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Canadian Rail 388 1985

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Canadian Rail 388 1985

Canadian Rail D
No. 388
SEPTEMBER­
OCTOBER 1985
1,-_, __ ~
NAI)
Published bi-monthly by the Canadian Railroad
Historical Association P.O
Box 148 St. Constant P.Q.
JOL IXO. Subscription rates $23.00
(US funds if outside Canada)
EDITOR: Fred F
Angus
CO-EDITOR: M. Peter Murphy
OFFICIAL CARTOGRAPHER: William A Germaniuk
LAYOUT: Michel Paulet
Front Cover
In
the days of steam this Newfoundland Railway
passenger train was photographed (data unknown) with
Bell Island in the background.
Photo courtesy of CN No. X31489.
Opposite
Lewisporte in the hey day of the Newfoundland Railway.
Photo courtesy of CN No. X30137.
First locomotive on the Newfoundland Railway,
photographed in 1881.
Photo courtesy of CN No. X50336.
IL
ISSN 0008-4875
NEW BRUNSWICK DIVISION
P.O. Box 1162
Saint
John,
~w Brunswick E2L 4G7
ST.
LAWRENCE VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 22 Station B
Montreal, Que. H3B 3J5
BYTOWN RAILWAY SOCIETY
P.O. dox 141, Station A
Ottawa, Ontario K 1 N 8V1
TORONTO & YORK DIVISION
P.O. Box 5849, Terminal A,
Toronto, Ontario M5W 1 P3
WINDSOR-ESSEX DIVISION
300 Cabana Road East,
Windsor,
Ontario N9G 1 A2
GRAND RIVER DIVISION
PO. Box 603
Cambridge, Ontario N1R 5W1
NIAGARA DIVISION
PO. Box 593
St. Catharines,
Ontario L2R 6W8
RIDEAU
VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 962
Smiths Falls, Ontario K7A 5A5
ROCKY
MOUNTAIN DIVISION
P.O. Box 6102, Station C,
Edmonton, Alberta T5B 2NO
CALGARY & SOUTH WESTERN DIVISION
60 -6100, 4th Ave. NE
Calgary,
Alberta T2A 5Z8
CROWSNEST & KETTLE-VALLEY DIVISION
P.O. Box 400
Cranbrook, British Columbia V1C 4H9
PACIFIC COAST DIVISION
P.O. Box 1006. Station A.
Vancouver. British Columbia V6C 2P1
KEYSTONE DIVISION
14 Reynolds Bay
Winnipeg. Manitoba R3K OM4
A triumph of twisting steel over
nature, demography, and politics.
Compiled by Mike Wragg
The Railway-an Island Institution.
OnMay 5th. 1984, in the CBC Radio series The
WayWe Were, three one-time Employees of the
Newfoundland Railway reminisced about the old
days. They recalled
the Newfoundland Express,
blocked
with passengers, loggers out of the
woods with bucksaws in bags, luggage crammed
in the aisles. It was the only land link across the
Island, and carried everything that moved.
Baldwin 4-6-0 and train photographed at
Whitbourne in 1903. Note link and pin couplers.
First car is buffet sleeper trinity which survived
until the 1950s.
Photo courtesy of Newfoundland Transportation
Historical Society.
There were babies who could not wait the once
26 hour crossing to be born. There were even
twins, one at Maccles, and number 2 arrived at
Terra Nova, up
the line. When the train left
St Johns at 5:00 pm, the only contact was with
the Dispatcher. The Staff were on their own and
relied on
travelling Doctors, Nurses and
Midwives, anyone, in an emergency.
The
Kitchen Crew moved swiftly to feed
hundreds of passengers, 24 only at each sitting,
in the dining car.
Station ae Jerseyside Placentia, first terminus of the
Gulf Ferry and terminus of the Placentia Railway.
Photo
courtesy of Newfoundland Transportation
Historical Society.
CANADIAN
149
R A I L
A certificate for 10 shares of stock in the first Newfoundland Railway company. This certificate
was issued in New York on December 12 1881. The picture is a standard design of the bank
note company.
Collection of Fred Angus.
What came through, was the caring of Staff for
Travellers. A sense of Family, all on a swaying,
bumping, grinding trip across the Island.
How did it all begin?
The Early Days
Railways were late arrivals in Newfoundland.
Following a trans-Island survey supervised by the
Scottish-Canadian engineer Sandford Fleming in
1874, plans were sent to the British Colonial
Office. There
was virtually no interest, either in
Government, or Business circles.
The proposed
west coast terminus was on The
French
Shore. French fishermen had treaty
rights to process fish on the north and west
coasts, free from competition, and the British
Colonial Office was reluctant to take heat from
Paris for thrusting a railway upon them.
Newfoundland Politicians were nervous of the
risks involved. In 1874, population was only
162,000., mostly engaged in the fishery along the
coast. All travel was along the coastal perimiter
and only hunters normally penetrated the
interior.
By 1880, a new Government in St. Johns
decided to go it alone on a limited scale, with a
light 3 6 gauge line from the Capital to Halls
Bay, with a branch from Whitbourne to Harbour
Grace.
A.L. Blackman, a wild promoter, representing
an American syndicate, gained the confidence of
Sir William Whiteway, then Prime Minister, and
won the contract.
The
Syndicate incorporated as The Newfound­
land Railway Company, which would own and
operate the line in return for a Government cash
subsidy of $180,000. a year for thirty five years,
Baldwin
design
4-6-0
built
in
Reids
shops
in
St.
Johns
in
1911.
Photo
courtesy
of
Newfoundland
Transportation
Historical
Society.
i~~~~~1i:~~:
Sentinel
Steam
Coach
used
on
branch
lines
in
the
1920s.
Man
in
cap
is
Mr.
Downton
father
offirsttreasurer
of
the
Newfoundland
Transpor
talOn
Hlstoncal
Society.
The
loop
then
and
now
on
the
Bonavista
Branch
Nfld.
Railway
195
and
Terra
Transport
800.
This
exposed
loop
is
due
to
become
a
historic
site,
the
only
one
of
its
kind
in
Canada.
Photos
courtesy
of
NTHS
and
Fred
Angus.
CANADIAN
EXPRESS CROSSING NEWFOUNDLAND
was the
subject of this very detailed
engraving on the 5 cent postage stamp
issued between 1928 and 1932.
Collection
of Fred Angus.
151
R A I L
following completion, plus 5,000 acre land grants
per mile. The Syndicate deposited $100,000. in
U.S. Bonds
as surety.
Money was borrowed on the London market,
and on August 9th 1881, work began, with fifty
men hired for eight cents an hour. The light rails
weighed 35 Ibs. per yard.
The old style
fish merchants were not too happy.
They
could forsee higher taxes, and erosion of
their hold on the Island economy. One such
Fishocrat spread rumours around Conception
Bay
that the Surveyors sticks and red flannel
were Canadian flags, ipso facto, a Canadian land
grab.
An armed mob stalled the survey at Foxtrap
and
Women pelted the Surveyors with rotten
cods livers. Judge Prowse and his posse had to
make a charge at the 600 strong crowd. This
action went down in history as the Battle of Foxtrap.
By
September 1882, the tracks passed
Holyrood and
trains were running three times a
week,
connecting with the steamer Lady Glover
at Holyrood,
for ports in Conception Bay.
The
first locomotive was an 4-4-0T., built by
Hunslet of Leeds, England around 1872., and
purchased from Prince Edward Island Railway.
The Newfie Bullet prepares to depart St. Johns with locomotive 1024 on the head end. Photo courtesy CN
No. X30702.
CANADIAN
152
R A I L
By the end of 1882, 40 miles of track was in
place,
but already the shaky Syndicate was in
trouble. The Government finally released the
$100,000 deposit, and the Company reached
Whitbourne by late Fall in 1883., then defaulted.
Francis
H. Evans, a London merchant banker,
was appointed Receiver for the Bondholders, and
completed the line to Harbour Grace, in the Fall of
1884. In 1896, the Government bought it, by
paying The Syndicate $1,500,000., and later, in
1897, paid the Bondholders $325,000.
Newfoundland now owned eighty four miles of
light railway across the Avalon Peninsula, the
most densely populated area of the Island, and it
was soon showing a modest profit.
The Government then built a 27 mile branch
from Whitbourne to Placentia, connecting with
steamers to Halifax, at a cost of $500,000.
In June 1890, the Government found an
honest Contractor and signed a contract. Efficient
and conscientious too, he was Robert G. Reid of
. Montreal. He began his career as a Scottish
.~tone-mason, and advanced to bridge building on
.-;;fa-large scale, working through Australia, the
-,-~.S.A., and Canada.
With Partner G.H. Middleton of Toronto, he
commenced joining Placentia Junction with Halls
Bay,
260 miles away.
The pay
was $1.00 per day. Some men boarded
with the Contractor for $2.50 per week, all found,
or they paid .12 cents for each meal. Some lived
at Reids
Whitbourne Headquarters, others in
moveable bunkhouses.
Advance gangs cut the right of way, graders
followed, and a third gang laid ballast, ties, and
50 lb. rail. Between 75 and 81 miles a year were
covered. At the close of 1 892., they had arrived in
Gander.
2,000 men were now on the payroll, and with
an election not far away, the Liberal Government
considered it prudent, politically and strategically,
to go all
the way to Port aux Basques. A contract
was signed on May 16th 1893, to run the railway
from the Exploits River, over the wind-swept Gaff
Topsails, to Grand Lake, down the Humber River,
to Bay of islands and on to Port aux Basques.
Reid
preferred the longer route around Halls Bay,
to avoid the notorious, exposed high country of
the Gaff Topsails, but the Government were
paying by the mile, at a rate of $15,600., in
The Botwood, depicted here at the Can-Car plant in Montreal in November 1943, was a
lightweight sleeping car of the type that served well until the end of main-line passenger
service in 1969.
Can-Car collection, C.R.H.A. Archives.
3%% bonds of the Colony, so insisted on the
shorter route. Over the past 87 years, delays on
the high Topsails, due to incredibly fierce winds
and drifting snow, have cost many times the
relatively small amount saved on construction.
Trains have been stranded for up to 17 days there
in Winter.
In
1893, they crossed the Exploits River at
Bishops Falls, and the Liberal government of Sir
William Whiteway was returned to power 0: a
tide of road building, and railway construction
itself employing up to 3,000 men. .
The rails entered Port aux Basques In 1897.,
546 miles of them, at a cost of $10.7 million. In
total, the Government owned 637 miles of track,
running through undeveloped country, where
Moose outnumbered People.
The first regular passenger train left 51. Johns
at 7:00 pm on June 29th 1898 and took 27%
hours to reach Port aux Basques the next evening
at 10:45 pm.
The regular schedule for a passenger train
between St. Johns and Port aux Basques for
many years afterwards was 28 hours ..
During the first run, seven locomotives were
used in relays, the types including 4-4-0s, 4-6-
Os, and a 2-6-0.
As men were laid off in 1898, some surplus
labour was absorbed by constructing the Lewis­
porte branch, the cut off from Brigus Junction to
Tilton, and the extension from Harbour Grace to
Carbonear.
The Reckoning
The Government was now faced with economic
depression and found its debt load, significantly
increased by the Railway, increasingly difficult to
carry. By this time, the system consisted of;-
Southern Division-so called Harbour Grace
Railway. Northern Division-so called
Placentia Railway 1886-1890. Halls Bay
Railway 1890-1894. Newfoundland
Northern & Western Railway 1894-1897.
In
1898, the new Tory Government, led by Sir
James Winter and Alfred Morine, signed a
contract with the Reid Family.
R.G.
Reid agreed to operate the Railway for fifty
years, in return for land grants of 5,000 acres per
mile and to run a coastal steamer service for
an annual subsidy of $90,000. He took over the
51. Johns dry dock for $325,000, and agreed to
operate Government telegraph lines.
This gave the Reids control over assets that had
cost the People $13,000,000., and the political
Mail car 231 outside the Can-Car plant in October 1943. Note that it is on standard­
gauge
archbar trucks for moving through the yards en route to the docks for loading on
board a ship for its trip to Newfoundland.
Can-Car collection, C.R.H.A. Archives.
(Aug.
1937)
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CANADIAN
156
R A I L
When the winter blizzards howl across Newfoundland plows like this are very necessary
to keep the line open. No. 830 had just been completed at the Can car shops in Montreal
when photographed in October 1944.
Can-Car collection, C.R.H.A. Archives.
upheaval that followed caused a change in
Government, and a modified contract signed in 1901.
Most important, the Government would
resume full ownership of the Railway. The
operating period was stretched to 1951, and Reid
allowed to end his personal liability by
incorporating into the Reid Newfoundland
Company Ltd. Rolling stock on the complete
railway system was so lettered.
Some development followed in lumber and
pulp and paper,
but by 1909, the population was
only about 220,000, and traffic was light. Steep
grades and
light construction restricted tonnage a
locomotive could handle, and the costs of winter
operating were horrendous. Losses were
$120,000 a year.
Another change in Government brought the
Reids some relief with new branch line contracts
on which no tenders were called. Payment was in
land grants and cash, rather than bonds as in
1890.
Lines were built to Bonavista 1911, Trespassey
1914, and Hearts Content, Grates Cove, and Bay
de Verde in 1915.
A proposed branch to
Fortune got as far as
Terrenceville and was abandoned. Newfoundland
now possessed about 950 miles of railway,
serving a scattered
population of 265,000.
By 1921 over
2,000 were employed and the
annual payroll had risen to $1.7 million. The
Railway created employment for interior
Newfoundland and it became possible to live and
grow, away from the coast and the fishery. A
string of settlements and towns sprouted along
the line, supported by the Railway, farming, and
the forest industries.
Although traffic through the 1914-1918 War
years was heavy, the Reid-Newfoundland
Company claimed average losses were $213,827
a year, and they needed $2.8 million to put the
track back in shape. The Government Engineer
reported $5.5 million was more like the figure
needed.
In
1920, the Company experienced a financial
crisis and eventually Mr. R.C. Morgan of the CPR.
was appointed as General Manager. The
Government was to meet all losses up to a
maximum of $1.5 million, and losses there were.
After a sometimes bitter dispute with the
Company, the Government repossessed the
railway and operated it as the Newfoundland
Government Railway. The dock and steamships
also changed hands, and the Reids got $2 million
in settlement of all claims
In 1926, an Act was passed changing the name
to the Newfoundland Railway.
During his short term in office, R.C. Morgan had
estimated it cost the Reid Company 7Y2 cents to
move one ton one mile, due to light 50 lb. rail and
corresponding light rolling stock, plus heavy
grades and excessive curvature. It cost the CPR
less than one cent, and yet Newfoundland freight
rates were similar to those charged by CPR in
Ontario and Quebec.
In the 1930s, many of the grossly uneconomic
branch lines were abandoned. The entire main
line was re-railed with 70 lb. rail by 1928, at a cost
of $3.3 million and new rolling stock acquired.
Five
oil-fired steam rail cars were bought from
Sentinel-Cammell in England, and used for
suburban services. Most likely, all the power and
ancillary equipment came from Sentinel in
Shrewsbury, and the complete units erected by
Metro-Cammell at Saltley, Birmingham.
In 1934 Newfoundland was unable to make
payments on the public debt of $100.7 million,
and responsible government was suspended.
Partial
colonial rule from Westminster was
restored with British Governor and a Commission
A refrigerator car for the Newfoundland Railway photographed new at the Canadian Car
and Foundry shops in Montreal in June 1945. Note that it is standing on the 36gauge
version of snap track.
Can-Car Collection. C.R.H.A. Archives.

CANADIAN
of six. Under government by Commission, the
Railway was maintained, but no improvements
made.
A Modest Profit
During the war years (1939-1945), Newfound­
land found itself a highly strategic piece of real
estate. Passenger
traffic doubled, as servicemen
and contruction workers were moved about the
Island. Freight carried rose from 649,126 tons in
1938, to 930,151 tons in 1944.
On
September 2nd. 1940, the Destroyers-for­
bases deal was made between the U.S.A. and
Great
Britain. American bases sprang up along
the Railway, at Stephenville, Gander, Botwood,
Argentia, and St. Johns. $45 million was spent
on the Argentia U.S. Naval Air Station alone.
The
Railway was in poor shape, but The United
States Government through lend-lease, and
their involvement in the war effort made sure the
needed improvements were made. For the first
and last time the books showed a small profit.
Another major rehabilitation program was just
as necessary after the strains of the war years.
Track and
bridges were upgraded, and coal
burning locomotives were converted to oil.
159
R A I L
A New Era
We are Canadas newest Province,
And no more are we alone.
Times have been so good to us,
Since the Maple Leaf came home.
L.
Crew/Creemore Music.
In
1949 all 350,000 Newfoundlanders joined
Confederation, and Canadian National took
over operation of the 700 mile railway system in
Canadas tenth Province.
CNR continued the rehabilitation program and
introduced modern maintenance and operating
methods already used on the mainland System.
There were about 3,500 Employees and by 1960,
total payroll was $10 million.
Traffic increased and steam locomotives were
gradually replaced by diesel electric units from
G.M.D. Ltd., during the years 1953 to 1956.
Track
was elevated through the high barren,
windswept Gaff Topsail area, to improve winter
operating and improved, heavier snow plows
were acquired.
Meanwhile the Trans-Canada two lane
highway sections were steadily linked up and
Double headed Caribou prepares to depart Port aux Basques in October 1954.
Photo CRHA
Archives, E.A. Toohey Col/ection No. 54-106.
Two views along the line, North of Port aux Basques and at Grand Bay.
Photos
CRHA Archives, E.A. Toohey Collection Nos. 54-114, 54-115.
CANADIAN
161
R A I L
paved. The jaunty slogan of the Joey Smallwood
Liberal Government was Yes Well finish the
drive in …. 65.
They did. AI1565 miles, and it was bad news for
the Railway. Newfoundlanders took to cars and
buses like ducks to water. By 1968, it was clear
that now 22 hour train ride could not compete
with 14 hours by bus. On June 30th 1969, the
last passenger express train left St. Johns for
Port aux Basques.
Freight receipts also took a beating. In 1976
C.N. lost $23 million on the Railway and $70
million on the ferries.
A Federal Government Commission headed by
Dr.
Arthur Sullivan completed a study in 1979
and one recomendation was to phase out the
Railway within ten years.
Response
from the province was;-It is the
position of the Government of Newfoundland that
our Railway should not be abandoned under any
circumstances. The Federal Government
agreed, and a separate division of C.N, called
TerraTransport was created in March 1979.
One key to improved service: innovation
This service (the Terra Transport container
plan) provides a very flexible and intermodal
means of moving freight both in and out of the
province and between customers within the
province. The service now being offered by Terra
Transport has had a very high customer
acceptance, and no wonder.
Those statements were made by Newfoundland
Premier A. Brian Peckford during a speech last fall
to
the United Tranportation Union in Corner
Brook, Newfoundland. They symbolize the kind of
acceptance the innovative use of containers has
had in that province.
Terra
Transport has announced a number of
innovations and improvements for the full range
of services it provides -Rail, Trucking, Express,
and
Roadcruiser, although this movement toward
container use has been the most dramatic.
A
historical perspective
Terra Transport with headquaters in St. Johns
was established in March of 1979 as a separate
division of CN, with responsibility for Island-wide
Rail, Trucking, Express, and Passenger Bus
Services
in Newfoundland. The immediate
mandate of the division was to plot a course for
revitalization since, over the years, many changes
had occurred -including the loss of large
volumes of traffic to competing carriers, and
increasing financial deficits to CN Rail in 1982.
However, even before those organizational
changes, the railway and coastal vessels had
been the transportation lifelines of Newfound­
land. Those coastal ships linked the communities
dotting the bays and inlets around the island, and
the railway linked the inland communities around
the province.
The railway station had become the focus for
shipping, receiving and storage of customer
traffic, with the agents role including issuing
train orders, sending telegrams, handling
payroll, and keeping records of loaded and empty
railcars.
In
addition, the local agent provided a
communication link with communities across the
island and to the mainland, as well as controlled
the movement of all trains.
Changing times
However, modern developments in technology
brought many changes to that transportation/
communication environment, including dial
telephone service, computers, microwave
towers, modern warehouses, improved handling
techniques and the completion of the Trans
Canada Highway.
These changes affected all modes of trans­
portation in various ways, including truck, water,
air and rail. CN Rail responded by introducing
diesel locomotives, upgrading repair and
maintenance facilities, acquiring modern track
repair equipment, improving roadbeds and
installing new bridges. In addition, a wheel­
changeover facility was established at Port aux
Basques to permit mainland cars to travel on
Newfoundlands narrow gauge track.
Despite these changes, however, the railway
started lOSing traffic at a tremendously high rate
to the new steamship services out of Montreal
and Halifax and to the truckers. CN Rail was not
providing what the customer wanted in terms of
flexibility, service and mode of transport.
The conventional railcar traffic moved directly
to North Sydney, then was tra nsported across the
Cabot Strait on a rai Icar ferry to Port aux Basques.
There the cargo had to be either transferred to
Newfoundland railcars, or the actual railcar
trucks changed so they could travel on the narrow
gauge Newfoundland Railway. The maximum net
weight on rail in Newfoundland was approx­
imately 100 000 Ibs. (45 400 kilograms). Alto­
gether, an expensive, inconvenient, sometimes
clumsy system.
The
increasing problems associated with a
changing transportation environment led to the
appointment, by the Federal Government, of a
Commission of Inquiry to study the total
transportation environment in Ilewfoundland
The Caribou at Cornerbrook, Nfld. in 1954.
CRHA Archives, E.A. Toohey Collection
No. 54-119.
Mixed train with 594 at St. Johns in October of 1954.
CRHA Archives, E.A. Toohey Collection
No. 54-109.
and Labrador. This Commission, which became
known as the Sullivan Commission, completed
its study in 1978, and set forth, among its many
recommendations, one in particular that applied
specifically to the railway. Recommendation
No. 29 stated:
That plans be commenced now to phase out
the railway in Newfoundland in approximately
ten years …
This recommendation was rejected by both the
Federal and Provincial governments.
In November
1979, the Federal Government
announced the funding for a five-year program to
support Revitalization of the Railway in New­
foundland. An amount of $67 million was
earmarked for new initiatives under a vigorous
program of testing and evaluation of the
railway to determine its longer term role within
the total Newfoundland tranportation
environment. In addition, $10 million was
provided to assist employees likely to be affected
by
manpower adjustments.
The
availability of funds was tied to the
development and implementation of programs to
improve the marketability and operational
effectiveness of the railway and to bring the
financial deficit under control. The annual
Newfoundland rail deficit of some $30 million in
1979 was expected to increase to $55-$60
million in the next five years if no action was
taken.
During 1980, Terra Transports marketing
function co-ordinated an extensive investigation
of several strategic planning alternatives.
According to Ed Roberts, manager, marketing, for
Terra
Transport at that time, these studies
included market surveys, traffic flow analyses
and
competition studies. Included also were
operational changes and new handling systems.
The
major objective, of course, was to determine
a new long term role for the railway that would
meet market requirements.
Four
alternate plans were submitted to
Transport Canada, and the Rail Container Plan
provided not
only the lowest cost option, but also
the highest probability of meeting customer
acceptance. Mr. Roberts stated that the container
plan offered a number of significant advantages
from a marketing and operational viewpoint:
Terra Nova in St. Johns in 1954. This private car is now preserved at the National Museum of Science and
Technology in Ottawa.
CRHA
Archives, E.A. Toohey Collection No. 54-136.
Stroils
Be /I e
(I Labrad
., or
—- ! -.-. v –.-
Quebec
Gulf of
SI. L awre nce
LOCATION MAP
~ Bonne Boy
a I
I s
Ie
,
,

Harrys Brook
Whites Rood
Stephenville Cra .
L -t-H–H+SS~
t.
-I-H–+
187
S I. George
Rubinsons
GUll of S oint L
LEGEND-
Planned but not built.
: U. S.A.F Rly.
: G.f C. Rly.
: Millertawn Rly.
: Suc hans Rly.
: Harpoon T ra mway
-SC
20mi 0
~~–
..
Lake
G of f Topsoil
Milieriown Jel.
®
Jet.
Horpoon
Brook
nee
Noire Dame Jet.
~nwood
Falls~
Pori
~ Clarenville
~~
~
Placentia
B 0)
L
N
Port Union
ST. JOHNS
Waterford
j Bridge
rn
e
Bov Bulls
Whitbou . Je I J
n,, . J
r~~~:
Portugal
TVj
wj.g 4 -85
CANADIAN
166
R A I L
Marketing
• Shippers were requesting a container service.

Containers could provide door-to-door
capability.

Transit times could be reduced, while depend­
ability would be improved.
• Delays on
the Gulf would be minimized
because of increased vessel flexibility.

Trend to smaller lot size shipments and result­
ing reduced inventory costs.
Operations
• Expenses would be reduced through product­
ivity improvements.

Containers could move equally well on
mainland or Newfoundland container cars so the
narrow-gauge track would not be a problem.
• The
program could be phased in, allowing for a
gradual and orderly switch from existing railcars
to conta i
ners.
• The switch to containers would not affect
conventional rail service within Newfoundland
for moving pulpwood and cement.
In 1982, Terra Transport introduced its
domestic container system, with its goal to
convert all conventional railcar traffic to the new
container system, and eventually eliminate the
railcar ferry and truck-to-truck transfers.
Under this improved system, traffic from
eastern Canada is placed directly into containers
at origin and moved by highway to container
terminals at Toronto, Montreal and Moncton.
From
there the containers move on railway
flatcars to North Sydney where they are
transferred to specially designed Gulf container
truck chassis.
These
containers are moved across the Gulf on
any
of CN Marines existing truck and auto ferry
services to Port aux Basques where the
containers are transferred to the narrow-gauge
40-foot (12.2 metre) Newfoundland railcars for
movement to container terminals at Corner
Brook,
Grand Falls, or St. Johns. From there, the
containers are delivered by highway to the
customers final destinations.
Although the containerization program is now
available only for eastern Canadian traffic, plans
are
underway to also include traffic from western
Canada and the United States. As part of that
innovation, distribution centres and Cargo-Flo
terminals are being established in the Maritimes.
Cargo-Flo
terminals provide services for handling
both dry bulk flowables -such as cement, flour
and fertilizers, and liquid products, ranging from
acids to liquid detergents.
Expected to be
complete by early 1984, these
new facilities will make it possible for traffic to be
tranferred from conventional railcars to
containers for movement across the Gulf to
Newfoundland.
The container service: A profile
The Terra Transport container service uses
standard I.S.0. containers, both 20 feet (6.1
metres) and 40 feet (12.2 metres) long; the first,
rated for 48 000 pounds (21 800 kilograms); the
second, 60 000 pounds (27 200 kilograms). A
triaxle, gooseneck chassis was designed to
accommodate these heavy payloads for 40-foot
equipment, allowing for maximum payload on
highways and eliminating any road height or dock
restriction problems.
To
meet customer needs, Terra Transport has
available a variety of container types, including
20-foot and 40-foot dry freight containers, and
heated and reefer containers. A prototype
SuperTherm container is now being tested.
A
20-foot roof hatch container for bulk
commodities has been introduced, with both full
and dump doors as well as a dump chassis to
allow unloading wherever customers want the
products. These features allow the container to
be used for standard or bulk cargo, and the roof
hatches allow the commodity to be loaded while
on chassis or railcar. Disposable liners are used if
the bulk cargo is corrosive.
A
bulkhead flat container has also been
introduced for forest products such as lumber and
plywood, or other commodities such as pipe and
structural steel. Permanent nylon strapping is
used to
secure the product, reducing shipper
loading costs.
TerraTransport containers
Since its introduction, the new container
system has demonstrated a very high reliability
factor, achieving a consistent seven-day transit
time and, not surprisingly, has met with great
customer acceptance.
Customers have commented on:
• Good
service. •
Deliveries have been in very good condition.
• Time and scheduling have been excellent.
This customer acceptance has also been shown
in the form of significant traffic growth. Many
customers who had previously left the railway are
now returning and once again CN Rail is regarded
as providing a very acceptable transportation
system into Newfoundland.
At present, TerraTra nsport has 1269
containers of various types, 13 front lifts, 661
chassis,
and 35 tractors. Some $34 million has
been
spent on equipment and terminals and $16
million on phasing in labour adjustments. The
CANADIAN
167
R A I L
The end of the era for the Nfld. Railways rotary snowplow.
CRHA Archives,
E.A. Toohey collection No. 54-151.
Division has now captured close to 40% of
general traffic in Newfoundland.
Not everyone is happy about this. Atlantic
Container Express Inc., an Ontario based trucking
Company, complained to the CTC. that
TerraTransport freight rates were too low and
represented
unfair competition.
On CBC. Radio January 14th 1985., President
Peter Clarke of TerraTransport,
confirmed the
CTC had ruled individual rates should be
increased
from 2% to 39%, with an average rise of
15% to 25% in costs to Users. If these increases
are
implemented, TerraTransport could lose 30%
of its Railway traffic. Presently they have been
suspended
until the Federal Court of Appeal can
make a decision.
By
the Fall of 1983, intermodal containers had
been in use
for 18 months or so, and a survey of
117 Customers was carried out.
106 Clients reported their business with
TerraTransport had increased during this time.
Six
indicated a decrease in business, and there
were five no change or dont knows. Security,
minimal damage, efficient service and door to
door delivery, were rated good to excellent. The System
continues to be modernised and
trimmed. Replacement of cabooses by ETUs was
announced in 1984 as the current objective.
The
branch from Clarenville to Bonavista was
closed entirely effective June 20th 1984.
The last mixed
train fom St. Johns to
Carbonear, called the Shoreliner, covered the
80.1 miles in five hours on September 20th 1984.
The train only stopped for ten minutes, when the
two EMD G8 road switches 800 and 804 pulled
out for the last historic run back to St. Johns. The
return fare was $14.00. Freight only services
continue on both branches.
It is
still possible to take a ride on the Railway,
but probably not for much longer. A passenger car
is added to the rear of a dai Iy ma in line freig ht, just
between Bishops Falls and Corner Brook, and this
service is mainly for the conveience of cabin
owners who have no road access.
Then there is the traditional Trouters Special
run out of St. Johns on the Victoria Day long
weekend, dropping the 100 or so passengers off
at their favorite fishing holes en route.
CN Diesels being loaded in Montreal to replace steam on the Nfld. Railway.
Photo courtesy CN No. 52594-15.
In Retrospect
These side trips will never compare with the
Ilewfie Bullet, as the Newfoundland Express
was dubbed by World War II Servicemen, in
deference to its average speed of 10 MPH. C.N.
later
preferred The Caribou, but the Bullet she
was and always will be. A typical consist before
C.N. began with Two Pacific locomotives, the mail
car with all the Canadian or mainland mail and
the express car for precious cargo i.e. liquor,
cigarettes and ice cream. Next, a baggage car,
two or three second class cars, three or four
coaches with plush seats, then the famous Diner
and last, the sleepers, with the tail end car usually
observation-platform equiped, like the Fogo.
Those who knew it then, remember the smoke,
from the coal stove at the end of each car, from
the tobacco and cigarettes, and if one opened
a
window, a face full of soot and engine smoke.
Certainly the constant aroma of oranges, a must
for children, before soft drinks were available.
They recall
luggage blocking the aisles, and
trying to keep ones feet walking to the Diner,
through cars buffeted by high winds and
squeaiing round the innumerable curves, some
angled as sharp as 14°. Then there were the
songs, accordians, and the interminable card
games on cardboard suitcases perched on
someones knees and the delays, from wash outs,
collisions with moose, impenetrable snow drifts
and gale force winds. The Railway even had
Windsniffer on the payroll for 30 years. Lauchie
McDougall 1896-1965 at Wreckhouse, where
140 kilometer winds are known, would walk the
track, and for $140.00 a year, warned the Railway
of impending winds liable to blow cars off the
tracks.
As a reminder of the old days, one steam
locomotive is kept in South Brook Park, Corner
Brook, by the Citys Rotary Club, to whom it was
donated by C.N. in 1958. All other steam locos
were scrapped.
The
Newfoundland Transport Historical Society
are restoring three Railway cars at their Museum
site in C.A. Pippy Park, St. Johns, and expect to
add
two more, plus a diesel locomotive soon.
Today,
TerraTransport is a modern, competitive
rail freight transportation Division, fully
computerised, and Trans Canada Hi~hway users
can often see the consists of 85 or so container
units and mUltiple diesel units, snaking around
the curves in the valleys below, running parallel
to the Highway for many miles of its length.
In December 1984, the Federal Government
made a commitment that the Railway would be
1903
REID-NEWfOUNDLAND COMPANY
ST. JOHNS. PORT-AUX-BASQUES AND NORTH SYDNEY
CDINO WEST ST. JOHNS SECTION CDIND EAST
READ IJOWN REW UP
CLARENVILLE SECTION
I
E~po~c~s IltIO~~ I :tt~! E~gr~s 1
Monda.y Tuesday TIONS ~ Tuesday Sunday
j
WedSd&.YThUrSday STA l ::: Thursday Wed8day~
Friday Saturday ::a. Sato rdar Friday I
1ST CL..ASS 2NDCLASS 2NOCLAR 1ST M….A.SS
BISHOPS FALLS SECTION
1—–,-.7. 1;~alD=—9.7 7.50 10.21> …… ROBhy Pood ……. 281 • ~ 8.38 ..
8.37 11.23o.m …… Badger Brook …… 296 C.~7 7.46
9.30 12.21 pm .. Millertown Juno •.. 31 LOO 6.55
9.4.0 12.3& …. ·St. PatriCKs Brook … 31 3.45 6.~O
~~:~:: 12.M …… westBrook ~~ t~:: ~:i&::
10.aD ~:~:: :::::::~o~~8fill:::::::~ 2.37 6.46
11.06 2.00 …… Klute Brook ….. ~!; 2.00 5.16 ..
~:~1&~ ~:~~:: :::::::ora~dll~ke::::::: ~~ Ji:l~:: ::~::
12.3·I1)m 3.M·· …….. DoorLake …….. ~!~ 12.06pm 3.42
~:~n~ ~:~bp-:nAr::B·;;:]ll:r::,~·i::L;= M:~~:~ ~:~p~ ::::::: ….
• F1aa Station
maintained and a further assessment of revital­
isation, and its relationship with other transporta­
tion modes in the Province, would be undertaken
to determine the overall transportation system
that will best meet the needs of the people of
Newfoundland.
REID-NEWfOUNDLAND COMPANY
ST. JOHNS, PORT-AUX-BASQUES AND NORTH SYDNEY
CDINa WEST PORT-AUX-BASQUES SEOTION CDIND EAST
Run J>OWN I RKAD UP
No.1 No. (. II No.6 No.2
Express Mixed STATIONS 1111ed E.l.presa
W~~!~y T~~~~i~ I ~ T~~~~ W~~~~y
Friday Sat.urdo.y I ~ Saturday Frlda.y
1ST CLASS 2SD CLASS A 2Nl) CLASS 1ST CLASS
… ~:~.~~ …… ~:~.p~ .. !~~: ::~:I.B~~r! .. .TI~~~::::: :~~ ~ … ID:~.~~ ….. :::.p~ .
.. ~:~.,,: … I····::::::·.g~~~: fi~t:::::·· …. !~ …. ~:~ …
…. j:iS·:, 7.24 i …………. Howards ……… 4~1 8.37 ji:i.5::·
3:~ :: ~:rg :: !::::::::::;~:~~8Wr~~~: 1~ ~:~:: g:tlp~
····.:ji,·:: . ····9:0j··: … · …….. ·nla.ck Duck U …………….. ……. ..
~.46 .. 9.21 I::::::::::::~~~g~~;~·~e :~ t~~:: u:~a~
~:re:: 10.17 j.. . ….. $FLsbt:l& . (7.4 ~.42 10.31
6.CtS.. :~:~p~ !:: ::::.~~~~~~.: ……….. :U ~:~:: 19:~::
.. ·7:j7:··· .. i:io·~i~··::::: .. ,::~g~~ ~~:~~~. : ……… m· ·2:50··:···· 8:2.3,
.. ··8:00 …. · .. · .. 1.60 ,,:::::::::::·i.itrl~yk~~~::.::::::::: g~ 2:20~ …. 8:00 ..
~.OOplU I 3.00am Ar •••• Port-aux-Basque …. Lv 5481 1. 10 am 7.00(l.m
W~d~~a) w~~~Je.yl ihu:~y w~~~ay
Fr1dllY Frida:,, i Saturd&y Frtd8.Y
PLACENTIA BRANCH
1.00 pm Lv .. Placentla .Junction … Ar 0 5.00 pm
……• Ville Marie. L2
….• DUDvUle …… 18
Ar ……… Placentia ……… Lv 20 .. j.~5 pm
BROAD COVE BRANOH
No. lb AccommodaUoo No. 16 .AccommodaUon
TUeed8.~r1~:~nesday STATIONS ~ TueSda.~r1J~nesday
t-____ 2N_D __ ~ __ ~______ __ _____________________ I~~~I. _____ 2_ND __ CLA ___ M ____ _i
Lv, ….. Whltbourne …… Ar
••••• $ Bla.ketown .. . .
…..••.•.. Droad Cove .. .
o
~
10
8.00am 8.00pm
S.30 …..
U.
02 ..
9.16 ..
. •……•..••••. TUton … . ….. 22
7.28 ..
7.00 ..
~.IO .. . ……… Harbour Grace ..
·········g:o·pm··
………. MOSQUito ……….. ..
Ar …….. Carbonear …….. Lv
:n
30
3.
····6:iO·a~····
BURNT BAY BRANCH
SpeclBl AI5;u~mOdatlon I
2ND CLASS I STATIONS
Lv.Notre Dame Junctlon.AJ
……….. .. ……… Ar ….. Lewisport ……. ,Lv
~ Special A~~Y;C~,moda.tlon
::iI 2ND (lLA88
BRIGUS BRANCH
SO.3Accom.[ No, 9 Exp. I No. 10 Exp. I
NO
. 4 Accom
oauyexcept
l
1tlonday Monda.y [DallyeXCep
Sunda.y ~~~~:g:: STATI.ONS ~ . ~hursdda.y Suoday
2ND CLASS 1ST CLAM i I 18~~~a~ j 2ND CLABS
n.8Sa.m 7.20pm Lv …. Brlsus Junotlon ….. Af 0 8.100am I 7.00pm
ll,]!.pm 7.68 …………… Br1iu8 ………. 11 8.03 ~ 6,15
12,C, 8.21 ………. ·Clarka Beach ……….. 17 7.31J 6.35 .. 1.00
8.35 ….. ….. Ba.y Roberta ……. … 21 7.:u. 5.lO ..
~:: :: f:M:: ::::::::::.~~.~aJt!;~,~:~~:::: … :: ~ i:~:: !:~~ ::
2.00 .. 9.12 ………. Harbour Grace … ….. 31 6.48 ~.)7 .. ,
.., …. ,., ……….. , …………….. ·MoSQulto, ……………….. , …..•… ~. ….. , …. . 2.1Kpm
I iI,Wpm Ar …….. Oarbonear ……… Lv as 6.20am I ~I.~~plll
$ Flaa-Sta.tlon.

j
f
1
~
;
j
,
…..
Eo.,
~
il
~
—–
u:i .
Cl
~i
Z
W
~
Z
S

::::i
0 0
~ ~
I w
0
Cl.
(f) z
z
I

:J
(f)
, a
~
Cl.
il
~
2 0
I
01
~
W
l-
i
CP
(f)
~
C A
———____ -.-J:i_

—~
CN
903
at
the
St.
Johns
roundhouse
in
1954
.
CRHA
Archives,
E.A.
Toohey
Collection
No.
54-154
.
A
plaque
on
the
Newfoundland
Railway
station
in
St
Johns
.
This is
in
commemoration
of
Sir
Robert
Reid.
Photo
by
Fred
Angus.
Less
than
a year
before
it
was
discontinued,
the
Caribou
,
more
familiarly
known
as
the
Newfie
Bullet
is
seen
at
Corner
Brook
on
October
6
1968
.
Photo
by
Fred
Angus.
Sometimes
the

mixed

train
had
no
freight
cars
and
was
pure
passenger
, as
we
see here,
en
route
to
Argentia
,
on
A
ugust
23
1982
.
NEWfOUNDLAND RAILWAY
NEWFOUNDLAND RAILWAY
ST. JOHNS, PORT-AUX-BASQUES AND NORTH SYDNEY
ST. JOHNS, PORT-AUX-BASQUES AND NORTH SYDNEY
RE
aOINV wnT-REAO OOWN aOING (A,T-READ UP
. . . . . . . . I . .
:::r:::::
::::::1::::::
………….
. . . . . I . . . . . . . .
1933
The Argentia mixed train stops at a station in this bucolic scene on August
23 1982. Note the lower-quadrant signal, also the weed-grown track.
Photo by Fred Angus.
CANADIAN
173
R A I L
Appendix I. Locomotive Rosters
Motive Power:
Notes on
Locomotive Rosters: The lists are divided into four:
(a) Steam locomotives Southern Division of the Newfoundland Ry.
(b) Steam locomotives of the Northern Division of the Newfoundland Ry.
(c) Steam locomotives of the Reid-Newfoundland Company and its successors up to the present
time.
(d) Internal combustion locomotives of the Newfoundland Railway and Canadian National
Railways.
Lists
(c) and (d) show two road number columns: that headed (1) is series in use until Canadian
National Railways assumed control. List headed (2) is series devised and put into effect by C.N. in
November 1950. It should be noted that C. N. locomotives 15-18 had numbers assigned but they were
scrapped before these numbers applied. Locomotives shown as built by Reid-Newfoundland
Company were built with parts supplied by Baldwin.
There is
regrettably no information on individual scrapping dates for locomotives prior to 1949. In
1936, however, the following Newfoundland Railway locomotives were still in existence:
100 re# 1; 107-109; 112-125; 151 -1 53; 190-199; 1000-1003; –a total of 34 stea m locomotives.
One of the original Newfoundland
Railway stations is that at Avondale,
built in 1882, and here seen with the
Carbon ear mixed train on August 24
1982.
Photo by Fred Angus.
High above the rooftops the mixed
train nears Argentia on August 23
1982.
Photo by Fred Angus.
CANADIAN
174 R A I L
No.1 00 re#l, built by Baldwin in 1898 was for many years assigned to yard service at St. Johns
and was known as The Shunter. Only one ex-Newfoundland Railway steam locomotive has been
preserved, No.
593,4-6-2 type in Lady Bowater Park, Corner Brook, Nfld., through the efforts of the
local Rotary Club.
Motive Power: Steam Locomotives
No. Builder Year C/N Type Cyls. Dri. From To
HARBOUR GRACE RAILWAY (Newfoundland Railway, Southern Division)(1881-1898)
Haw.-Les. 1881 1884 0-6-0T 8×12 27 New RNCo.#1 1898
2 Some, if not all, of these were 4-4-0T Hunslet 1872,

#2

3 1 Ox16, 42 purchased from the Prince Edward Island

#3

4 Railway in 1881. Group may also have included one

#4

5 or more unaccounted locomotives from the New

#5

6 Brunswick Railway.

#6

7 Haw.-Les. 1882 1885 2-6-0 13×18 40 New RNCo#20 1898
8

1886

21

9 1887 22
1/10 1888 x1887
2/10 1888 2061 2-6-2 14×20 42 RNCo#23 1898
11 1882 1889 2-6-0 13×18 40 x1894
12 Baldwin 1877-8 14×18 41 NBR x ?
Notes: A-Named St. Johns. B-#12 reported ex N.B.R. #9; other sources suggest it is
N.B.R #10. (q.v.)
PLACENTIA
RAILWAY (1886-1890); HALLS BAY RAILROAD (1890-1894);
NEWFOUNDLAND NORTHERN & WESTERN RAILWAY (1894-1898)
(Newfoundland Railway, Northern Division)
1
? ? ? ? ? ? ?
2 Baldwin 1889 10135 4-4-0 14×18 48 New RNCo#43 1898
3

5/91 11851

#41
4
11859 2-6-0 16×20 44 #60
5 7/91 12100 4-4-0 14×18 48 #42
6 6/93 13519 2-6-0 16×20 44 #61
7
13518 4-4-0 14×18 48 #40
8 7/93 13566 2-4-2T 44 #8
9
13567 #9
10 3/94 13968 0-4-2T 9×16 33 #10
11 13976 2-6-0 16×20 44 #62
12 4/97 15308 4-6-0

#105
13 15309

#102
Notes
A
B
A
D
B
C
Notes:
A-No information available. Could have come from same group as Nos. 2-6 of Harbour
Grace Railway. B-Named Sir Herbert Murray. C-Named Hon. Robert Bond.
D-Named
Sir William V. Whiteway.
REID-NEWFOUNDLAND COMPANY (1898-1923)
NEWFOUNDLAND RAILWAY (1926-1949)
NEWFOUNDLAND GOVERNMENT RAILWAY (1923-26)
CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS (1949-@)
CANADIAN
175
R A I L
THE CARBONEAR MIXED TRAIN near Holyrood on September 15 1984.
Photo by Omer Lavallee.
NEAR CUPIDS the Carbonear
mixed train passing through some typical Newfoundland
scenery on September 15 1984
Photo by Omer Lavaltee.
Nos.
(1)
1/1
2/1
2)
3)
3)
5)
6)
8
9
10
20
21
22
23
40
41
42
43
60
(2) Builder Year C/N Type Cyls. Dri. From To Notes
Haw.-Les 1881 1884 0-6-0T 8×12 27 HGR #1 1898 Bot. #1 1898
Baldwin 1898 16244 4-6-0 16×20 44 #100 1925. x6/1939
( x1889
See comments under same numbers, Harbour Grace Railway.( x1891
One possibly sold
to Millertown Railway instead of ( x1891
being scrapped, as noted. ( x1891
(
x1893
Baldwin 7/93 13566 2-4-2T 14×18 44 NN&W #8 1898 x1925

13567

#9

x1934
3/94 13968 2-4-2T 9×16 33 #10 IntI.P&P#1 19-?
Haw.-Les
1882 1885 2-6-0 1 3x 18 42 HGR #7 1898 x

1886

..

#8

x
1887 #9 x
1888 2061 2-6-2 14×20 #10 x
Baldwin 6/93 13518 4-4-0 14×18 48 NN&W #7 x
5/
91 11851 #3 x
7/91 12100 #5 x
1889 10135 #2 Bot.#8 1918
5/91 11859 2-6-0 16×20 44 #4 x
ONE OF THE MORE SPECTACULAR SCENES on the Newfoundland railway system is
where the line skirts the cliff-side at Spaniards Bay. Here we see the mixed train
returning from Carbonear passing this scenic spot on September 15 1984.
Photo by Omer Lavallee.
Nos.
(1 ) (2) Builder Year C/N Type
61 6/93 13519
62 3/94 13976
100 10/98 16244 4-6-0
101 16245
102 4/97 15309
103 10/98 16271
104 16272
1/105 4/97 15308
2/105 2/00 17510
106 17511
107 6/00 17832
108 17837
109 1/08 32576
110 32577
111 R.-N.Co. 1911 1
112 1911 2
113 (1 5) 1912 3
114 ( 16) 4
115 1913 5
116 6
117 (17) 1914 7
118 8
119 1915 9
120

10
121 Baldwin 10/17 46636
122 (18)

46637
123 46638
124 46691
125
2/00 17510
150 2/03 21597 2-8-0
151 21598
152 280 R.-N.Co. 1916 11
153 12
The Carbonear mixed train going up the steep
grade along the cliff at Spaniards Bay oil August
24 1982.
Photo by Fred Angus.
Cyls. Dri. From To Notes
#6 x
#11
x
New re# 1 1925
x
NN&W #13 1898 x
New x
x
NN&W #12 1898x
A
New re# 125 1918 A
x
B
x1939
x
50 x1939
x
x
x

CN F-3-a x12/51
x12/51
x by 1938
x1938
CN F-3-a x7/53
x1938
x
x
x1938
CN F-3-a x7/53
x1939
x
16×20 Ex 2/105 x1939
18×24 48 New x1934

x
CN L-5-a x4/55
x
With the sea as a spectacular backdrop the mixed
train nears the end of its trip to Carbonear. This
scenic location is reachable only by a rough back
road, but the view is well worth the effort to get
there.
Photo
by Fred Angus. August 24 1982.
CANADIAN
178
R A I L
Nos.
(1 ) (2) Builder Year C/N Type Cyls. Dri. From To Notes
190 590 Baldwin 1920 54398 4-6-2 17×24 52 CN J-8-a x4/57
191 591

54399

..
x4/57 192 592
54400 x4/57
193 593 54401 Preserved 11/58 194 594
54466 x8/58 195 595
54467 x4/57 196 596 1926 59531 18×24
CN J-8-b x3/57 197 597 Montreal
67129 x4/57 198 598 AL.Co. 1929 67941
Cfj. J~~-c
Bot.#598 3/57 199 599

67942 #599
1000
300 1930 68400 2-8-2 48 CII R-2-a x6/57 1001
301 68401 x3/57 1002 302
No. Brit. 1935 24297 CN R-2-b x5/57 1003 303

24298 x9/57
1004 304 1937 24436 x3/57 1005 305 1938 24521
x11/57 1006 306 24522
x3/57
1007
308 Montreal 1941 69444 2-8-2 18×24
48 New CN R-2-c Bot.#3084/57 1008 307
No. Brit.

24667

CN R-2-b x5/57 1009 309 AL.Co. 69736
CN R-2-c x5/57
1010 310 69737 x5/57
1011 311 69738 x5/57 1012 312
;,
69739 x3/57 1013 313 69740
x6/57
1014 314 Montreal 1941 69695 x11/57 1015 315
69696 x6/57 1016 316 AL.Co. 1944 71963
x8/57
1017 317 71964 x7/57
1018 318 71965 x7/57 1019 319
71966 x9/57 1020
320 Montreal 1947 75635 CN R-2-d x7/57 1021
321 75636 x11/57 1022
322 75637 x10/57 1023 323 75638
x7/57
1024 324 1949 76333 x8/57
1025 325 76424 x9/57
1026 326 76425 x8/57 1027 327 76426

Bot.#3274/57 1028
328 76427 x12/57 1029 329 76428
x11/57
Notes-
A-Duplication
of numbers account overlapping dates not explained. Dates
of renumbering possibly incorrect. B-C/N also given as 17831.
Diesel Electric Locomotives
H.P.
5000 775 Gen.Elec 1948 29722 B-B 380 New CN ES-4-a sold 10/68 B 5001 776

29723

B 5002 777 29724 B
800 G.M.D.Ltd. 1956 A923 C-C 875 CN GR-9-b@
801 A924 @ 802 A925 @ 803 A926
@
Nos. (1) (2)
Builder Year
804
805
900 1952
901
902
903
1953
904
905
906
907
908
909 1956
910
911
912
913
914
915
916
917
918
919
920
921
922
923
924
925 G.M.O.Ltd. 1956
926
927
928
929
930
931
932
933
934
935 1958
936
937
938 1960
939
940
941
942
943
944
944
945
946
C/II
A927
A928
A303
A304
A305
A435
A436
A437
A438
A439
A440
A897
A898
A899
A900
A901
A902
A903
A904
A905
A906
A907
A908
A909
A910
A911
A912
A913
A914
A915
A916
A917
A918
A919
A920
A921
A922
A1450
A 1451
A1452
A1834
A1835
A1836
A1837
A1838
A1839
A1840
A1840
A1841
A1842
Type
C-C H.
P. From To Notes
@
@
1200 CN Y -4-a then G R-12-a @
@
@
CN Y -4-b then GR-12-b @
@
@
@
@
@
CNGR-12-g@
@
@
x4/57 A
@
@
@
@
@
@
@
x4/57 A
@
@
@
@
1200 New CN.GR-12-g @
@
@
@
@
@
@
@
@
@
CN GR-12-p@
@
@
CN GR-12-x@
@
@
@
@
@
@
@
@
@
Notes: A-Collision 13 Sept.1966. B-Sold to Frederick & Associates, Atlanta, Ga., USA; then in
1969 to Northern Railway Co. of Costa Rica.
Steam Self-Propelled Cars: Five
motor passenger cars built by Sentinel-Cammell of Great
Britain. Two, Newfoundland Ry. A and B in 1923; three more, C. 0 and E in
1925. Used in suburban services. Scrapped.
CANADIAN
180
R A I L
LEA VING CARBONEAR one of the last Terra Transport mixed trains is starting its return
journey to St. Johns on September 15 1984. The extra coaches were added to
accommodate the numerous passengers wishing to take a last ride.
Photo by Omer Lavallee.
The Only on Wednesday Bonavista train
crossing a causeway near Trinity on August 25
1982.
Photo by Fred Angus.
The only remaining passenger train service in
Newfoundland is the coach that runs on the main­
line freight train between Bishops Falls and Corner
Brook. Here we see it on August 26 1982 between
a small box car and the van.
Photo
by Fred Angus.
CANADIAN
Appendix II. Containers
Container Handling Equipment
Containers by type:
20 foot Dry
20 foot Tank
20 foot Roof Hatch
20 foot Bulkhead
20 foot Heated
20 foot Roof Hatch Hopper
40 foot Dry
40 foot Heated
40 foot Heated (Intra Nfld.)
40 foot Reefer
40 foot Bulkhead
40 foot Supertherm
200
2
100
1
650
51
30
101
131
Total
1,269
(a) Chassis 661
(b) Front Lift Units 6
(c) Side Lift Units
7
(d) Tractors
35
(e) Yard Brutes (Yard Tractor) 6
(f) Dolly -Converters 6 (Trailer Trains -Highway)
181
R A I L
Acknowledgements to the following
Works
on which I have drawn
liberally;-
1. The Newfoundland Railway 1881-1949. by
J.K. Hiller.
Newfoundland Historical Society
Pamphlet Number 6. 1981.
2. Centennial Newfoundland Railway 1881-
1981. Copyright (c) 1981. A.R. Penney.
Published by Creative
Printers.
3. Narrow Gauge Railways of Canada by Omer
Lavallee. Copyright 1972 Railfare Enterprises
Ltd.
4. Les Harding, writing in The Newfoundland
Quarterly Spring & Summer Issue 1982.
5. The Book of Newfoundland. J.R. Smallwood
(Ed).
6. Movin magazine.
7. Report of The
Joint Consultative Committee of
TerraTransport into the use of rail containers
FEB 1984.
8. C.B.C. Radio The Way We Were program
May 5th 1984.
9. The Evening Telegram, St. Johns.
10. The Trinity-Conception Compass.
Up and over the barrans near Gaff Topsail a 60-car freight
train with a single coach at the end. One can easily see
the amount of freight handled over this line.
Photo by Fred Angus.
The Terra Transport yards at Port Aux Basques. Note the dual-gauge
track.
Photo by Fred Angus. August 22 1982.
Terra Transport in 1985, locomotive 937 and container train.
Photo courtesy eN, No. £4168-2.
—t

Of/loading containers in St. Johns.
eN photo No. 82012-1 .
BACK COVER:
Mixed (Bin on the Newfound/and Railway at Holyrood.
Photo courtesy of eN No. X34651.
Canadian Rail
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