canadian Rail
P.o. Box 148 St. Constant, Que., Canada
J5A 2G2
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