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Canadian Rail 408 1989

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Canadian Rail 408 1989


Canadian Rail EJ
No. 408
JANUARY-FEBRUARY
1989
2
CANADIAN ~IL
=—————————-15SN 0008-815 —–
PUBU5HfD BI·MONTHLY BY THE CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION
EDITOR: Fred F. Angus For your membership in the CAHA which includes 8
CO-EDITOR: Douglas N. W. Smith subscription to Canadian Rail write to:
J5A 2G2
.. $27.
$23. in U.S. FUNDS.
PRODUCTION: M. Peter Murphy CAHA. P.O. Box 148, 51. Constant, Quebec
CARTOGRAPHER: William A. Germaniuk Rates: in Canada
LAYOUT: Fred F. Angus outSide Canada:
TYPESETTING: Belvedere Photo-Graphique Inc.
PAINTING: Procel Printing
r—————–~TABLEOFCONTENTS——————_,
THE GOING GETS BETTER ……… .
CAR NAME CONFUSION .. .
CENTENNIAL OF THE INTERNATI
ONAL OF MAINE
LES 100 ANS DE LA GARE WINDSOR ……… .
FAREWELL TO THE WITTS ……………… .
DOUGLAS N.W. SMITH 3
. …. JACK BEATTY 5
FRED ANGUS 9
….. ,……… GUY CHARTRAND 12
FRED ANGUS 14
FROM THE COLLECTION (CORNWALL 7 AND OTTAWA 423)
HOW HAVE THE MIGHTY FALLEN . . . . . . . . . . …….. .
RAIL CANADA DECISION . . . . . . .. .
……. .
BOOK REVI EWS … . . . . . . . . . ….. .
CRHA
COMMUNICATIONS …….. . .
…. FRED ANGUS 16
FRED ANGUS 19
DOUGLAS N.W. SMITH 20
………. 28
30
Cnadian R,lil is conllnvaUy in n!!ed 01 new:;. ~ta;!!s. historical niOta. pholOS. maps anc.J other reproduetible malerlal Pleas!! send all
c
ontrlb.,tions tu the editor: Fred F. AnJu~. 3021 Traf81gM Ae. Moneal. P O. H3Y 1 H3. No payment C8n be made for contribull0M. but
the
conlriuutl>( will br. glen credit 1m material s~bmiued. M~teal will be returned to the contributor if requested. Remember. Knowledge IS
of Iml~ Iue Ilnlpss 1 s shined with Olhers
Frederick F. Angus
A. C. Ballard
Jack A. BeaMy
Walter J. BedbfOok
Alan
C. Blackburn
• NATIONAL DIRECTORS·
Charles De Jean
Gerard Frec:hf.lle
DaVid
W. John:>on
J Christopher Kyle
William Le Surf
Bernafd Manon
M. Peter Murphy
Roben V. V. Nicholls
Andrew W. Panko
Douglas N. W. Smith
Deryk Sparks
David W. Strong
Ulurence M. Unwin
RIChard Viberg
A. Stephen Walbridge
John C. Weir
The CRHA has a number 01 local diVisions across Ihe country. Many hold regular
meelings and issue newsletters FUllher information may be oblained by writing to the
dIVIS
on,
FRONT COVER:
One hundred yu~ flO. M F,brollry 4 1889. r~
Clln.di,,,, P.c/IC R Monrrt!!lIlwJ$~n.d. rodly. g.I/yenillJ,d. the
builtJmfJ SlillllouUI Canlldlln P.clfic·s cOtpo,.e
.dQu/trre~. lind IS still usd .1 a srltlion by
commuler Irllin,. This view. 11.,n IIMI 1900.
s/tow,
the origlnlll 1889 burlrl;fI be/ort. i, WII
41fr.rrdu. ~SU~I c.~ 459 IIIId 559, $II.
p.ssmrl fflt!! sr .. .or>. WtNI/ buill ,II 1898 and 1899
res~l;ve,.,..
• NtW BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O Dox 1162
Saini John.
New BruWlC~ E2L 4G 7
• Sf LAWRENCE VAlLEY DIVISION
PO 80. 22 SIIon S
Mont.eat. au. H3S 3J!>
• RIOEAU VALLEY DIVISION
PO. So. 962
Sm,th, FolIl. 00 I<7A 5A5
• KINGS10N OIVISION
• 60 1 PI.c. 0 h, ….
Kng, 000 II; 1K 6S5
• TORONTO. YORK DIVISION
PO. 110, 5-&(!t. T.rm ….. 1 A.
ToronIO.O
IIo MSW I fJ
• NIAGARA OIVlSION
PO.
S(I 593
$C. c.mar,nea. Ot$O L2R 6we
• WlNOSOR-ESSEK DIVISION
300 C.b ….. Rd Enl.
Wi<*o<. OnarlO N9G IA2
• KEYSTONE QlVlSION
14 Reynolds Bav
W.nn,pey. M.n;,obiI RJK ()M4
• CALGARY a. SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60 -6100, 4th A … , NE
C.lg,o/Y. Albe~ 12A 5ZB
• ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O.
Boo 6102. SIf C.
Edmonlon, Alb • SELKtRK DMSION
f0 so 39
Reve4110ke. B.C. VCE 2S0

CROWSNES1 & KETTLE·vAlLEY OlllSION
PO 80.400
C,brOO~. BH.n Columb •• VIC 4H9
• PACIFIC COhST DIVISION
f 0 So-1006. SW,on A,
Va
ne.,. Bt,sn CoIumb •• v6C 2Pl
N.,ion,, Acl!ives of Cn.rI •. PA·8674.
As pan 01 its activities. the CRHA oparates
the Canadian Ra.lway Museum at Oelson/SI.
Constant. Olil!bec which IS 14 miles 123 Km.)
Irom downtown Montreal It is open daily
!rom late May to early October. Members and
therr Immed,ate lamilies are adminl!d Iree of
charge.
GOA~ OF 1Hl A55OClIOIll. TI-fE COLlEcnON. PRESERVAnON AND OISSEMINATION OF ITEMS RELATING TO THE HISTORY OF RAILWAYS IN CANADA.
3
The Going Gets Better
By Douglas N. W. Smith
On December 4, 1988, GO passed a major milestone and
held ceremonies to officially mark the extension
of its commuter
train from Pickering to Whitby, Ontario.
What differentiates
this from other
GO service extensions is that this service will
operate over a new track built
by GO. Indeed, relatively few
North American commuter operators have constructed any new
trackage during the last sixty years. The reasons for
GOs action
go back to the foundation of the system.
In May 1967,
GO started service. Funded by the Government
of Ontario (hence the acronym GO), the initial service between
Pickering and Oakville was viewed as a experiment to assess
whether Ontarians would abandon their cars for commuter
trains thereby reducing the need to expand freeway capacity.
Hourly service was operated during the day with
20 minute
service during rush hours. The experiment proved an unmitigated
success. Twelve years later,
GO operates commuter train
service over 6 lines as well as a network
of bus services. The
Pickering-Oakville rail line remains the busiest in the network.
Passenger counts have risen from 2.5 million during the six
months
of operations in 1967 to over 12.8 million in 1987. The
five commuter train routes handled slightly more than 4 million
passengers in 1987.
The Pickering-Oakville service, which is known as the
Lakeshore line as the communities it serves lie along the shore
of
Lake Ontario, is operated over CN trackage. Part of the reason
for the selection
of the initial terminal points was related to track
capacity constraints.
At Pickering, the CN main line from
Montreal splits: passenger trains follow the old
CN main line to
Union Station while freight trains go north over a new belt line
constructed in the
1960s to MacMillan Yard. West of Oakville ,
the three track main line narrows to two tracks.
CN was
adamnant that if the Province wished to introduce
GO service
beyond either
of these points, it would have to foot the bill to
expand track capacity as the trackage could not accommodate
GO without affecting the performance ofCN s freight and inter­
city passenger trains.
Go has met the demands for service to communities beyond
its commuter train network through feeder buses. Starting
in the
1970s, the population of these outlying areas began to increase
sharply. This has placed pressure on the highway network as
people move further and further away from Toronto
in search of
affordable housing. For many of these daily commuters, the
time lost switching from a
GO bus to a GO train made public
transit an unattractive option.
Faced with CNs position that GO would have to fund the
construction
of an additional main line if it wished to expand the Lakeshore service beyond Pickering or Oakville, the Province
opted for a completely separate rail service which it called
GO­
ALRT. Announced in 1982, GO-ALRT was to be an
electrified rail service using intermediate capacity vehicles. In
Phase
I, GO-ALRT was to be built from Pickering to Oshawa
and from Oakville to Hamilton. Later, the two isolated segments
were to be joined
by building a line across the northern part of
Toronto. Finally, the conventional GO Transit service between
Pickering and Oakville was to be replaced
by GO-ALRT
system.
Due to problems in determining the alignment to be used in
Hamilton, construction of the new rights-of-ways started first
on the Pickering-Oshawa extension.
GO-ALRT, however, had
numerous detractors who opposed the system as it would still
involve transfers between vehicles in Pickering.
Just prior to the
1985 provincial election, the Minister
of Transportation and
Communications announced the scrapping
ofGO-ALRT. Rail
service to Oshawa and Hamilton would be provided
by
conventional GO commuter trains. The reason for the change of
plans was proposed new federal rail passenger legislation which
gave commuter trains priority over freight trains, provided for
lower charges for track use and established an arbitration
mechanism to investigate capacity problems and determine how
improvement costs should be allocated.
On the eastern extension, the province decided the GO train
service would operate over the
GO-ALRT right-of-way which
had already been largely graded between Pickering and Whitby.
The decision to scrap
GO-ALRT would bring GO train service
to Whitby one year earlier than would have been the case under
the
GO-ALRT schedule.
On December
4, 1988, GO formally opened its 9 mile
Pickering-Whitby extension. As
part of the celebrations, four
round trips were operated between the two communities during
the afternoon with
all passengers being carried free. To highlight
the fact that the new line
is double-tracked, two trains ran side­
by-side from Pickering to Whitby as
part of the ceremonies.
One item which differentiates the
GO and CN lines in the
Toronto area
is the use of concrete ties on the new GO line.
While the line between Pickering and Whitby
is owned by GO,
it is operated by CN . The junction between the CN and GO line
is just to the west of the point where the CN freight belt line
starts.
GO had to burrow through an embankment which carries
the belt line over a major road in order to reach its new track
which
is to the north of the CN line.
As the original Pickering passenger track was built south
of
the CN main line, it was necessary to build a new tunnel under
4
While the regular GO Transit train departs Pickering Jor Toronto and Oakville, two special trains stand on the new GO trackage
built
to link Pickering and Whitby. The date is December 4, 1988 and shortly the ceremonies will begin to inaugurate this new GO
line. All the locomotives in this picture are the new F59 PH locomotives delivered to GO from the General Motors Diesel plant
in London, Ontario last Jail as part oJan order Jor 16 such units. These units were designed by GO to meet theJrequent stop-and-go
nature
oj commuter service. One oj the major changes Jrom GMDs standard passenger locomotive, the F 40PH, is the addition oj
a separate engine and alternator Jor the head end power supply Jor the train. Thus the entire 3,000 horsepower output oj main
engine is available Jor traction power. Using microprocessor controls, the new
F59PH attains 24% adhesion versus 18% Jor GOs
older locomotive
s. These two Jeatures coupled with blended dynamic braking gives the unit enhanced acceleration and deceleration
characteristics.
Photo Credit: Douglas
N. W. Smith
the eN line to access the GO line. New stations were
constructed to serve Ajax and Whitby, the temporary terminus.
The new stations are accessible
by public transit, the buses pull
right up to the door, and
by auto. Parking lots for 720 and 1,060
cars were built
in each respective city. Ajax and Whitby Transit
are integrated into the GO system; no ex tra fare will be charged
to those travelling on
GO by either system. During the early
1990
s, GO plans to complete the remaining 4 miles of line to
reach Oshawa.
This marks the first extension of the
full daytime GO
schedule offered on the Lakeshore route. GO trains will run to
Whitby at hourly intervals every day and with 20 minute service
during weekday rush hours. Total trip time
from Whitby to
Union Station will be 52 minutes. The regular schedule started
December
5, 1988.
The new line cost $109 million allocated as follows:
track work -$16 million, signals – $ 9 million, stations – $
13
million, and land acquisition and civil engineering costs
including rebuilding a highway interchange – $
71 million. 1988 has been a very successful
year for GO in other ways.
The financial year ending March
31, 1988 saw the company
recover more than
65% of its costs from the farebox for the first
time.
As part of the program to expand its rail services and to
retire older motive power, GO acquired 16 new F 5 9 PH
locomotives and 63 new bi -level cars this year. As well, new
orders were placed this year for another
12 locomotives and 60
bi-level cars. To help speed passengers to their destinations, the
company switched over to a
POP fare system on October 30,
1988. Passengers not using monthly passes now must validate
their tickets at machines
in the stations. Roving inspectors travel
on the trains
to ensure compliance. This replaces a rather
cumbersome system which required all passengers to enter and
leave stations
at one point so their transportation could be
inspected. Speaking of station, GO opened a new station at
Appleby to help serve the growing community of Burlington.
And finally, just into the new year,
GO will increase its service
on the Toronto-Milton line from three to
five rush hour
commuter trains effective January
9, 1989.
5
Car N aIDe Confusion
By Jack Beatty
At the tum of the century, following the 1899 merger of the
Wagner Palace
Car Company and the Pullman Company, the
new management found to their dismay that the names of more
than 300 cars were duplicated. The Nomenclature Committee
of Pullman paid a hurried visit to the Chicago Public Library
where names like Lochinvar, Marmion, Hercules, Hyperides,
Lysander and Prometheus were chosen
in haste. .
At the same time, the predecessors
ofCN as well as CP were
building and operating their own fleets of rear-end equipment
and there appeared to have been little consultation amongst the
operators. Thus duplication
of names occurred and this has
continued into recent times. A search
of Official Registers of
passenger train equipment for the period 1952 to 1970 lists many
instances where more than one car bore the same name -one
name being thrice assigned!
While it
is obvious that some cars would be extremely
unlikely to
be interchanged, one must consider the operation of
cars in the Quebec-Montreal-Toronto-Ottawa pool zones from
1933 to 1965. During this time both
CN and CP sleepers would
be on the same train, as well as Pullman sleepers on
CN trains
between Montreal, Toronto and Chicago and on
CP trains
GLEN RIVER, a CPR JO-compartment sleeper, photographed in 1925.
National Archives
o/Canada. Photo PA-48427.
between the same points including through extra cars from
Quebec
or Montreal to Chicago and beyond.
The writer recalls a case where a through Pullman
12-1 (12
section, 1 drawing room) car, en route from Quebec with a
special party, went bad order at Toronto and had to be replaced
by a CP 12-1 sleeper which went through to Galveston
Texas.
In another instance, in late September, after summer
operation
of the Mountaineer ceased, through cars from
Vancouver and Banff enroute to St. Paul and beyond were
handled on the
Soo Dominion on train 8 to Moose Jaw and
train
14 beyond. One bright sunny morning, as luck would have
it, two mid-train sleepers were coupled together on arrival at
Moose Jaw. Both were named
Glen Major, one was a green
6-3 Pullman for St. Paul and the other a red
CP lO-compartrnent
car for Montreal. I am sure you have already guessed what
happened! !
Editors note: This confusion can still happen. In the last year
two instances have been noted on VIA. In one case former
CN
car ELGIN was in the same train as former CP ELGIN
MANOR, while atl6tfier Gase saw EVANGELINE in the
same train as
EVANGELINE PARK.
6
TABLE I
PULLMAN COMPANY AND CANADIAN PACIFIC CARS WITH DUPLICATE NAMES.
(All sleepers unless indicated)
CAR
NAME OWNER PULLMAN CONFIGURATION CP CONFIGURATION
ALGONQUIN PARK ACL 10 roomette 6 bedroom 1 dwg 3 dbr dome lounge
GLADE PRR 34 seat parlour 14 section
GLEN
MAJOR SP 6 cmpt 3 dwg 10 compartment
IPSWICH NYC
12-1 13 section
JAMES
BAY NYC 22 single bedroom 3 dbr 2 cmpt solarium
LAKE
HURON SOU 13 double bedroom 1 dwg 4 cmpt lounge
LAKE
ERlE B&O 10 sec 1 dwg I cmpt I dwg 4 cmpt lounge
LAKE
SUPERlOR B&O 10 sec 1 dwg I cmpt 1 dwg 4 cmpt lounge
NEWCASTLE
NYC
12-1 12-1
NIGHTINGALE NH 14 roomette 4 double bdm 12-1
PALM GROVE PRR 2 bdm I cmpt 1 dwg lounge 10 roomette 5 bedroom
PINE GROVE ATSF
10 roomette 6 bedroom 10 roomette 5 bedroom
POPLAR
DROVE ·NYC 6 section 6 double bdm 10 roomette 5 bedroom
RAPID CITY
ERlE 10 sec I dwg 1 cmpt 8 sec 1 dwg 2 cmpt
REDCLIFF NYC
12-1 8 sec 1 dwg2 cmpt
RlVERTON
B&O
12-1 8 s~c 1 dwg2cmpt
SALVADOR FEC 21 roomettes 12-1
TABLE II
PULLMAN COMPANY AND CANADIAN NATIONAL CARS WITH DUPLICATE NAMES.
(All are sleepers)
CAR
NAME OWNER PULLMAN CONFIGURATION CN CONFIGURATION
GREENBANK B&O 12-1 6 sec 6 rmt 4 bdm
GREENBRlER SCL
11 double bedrooms 6 sec 6 rmt 4 bdm
GREENRlDGE B&O 12-1 6 sec 6 rmt 4 bdm
GREENWOOD PRR 11 double bedrooms 6 sec 6 rmt 4 bdm
NEWCASTLE NYC
12-1 12-1
PINE FALLS PRR 10 roomette 6 bedroom 14 roomette 4 bedroom
TABLE
III
CANADIAN NATIONAL AND CANADIAN PACIFIC CARS WITH DUPLICATE NAMES.
CAR NAME
CARTIER
FISHER
GLENCAIRN
GRANDMERE
JOLIETTE
KAMLOOPS
KINGSTON
LACHUTE
NEEPAWA
NEWCASTLE
NEW WESTMINSTER
NORTH
BAY
(All sleepers unless indicated)
CN CONFIGURATION
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
CP CONFIGURATION
48 seat diner
13 section
10 compartment
14 single bedroom
14 section
13 section
13 section
13 section
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
RENFREW
ROSETOWN
SHERBROOKE
SUDBURY
TILLEY
TORONTO
TRENTON
TUPPER
VANCOUVER
VERDUN
VERNON
VICTORIA
VALOIS
CANTERBURY
SOUTHAMPTON
SUMMERLAND
LINWOOD
HAMILTON
JELLICOE
REGINA
WINDSOR
RIVERDALE
RIVERVIEW
GEORGIAN BAY
LAKE ERIE
LAKE HURON
MONTREAL
FORT SIMPSON
FORT WILLIAM
~.—
–::..:.::…
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
10 sec 1 dwg buffet
10 sec 1 dwg 1 empt
10 sec 1 dwg 1 empt
10 sec 1 dwg 1 empt
10 sec 2 dwg
8 sec 1 dwg 2 empt
8 sec 1 dwg 2 empt
8 sec 1 dwg 2 empt
8 sec I dwg 2 empt
10 roomette 6 bedroom
10 roomette 6 bedroom
1 dwg 2 empt 3 single bdm lounge
29 seat parlour
29 seat parlour
29 seat parlour
4 double bedroom lounge
4 double bedroom lounge
..
_ 70:–.~_ -•
~ — -.. –
-.. . -.
:… ~.–. –_.
._–.–~.:
. .
-..
8 sec 1 dwg 2 empt
8 sec 1 dwg 2 empt
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
12-1
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
8-4
30 seat diner
12-1
12-1
13 section
13 section
14 section
8 sec 1 dwg 2 empt
36 seat diner
10 roomette 5 bedroom
5 double bdm lounge
3 dbr 2 empt solarium
1 dbr 4 empt lounge
1 dbr 4 empt lounge
cafe sleeper 1 dbr 6 sec
6 sec 2 empt buffet observation
6 sec 2 empt buffet observation
.
-.:–: -.:
.
Canadian Pacifics most-numerous class of sleepers was the N series, a group of sixty-eight 12-section I-drawing room steel
sleepers built between
1921 and 1924, and used on all parts of the system for forty-five years. The first one was NA UGHTON
seen here brand new
in May 1921. The only name triplicated be/ween CP, CN and Pullman was NEWCAS1LE, and CPs
member
of that trio was a similar car. A nother car of the series, the eighth one built, was NEVlLLE now at the Canadian Railway Museum.
National
Archives
of Canada. Merrilees Collection. Photo PA-164732.
7
8
eN Northern type steam locomotive 6114, built in September 1927, is typical oJ the big power introduced during the
presidency
oj Sir Henry Thornton.
POSTCRIPT
Some time ago, when the writer was researching duplication
of sleeping car names, he became intrigued by a lO-section I
drawing room 2-compartment sleeper operated by the Pullman
Company but owned by the Chicago and Indianapolis Ry.
Co.
(later the Monon Route). It bore the name Sir Henry W.
Thornton an unusual name for a British knight. Subsequent
research has produced the following biography
of the gentleman
in question.
Sir Henry Worth Thornton
Born November 6 1871
Died March 14 1933
Railroad manager, son
of Henry Clay and Millamenta
Comegys
(Worth) Thornton, was born at Logansport Indiana.
Graduated from University of Pennsylvania 1894 with degree of
B. Sc. He began his career as draughts man in office of chief
engineer
ofPRR and became engineer of maintenance of way . In
1901 he became a division superintendant and in 1911 was
appointed general manager
of the Long Island Railroad. His
work there attracted the attention
of Samuel Rea, PRR
president, who, when asked to suggest a general manager for the
Great Eastern Railway of England, recommended Thornton
who was elected to the positionjust before the outbreak
of World
War 1. During the hostilities he was called upon to direct the
Great Eastern in handling troops and supplies, and became a
member
of the committee of general managers to administer the
British railways for the government.
In 1916 he was appointed
deputy director
of inland water transportation with rank of
colonel in the Royal Engineers. Successively he handled railway
movements in France and undertook negotiations with the
French, Italian and American governments, advancing to the
rank
of Major-General. After his military service he returned to the management
of
the Great Eastern, as well as being on a Committee to
investigate the management and finances
of the Metropolitan
Water Board of the city of London. In 1919 he was gazetted
Knight Commander
ofthe Order of the British Empire, and was
also honoured by decorations from the United States,
France
and Belgium. He became a naturalized British subject in 1919,
intending to remain
in England, but when steps were taken in
1922 to consolidate all English railways into four systems he had
some doubts as to his status.
It was at this time that the newly­
created Canadian National Railways sought his services and,
in
1922, he became Chairman and President of the CNR.
Sir Henry Thornton remained CNR President for ten years
during the National systems great period
of consolidation and
upgrading as the railway was transformed from a collection
of
amalgamated lines to an efficient unified system. By 1930 it had
become one
of the largest railways in North America and was a
pioneer
of such innovations as Diesel-electric locomotives and
on-board radio for passengers. Its 1927 train the Confederation
was the most up-to-date in the country.
The Presidency of Sir Henry Thornton came to an end in the
depression
year
of 1932, and the following March 14 (1933) he
died.
To this day he is recalled as one of the real makers of the
Canadian National system. Thus we see that the name
of an
American sleeping car commemorates the name
of one of the
greatest railroad executives in
Canada.
Editors note:
The recent fire in the Cuban consulate on Pine A venue in
Montreal recalls that this building, formerly a private house, was
the residence
of Sir Henry Thornton during the time of his
presidency
of the CNR. It is an interesting fact that he lived
almost across the street from his arch rival, Sir Edward Beatty
who was
CPR president from 1918 to 1942.
9
Centennial of The International
of Maine
By Fred Angus
(Historical data courtesy
of Tim Humphries of CP Rail News)
Until recently the name Packard Brook Maine was not
familiar to railway historians. It was,
as someone once said, a
name that went down in history and never came up again. Yet it
was at this place, ironically
in the United States, that the last rail
was laid completing the Canadian Pacific Railway from ocean to
ocean just one hundred years ago.
By the summer
of 1886 the CPR main line from Montreal to
the west coast was complete and in operation, and
in that year
the company cast its eyes eastward to find an ice-free winterport
on the Atlantic.
It was decided that this port would be Saint John
New Brunswick, and a railway line
of about 480 miles would be
built east from Montreal to reach it. The proposed railway would
pass through the state
of Maine and would be much shorter than
any other line, either built or proposed, between Montreal and
the Maritime provinces. Hence it was quickly termed
the Short
Line, a name still used and still very applicable.
By 1886, slightly more than half
of the proposed line had
already been constructed
by various companies. The earliest
portion to be built had been the 146-mile section between Saint
John
N.B. and Mattawamkeag Maine. This was part of the
European and North American Railway, separately incorporated
in Maine and New Brunswick. The New Brunswick portion was
incorporated on April 13, 1864
as The European and North
American Railway Company For Extension From St. John
Westward, mercifully shortened
in common parlance to the
Western Extension Railway. Construction began near Saint
John in 1867, and was completed
to St. Croix, across the river
from Vanceboro Maine, late
in 1869. The ultimate destination
of the Western Extension was not Montreal but Bangor Maine
which had been connected
to the rest of the U. S. rail system in
1855. By the end of 1869 the European and North American
Railway
of Maine had built north from Bangor to Mattawamkeag,
leaving a gap
of 56 miles which, for the next two years was
covered
by a stage coach connection. The gap was closed by the
E&NA of Maine and, on October 19,1871, the last spike was
driven by U.S. President Ulysses S.
Grant at Vanceboro. It is
interesting to note that the entire line from Saint John to Bangor
was built to the old provincial gauge
of 5 feet 6 inches and was
not converted to standard until 1877. The
E&NA of Maine
eventually became
part ofthe Maine Central while the Western
Ex tension became the Saint John & Maine, later a part of the
New Brunswick Railway and, after 1890, the
CPR.
Meanwhile, many miles to the west, the completion of the
E&NA drew the attention of several Canadian promoters,
headed by John Henry Pope of Cookshire
Quebec, who were
promoting a railway eastward from Lennoxville to Megantic Que. The Pope group saw the advantages
of linking its own line,
the St. Francis & Megantic International Railway
(SF&MI)
with the E&NA at Mattawamkeag. The result was the granting,
in 1871, by the Maine Legislature, of the charter of what would
become the International Railway Company
of Maine. The
SF &MI was renamed the International Railway Company, and
was opened east to Megantic in 1879, and to the international
border in 1883. Some grading was done on the Maine side
as far
as Holeb, but no rails were laid for another three years.
Closer to Montreal, the South Eastern Railway had built a
line between
Farnham and Brookport, while the Waterloo &
Magog was building between its namesake towns. Portions
of
both lines would eventually become part of the Short Line
although not originally planned as such. This, then, was the
situation when the
CPR appeared on the scene.
In 1883, the
CPR began to obtain control of local rail lines
and charters
in Quebec, the chief of which was the South
Eastern Railway, but which also included the Waterloo &
Magog (see Canadian Rail, September-October 1988, page
182). Thus
in 1886 the CPR was well prepared to begin in
earnest to build
the Short Line. Contracts were let for the
building
of a new line between Montreal and Lennoxville using
portions
of the SER and the W &M. This new line was opened
on August
6, 1888. The CPR had also, in 1886, acquired
control
of the International Railway, including its counterpart in
Maine, and during that year completed the survey all the way to
the connection with the Maine Central (formerly
E&N A of
Maine) at Mattawamkeag. ,
Tenders for the section in Maine were invited in the spring
of
1887, and bids closed on April 26 when nine contracts,
averaging
14 miles each, were awarded for clearing and
construction
of the railway subgrade. Access for the construction
was at six points; the two ends at Mattawamkeag and Holeb
Maine, the connection with the Bangor & Piscataquis (later
Bangor & Aroostook) at Greenville and with the same railway at
Brownville Junction.
Thus there were six fronts from which
to tackle the
w,ork. In the spring of 1888, five locomotives and
crews were assigned to the work with tracklaying and ballasting
on various sections. The first rails were received
by ship at Saint
John, from American mills,
in June 1888.
By mid-September 1888, track was completed, and mixed
train service was
in operation, between Megantic Que. and
Greenville Maine, a distance
of 85 miles, and, at the end of the
same month, the bridge across the Penobscot River at
Mattawamkeag was completed allowing tracklaying to proceed
westward from that point.
By the end of November the large
10
bridges at Wilsons Stream and Ship Pond (Onawa) were
complete, and by early
December the only gap was at Packard
Brook, 12 miles east of Brownville Junction.
On Saturday, December 8, 1888, Thomas Shaughnessy, the
future President
of the CPR, passed through Brownville
Junction eastward on an inspection trip.
He had expected the
line to be complete, but there was still
that gap of a few hundred
yards.
It is only through his report that we know the exact
location of the last rail. He walked across the gap to where a light
engine was waiting to take him to
Mattawamkeag and the
connection to Bangor.
The nex t day, being Sunday, no work
was done, but early on the morning
of Monday, December 10,
1888
at 8:00 A. M. the last rail was laid (and, presumably, the
last spike driven) with no ceremony
of any kind. A terse
telegram to Shaughnessy simply said
Closed tracklaying this
morning at eight
AM, even shorter than Van Hornes famous
fifteen word speech at Craigellachie.
The Short Line was
complete, but it would be almost six months before the first
passenger train left Montreal for Saint
John on June 2, 1889.
At this place on DeCemb~r 10, 1838
-the lAST RAIl was–Iaid ontlW
_-; lilte;nationaJ. Rai/waro/Maine
achieving CanaIlian_ Pacilic:service
-between the PaeiHe & Atla n-tic Oceans
.. —
Unveiled December 9, 1988 at-Packard
Brook by the Canadian
Atlilntic-Failway
The 1988 commemorative plaque at Packard Brook_
Photo by Fred Angus_
L,,~ ~,c., OLI. …….. 0 •. /10 ….. ,~ u.s. M1 .,.A.I
} I ….. otJen, !tar off tho colored label at the perforated marl(,
~—–…… -…. ~–.
THE GREAT NOW1H WESTERN TIl.LEGRAPH COMPANY OF CANADA.
onlkATIHe THE LINKS 01- 71111 MU:-TRJIAL. I-~IIIION AND MAl.:LTOBA TlLIlGKM1I CO]olrASJp.s
./
Thl CoOlpt0yuRGIZIIlu 1Jld ddinu 1.IIuug;n only eoDdIlIO~ IUDI[I)::I lialoiliy, …. ·hich han b~~n .S~ol(.d 10 by l11e IU.oJcr of lI:I.
t01l0£~T:n~~~e. fI1.I.HI~ apinH onlr hv rf.pf.lli,, :I. l1leu:.gc h..~l. 10 ,he ~tmHn 1ulion Cor com!> •. ..,d ~h Com~fI … 111 00 hold
,u.clf li.1.hle (or ~oll 01 de1.a.)$ in u:uSroiuion 01 dcivelY of unrcpe31td ,n~I:CS, ~C)~no1 Ihe amoUIII or loll, !>:l.i -re Ihe cl.;,iOl i~ POI plUoented in ,riling …. !thin ~iXlY d,,)~ ar.tr ,cndint: Ihe o)~i:t.
rhi.l. II ao uorcpeMed rncss.a~c, .. nd iloJ.HvCfCd by Icqucu ollht suder, under tL~ (vod-ilioDi lJ,mcd abo .. c.
ft. P. DWIGHT, Gencu.l1>hMl;cr. F.1(IISTU:: WIMAN, f,u,du,
—~—–
_________________________ – -___ –__ 0 _
Money or-ders by ~6legraph between principal telegraph offices in Canada and tho U led Slales.
~—————————.—————~~~—
T-E-L J:a~ A M £J /00 1_Y-___ ~ ~o·iA}/ ~1
o ~~~=~=_~~_~ __ o~-__ Ko.dh~k:> ~:~~ __
——-R;;:~I i-.T-;;:;:—-(/
___ 0 ______ ——————______ 0 ______ ————-___________ _
,
o
—–.———.0—————-0—0——————–0——————–0 -0—-0
~ _________________________ 0 ___ -_-_0-_0 ______ —-
—-~————————–,—
The telegram, dated December 10, 1888, which announced the completion of the tracklaying.
Canadian Pacijic Corporate Archives.
One hundred years later it was decided to commemorate this
event. On September 1, 1988 the operations
ofCP lines east of
Megantic (including the International of Maine) had been
transferred to a new business unit known as the Cariadian
Atlantic Railway, thus it was the
CAR that organized the
commemoration.
Due to the fact that December 10, the actual
anniversary, fell on a Saturday, it was decided to hold the
ceremony one day earlier, on the
9th, in order to secure better
coverage from the news media.
Friday, December
9, 1988 dawned bright and crisp; there
was frost all about, but the much-feared snowstorm did not
materialize and good weather prevailed.
At the station in
Brownville Junction were three cars;
CP business car Ontario,
business car 90 (an
RDC formerly in passenger service), and
VIA Rail
RDC 6128. The latter car had come to Brownville
Junction the night before on the rear
of the westbound
Atlantic , train 11 . Some historians noted that 6128 had been
the last car to run to Fredericton
N. B. when rail passenger
service to that city ceased in September 1985, also it was about
to make more history
as it would be the first VIA RDC to cross
Maine, since it went on to Montreal (also on the rear
of train 11)
the night after the ceremony.
11
Enroute to Packard Brook, Passenger extra 6128 passes Lakeview
as Mount Katahdin, the highest
in Maine, appears in the
background.
Photo by David Morris.
After the speeches, the rail was replaced, bolted up and
spiked down, thus symbolizing the laying
of the last rail 100
years ago.
AJI then got back on car 6128 and returned to
Brownville Junction.
The celebration was not yet concluded
however for a sumptious buffet was laid on
in business car 90.
Three special cars lined up at Brownville Junction on December 9
1988. Car
6128 made the trip to Packard Brook while the others
remained at
B.J. Jor the buffet lunch that closed the celebrations.
Photo by Fred Angus.
By 9:00 A.M. the invited guests were arriving, and about an
hour later car 6128, with about 90 guests aboard, set out on the
12 mile run for Packard Brook. Reaching this point, one noted
that a section
of rail had been taken up and lay beside the track;
also a plaque, still suitably covered and surmounted by the flags
of Canada and the United States, had been erected beside the
track.
Fred Green, General Manager of the Canadian Atlantic
Railway, gave a speech outlining the long association between
CP and the state of Maine, and the governor of Maine sent a
proclaimation declaring December 10, 1988
as Canadian
Pacific day. After more speeches, dealing with the past, the
present and the future, the plaque was unveiled
by Orner
Lavallee, former Corporate Archivist and Historian
of CP. It is
interesting to note that Mr. Lavallee has had a long association
with the International
of Maine , having worked on old pay car
52 in
that region in the days when employees were still paid in
cash. Among those present were four pensioners whose
combined service with the company totalled more than a century
and a half.
The commemorative plaque, surmounted by the flags oj both
nations,
is unveiled at Packard Brook as news photographers
record the scene.
Photo by Fred Angus.
Finally it was all over and the guests departed having
appropriately commemorated the completion
of the International
of Maine. Next June it will be a century since the first through
train from Montreal to Saint John, which made the
Short
Line, in the words of the reporter for the Saint John Daily
Telegraph,
a fixt fact.
12
Les 100 ans de la Gare Windsor
Par Guy Chartrand
President de Transport 2000 Quebec
Au debut de fevrier prochain, la Gare Windsor aura 100 ans.
Cet edifice, jadis frequente par les grands de ce monde, est I un
des plus riches en histoire au
Canada. Meme si la partie
principale de la gare a ete construite en cinq etapes sur une
periode de
25 ans, et meme si des differentes sections ont ete
realisees par des architectes differents, tout
Ie complexe
demeure parfaitement unifie.
Ledifice reflete la croissance du
Canadien Pacifique depuis I achevement de la Iigne trans­
continenta
le en 1885. La compagnie desirait se doter d un siege
social et
dune gare denvergure a Montreal, point de depart de
la ligne transcontinentale vers I
Ouest.
La Gare Windsor, sa partie originale situee juste sur Ie coin
des
rues Peel et La Gauchetiere, fut erigee entre juin 1887 et
fevrier 1889 au cout de
$300,000. Elle fut loeuvre de deux
hommes: I architecte Bruce Price
et Ie directeur general de
lepoque du
CPR, William Van Horne. Bruce Price etait un
architecte de New York qui avait acquis une experience
considerable dans la realisation de complexes hoteliers et
residentiels et etait reconnu comme un maitre du «style
bardeau» de I architecture residentielle americaine. Bruce Price
dessina un certain nombre
dautres edifices au Canada, dont la
gare de la Place Viger
a Montreal, devenue depuis un edifice a
bureaux mais avec son apparence exterieure preservee, Ie
College Royal Victoria a Montreal, I Hotel Banff Spring et les
premieres phases du celebre
Chateau Frontenac a Quebec.
En 1900, la Gare Windsor ne pouvait plus repondre aux
besoins du Canadien Pacifique, et Edwards Maxwell, un
architecte montrealais, fut designe
pour concevoir une extension
qui fut construite
Ie long de la rue La Gauchetiere. Maxwell, qui
eut plus tard pour associe son frere, elabora
Jes plans dhotels a
Winnipeg et Calgary, ceux des Edifices Ugislatifs a Regina et
des plans pour trois prolongements du
Chateau Frontenac. Plus
tard, en 1906 et 1912,
la Gare Windsor fut a nouveau agrandie
en gardant toujours ce style impressionnant par sa robustesse.
En 1913, de nouvelles voies ferrees etaient amenagees et la
presente salle des pas perdus reaiisee.
Le seul accident grave
a survenir dans la gare, et qui cause la
mort de plusieurs personnes qui attendaient Iarrivee des trains,
survint
Ie 17 mars 1909 au moment ou Ie train en provenance de
Boston manqua de freins et termina
sa course dans la salle
dattente. Elle connue ses moments de gloire Jors du depart du
train du Roi George
VI et de la Reine Elisabeth au printemps de
1939.
La Gare Windsor connu son apogee au cours des deux
conflits mondiaux, et Ientre-deux-guerres.
Cetait la maison­
mere du Canadien Pacifique.
Des milliers de voyageurs sy
donnaient rendez-vous. Cetait
Ie point de depart et darrivee
des trains vers
lOuest, les Maritimes, les Etats-Un is et un peu
partout au Quebec.
A post card 0/ about 1905 showing Windsor station and St.
Georges church both o/which are still standing.
Canaoian Pacific Railwa~
-:0:-
NOTICE.
-:0:-
COMMECINQ
MONDAY, 4th February, 1889,
All Tr&ln. from or tor
TOlOfIto, J>eurboro and ClUJ Po..t8
,vue, and at.u fol Bosron,
Xuvpurl, Farnham, SI~I­
broo~ and lit. Joluu,
WIJ.L ASRH): AT AMn DF-PART FItO)l TIn:
NlW WINDSOR STREET STATION, I
On ,DOMINION 8Q.UARE.
Qttatva, Jnn~peg, Orubec,Jol~
St. TIeIue, St. JelOnM, lU. Un
CItU St. EU6tae1UJ era
WILL A.lIlIV): AT AoMD DaPART FROX
D A L H 0 U SI E SQUARE STATION
A. Hllbcrto.
TICKET OnIOES:
:180 St, Jamn trett .. \lntloor and Balm?,al
Hot.I., Hnd WlnottOr IUeelaud Dalbou.sle
Square IIlat·lc.a ..
D, McNICOLt.,
LlCIU8 TUTTLE,
(jeD. IUII, eDt.
Pu •. Trllftlc aI.Dager. 118
Beats all creation, the new CPR station . So said a large sign, attributed to CPR President William C. Van Horne, at the time
Ihe new Windsor Street Station, as it was then known, opened on February 4, 1889. This photo was taken in the summer of 1889,
only
afew months afier the opening, and shows the station as it looked when completed. In later years there were numerous
extensions and alterations, most notably those made
in 1900, 1906, 19/0-1913, 1952-1954, 1971. In the early 1970s there were
serious plans to demolish the structure and replace it by a new development, but this plan was fortunately cancelled and an
extensive renovation
to the building was carried out. The original 1889 structure, shown here, still stands as pari of the much
larger complex. From the outside
is appears little changed afier a century.
13
;:;.;~
?
Son declin, en tant que terminus principal, debuta vers les
annees 1950 pour
saccentuer par la suite. Le transport
ferroviaire des voyageurs commenc;:ait sa longue agonie au
Canada,le transport aerien et I automobile gobant les voyageurs
un apres Iautre. Au debut des annees 1970, des rumeurs
circulaient a Ieffet que ce magnifique edifice sera
it demoli, pour
faire place a un complexe immobilier. Une association sans but
lucratif, «Les Amis de la
Gare Windsor», prit forme en 1973
avec pour but dempecher sa demolition. Le groupe sensibilisa
les autorites et la gare fut sauvee. Via Rail, qui avait pris la charge des trains voyageurs en
1977,
deserta la Gare Windsor en 1985 pour consolider ses
operations a la
Gare Centrale. Depuis de moment-la, Ie
magnifique edifice de pierres n est Ie rendez-vous quotidien que
des trains de banlieue de la ligne MontreaJ/Rigaud exploitee
par
Ie CP pour Ie compte de la STCUM. Les usagers sont toujours
au rendez-vous. Pour un autre cent ans …
Sources: Le Devoir, Montreal 7 janvier 1989.
14
Farewell to The Witts
By Fred Angus
In 1921 the Toronto street car system was like a rolling
museum. The old Toronto Railway
Company, which had been
given a
30-year franchise by the city in 1891, had placed few
cars in service since well before World War 1. This was partly
due to wartime shortages, but was also due to the fact that the
company realized that its franchise would not be renewed when
it expired
in 1921 and was unwilling to make heavy capital
expenditures. A
few new cars were built in the companys
shops, but these did not even fully replace those lost
in two
serious car barn fires, in 1912 and 1916. The needed capacity
was partially supplied by such
band aid measures as
converting a number
of obsolete open cars into closed trailers,
and retaining old closed cars as trailers, a
few of which dated
back to horse car days. So it was that the new Toronto
Transportation Commission had its hands
full when it officially
took over the system on September
1, 1921.
One
of the top priorities was the renewal of rolling stock, and
during the two years following September
1, 1921, the
Commission, under General Manager
D. W. Harvey, placed
575 new cars in service and scrapped 490 old ones. The actual
gain
in passenger capacity was more than the difference of 85
cars, for many
of the old ones were small single-truck units. The
new cars were of steel, both motors and trailers, and were of the
Peter Witt design with front entrance and a sliding door near
the middle. These cars served long and well, many still being
in
rush hour service forty years later, in the early 1960s.
Following the expansion of the subway system and the
conversion
of some street car routes to bus, the Witt cars were
retired.
Few were seen after the abandonment of the Dupont line
early in 1963, although a very few were still available for special
occasions.
By 1966, however, all were gone except for some in
museums, plus car 2766 still owned by the TTC. At that time
plans still called for the complete removal
of all street car service
from Toronto
by 1980, however this policy was reversed in
1972, and consideration was given to building new cars. About
this time it was decided to s
tart a tour tram service using Witt
cars, some
of which were borrowed from museums. At first this
service was run
by the TTC charging regular fares, but later was
contracted out to private operators.
It had been expected that the
tour trams would run about five years, but
it turned out they were
in use fifteen years, thus extending the Witt era in Toronto to 67
years!
In 1988, however, time ran out for the Peter Witts and it was
announced that this season would be their last. During 1988,
cars
2424 and 2766 were in use, the former a large Witt owned
by the Ontario Electric Railway Historical Association, and the
latter a small Witt still owned by the
TTC. The Toronto and
York Division
of the CRHA organized a farewell tour, using car
2766, to take place on Sunday, November 27, 1988. Although
Toronto Tours had the exclusive right to operate these cars, they
very kindly arranged to use a
PCC car on that day and allow the
Car 2766 on the farewell trip on November 27, 1988.
Photo by Fred Angus.
CRHA to use the Witt. The tours will continue next year, using
PCCs, and are still an excellent way to see Toronto.
Despite predictions
of bad weather, November 27 was a
beautiful day as
car 2766 made its farewell trip. Due to strict
TTC security, even those who boarded at Russell car barn had
to wait on the sidewalk until the car came out, a far cry from the
old days at St. Denis barn
in Montreal. Then on to the major
pick-Up point
at Church and King, where we got a good view of
rebuilt PCC car 4600 now used in the tour service. Then
followed a most interesting four-hour trip covering many lines,
often including trackage not used
in regular service. In all, fifty
participants rode the
car, a sell-out crowd, and others had to be
content with following
by automobile or on regular cars. Then
back to the point
of departure with a feeling of sadness as 2766
headed back to the barn
for the last time.
The sadness is somewhat mitigated by the fact that the car
lines are not being abandoned , nor will any of the remaining Witt
cars be scrapped. Car 2766 itself will be retained by the TTC
which is considering starting its own museum and there is always
the possibility, dare we hope, that
it could once again someday
be seen on the streets
ofT oronto on special occasions. Of course
the
CRHA owns car 2300, donated by the TTC in 1963. This
has recently been reaffirmed as an important
part of the
N alional collection. Other Witt cars are
in other museums, most
notably the
OERHA museum at Rockwood Ontario, but also
including 2898 at the Shore Line Trolley Museum in Branford
Connecticut, as well as others
in other locations. The Witts
played an important part
in Toronto over 67 years, and the
passing
of the last from active service is truly the end of an
era.
In-To~onto,asin ev.ery large city in-the World; publl~ tr~nsPortation serVices are and -wilL
continue to::beindispensable to the welfare and progress oftha entire co~unity ,and of ~very,
personinthe commuriity_ , : , ,_ _: _ – _ . , ~ ,-.
After
moiethan thirtyYea~soI extensive experiEiri:~e ~itb. the ptiv_ate ~u!Qin~bl1e, there is
no~dicafion, that any private veliic(e will eveCsatisfadtor-ily, r,eplac~ public han~if services, In safety, convenience, .depend<1bilily, efficient
use6£,stleet spa~e/and in the vital. faCtor of.
coot, the privCite .vehicle: is oj.ifclasSed~ by public lransi.iserY,ices:~ , ,
, – I:Iow.e~er, the competiii()ri~or Pllblic pCitrcinage _wili-cQ.ntlnrie to be -ani~2eD:tiye -for both ,
theplivate vehicle and the pubH-c hansitsyslemlo, -offer constant-lyimproved service, Two
ql~.li~~s,spee~ andriding-:co¢fort; will count heavily, iii thiscbmpetitiQn,,:
:Toronto is a)teady familial with-what-hp.sbeendonetoachij;lve
new~fanda~-as of-speed and
luxlii,ous_ -comforl in one tran~n vehicle,tlie bus, -tlie latest-,models, of. whiGh,a,re in service on
al1T,I,~<;:; routes, _, ,, .. --
-:-___ O~th~ f~llowing pagesii:iere,are,ci~scribed so~e of th~-,hiairi features of g-reallylharilellous
ne~, str-eet car; developedJoachieye~the new high-st<1ndard ~nthe: ess,ential-rail servlces:
, –
-hth ihe addition ofon_ehun~red -a.nd fort; ofthe:~e -ilew,car~, -s;;ri, -t~ b¢in servic,e, -the
-T,T.
C;, will h!,-ve completed ,a: programme of rolli~g stock Inoa~z:niZati9n whicli willhold for the ,Toron,to
IrCl.nsit system a lea!1ingplaceamong the ,best in~the World;, -, –__
–. -.. -, -.. —
The beginning of the end for the Wills was the arrival of the first PCC car .fifty years ago, This advertisement appeared at that
time,
Collection
of Norris Adams,
15
16
Front the Collection
Cornwall Electric Locomotive Number 7
and
Ottawa Electric Railway
Car Number 423
By Fred Angus
In this issue, the From the Collection column will feature
two pieces
of early electric railway equipment, both used in non­
passenger service, from eastern Ontario cities.
Cornwall Street Railway locomotive number 7 was built
about 1900, by the Montreal Street Railway, for the Shawinigan
Falls Terminal Railway.
It was locomotive number 1 of the
SFTR and in its career was, at different times, equipped with a
trolley pole and pantograph.
At present no photo of locomotive
number 1 has turned up showing it during this period; however
photos
of number 2 do exist showing both configurations; these
give a good idea
of what number 1 must have been like during its
career at Shawinigan.
Upon its retirement from the SFTR, this pioneer locomotive
was sold to the Cornwall Street Railway where it was
renumbered
7. It served the CSR until the 1950s when it was
sold to Courtald
s, an industrial plant located in Cornwall. Still
numbered
7, it remained in service until 1959 when its main
frame was broken
in a collision. Fortunately, by then its
significance was appreciated, and it was donated
by Courtalds
to the CRHA. As the Canadian Railway Museum was still in
the planning stage, the locomotive remained in Cornwall until
1963 when it was shipped to Delson. Early
in 1964 its broken
frame was repaired by welding, and some cosmetic restoration
was done. Unfortunately little has been done since and
deterioration has set
in. However it is now hoped to complete
restoration on this historic piece, so that
it can again be
displayed as the oldest electric locomotive
in Canada, and one of
the oldest preserved in America.
. …

I
1
Cornwall Street Railway electric locomotive No.7 photographed by Ernie Plant on August 15 1945, the day World War II ended.
Note
the victory sign (V plus three dots and a dash) painted on the side o/the locomotive.
National Archives
o/Canada. Merrilees Collection. Photo PA-166503.
17
Shawinigan Falls Terminal Railway number 2 shown with trolley pole and with pantograph. Number / was similarly equipped.
National Archives
of Canada. Merrilees Collection. Photos PA-164672 and PA-/64681.
This
is what Ottawa Electric Railway mail cars looked like when new. This one is 425, but 423 was identical.
National Archives
of Canada. Merrilees Collection. Photo PA-143139.
18
Car 423 in the 1930s, still painted white, be/ore its roo/was rebuilt.
National Archives
o/Canada. Merrilees Collection. Photo PA-136693.
Ottawa Electric Railway car 423 has a rather different
history but
is no less interesting. Soon after the Ottawa street car
system was electrified by Ahearn and Soper in the early 1890 s,
the company secured the contract to carry the Royal Mail from
the main post office to the Broad Street railway station. Special
cars were fitted up for the purpose, and in addition the regular
street cars bore the lettering
Royal Mail which gave them the
right
of way over other traffic. By 1906 the special mail cars
were getting old and
in poor condition. A newspaper article of
December 7 1906 calls them a disgrace. Accordingly, late in
1906, the Ottawa Electric Railway ordered three new mail cars
from the Ottawa
Car Company. These were numbered 423,424
and 425. The old cars did not last long thereafter, one had been
wrecked
in July 1906, while another was destroyed by fire in
January 1907 when a fuse in the motor blew violently.
The Ottawa mail cars were not rail post offices, but were used
in what amounted to a freight service between post office and
station. Thus they were vulnerable to competition from trucks as
the paving
of the streets became improved. The end came after
the three new cars had been
in service for less than five years.
The Ottawa Electric Railway had been charging the
Post Office
$ 8000 per year for the service, but suddenly, in the spring of
1911 , raised their fee to $ 15,000. The postal officials refused to
consider this great increase and, on
May 12, 1911, announced
that they would terminate the contract with the
OER effective
September 1
of the same year. The Post Office then bought
automobile trucks to handle the mail , and the electric operation
became a thing
of the past on September 1, 1911. Soon
thereafter the electric railway tore up the tracks on Little Sussex
street which had been used only by the mail cars.
Although the
OER said that the bodies of the redundant mail
cars would be practical.ly useless to the company, they still
had a long career ahead
of them in work service. Car 424
disappeared from the roster fairly early, but 423 and 425
423 at Champagne car barn in /951. The car is in this
configuration today.
CRHA Archives. Bailey Collection.
survived for many years, still painted in their white colour
scheme
of their mail car days. 423 became a sand car while 425
was converted
to a welding car, and both played their part in
maintaining the high standard of the Ottawa street car service.
Some time, probably
in the late 1930s, 423 suffered an
accident which damaged its roof; as a result the roofwas rebuilt
from the railroad design to the
deck roof more typical of
city street cars. 425 retained the original type roof until it was
scrapped in the late 1940 s. Sand car 423 remained
in use until
the end
of all electric car service in Ottawa, and it took part in the
farewell parade through the streets on
May 2, 1959. It was then
donated
to the CRHA and shipped to the Canadian Railway
Museum at Delson late in 1962.
As 423 has always been kept inside,
it is in remarkably good
condition considering its age.
It is still, however, in its sand car
configuration, but it
is hoped soon to restore it as a mail car,
perhaps even with the original type roof line. Thus visitors to the
Museum will be able to see how the mail was moved in the
nations capital early
in the century.
19
How Have the Mighty Fallen
By Fred Angus
The recent abandonment of the Newfoundland Railway points out how little the railway mattered in the economy of the province in
1988. It was not always thus. A century ago, when plans for a trans-island railway were being discussed, the railway appeared
prominently on the currency
of the colony. The Union Bank of Newfoundland issued this twenty dollar bill in 1889 depicting no less
than
FIVE locomotive engravings. None was a Newfoundland locomotive, all being standard banknote engravings, but the
unprecedented use
of so many on one note showed how important the railway was considered. The Union Bank failed in 1894,
although the notes are still redeemable at 80 cents on the dollar, and are now extremely rare. The railway lasted ninety-four years
longer.
The front and back of this rare note were specially photographed for Canadian Rail by the Bank of Canada Museum, and are
used with the permission
of the curator of that museum .
. -::.
20
~~nada
uansport Decisions
By Douglas N. W. Smith
In its November 12, 1988 issue the Windsor Star carried
two articles dealing with railways
in the Windsor area by their
staiTreporter Richard Brennan. Your editors believe these are
of
more than local interest. One outlines the difficulties facing the
railway industry and the other provides a look at the recent
history
of one of Canadas more successful short lines, the
Essex Terminal Railway. Giving the pending abandonments
of
numerous branch lines across the country and the possibility of
new short line railways being created from some of these lines,
we have decided to reproduce the complete
text of these two
articles
in this issue of Canadian Rail. Contained in the first
article
is a cross-section of current thinking of transportation
planners, operators and users on the issues
of rail-truck
competition and highway user fees paid by truckers.
What the
final answers will
be to these questions will determine how the
rail network will evolve over the coming years.
Rail Near the End of the Line
There was a heck of a party that day in 1854 when the Great
Western Railway locomotive, puffing great billows of black
smoke,
came to Windsor.
To welcome the first train from Niagara Falls, Ont., a
cannon was discharged
in Detroit while over in Windsor,
railway officials and civic leaders from both cities slapped each
other on the back and welcomed the dawning of a new era.
Just as Windsor prospered, so did other towns and cities
along the railways crisscrossing the nation, while others left
behind withered and died.
Thats the kind of power the railroads
had then.
If not for rail, Amherstburg would have been this
areas major centre.
In recent years, however, the railways importance has
dwindled.
The atmosphere is more like a wake. Just as shipping
on the
Great Lakes gave way to the rail, the railroad is losing
ground
to trucking.
Estimates, along the Ontario corridor at least, suggest trucks
are carrying 80 per cent
of the freight while rail is getting only 20
per cent.
Aided by deregulation under the new National
Transporta­
tion
Act and squeezed by competition from trucks, the railways
are abandoning unprofitable lines with unprecedented speed.
Nationally, for example,
CN carries 90 per cent of its freight
on one-third
of its tracks. And CP says it is in a similar situation with the least-used half
of its tracks carrying only three per cent
of its freight traffic.
This year will go down
in the history books as the year
Newfoundland lost its entire railway.
And some observers
figure the entire east coast
is threatened with a similar fate.
New transportation laws allow railways -within limits -to
respond to profit and loss as other businesses do.
At one time
they had to prove the branch lines they wanted closed would
never again
tum a profit and abandoning them wouldnt harm the
public.
Now the railways can abandon up to four per cent of their
tracks each year without public hearings if there
is no public hue
and cry. And now the public must prove that abandoning a line
will cause undue economic harm to the area.
CN and CP have been abandoning lines at a combined rate of
about 840 krn a year since 1975 when the Canadian Transport
Commission lifted an eight year moratorium on line closures.
Little more than a decade ago in
Windsor, if it was worth
carrying -it was carried by rail.
Mike Brogan, manager
of transportation and purchasing for
Chrysler
Canada Ltd., said he remembers a time 12 to 15 years
ago when
50 train cars a day would roll into the Windsor
assembly plant carrying parts.
Now as far as materials, we have very little reliance on rail,
probably less than one per
cent, Brogan said.
The train cars have been replaced by about 400 transport
trucks.
Trucking is more conductive to the reduced inventory level,
or just-in-time delivery, that we have tended to in the last few
years.
Rails forte is still bulk shipping -wheat, lumber, iron ore,
zinc, steel.
I couldnt do without rail. Seventy per cent of our business
is still rail, said John VanDe Hogen, president of VanDe
Hogen Group Inc., which handles U.S.-bound lumber ship­
ments that arrive by rail
in Windsor from western and eastern
Canada.
If it wasnt for rail we would be out of business, he
said.
But the fact remains railways have lost ground, and according
to one expert, will continue to do
so until the railway system is
simply a network connecting major cities in only eight of the 10
provinces.
By and large we are quite concerned about the future of the
national
system, said Roy Jamieson, executive director of
Transport 2000, a lobby group dedicated to saving the
railways.
Transport 2000 has joined the Quebec government in calling
for a moratorium on branch line abandonment.
Jamieson said together,
CP and CN have submitted
abandonment applications totalling
4,500 km of track in eastern
Canada, alone.
Besides Newfoundland,
CN also wants to abandon Prince
Edward Island, and
parts of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia,
Quebec and Ontario.
And CP, said Jamieson, has just spun off its line to the
Atlantic east
of Sherbrooke, Que., through Saint. JOM, N.B.,
and the Annapolis Valley
in Nova Scotia to Canadian Atlantic,
a wholly owned subsidiary
of CP.
Transport 2000 sees the paper shuffle as nothing more that a
ploy to wind down rail service
in Atlantic Canada. Its the idea
of use it or lose it and they are not going to make any effort for
them to use it, Jamieson said.
And CN has made some noises about shutting down its
Moncton, N. B. line
in 10 years, he said.
One of the ironies of the whole process is that when you
amputate the limbs the whole body becomes a little weaker,
Jamieson said.
Jamieson said his greatest fear
is that railways have given up
the fight against the trucking industry, content to haul bulk
commodities.
Transport 2000 and the railways complain the trucking
industry has an unfair advantage since the big rigs operate on
highways paid for by the tax-payers in the various provinces
while the railways have to pay their own way.
We have suggested … perhaps its time the provinces took a
look at a weight-distance tax for tractor trailers, similar to
system used by
12 U. S. states.
Essentially you charge the trucker for the equivalent
damage it
is doing to the highway, Jamieson said, noting that
studies have shown that an average tractor-trailer does the
equivalent damage
Of 9,600 cars.
Since the
mid-70s, the number of registered trucks in
Canada per kilometre has jumped to 4.4 from 2.2 and, on the
whole, they are much longer and heavier now than a decade ago.
They are wearing out the highways two to five years faster
now and putting a great deal
of strain on the provincial highway
budgets, he said.
Besides that, he said, the Canadian Construction Association
and the Road and Transportation Association are lobbying hard
to have the money spent
in Canada on road construction and
maintenance increased to $8.5 billion a
year from $6.5
billion.
Maybe the province should take another look at a more
cost-effective way
of moving goods and people, Jamieson
said.
Raymond Cope, president the Ontario Trucking Association,
said he has heard all the criticisms
of the trucking industry, and
has to admit he does have some sympathies for the railways.
21
The trucking industry can expand and contract operations
as
it sees fit in its own corporate judgment. In that sense we have
an unfair
advantage, Cope said.
Cope said the
OTA agrees the railway is overregulated and
has suggested to the federal government that it relax some
of the
rules so they can be more competitive.
Railways have a big problem generating enough revenue to
cover the cost
of unproductive lines, he said.
He said, however, he doesnt agree the trucking industry
isnt pulling its own weight.
Cope said the provincial licence fees, and the tax paid on
gasoline
by the motoring public more than cover the money
spent on building new roads and maintaining existing highways.
Railways pay for their own rail and we pay for the
highways. I see absolutely no difference between the
two, he
said.
But Cope might have a tough time convincing railroaders like
Murray Elder, president
of Windsors own Essex Terminal
Railway.
We are operating under trying conditions because the
taxpayers are subsidizing the truckers by building huge beautiful
highways.
And all the while the construction and trucking
industry lobbies have got a gun to the head
of government to
build more highways,
Elder said.
Last year, B. G. Hutchinson
of the civil engineering faculty
at the University
of Waterloo, concluded in a study that
pavement
in some Canadian cities is rutting prematurely
because the big trucks are allowed to carry too much weight.
Trucks abuse the highways with their heavy loads and
increase the death rate. You know if a
car is involved in an
accident with a truck that the other guy has to come out second
best.
The big railways are also not free
of subsidies. Canadian
taxpayers pay for the cost
of keeping open non-productiv~
branch lines out west so farmers can still have the option of
sending their wheat by rail. Western Canada accounts for 70 per
cent
of Canadas rail traffic and as long as the Prairies grow
grain, there will ne trains.
In 1987,
$43 million in subsidies was given to CN and $69
million to CP.
So far Essex County, with its more than 300 krn of railway
line, has escaped abandonment but
thats not to say it wont
happen, even though Essex County represents vital links to the
U.S. market.
Florida-based
CSX Transportation, through its Canadian
subsidiary Lake
Erie and Detroit River Railway, has applied to
abandon
145 km of rail line between Oldcastle and West Lore,
west
of London.
Since
it represents more than four per cent of CSX line in
Canada, the National Transportation Agency has requested the
company supply reasons why
it wants to abandon the line, said
agency spokesman Janette Laroche.
The route includes stops at Harrow, Arner, Kingsville,
Leamington and Blenheim. And as a result the Harrow
Farmers Co-operative Association Ltd., has filed an objection
22
on the basis it will cause the co-op and its producers undue
economic harm.
The co-op, said general manager Ai Heffernan, relies on the
rail to transport
com to the province of Quebec and the maritime
provinces.
Its very important to us, Heffernan said. If it
closes we could lose a substantial amount
of business.
Heffernan said if he has to turn to trucking, a more expensive
form
of moving corn, he will have to give the area farmers less for
their
com. And if the farmers choose instead to sell their corn to
grain terminals
in the town of Essex, which is on the CN line, is
it going to cost them more to get it there?
Applications for abandonment do not include the kilometres
ofCN track scheduled to be removed from Windsors riverfront
by
Nov. 30, 1990, following a land swap with the city.
Rather than rail dying out in
Essex County, quite the reserve
may be true.
The railway in southwestern Ontario may become
even more important if free trade is passed, said Mike
Matthews, a spokesman for
CN , which is studying the impact it
would have
on the area.
A lot of customers are going to be affected one way or the
other
by free trade and will cause some change in our traffic
pattern as we know them today.
We have to see whether we have
the wherewithall to handle it.
We are making sure we have the
capital expenditure earmarked
so they will do the most good,
Matthews said.
About 24 per cent of CNs total revenue comes from the
international market.
We want to make sure we are in a
position properly to adapt to any change
in traffic pattern.
CN and CP are in the midst of ajoint study on whether it is
feasible to enlarge the railway tunnel that runs beneath the
Detroit River.
Weve done some studies and we have some initial
estimates
on how this would be done. Its still a very big number
(financially) and
were going to keep looking at it until we see
whether
its economically feasible to do it, said CN president
Ron Lawless shortly after
CN announced it would remove the
waterfront tracks.
Now, only train cars of a certain clearance can use the
tunnel, which prevents enclosed auto carriers from using it.
Preliminary costs
of enlarging the tunnel have been set at
more than $22 million.
Lawless also noted
in the Montreal interview that free trade
should be good for
Windsor.
We think the automobile business is very good for us. Its a
major border crossing for us.
Ive said … that with the free trade
initiatives under way .
.. we are very well positioned as a
national railway
that owns several railways in the United States
to take full advantage
of any business that will be generated, he
said.
CN owns Grand Trunk Western, which is headquartered in
Detroit and serves
Ohio, Illinois and Michigan. It reaches right
into the heartland
of the United States, which CN is obviously
counting
on to expand its business.
CN also owns the Central Vermont in New England, the
Duluth, Winnipeg and Pacific that enters the western United
States from
Canada near Duluth. Theyre well positioned.
And just a few years ago it bought the Detroit, Toledo and
Irontown Railroad that runs back into Cincinnati.
Lawless said
Windsor-Detroit has the highest number of
train crossings and possibly the highest volume of material and
can see the importance
of the Windsor operation continuing to
grow.
Its a major railway centre and I can see it growing. Thats
why we put our money into the Vande Water yard.
CN took over the Vande Water yard in west Windsor after it
and
CP bought Canada Southern Railway.
CNs Matthews said CN has taken the stand that it shouldnt
have to maintain inefficient lines.
Our purpose is to operate as efficiently and economically as
we can.
Our customers have to compete in a stiff market and
they dont have to pay exorbitant rate. We have to keep reducing
our costs so our transportation costs are as low as possible, he
said.
ESSEX TERMINAL RAILVVAY
0 BeMer Localily In CanaDa
fOR
MANUFACTURING
Convenient sites or any
size available
GENERAL OFFICES-1601 LINCOLN ROAD, WALKERVillE, ONTARIO.
D. PRTRRKIN, Jr .. President. Chicago, In. C. J. CLARK Secretary, Windsor, Ont.
K. Wl!:ATHRRFORD, Vice-President, »F ADAMS, -traffic Representative
R G. LANCASTER, Vice-President, Windsor, Ont. and Assist.l.nt Secret~ry. Walkerville. ODt. M.
A. ELDER, Vice ,President, »G. G. DAWSON, Accounting Manager, •
L. M. MellRIDR, Vice·Prest. &Assl.Secy, Chicago, III. C]. CLARK, Soiocitor, Wind,or,ODt.
W. HASl.ER, ~ice-Pre~idcnt and Treasurer, W, A. B£~~RTTE, S,l1pc;J Maintenance of
~. GIBSON, V,ce Pruldent, ,,~ nnd Rolling !)tock, Valkerville, OnL
OPSRATED FOR FR~IGHT ONLY
Connecting with Canadian National Kys., Norfolk and Western Ky.,
Chesapeake and Ohio Ry., Canadian Pacific Ky., Penn Central.
MILEAGE 1 C~n.dl.n National Junction to Qu.rrles ………………. 19 m!!.
WIndsor F.ctory Br.nch …………….. , ………. , …….. 2
Mny, SG8. Total MII •• ge ……. , …… , .. , .. , ………. , …….. ~1 mil ..
In an attempt to compete with the trucking industry, the
railways are being forced to look more to carrying containers and
truck trailers, both
of which can be easily linked with trucks for
fmal delivery.
John Cox, a
CP spokesman, said it used to be that rail had the
advantage if the delivery point was
500 miles or more and but
now its about 1,
200 miles.

It getting to the point where trucks almost have advantage
between Toronto and Winnipeg,
Cox said.
Essex Terminal
Beats the Odds
Its the little railway that could.
Thriving
in the midst of railway giants is one of Canadas
longest serving and most successful small railways, the Essex
Terminal Railway
(ETR).
At a time when the big guys are feeling the crunch from
trucking,
ETR keeps chugging along on its 40 km of mainline
track.
Weve never had a nickel from Ottawa, company
president Murray Elder likes to tell visitors.
With railways
in the U. S. closing down unprofitable
inefficient lines, small companies are stepping in to
fill the gap
with non-unionized staff.
ETR was incorporated under special act of Parliament in
1902 by officials of the Canadian bridge company and got
started laying its first bit
of track six years later.
In November 1964, Morton Industries of Canada Ltd. (now
Canadian
Salt
Co. Ltd.) bought E TR and just five years ago it
was resold to a group
of local businessmen who have continued
to modernize the operation.
23
ETR, which has 100 employees who belong to six different
unions, has been successful by being an efficient gopher for the
big guys. It has direct connection with
CN, CP, CSX (formerly
C&O) ConRail and indirectly with with GTW (Grand Trunk
Western) DT &1 (Detroit, Toledo & Irontown) and Norfolk and
Western.
The railway runs in a southwesterly direction from the CN
tracks in east Windsor, through Walkerville, Windsor, Sandwich
and Ojibway to Amherstburg.
ETR now maintains more than 84 km of track, including
lines into about
20 major businesses such as General Chemical,
Ford Motors
of Canada Ltd., General Motors of Canada Inc.,
and
Seagrams.
ETR spends its days transferring cars from one railway to
another and hauling bulk commodities from places like
General
Chemical to the major railways.
I think what we offer is a required
service, Elder said. It
is a valuable service to the industrial makeup of this area. Its an
essential service
.
The little railway with its four locomotives and a handful of
cars brings in about $7 million annually from many sources,
including land rental, and construction and repair contracts.
It is a profitable little railway run essentially by poeple from
Windsor and we are trying
to keep it that way.
Just recently, ETR gave some thought to getting into the big
time.
Although unsuccessful, it made a bid
for the B.C. Hydro
Railway with its 120 km of track running from New Westminster
to Chilliwack, along the U. S. Border.
ITEL, a railway car
conglomerate, outbid ETR by five to seven million dollars with a
whopping offer
of $29.2 million.
But that
doesnt mean the little railway has given up.
Were always looking for a deal, Elder said.
Sources:
Windsor Star, Nov. 12/88.
One o/Canadas overlooked railways is the Essex Terminal. General Motors Diesel delivered one SW 1200 to that railway. In
1983, Unit
105 was photographed while switching cars in Windsor.
Photo Credit: Douglas
N. W. Smith
24
.
By November 1990, CN will cease to use its trackage along the Windsor waterfront. In this 1983 view, locomotives ofCN, VIA
and Norfolk
& Western Railway congregate alongside the CN roundhouse. When the N& W took over the Wabash Railroad, it
inherited the Wabashs trackage rights over CNs line from Windsor to Niagara Falls.
Photo Credit: Douglas N. W. Smith
MONTREAL & SOUTHERN COUNTIES SPARED
On December 1 , 1988, the National Transportation Agency
(the Agency) denied
CNs application to abandon the 35 miles
of line between Chambly and Granby, Quebec. This line
achieved its greatest fame as
part of the electrified Montreal &
Southern Counties
(M&SC) between Montreal and Granby.
The first portion of the line was constructed by the Montreal,
Chambly & Sorel Railway. Incorporated
in 1871, it completed a
line from St. Lambert to Chambly in September 1873.
Four
years later, an extension was completed from Chambly through
to
Farnham via Marieville and Ste. Angele. In November 1882,
the line was extended
from Marieville to St. Cesaire.
In 1875, the company was renamed the Montreal, Portland
& Boston Railway
(MB&P). The MP&B was leased to the
South Eastern Railway
in 1878. The South Eastern Railway
(SER) main line extended from Farnham to Newport, Vermont
where it made connections with the New England railroad
system. Even though
it was necessary to ferry freight and
passengers across the St. Lawrence, the
MP&B provided the
SER with access to Montreal. This broke the twenty five year
hold that the Grand Trunk had maintained on traffic moving
between Montreal and the east coast.
CP leased the South
Eastern
in 1883 in order to access the ice free harbours on the
Atlantic coast. Following the completion
of its own line from
Montreal to Farnham which included a new bridge across the St.
Lawrence River at Lachine,
CP terminated the lease of the
MP&B in 1891. The Central Vermont Railway (CV) imme­
diately leased the property. In 1896, the assests
of the MP &B
were vested
in the Montreal & Province Line Railway (M &PL).
In 1897, the Montreal & Southern Counties was incorporated
to build an electric railway from Montreal to Sherbrooke.
Lacking financial resources, little was accomplished during the
M&SCs first decade. In March 1906, the Grand Trunk
acquired control of the M&SC. On November 1, 1909, the
M &SC inaugurated service between Montreal and St. Lambert.
Shortly thereafter, the M &SC concluded a trackage rights
agreement with the
CV to extend its electrification over a portion
of the M&PL. The M&SC reached Richelieu in June 1913,
Marieville
in September 1913, and St. Cesaire in May 1914.
New trackage was laid from St. Cesaire to Granby. Interurban
service started to Abbottsford on December
18, 1915 and to
Granby on April 30, 1916.
On November 1, 1923, the CV leased the trackage used by
the
M&SC to it with the remainder being leased to CN. The
M&SC was never a money maker but endured for over forty
years.
On November 24, 1951, CN cut back the electrification
from
Granby to Marieville and on October 13, 1956 closed
down the remainder
of the electrification. Regular diesel
powered passenger service continued until May 1961 .
The Agency determined that the line was operating at a loss.
Traffic declined from 592 carloads in 1984 to 405 in 1987.
Two
firms indicated that they would be substantially increasing their
shipments.
SA VACO Quebec Corporation ships currently
metal billets for milling. The company indicated it could
increase its carloadings
at its Marieville plant from 35 to
upwards
of 2,000 if CN would increase the freight service from
two to four trains per week and trial tests
of moving coiled steel
to the plan by rail prove successful. Papier Rouville
Inc.
indicated it would be substantially increasing its shipments.
The Agency determined that while the line is currently
uneconomic, future traffic possibilities could make the line
economic.
It ru led that CN must maintain the line for a two year
period, file regular reports of marketing efforts, and increase the
frequency
of service to meet the needs of shippers, particulary
the traffic expected
by SAVACO.
25
An inlen/rban lrain passes lhrough lhe rock cui near AbbolsJord Que. on August 4, 1951.
CRHA Archives. Toohey Collection. Photo 51-627.
Steam and eleclric meet al Granby station on August
4, 1951.
CRHA Archives. Tooh
ey Collection. PhOlo 51-634.
26
CP LINE CLEARED FOR OPENING
On December 5, 1988, the Agency issued an order
authorizing
CP to open for the carriage of traffic the second main
line track from mileage 68.10 to 89.75 and sidings between
mileage 88.6 and
90.2 of the Mountain Subdivision in British
Columbia.
With this order,
CP may now start to route traffic through its
new Mount
MacDonald and Mount Shaughnessy Tunnels at
Rogers Pass. Over 8 miles
in length, the Mount MacDonald
Tunnel
is the longest railway tunnel in North America. This
$600 million project effectively provides CP with a 28 mile
double track main line through what had been one
of its most
difficult operating regions.
The new line reduces the ruling grade
through the pass from
2.4% to 1 % thereby eliminating the need
to use pusher locomotives on westbound trains and increasing
the capacity
of the main line. The October 20, 1988 Employees
Operating Timetable 83 included a schematic map
of the new
trackage which
is reproduced in this issue.
The Association wishes to extend its congratulations to
CP
on this historic occasion as it nears the end of the single largest
capital project undertaken by the company since the completion
of its transcontinental line in 1885.
SHORT TURNS
On December 1, 1988, the Agency approved CNs
application to abandon the 14.2 mile West Shefford Spur
between Granby and
Farnham. Handling a total of 41 carloads
in 1986 all destined to or from Farnham, the Agency
determin~d that the spur was uneconomic. Alternate rail service
is available to shippers in F arnbam via CP. A detailed history of
this line may be found in the September-October 1988 issue of
Canadian Rail.
The
CN application to abandon the 0.8 mile line between Val
Royal and Cartierville,
Quebec was approved by the Agency on
November 30, 1988.
The line was built in 1920 under a charter
held by the Canadian
Northern Ontario Railway. The trackage
was electrified and passenger service was provided over the line
as
part of CNs commuter service through the Mont Royal
tunnel.
In April 1976, the frequency of service was cut back
from hourly throughout the day with additional service at rush
hours to only six rush hour trains and one train on Saturdays and
Sundays. All service was discontinued
in the early 1980s. The
abandonment was unopposed.
CP received permission on December 1, 1988 to abandon
the 6 mile Chemical Spur from Mile 85.9 on the Willingdon
Subdivision near Two Hills to a point near Duvernay, Alberta.
The line was constructed
in 1954 to service Western Chemical
Limited plant. After several changes
of ownership, the plant was
closed
in 1980. No shippers have used the line since that time. While annual losses averaged approximately
$21,000 per
annum,
CP estimates that it would cost upwards of$800,000 to
return the line to a serviceable condition. Based upon inter­
ventions
by the provincial and municipal governments and local
firms, the Agency extended the abandonment
date from its usual
thirty day period to one year
in order to allow sufficient time for
industrial development to occur which would utilize rail service.
Should such traffic be forthcoming,
CP would reconsider the
need to abandon the line.
On October 11 , 1988, the Agency revised the abandonment
date for the remaining 24 miles
of the Colony Subdivision
between Rockglen and Killdeer, Saskatchewan.
The line was to
have been abandoned December 31, 1988
or whenever the
Saskatchewan
Wheat Pool elevator at Killdeer was closed,
which ever came first.
An extension was requested by various
parties, including the federal and provincial ministers
of
transport to assess the results of a road impact study undertaken
jointly by the two governments. The revised abandonment date
is August 31, 1989.
On November 9, 1988, the Agency gave GO transit
permission to open its new line between Pickering and Whitby.
A
full account of the opening of this line is contained in another
article
in this issue.
An excursion train run by the CRHA at Cartierville on October
20, 1968.
Photo by Fred Angus.
TIME TABLE No. 83, OCTOBER 30, 1988
i
MOUNTAIN SUBDIVISION
ROGERS TO FLAT CREEK
SCHEMATIC TRACKAGE LAYOUT
MILE 66.2 BEGIN NORTH TRACK MILE
66.2 BEGIN SOUTH TRACK
FRAINE
MILE 68.3 END NORTH TRACK MILE 66.3 END SOUTH TRACK BEGIN CONNAUGHT TRACK
GRIFFITH
MILE 71.7C
STONEY CREEK
MILE 77.7C
MACDONALD
MILE 84.7M
MOUNT MACDONALD TUNNEL
MILE 89.9M END MACDONALD TRACK
BEGIN NORTH TRACK
ROSS PEAK
w

MILE 94.2 END NORTH TRACK
H.B.
D. MILE 95.1 1
BEGIN MACDONALD TRACK
H.
B.D. MILE 70.9M
WAKELY
MILE 7S.0M
MOUNT SHAUGHNESSY TUNNEL
BEAR CREEK
MILE 79.3M
LEGEND
TUNNELS
__ HOT BOX DETECTORS
GLACIER
MILE 8S.SC
DEFECTIVE CAR SET· OFF SITES
MILE 89.9C END CONNAUGHT TRACK
BEGIN SOUTH TRACK
FLAT CREEK
MILE 94.2 END SOUTH TRACK
27
61
28
Lords of the Line
By David Cruise and Alison Griffiths
Published by
Penguin Books
2801 John Street
Markham, Ontario
L3R IB4
Price: $25.00
Reviewed by Fred Angus
Once again we note the pUblication
of a new book dealing
with the history
of the Canadian Pacific Railway. But, as with
other recent books, this one
is different again and does not
duplicate the other works. Lords
of the Line is not a book about
the
CPR per se, but rather about six remarkable men who directed the course
of this vast enterprise over a period of almost
a century, it is,
in effect, six biographies rolled into one, anyone
of which would have been the subject of a book of its own (or, for
that matter, a
TV mini series). Here we read of the lives of:
George Stephen, William C. Van Horne, Thomas G.
Shaughnessy, Edward W. Beatty, Norris R.
Crump, Ian D.
Sinclair. All these men had one thing in common, each, in tum
held the position
of President of the Canadian Pacific Railway
Company, now Canadian Pacific Limited, and their combined
tenure totaled seventy -six
of the companys 108 year existance.
The reader of LORDS OF THE LINE will very quickly
realize that, unlike many biographies, this
is a warts and all
story. It tells not only of successes but also failures, popular
decisions and unpopular ones. We are taken behind the scenes,
past the well known historical facts into the world
of intrigue,
secrecy and politics that has always been so much a
part of the
world
of large corporations but is so seldom seen by the public of
the time. Although many of the events recounted took place
more than a century ago, each relates to the later happenings and
helps to explain the growth
ofCP up to the present day. We are
also taken,
in many instances, into the personal lives of these
history makers. Here there
is still speculation and even
controversy, for it
is very difficult to fathom the thoughts and
actions
of historical characters.
The book divides itself, quite neatly, into two portions which
correspond almost exactly to the nineteenth and twentieth
centuries.
Each part is precicely half the book (226 and 231
pages), the first covering the presidencies of Stephen (1881-
1888)
and Van Home (1888-1899), while the second deals with
the period
of Shaughnessy (1899-1918), Beatty (1918-1942),
Crump (1955-1964), Sinclair (1966-1972). Lest one think that
the intervening years
of 1942-1955 and 1972-1988 are left out,
we hasten to say that this period
is well covered as well.
In the first half
of the book we deal with the formation of the
company, the construction
of the railway and the growth of the
enterprise into a world-wide transportation system.
It is the era
of dynamic actions, but also of intrigue, speculation and
doublecross.
Most revealing is the story of how George
Stephen, having given up the presidency in
1888, did not simply
retire into seclusion
in England as is commonly believed. No, he
became an ally
of James 1. Hill, the Empire Builder of the
Great Northern and one-time member of the CPR Syndicate
but later the arch rival
of the company. The behind -the scenes
intrigues
of Stephen and Hill appear to have been, at least
partially, responsible for Van
Homes resignation, in 1899,
from the presidency of the company at the comparatively young
age
of 56. Weare left to speculate as to what might have
happened if
VanHorne had got his way and the CPR had
retained control
of the Duluth and Winnipeg Railroad in
1897.
As we enter the second half of the book, the twentieth
century, we see the
CPR as a huge corporation entering into its
most prosperous years, the time between
1900 and 1914. We do
not lose sight
of the heroes of the first part, however, for we
continue to follow the fortunes
of Van Home as he goes to Cuba
and, against many odds, builds the railway in that country which
had just been freed from almost four centuries
of Spanish rule.
However the main thrust
of the book is the CPR, and we follow
the presidency of Shaughnessy, who was well established in his
career before 1900, and then see the rise to power and the
presidency
of Edward Beatty who held the position longer than
anyone else.
By the 1950s the
CPR, though still Canadas largest
corporation, was
in serious condition, described as a decrepit
hulk once again
on the brink of failure . Its great days appeared
to
be in the past, and its operations were inefficient by modem
standards.
It was at this time that there rose to power the fifth
lord
of the line Norris R. (Buck) Crump. In the Crump era the
company was turned around and transformed from a railway
company to the diversified many -faceted corporation it
is today.
Old ideas and traditions were swept aside, diesel locomotives
replaced less-efficient steam and, despite
Crumps original
advocacy
ofthe transcontinental train the Canadian, which
he later admitted came too late, the passenger service was much
downgraded. Crump was soon followed
by Ian Sinclair who
continued the transformation, first as President, later,
in
defiance of former tradition, as Chairman. While the events of
the Sinclair era are too recent to put into the same perspective as
those of, for example, the Van Horne years, we get a good
picture
of the transformation of the company into the Canadian
Pacific Limited
of today.
Of course the book deals also with contemporaries and
associates
of the main characters. We read much about well
known persons like Donald Smith (later Lord Strathcona),
Major Rogers, Sir John
A. Macdonald, James J. Hill. However
we also learn much about lesser known, but equally deserving,
members
of the CPR team over the years. For example, in the
early years, we read
of Richard B. Angus (a former banker and
member
of the original CPR syndicate, after whom the Angus
shops were named) who worked tirelessy, often behind the
scenes, and was frequently the mediator
of disagreements
between Stephen and
VanHorne. In later years we hear of the
lesser known presidents, D.
C. Coleman, W.M. Neal and
W.A. Mather.
Railways
enthusiasts will notice some curious omissions and
contridictions in this book. In two places (pages 106 and 378)
the Big
Hill, in the Kicking Horse Pass through the Rockies,
is placed in the Selkirks. Also, it is difficult to understand why no
mention
is made of the Short Line through northern Maine to
Saint John New Brunswick which, completed
in 1889, was the
last major link
in Van Hornes plan of a truly transcontinental
railway from ocean to ocean. Some other inconsistancies appear
from time to time, but these two examples will suffice.
LORDS OF THE LINE shows once again that Canadian
railway and corporate history
is not dull if properly told.
Certainly it
is on a par with the intrigues of the great American
railroad financiers
of the last century. While much of the
information
in this book has indeed been published elsewhere,
this brings it together with many previously unpublished facts.
It
is a book that should be read from cover to cover.
29
F.K. ROBERTS
A COMPENDIUM OF RAILWAY CONSTRUCTION
(Part I -Taranaki)
THREE PRESERVED NZR STEAM LOCOMOTIVES
These two books are very interesting works on railways of
New Zealand. The former costs $12 NZ (about $8.75 CAN)
while the latter is $9.60 NZ(about$7.00 CAN). They may be
obtained from:
The New Zealand Railway and Locomotive Society
P.O. Box 5134
Wellington, New Zealand
30
CRHA ComDlunications
POSTAGE -CANADIAN RAIL
For ten years, CANADIAN RAIL has been mailed under provisions of a BOOK RATE, by which the Federal Department
of Communications subsidized CAN ADA POST for carrying a Canadian publication of our interest and quality at lower-than­
first-class rates.
Without prior notice, the
BOOK RATE, as of January 1st., 1989, does not apply to periodicals. The Department of
Communications has introduced a new preferred second class rate under the Departments PUBLICATIONS
DISTRIBUTION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM which appears to apply to news publications -such as TIME magazine.
However, under the numerous and complicated regulations which
CANADA POST, as the administrator of the Program, has
applied to
CANADIAN RAIL, a quality CANADIAN journal edited and published by CANADIANS in the interest of
CANADIAN RAILWAY HISTORY, our journal has been refused use ofthe subsidized postal rates. Even our efforts to obtain
a copy
of the new Program have come to nothing.
The former
BOOK RATE of47 ¢ per issue to Canadian members has given place to a First Class rate of$1.14. We calculate
that this increase will costC$5,OOO additional postage for our 1989 issues. Our budget
for 1989, prepared in July, was based on a
nominal increase to the
BOOK RATE.
We urge all Canadian members to write to their Member of Parliament, and demand an explanation of the apparent bias of the
Assistance Program, or the regulations applied
by CANADA POST against CANADIAN RAIL.
TIME MAGAZINE -YES
CAN ADIAN RAIL -NO
WHY?
BACK ISSUES -CANADIAN RAIL
Due to the huge increase in the cost of mailing CAN ADIAN
RAIL which became effective on January 1 st., 1989, we are
forced to announce the following increases
in the Postpaid prices
for back issues, effective immediately:
Small issues –
C$2.25
Large issues -C$4.75
Please address your orders to:
Back Issues, Canadian Rail
P.O. Box 148
St. Constant, Quebec, Canada
J5A 2G2
Steve Walbridge, Treasurer
Fred Angus, Editor
SESQUICENTENNIAL BOOK
Quite a number of members have, when paying their 1989
dues, ordered a copy
of the 1836 -1986 book on the
Champlain and St. Lawrence Rail Road.
We note that some of
them had bought the book last year. If you have ordered the book
both years and do not want a second copy please let
us know. If
you wish we will refund your money or, alternatively, if you
want, this could be considered as a donation to the Association.
Please let
us know what you would like.
BROCKVILLES RAILWAY HISTORY COMES TO
LIFE, AS
THE BROCK VILLE MUSEUM PLANS
EXHIBITS
Imagine yourself in Brockville during the 1860s. You stand
watching steam ships float by on the St. Lawrence River, while
behind you a steam engine chugs through the first-built railway
tunnel
in Canada. You think to yourself, of how much progress
has been made with the coming
of the railway, and what will the
future hold. You
cant help wondering if, in the years to come,
trains will still be passing through that tunnel,
or if anyone will
care about your
job on the railway.
Well, today
in 1988, a group of people are showing that they
do care.
The Brockville Museum is preserving the Citys
railway heritage by developing an exhibit of cases and panels,
inside the Brockville tunnel, which
hasnt been used by the
railway since 1954.
Next to the tunnel in Armagh S. Price Park,
rests a 1954 CP caboose, which marks an endpoint in
Brockvilles railway history. The museum has already painted
the exterior
of the caboose (van), with the original paint colour
and
CP logo. Work is now being done to accurately restore the
interior, and to display a small exhibit
in one end of caboose.
The caboose will then act as a vistor center for tourists during
the summer months.
It is hoped that the exhibits in the tunnel
and in the caboose will enable people
to understand the
importance
of the railway in Brockville, and of the railroaders
who worked on the trains.
The Brockville Museum needs your help
in re-creating this
railway
past for future generations to see and understand. The
purpose of this article, is to appeal to readers of Canadian Rail
for information, pictures, or artifacts which could be donated or
loaned for reproduction,
for use in these two exhibits. Specifically,
the museum
is looking for:
1) a
General Steel Ware Stove # 31 from the eastern
region,
2)
CPR lanterns, marker lamps, tools, flares, interior van
photos,
railroader
clothing or dishes, regulation manuals,
and other caboose accessories from 1954, and
3) pictures or archival material pertaining to: The Brockville
and Ottawa Railway. The Brockville and
Westport
Railway, The Grand Trunk Railway, The Canada
Central Railway, or The Canadian Pacific Railway,
which could be used
in an exhibit on the history of rail
transportation
in Brockville.
Exhibit installation for the caboose should be complete
in
April, 1989. Thus, immediate help or inquires from your
readers, during what
is now the planning process, would be
greatly appreciated.
Please contact:
Jan S. Homewood (Director)
Brockville Museum
5 Henry St., Brockvil1e, Ontario.
K6V 6M4
Phone: (613) 342-4397
Those in Ottawa may contact: Janett Brummel at 234-9549
or Lana Shaw at 829-6756.
31
NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
The Annual General Meeting of the C. R. H. A. will be held
at Vanier College, 821 Ste-Croix boulevard, St. Laurent
(Metro
Du College) on Wednesday, April 26th, 1989, starting
at 7:30
P.M. All regular members are urged to attend.
PROCEDURE FOR NOMINATING 1989 DIRECTORS
At the Annual General Meeting, a board of directors will be
elected
for the year 1989. The nominating committee, set up by
the Board, will prepare a slate of candidates for the 1989 Board.
Any
REG ULAR member in good standing who is a Canadian
citizen may be nominated
in addition to the above slate. All such
additional nominations, to be valid, must be made,
in writing, by
a regular member, seconded
in writing by another regular
member, and must contain the written consent
of the candidate
to serve if elected. The nomination must be received by:
Bernard Martin, secretary, 8 Plateau Beaujeu,
Repentigny, Quebec
J6A 3S9
before midnight on March 31st 1989. Please note that it will not
be possible to make nominations from the floor at the Annual
General Meeting.
By Order
of the Board, December 1st, 1988.
AVIS DASSEMBLEE GENERALE ANNUELLE
LAssemblee Generale Annuelle de IA.C.H.F. aura lieu
au campus du College Vanier, 821 boulevard Ste-Croix, Ville
St-Laurent (Metro
Du College), mercredi, Ie 26 avril 1989 a
19: 30 heures. Tous les membres reguliers sont pries d etre
presents .
PROCEDURE POUR LA MISE EN NOMINATION
DES ADMINISTRATEURS POUR 1989
A I Assemblee Generale Annuelle, un executif sera elu pour
Iannee 1989. Un comite de mise en candidature soumettera une
liste de 12 candidats. Tout membre
REGULIER en regie
(1989) de citoyennete Canadienne, peut poser
sa candidature,
en plus de la liste soumise. Pour que la candidature soit valide,
elle doit Hre soumise par ecrit
par un proposeur et un secondeur,
tous deux membres reguliers, et do it contenir I assentiment du
candid at de remplir
la fonction si elu. Les mises en candidatures
doivent parvenir
au secretaire avant minuit Ie 31 mars 1989:
Bernard Martin, 8 Plateau Beaujeu,
Repentigny, Quebec
J6A 3S9
Aucune mise en candidature ne sera permise a IAssemblee
Generale Annuelle.
Par Ordre du Conseil, Ce l
er
decembre 1988.
32
Robert Turner (right) receives the award from PCD President Doug
Bal/rum
in Vancouver on December 14, 1988.
Photo by Norris Adams.
THE 1988 CANADIAN RAILROAD HISTORICAL
ASSOCIATION
ANNUAL AWARDS.
Your nominations in one or more of the awards categories are
respectfully solicited
by the Awards Committee. All pertinent
information for submissions are outlined on page 219
of the
November/December 1988 issue of Canadian Rail. Your
participation
is crucial if the program is to be successful.
As you know, the purpose
of the awards is to honour and
encourage those persons who,
by their active involvement in
railway activity whether
it be in writing, researching, recording,
or manual reconstructive work, have contributed to the
preservation
of railway history in Canada. Those persons
deserve to be honoured for doing all of these things and are doing
the things which,
in fact, is what our Association is all
about.
The comments of the winners of the 1987 awards indicate
that the program
is indeed an incentive to continue their good
work.
Mr. Robert Turner, author ofWest of the Great Divide
says in part -I do appreciate the efforts of CRHA to establish
an awards programme.
It is very nice indeed to have ones work
recognized but I think that programmes such as this one also will
encourage more people to become active
in writing, the
preservation
of structures and equipment and other aspects of
Canadian railway history. Dr. Fritz Leh!TIann, for his article
A thorough Man of Business states -What a del ightful
surprise!
Its a nice idea of CRHA to give some recognition for
this kind
of work, and I am very flattered to be in such truly
illustrious company as Orner Lavallee and Robert
Turner.
Many good books and articles were written and preservation
activities took place throughout the country
in 1988. A review of
the award categories will certainly bring to mind someone who
deserves your nomination. By so doing you will honour a fellow
railroader-ferroquinologist -as well as perpetuate the CRHA
Annual Awards.
Dr. David Johnson (left), President of the CRHA, presents the
award
to Doug Smith in Montreal on November 14, 1988.
Photo by Walter Bedbrook.
Dr. Fritz Lehmann (left) and PCD Director Ron
Meyer hold Dr.
Le
hmanns award.
Photo by Norris
Adams.
.-
l..1 .,:,
KINGSTON DIVISION
Without a railway museum or railway structures or rolling
stock to restore, the activities
of the Kingston Division of
CRHA may seem very modest when compared to that of other
Divisions. They are however quite interesting.
At the end of
1988 the Division has 42 members, with the membership likely
to grow in 1989.
The Division holds its meetings on the second
Wednesday
of each month (including Summer) at 2000 hours,
in Room S243 of Saint Lawrence College (comer King Street
and Portsmouth Avenue
in Kingston). Members and non­
members are always welcome. A typical meeting has a business
part followed by an entertainment part which consists of a
presentation
by a member of a movie, video or slide show on a
railroad topic. Speakers are also invited from time to time.
The
May meeting is especially popular as an auction of railroad
artifacts
is held for the benefit of the Division.
At least two field trips a year are organized, usually held on
the last Saturday
of April and of September. In 1988, the trip
was replaced by the participation
of several members in the
special excursion
of ex-CPR 1201 around Ottawa. The
September trip, held on the 24th, had the members tour the yard
and engine/car facilities
ofCP Rail at Cote Saint-Luc, Quebec.
This was followed by a stop at Dorval to see
CPR 1201 return to
Ottawa on another
of its several outings.
The Division also tackled some projects, and one of these
saw its successful completion last
Fall, as the City of Kingston
had
old Spirit of Sir John A. fully refurbished. Of course, the
Spirit is none other than Canadian Pacific Ten-Wheeler
1095, displayed in Confederation Park in Kingston since 1967.
During the last four years, the Division has offered its good
services to the City for the restoration
of the old gal which was
deteriorating seriously, but the City preferred to handle this
itself. Another on-going project
is the installation of Commodore
Plomers O-scale layout which was donated to the
CRHA. A
long search has finally found a suitable room and a small team
of
modellers is now ready to go at work to form a club layout.
Several members
of the Kingston Division are interested in
preserving some railway equipment, notably Canadian Loco­
motive Company -built locomotives (in particular, the Canadian
Pacific
C-Liner and H-Liner preserved at Ste-Foy,
Que.). Meanwhile, it was voted to offer to the Canadian
Railway Museum
atDelson to adopt the Trainmaster (ex­
CPR H24-66 -# 8905), and take the responsibility of its
maintenance in the future.
The Kingston Division is also a full
partner of the Rideau Valley Heritage Railway Association
devoted to the foundation
of a tourist railway (and museum)
between Kingston and Smiths Falls.
Among other accomplishments, the Division was donated
an
authentic Notman photograph of Lake Louise, taken in 1887, by
Air Vice Marshall (ret.) Max Martyn. The framed photograph
will be used
as the Divisions Annual Achievement Award, with
the winner allowed to display it
at his or her home during the
year. Finally,
The Divisions publication, Kingston Rail
certainly deserves recognition. It is issued 6 times a year thanks
to the work of Deryk Sparks who followed Hugues Bonin as
Editor.
Hugues W. Bonin
Secretary
33
ST. LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
On December IS, 1988 VIA Rail resumed through service
between Montreal and Quebec City via Trois Rivieres following
the rebuilding
of the CP Rail bridge which had been destroyed by
ice in the spring of 1987. To commemorate this, the Division
organized a group to
go to Quebec on the train on Saturday
December
17. Unfortunately operating difficulties prevented
the train from going all the way; however the Division hopes to
repeat the trip under more favourable conditions later this
year.
These three photos show two
of the first through trains. The
top view
is the very first through train, seen at Portal Heights on
the morning
of December 15. The other two, at Town of Mount
Royal on
December 17, depict the train on which our group
travelled. Two electric locomotives (6713 and 6715) seem
ample power for one Budd car
(6225).
All three photos by Fred Angus.
34
CORRECTIONS
The following errors appeared on pages 214 and 215 of issue
407.
First, the photo caption on page 214 stated Conrail elected
not to take over the Penn Central trackage across southern
Ontario. Page 215, first paragraph 1 contains the statement
that the C
&0 line became redundant when C &0 acquired
trackage rights from
CN over the former Conrail mainline
between Windsor and St.
Thomas. Perhaps less informed
readers would like to
knoW which is right?
Secondly, the Business
Car contains an error-filled article on
Amtrak written
by an obviously misinformed non-rail enthusiast
source.
The article begins on page 221. From beginning to end:
-Amtrak did not condemn the Guilford Connecticut River
line for
$2.37 million dollars. Amtrak can no more
condemn track than VIA can. Amtrak
can, however,
decide not to run on a given piece
of track. Hence, the
Montrealer was discontinued April
6th, 1987, because
track conditions necessitated a speed
of 10 mph for most
of the line from Springfield, Mass. to Windsor, Vermont.

The line is now the property of the Central Vermont
Railway, who had previously held trackage rights over the
line from Windsor, Vermont to
East Northfield, Mass.
Amtrak paid for the track rehabilitation.

The track from New Haven, Connecticut to Springfield,
Mass. is owned by Amtrak, not Conrail.

No final decision has been reached as to reroute the train,
as stated, from Springfield,
Mass. to Palmer, Mass. on
Conrails Boston & Albany Division, then up the CV to
East Northfield (not a new route , but the one used in the
weeks before the discontinuance), or to travel the proper
route directly from Springfield,
Mass. to East Northfield,
Mass. along the Connecticut River.
-Track geometry test done November 29th show that the
rebuilt portion
is now good for 59 mph, reducing travel
time between
East Northfield and White River Jct to
about 1
~ hours. It may be decided that the slow portion
from Springfield to
East Northfield can be absorbed by
the time savings over the rebuilt track.
John Godfrey
TRANSFERS WANTED
Jacques Pharand, author of the article on Montreal transfers
(Canadian Rail #
403) is looking for items to complete gaps in
his collection. He is willing to buy or trade for items from all
other North-American systems
or other memorabilia of
Montreal Tramways vintage. You can send descriptive listings
or items outright. All queries will be answered.
He can be
contacted at (514) 283-4855 / 288-6165 or
at the following
address:
1100
St-Urbain St. Apt. 606, Montreal, QC H2Z 1 W 1.
ADDENDUM TO 7700 ARTICLE:
With regard to the article on CN 7700 in the April-May
issue of Canadian Rail, Ray Corley sends the following
revisions and additions:
As originally planned, the unit was to have been rated
at
42%, this being the tractive effort at 30% adhesion. This was
based upon the old way
of rating starting tractive effort on a
diesel electric locomotives. By June
1930, however, it was
agreed to rate it
at 36%. This was the starting tractive effort
at 25 % adhesion which was the same basis
of measurement
as used for steam locomotives. In 1946,
all CN units were re­
rated on the basis of continuous tractive effort. At this time
the rating for
7700 was changed to 15%, this being slightly
higher than its advertised rating. Thus the re-engining
of the
unit
in 1953 had nothing to do with the change in tractive
rating. As
part of the new system of locomotive classification
introduced by
CN in September 1954, the unit was re­
classified as
LS-4a.
ASSISTANCE WANTED
I am employee of the German Federal Railways. Since about
15 years I collect lamps and lanterns from our German and from
other railway companies here
in Europe and overseas. Your
address I got from a book for railway museums.
From Canadian Railways I have till now only one modern
battery hand lamp
in my collection (please look photo).
I want to enlarge my collection, if possible, and
Id be
pleased, if you could help me.
Are you able to send to me
lanterns,
or could you pass my letter to the administrations of the
great Canadian railway associations. I think, there might be in
Canada also rail fans, interested in an exchange.
Martin Stoklossa
Weiherstrasse
13
D-8851 Oberndorf
West Germany
c. R. H. A.
CONFERENCE 89
TORONTO -MAY 19 TO 2[ -[989
January 3, 1989
TO ALL MEMBERS
The Toronto & York Division is pleased to announce that the
CR
HA Annual Conference is being held in Toronto on Victoria
Day weekend-May 19 to 21,1989.
Why not plan to visit our great city [or this event? Toronto
offers you one of the (illcst transit systems in the world. having a
subway system, light rail transit operations, and a wide aricty
of buses and streetcars. As for railways -you can watch
ccrything from the Ontario Northland NORTH LANDER .
VIA LRCs. the CANADIAN, and lots in between.
Planned events include –
I. Railway facility tour
2. RaiiwRY museum lOur (Rockwood)
3. Presentations-Archival Maintenance & Management
Port Stanley Terminal Rail From Dream To Reality.
4. Banquet with guest speaker
5. Divi~jonal Busine~s Meeting
TORONTO
MODEL RAILWAY SHOW
MARCH 18 & 19 1989
SATURDAY
11:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
SUNDAY
11:00 a.m. 10 6:00 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL CENTRE
6900 AtRPORT ROAD MtSStSSAUGA. ONTARIO
ADMISSION:
ADULTS $6.00
SENIORS $4.00
CHILDREN 6-13 $3.00
5 & UNDER FREE
~~ ~~
35
Other possihle activities _ Riding the GO commuter trains,
and a railway photo tour of Toronto.
~~ 60.000 sq. Fee/ of ~.hiblls, feofurlll!:.. :e-4:
~ • OpeN/ling l.oyrll/fI • Mod~1 Roilwoy Clubs ~..o_
…. • All Scafes • Commercial f}i.~flfays
Although tnc delegate fees have nOI been finalized yet it is
anticipated that they will be less than $90.00 per delegate, with
special reduced fees for spouses should they wish to attend.
Fees will include -All meetings & tours
Banquet Saturday
night
Lunch F
riday & Sunday
Delegate package inc!. maps,
guides and souvenirs.
Accommodation
is being arranged with the University of
Toronto for the use of their co-ed donnitory quarters, or you
m
ay make your own bookings at the hotel of your choice.
Final infonnation and application fonn.~ will be mailed to you
in 4 to 6 weeks.
Hope YOU will be attending Ihi~ conference.
YOUR I::IOST -TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. BOX 5S41. STATiON ·A. TORONTO, ONT. M5W lP3
• Dtmolls/rations • VtlIdur~
-HOURLY DOOf{ PRIZES –
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BACK COVER:
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011 NO·/f:m/H.r )7. 1988 Ihl Twonto ond York DiiJion of Ihr CRHA OJ) Ptl
tr Will car }766. Thi$ as lilt lem trip forthil Iypr of c:o.r wllich hod firsl bun pfacwJ iro SlrviN! in 19lf.
Ph
f)io bJ hId AIXII.t.
Canadian Rail
P.o. Box 148 St. Constant, Que., Canada
J5A 2G2
Postmaster: II undelrllered within
10 days return 10 sender, postage guaranteed.

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